Posts Tagged ‘BLACK CHILDREN’

THE BLACK MAN! -IN ALL HIS POWER AND GLORY!

May 2, 2013

http://yeyeolade.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/3377737.jpg

KABEYESI O! – YORUBA KINGS ARE GREAT! – BLACK MAN BE A KING WHERE EVER YOU ARE BY HEADING THE BLACK FAMILY!

May 2, 2013

http://yeyeolade.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/yoruba_nigeria.jpg

THE REAL MICHAEL JACKSON and MUHAMMED ALI and ONE OF HIS 4 WIVES! -BLEACH LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON AND BECOME A MONSTER! -BLEACH AND DIE!

April 30, 2013
BLEACH AND DIE!

BLEACH AND DIE!

BLEACH AND DIE!

GABOUREY SIDIBE-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPEME

January 4, 2013

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h164/ybfchic/January%202013/gabourey_sidibe_by_Suzanne_teresay_zps6a8cb32b.jpeg

REVOLUTION IN GOVERNING IS HAPPENING IN NIGERIA!- EKITI STATE GOMINA KAYODE FAYEMI HAS REVOLUTIONIZED EDUCATION IN HIS STATE WITH HIS AWOLOWO VISION TO UPLIFT THE MASSES!- OTHER GOMINAS IN ONDO, OSUN,LAGOS,RIVERS, IMO,DELTA,STATES ARE REVOLUTIONIZING AGRIC,ROADS,EDUCATION,TOURISM, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT!

October 21, 2012

ImageImage

New Robes For Ekiti Schools As Govt Embarks On Operation Renovate All Schools

Renovatedd Corpus Christi College, Ilawe-Ekiti

They sat around in groups, their faces a palpable picture of downright disbelief, enthusing about the incredible transformation that had taken place in their school. Some others loitered here and there, