Archive for the ‘BLACK WOMEN’ Category

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL ! Our BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY GABOUREY SIDIBE IS Busy Breaking the skinny/no shape/no nose/no lips/no hips/white/girl/standard/of/beauty/glass/ceiling everywhere! BLACK ON!

April 30, 2012

Back To Woolly NATURAL BLACK PEOPLE’S HAIR -THE MOST Beautiful Hair on the PLANET! -This. Sister cuts it all off and gets BACK To Wearing her hair NATURAL!

February 1, 2012

Stylist advocates for return to natural black hair styles, with a big chop first

By Lolly Bowean

Updated: February 01, 2012 – 3:01 am

Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — On the cold, winter night that Sharon Coleman shaved off all her hair, she sat surrounded by other African-American women who were grinning and applauding as the clippers hummed.

And when every strand of her shoulder-length, straight hair was on the floor, Coleman stood from her seat, and fell into the arms of the women circled around her. The room was filled with strangers who had come to witness the new hair ritual, show support and find courage to do the same, Coleman said.

“All the women just embraced me and were very encouraging,� she said as she recalled the event. “Everyone was complimenting me: ‘I like the way you look. I love your hair.’�

For African-American women, hair is often a battle ground for how beauty is defined. For one group of black women, shaving their hair to a close-cropped, boyish style has become a way of empowering themselves, rejecting mainstream standards of beauty and shedding their obsession with extensive, daily hair rituals.

Earlier this month, Emon Fowler launched her Chicago-based “Harriet Experiment,� in which she is asking black women to abandon weaves, wigs and chemical relaxers and spend a new year with new hair. She wants the women to start with the “big chop,� in which they shave off their processed hair completely and start anew.

Fowler, 30, has organized gatherings to take place throughout the year for women to cut their hair while surrounded by cheerleaders who have done the same. She has been recruiting women on Facebook, stopping them in grocery stores and making appearances at fairs and festivals to promote her cause.

“This is all about breaking free from that hair bondage,� said Fowler, a hair stylist. She says her project isn’t about building a clientele, but changing mind-sets. “When a woman decides to cut all her hair, she discovers something underneath that is liberating. It can be therapeutic because you have to let go of the idea that you need these superficial extras to feel beautiful. It says, ‘I’ve accepted me.’�

Fowler said she was inspired to start her movement after reflecting on the life of Harriet Tubman, the iconic hero who risked her life to free hundreds of slaves. She sees her mission as helping to free African-American women from the emotional and psychological baggage associated with their hair.

There are varying opinions in the black community about the meaning of straight hair, but some think it’s an attempt to imitate the white standard of beauty. Fowler said she wants to reinforce to African-American women that they don’t have to change their hair to feel pretty or accepted.

For African-American women, shaving off all their hair is nothing new. In the 1970s, thousands of black women wore their hair short and close-cropped as a symbol of racial pride and consciousness, said Lanita Jacobs, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Southern California.

But in Fowler’s project, the women who decide to undergo the big chop do it publicly, and with a built-in support system of cheerleaders, Jacobs said.

That support can help ease what can be a shock to black women’s psyche, one expert said.

“Black women have been conditioned to believe that our hair, in its natural state, is not beautiful, not professional and not manageable,� said Chris-Tia Donaldson, a Chicago-based author who wrote a book about the topic. “When you go to hair that is short, it can take a toll on your self-esteem. You have to learn how to work it and own it.�

There is a growing trend toward wearing hair more naturally, which some believe means a change in the definition of what beauty is for the next generation of African-Americans, Jacobs said.

“There has been a radical shift in black people’s minds on what can be beautiful,� she said. “Increasingly, black men are making room for non-straightened and non-long hair as a qualifier for beauty. More African-American celebrities are experimenting with natural hair.

“What black women do with their hair has always created questions: Who are you? Who are you trying to be? What does this mean?�

(EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE)

(EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM)

When any woman shaves her hair close to the scalp, it can unearth feelings of vulnerability, said Jacobs. For those African-American women who have straightened their hair for much of their lives, it can be particularly stirring.

“You are in some cases stepping away from something that you know and into new, unknown territory,� Jacobs said. “When you do the big chop, people come up and ask questions. It can complicate your appeal to the opposite sex, it can complicate your job searching endeavors, it can complicate your family relationships. Your family may ask, who are you?�

Because her hero, Harriet Tubman freed an estimated 700 slaves, Fowler has an ambitious mission to find 700 black women willing to undergo the big chop this year, she said. So far, she’s only gotten a couple dozen to join her on the journey. But her project isn’t just about numbers, she said. It’s about making a statement.

(END OPTIONAL TRIM)

The project actually comes at a time when more African-American women are abandoning the mainstream weaves and relaxers and making peace with their natural textures, statistics show.

The number of black women who said they do not use chemicals to straighten their hair jumped to 36 percent in 2011 from 25 percent in 2010, according to a report by Mintel, a consumer spending and market research firm. Sales of hair relaxer boxed kits dropped 17 percent between 2006 and 2011, Mintel’s report showed.

In addition, there has been a recent flood of blogs, websites, meet-up groups and YouTube video postings devoted to demonstrating to women how to transition to natural textures and how to style their new hair, Donaldson said.

(EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM)

Antinique Bearden-Nunes said she’d been thinking about leaving her straight hair behind for a year, but she was afraid of how she would look. When she saw other women at Fowler’s launch celebrating the cut, she stepped up to do the same.

“I feel like I can do anything now,� said Bearden-Nunes, 24, who was still giddy about her haircut days after it was done. “I finally can care less about what others think. I have three young children, and I can’t let them see any shadow of low self-esteem.�

Bearden-Nunes said she’s been so pleased with her decision that she’s been oblivious to the reaction of her friends and strangers on the street. Her fiance wasn’t at all thrilled when she came home with less than an inch of hair.

“I told him, ‘I’m still me, I’m still beautiful,’� she said.

(END OPTIONAL TRIM)

After years of contemplating the bold step, Coleman, 55, decided that she would cut all of her processed hair off. For Coleman, it was a break away from what she called an unhealthy obsession and lifestyle.

“I’ve had chemicals in my hair since I was 14 or 15 years old,� she said. “It was like a vicious cycle. I was using chemicals monthly to get a touch up or a perm. I had to blow my hair out, use the curling iron. I’ve gone through so much over the last three years with hair pieces and wigs and such. I’m done with it.�

The day she arrived at work with her short cropped cut, Coleman said she noticed some of her colleagues paused and looked at her. Her manager, in particular, smiled and celebrated her new look.

But some of her friends have been less enthused when they see her hair, Coleman said. Some shake their heads and say they would have never done it.

“When you make a drastic change of this nature, you have to own it and thatâ™m doing. I walk with confidence, she saidThis is the new me!

Gabourey SIDIBE-OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IS. HONOURED BY ESSENCE MAGAZINE !

January 26, 2012

http://www.marketwatch.com/m/story/7ae9076a-5d4e-4c72-8873-f4c7a307ca7c?pageNumber=1&allPages=True. . K erry Washington, Paula Patton, Shonda Rhimes, Octavia Spencer, & Pam Grier to be Honored at the 5th Annual Essence Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon

–Essence Celebrates African-American Women Who Shine on the Big and Small Screen; Spotlights Black Women Writers, Directors, and Producers; and Addresses Re-Defining Roles of Black Women in Front of the Camera and Behind-the-Scenes –Essence.com To Exclusively Live Stream From The Red Carpet, Bringing Stars, Style & Sizzle Up Close! –Essence Annual Hollywood Issue Hits Newsstands February 12th

NEW YORK, Jan. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Today, ESSENCE is pleased to announce the 5th annual ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon honoring the industry’s most exciting African-American talent–both in front of the camera and behind-the-scenes in Hollywood. Taking place on February 23, 2012 at the Beverly Hills Hotel, ESSENCE will celebrate five extraordinary women who have left an indelible impression with their work within the film and television industries: Kerry Washington (Vanguard Award), Octavia Spencer (Breakthrough Performance), Pam Grier (Legend Award), Paula Patton (Shining Star Award) and Shonda Rhimes (Visionary Award presented by Lincoln). This star-studded event commemorates ESSENCE magazine’s annual Hollywood issue and in honor of the fifth anniversary, Essence.com is giving fans exclusive access to all the red-carpet celebrity style, action and interviews via live stream from 11:30am to 12:30pm PST and re-airing that evening at 9:00pm EST.

“Black women actors, writers, directors and producers still lack diverse opportunities in Hollywood and, unfortunately, are often overlooked during awards season,” commented ESSENCE Editor-in-Chief Constance White. “The ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon exists to provide a fitting tribute to the brilliant talent and accomplishments of African-American trailblazers like Kerry, Pam, Paula, Octavia and Shonda and celebrate their collective work as an inspiration for generations to come.”

Since its commencement in 2008, ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood has honored Halle Berry, Jada Pinkett-Smith, Angela Bassett, Queen Latifah, Taraji P. Henson, Viola Davis, Jennifer Hudson, Zoe Saldana, Mary J. Blige, Gabourey Sidibe, Jurnee Smollett, Ruby Dee, Diahann Carroll, Cicely Tyson, Loretta Devine, Gina Prince-Bythewood, and Suzanne de Passe. As one of the most highly anticipated events during Oscar week, this A-List event has hosted some of Hollywood’s elite, including Tom Cruise, Will Smith, Amy Adams, Samuel L. Jackson, Forest Whitaker, James Cameron, and Laurence Fishburne, among many others.

Stay tuned to Essence.com for highlights and behind-the-scenes access to ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood. Follow us on Twitter @essenceonline #EssenceBWIH. Join in the discussion on Facebook.

Sponsors for the ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon include presenting sponsor Lincoln, as well as partner sponsors ING, L’Oreal Paris and Smartwater.

About the ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood honorees:

Kerry Washington: As the recipient of the Vanguard Award, Kerry Washington has built an impressive list of credits starring in award winning, critically acclaimed films such as The Last King of Scotland opposite Oscar Award winner Forest Whitaker and Ray for which she won “Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture” at the NAACP Image Awards. In 2010, Washington made her Broadway debut in David Mamet’s provocative hit Race with James Spader and David Alan Grier. Washington appeared with Matt Damon, Josh Brolin and Sean Penn in Howard Zinn’s documentary The People Speak. In addition to earning praise for her accomplishments within her acting career, Washington was appointed by President Barack Obama to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in November of 2009. She will next be seen in We the Peeples with Craig Robinson, 1000 Words with Eddie Murphy, and The Details with Toby Maguire. Kerry is set to star

GOMINA OSUN MOVES TO SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE!

January 7, 2012

Aregbesola makes case for Yoruba Academy

Tweet

December 8, 2011, 10:04 pm

News

OSOGBO—The Osun State Governor, Rauf Aregbesola, has said the establishment of a Yoruba Academy would go a long way to promote the Yoruba culture and tradition as well as enhance the speaking of the language by a new generation.

The governor disclosed the intention of his government to enact a law that would make it compulsory for every school, both private and public to include in their curricular activities, teaching of Yoruba language.

The Governor spoke in Osogbo, the state capital at the anniversary lecture, tagged, “Reclaiming Our Cultural Concept: Yoruba Vegesimal and Decimal Number System in Perspective”, as well as Book Lunch marking the one year anniversary of his administration in office.

He lamented that the culture, language and values of the race have faded away.

The governor stated, “We will enact a law that will make it compulsory for every school, both private and public to teach Yoruba language. We will take the bill to the House of Assembly latest by February and work towards ensuring that by March, it becomes law that every school must comply with. We will compel teaching of Yoruba language on everybody studying in Osun from elementary to university level.

“Also, we will establish a Yoruba Academy for Language, Culture and Tradition where those who are interested in learning Yoruba language we be learning our culture and whatever associated with it”, he said.

The governor who expressed disgust over the disappearance of Yoruba language and culture, especially among the younger ones, said that his administration would do everything it requires to revive the lost glory.

Aregbesola noted that there were differences between culture and religion, the governor added that “it was our failure to recognize our culture and tradition as very important machinery for development that makes us to be lagging behind.”

Gabourey Sidibe- THIS BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IS HOT !

December 30, 2011

Alaroye Newspaper IS SAVING YORUBA LANGUAGE From DESTRUCTION!-ALAO ADEDAYO FOUNDER TELLS HOW HE FINALLY SUCCEEDED IN PRODUCING A FLORISHING YORUBA NEWSPAPER ! –YORUBA IS DYING! —WHAT CAN YOU DO TO SAVE IT??-FROM VANGUARD NEWSPAPER((NIGERIA)

December 25, 2011

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade Alao Adedayo-Founder/savior of Yoruba Language thru his GREAT newspaper Alaroye! Do Your own part and BUY it every week, get your children to read it- FIGHT TO SAVE Yoruba Language. FROM DYING!

I stumbled four times to make Alaroye a success story – Alao Adedayo

July 8, 2011

Musa Alao Adedayo, a.k.a Agbedegbeyo, is the Publisher/Chief Executive Officer, World Information Agents Limited, the publishing company of the popular Yoruba newspaper, ALAROYE. He spoke to BASHIR ADEFAKA about himself and how he stumbled four times to get it right with the vernacular paper that has today become a success story in the newspaper industry in Nigeria. Excerpt

How did you start out in life?

I am a Muslim but I am not a biased person because God Himself never loved a biased person.  But those who know me from the beginning used to call me Alao Agbedegbeyo.  When I talk of people who know me from the beginning, they are people from the  70s, early 80s and so on.

I came from Abeokuta to Lagos in 1980 doing Ewi (lyrics) artist.  In those days as an Ewi person, you must be attached to a particular musician and I was with Dele Abiodun, who was like my master.  Ewi was like side-attraction at a show and it would come on stage while the musician and his band members were taking a rest.

I had also participated in some dramas through the likes of Jide Kosoko, Ishola Ogunsola, (Dr. I. Show Pepper) and Adebayo Salami (Oga Bello).  It was because of the Ewi that I used to present in those days that Jide Kosoko would always come to Dele Abiodun’s shows.  He would say to me, “Alao, we are having an outing somewhere and I want you to perform your Ewi there,” and I would say no problem.

How did Ewi correlated with the broadcaster that you were?

By and large as God would have it, through that channel, as I have mentioned before, I became a broadcaster.  Sometime in 1979, Radio Lagos started a programme called, Kebuyeri, which was mainly for the Awada Kerikeri group that was then run by Adebayo Salami popularly called Oga Bello.  We went to a show at Ebute Metta and Adebayo Salami and his group members had also come to that show.

It was there he saw me and said, “Ah, Alao! Radio Lagos has just given us a programme and we want you to be in it” and I said no problem.  We didn’t even discuss money because what was more important to us at that time was the job.  That was how we started the programme and it became overwhelmingly popular turning me into a celebrity.

Behind that programme, a plan was going on by the management of Radio Lagos and the producer of the programme, Adebayo Tijani, communicated to me that management was talking about me and that was how I became a newscaster with Radio Lagos reading Yoruba news at that time.

I left Radio Lagos in 1981, which was a real year of politicking in the country.  Then, Radio Nigeria Ikeja which was established within that time was located in Ikoyi and in fact when we were there, we were always abusing and calling them, “Agberekusu f’ohun Ikeja” that is, people who were on the Island claiming to be speaking from Ikeja (laughs).  I eventually found myself at the Radio Nigeria Ikeja and later NTA but I did not stay long before I left.

When you left service, where did you go?

When we joined broadcasting, most of us did not get the job because of our educational qualifications and so, when I left the NTA, it was an opportunity for me to now go and improve myself, which then took me to the Nigerian Institute of Journalism (NIJ) and then the universities for my first and later second degrees.

How did Alaroye come into the show?

It was in May 1985 when I was 25 and while I was still working as a Yoruba newsreader with the NTA that I decided to try my hands in publishing, which brought about the Alaroye.  Between May and October of 1985, I was only able to publish four editions of the tabloid that was meant to be weekly.  I was doing it alone because I had no such money to hire people.   It thus became a staggered publication because it was a one-man’s idea and as a result, no prospective partner was willing to support or invest in the business.  It was also like that because Yoruba newspaper business at that time was seen as a barren land.  So, naturally, it died.

Further effort was made at resuscitating the paper in 1990 but it couldn’t get to the vendors,  though it was being published. It was to be launched that year so that some funds could be raised. On the day of the launching, a prominent member of the community who was a friend of both the chief launcher and chairman, Lai Balogun, died. So it was a wrong day for the Alaroye’s show as the whole community was thrown into mourning and no one remembered the launch.

In 1994 when I made the third attempt at the publication, I was convinced that Alaroye would one day emerge a success story because, for four weeks, I was able to publish the weekly paper consecutively and throughtout the period,  it was well circulated and generally accepted.

And because I had acquired more knowledge about all it required to make a successful print media, Alaroye was able to stand and  able to meet the standard of a newspaper. Yet, it couldn’t go far because I could not raise the required fund to keep it going.  And for two years, it remained like that until July 2, 1996, when we were able to revisit it and tried our best to make it what it is today.  That was the fourth attempt and it has now come to stay.

I thank God that today, Alaroye is seen not as a happenstance, but a planned revolution in the newspaper industry in Nigeria.  And it is so because, no Yoruba newspaper has been so successful because most of the earlier issues, people have said, were translataion of English newspapers or repetition of news items already carried on radio and television.

Alaroye is original for its thorough analysis, research works and investigative journalism that many have appreciated as having put the newspaper on a very high pedestal. It informs, educates, entertains and analyses events as they unfold through the Yoruba culture. For this, it circulates in Nigeria, wherever Yoruba domicile, with the print run sometimes as high as 150,000 copies per week.  I have the reason to really thank God today because, in Nigeria, particularly among the Yorubas, Alaroye is a language. It is the culture.

The Conference of Yoruba Leaders showcased by your newspaper, which debuted in 2002, hasn’t seemed to produce any result considering the fact that Yorubas are still intolerably disunited.  What is the problem?

The problem we have in Yorubaland is the way we play our own politics.  What Alaroye is trying to do is to serve as a bridge to bring all the leaders together.  There is need for a connecting point, which will connect all Yoruba people with one another.  We have very, very intelligent, well exposed and highly patriotic sons and daughters of Yorubaland.  We cannot run away from the fact that we are Yorubas; we had been Yoruba people before Nigeria and we will remain Yoruba people within Nigeria.

Yes, political party differences are there but we should be able to know that there is difference between politics and governance.  So, during election, you can abuse and criticize yourselves but once election is over, issue of governance becomes the central point while politicking is set aside for another election season.  And if you are the governor, you should see yourself as the father of all, as the head of government and people should see the governor beyond his party but as the leader that all of us should relate well with as one of our own.

In the year 2002, I went to Papa Abraham Adesanya and I said to him, “E ma bawon se oselu.  Ema bawon da si oro oselu.  Asiwaju Yoruba ni ki’e je” (That Papa should not be part of politics other Yorubas played but that he should be okay with himself as Leader of the Yoruba Nation).

He asked me why.  We talked a lot about it and he agreed with me.  Not only that I went to discuss it with him, we made it a critical editorial issue, which some of the Afenifere members then responded to.


[

>BACK TO AFRICA ! -DAN FOSTER,THIS BLACK AMERIKKKA HAS COME BACK HOME WITH A BANG AND IS FREE,BLACK AND RISING IN THE MOTHERLAND!

May 26, 2011

>

CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)


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Nairaland [Nigerian Forum] Home Help Search Who is currently online? Recent Posts Login Register Nairaland Forum  |  General | Welcome  |  Politics (Moderators: aisha2, Jarus)  |  CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)

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Author Topic: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)  (Read 5257 views)
Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin,   Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there.  This guy neva jam  Grin Grin


Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.
Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments  Grin


Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!


gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria


deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Also, True !


PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there.  It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.


Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?,  Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis  Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio,  lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?


JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

 A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food.  Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East


* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??


shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.


rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps.  Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.


FROM THENETNG.COM

Opinion

« Breaking News – Emeka Ike Wins GUS Celebrity Showdown!Smart BasketMouth Escapes Branson Push »Dan Foster Gets Baby No 3

By Victoria Ige

Mr Foster and wife pose with their first baby in this picture obtained from the official Dan Foster Facebook account

Popular on-air personality Dan Foster an his wife Lovina are celebrating the arrival of their second child together.

Foster’s wife Lovina delivered a baby boy, Thursday May 27 in a Lagos hospital.

The couple already had a girl together; while Foster, an American, has a grown boy from an earlier marriage.

‘Baby boy has landed and mommy is safe and God is great… We’re so full of joy, join us for a thought of praise’ Dan Foster wrote in an SMS blast to friends.

The baby weighed 3.8 kg at birth.
777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

But besides all these and many other goodies abut Dan, he has his other side. Dan Fo

BACK TO AFRICA !- THIS BLACK AMERIKKKAN DAN FOSTER DID SO WELL ADJUSTING IN NIGERIA THAT HE’S WRITING A BOOK ABOUT HOW TO DO BUSINESS IN NIGERIA- IMAGINE! BLACK ON!-FROM NAIRALAND.COM

May 26, 2011


FROM NAIRALAND.COM
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
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Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa”

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

–Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin, Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there. This guy neva jam Grin Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!

gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria

deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.
Also, True !

PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there. It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.

Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?, Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio, lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?

JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food. Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East

* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps. Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.

>BACKTO AFRICA!- LLOYD WEAVER COMES BACK AND IS THRIVING IN BLACK FREEDOM IN NIGERIA!

May 23, 2011

>

http://64.182.81.172/webpages/features/blockbuster/2010/june/12/blockbuster-12-06-2010-003.htm

‘MY FILM celebratES Awo, Zik, Ahmadu Bello’

By DENNIS UGBUDIAN

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Mr. Lloyd Weaver is an African-American who has lived in Nigeria with his family for over two decades. He is an artiste and currently a producer with The Serengeti Network. Right now, the dramatist is working on a drama series about Nigeria’s independence entitled, Roots Style. He, however, lamented lack of funds to achieve his dream. In a chat with Blockbuster, Weaver opens up on his sojourn in Nigeria and challenges of celebrating our past heroes in film. Excerpts:

Background

I am an African-American, who at a very early age in life became very interested in my African heritage. Probably because I lived in New York City, it became a melting point in terms of ethnicity. I lived among people mostly from Europe who were aware and proud of their own ethnic heritage. So, I heard people who said that their ancestors came from Hungary or China. I wanted to know where my own ancestors came from. And I became interested in how we came to America, which was different from other Americans. We were stolen from Africa and in the process of slaves mixing together in the US, our specific ethnicity was lost but it still became a source of fascination to me.

So, I began to study more about African history, African nationalities, culture and traditions and anything that has to do with Africa. But my interest began when I was a child in primary school. I grew older and began to study more and I discovered that majority of slaves taken were from the area that is now called Nigeria, along this coast which is called the Slave Coast. I knew that Nigeria was more than likely ancestral to me, and a lot of other places. But later on in life, I went to Columbia University where I took a course in African Studies with one Professor Adugbowoyin, and he showed statistically that more slaves came from Nigeria than any other area of Africa. So, if you considered this you would understand. But this is not really what brought me to Nigeria.

Journey to Nigeria

I think it was a spiritual journey. I think I have been sent by God to go where He wanted me to be on this planet, to bring down certain things that I have the advantage of gaining in the US. I came to Nigeria out of curiosity in 1969. By then I was already involved professionally in the television business. And I was very curious about the television stations. Then I went to Ibadan. I looked around out of curiosity and it stayed in my memory. By coincidence in 1982, I was asked by a fellow African/American to join the television in the US, a programme that I studied in order to come to Nigeria and train personnel working with the Nigerian Television Authority. Of course, I was very pleased to do this, I was working in a place called CBS News (US) at a time so I was pleased to take that trip to come over here.

On Roots Style

Americans have a heritage, they believed that somebody fought and many people died that is why they can enjoy certain things, and enjoying them they should always uphold as the ensemble of the things done by their forefathers. We need to teach our young people to feel that way or else they would forget the idea of a nation, knowing that my first idea was to write a series of text books for Nigerian schools and to begin a campaign to get history back into the curriculum, but later somebody said to me, ‘Lloyd, you forget that you are a television producer’, and I began to organize a group of people to study Nigerian history understand the past that was a glory that brought about the independent that’s being written into drama. The opportunity presented itself with this year that is going to be the 50th anniversary of our independence.

Best hands

You’ve all seen Roots and seen how history was made into drama, you probably watch BBC History, there has been a lot of history on television, and so the idea of dramatizing history is nothing new. We always see European films about the great battles of their ancestors. So, doing historical film is nothing new, we’ve got some of the best actors and actresses in the world right here in Nigeria. We have some of the best television and film technicians as Nigerians though they are scattered all over the world, but we have the best of them here, so we are going to draw on writers who are Nigerians including cameramen and directors who are Nigerians.

Wherever they are in the world, we are asking all of them to come home and create ultimate television or film of their lives the one that is going to inspire Nigerians to understand who they are as a single people and be able to rally themselves together. Because we all exist under a single flag, we want to teach Nigerians to honour their flag, to honour what their ancestors accomplished, to forget what happened between 1960 and today, to go back to what a common heritage is. We’ve been talking to the families of all the founding fathers and we have been traveling all over the country even to England to talk to descendants, the so-called colonial masters.

Celebration

We are going to air 13 episodes at an episode per hour. Our intention is to go on air on July 1, 2010. There are 13 weeks preceding the celebration on October 1. Our final episode where we would show the raising of Nigeria’s flag would be on September 29, the eve of the anniversary. Nigerians would have watched the whole thing and finally for the first time maybe since independence, Nigerians will fully understand what they are to celebrate and it is going to be such as you have never seen in your life.

Heroes and villains

This is drama, and drama at its best, if you know anything about drama then you will know that the drama is built on conflict, there is a good guy and a bad guy, usually in the beginning of the drama, there is a bad guy that is doing very well and the story is on what the problem is. In this case, Nigerians are the protagonists, and the common problem is the British colonialism. So, British colonialism is the bad guy. At the beginning of the story, you might say European colonialism of one kind or another because we know that the British is preceded by the Portuguese who came to rob and steal and there were also the French and Germans. Our people still fought and there were heroes that every Nigerian should know about like Obafemi Awolowo, Ahmadu Bello and Nnamdi Azikwe.

>NIGERIA-WE HAIL THEE! -"15 YEAR OLD NIGERIAN TEENAGER IN AMERIKKKA GETS ADMISSION TO HARVARD!"-FROM NAIJAFEED.COM-THE SMARTEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD TAKE IT FROM ME,A BLACK AMERIKKKAN, ARE NIGERIANS!

May 20, 2011

>

http://www.naijafeed.com/naijafeed/2011/5/12/15-year-old-nigerian-teenager-gets-admission-to-harvard.ht

Thursday
May12 2011

15 year old Nigerian teenager gets admission to Harvard


A 15 year old Nigerian girl has been offered admission to the prestigious Harvard University in United States of America, She is Saheela Ibraheem, 15 year old daughter of a Nigerian immigrant family living in New Jersey, United States. The Harvard University new intake is the latest media sensation.
Since news broke about Saheela’s incredible acceptance to 13 of American’s prestigious Universities, local and International media have taken interests in the teen’s success story.
A source at Wardlaw-Hartridge high school, who fears that media interests in the young Nigerian-American is fast becoming overwhelming and could be a distraction during her upcoming exams said that about a dozen media organizations are schedule for possible interviews with Saheela. According to the source “She [Saheela] is amazing and because she is well spoken, media organizations wanted to have live interviews with her”.
In 2010, Saheela applied to 14 schools that includes some of America’s Ivy Leagues. All, but Yale, offered her admission. This includes, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Cornell, Brown, Williams College, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard, which she settled on after a convincing visit to the university’s campus. In an interview with Fox 5, New York, Saheela’s mother, Shakirat, attributes her daughter’s academic success to her interest in learning and knowing more. According to Shakirat,”When you teach her 1, 2, 3 she wants more,… When you teach her 1 through 5, she’d say how about this.”
Her dad, Sarafa, a graduate of Nigeria’s own ivy school, University of Ibadan, is a financial analyst and vice president at a major Financial group in New York
Besides her academic excellence, Saheela actively plays soccer, softball and the trombone. Nigerians have reacted to the good news. Bukky Adekanbi, a Nigerian residing in New York said.
“It is always joyful to hear that Nigerians are doing great things around the world regardless of how bad some international media tries to portray us. We Nigerians here in America are proud of Saheela and her parents,”
Saheela who plans to study neuroscience or neurobiology – scientific study of the nervous system. said “It all comes down to the support I’ve had at home, from my parents, even my brothers being there every step of the way.”
Vanguard
Related stories: Video – University in Canada high acceptance rate for Nigerians despite tough immigration
Chimamanda Adichie at 2009 TED Conference

Reader Comments (2)

am proud to hear this when talking about nigeria in good things and i pray that after her school let united state allow her to come and apply what she learn to us nigeria her fatherland my daughter please try to work more harder than before
May 16, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterjackson
Na smaaat girl be that! She dey make us proud!
May 16, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterLawal

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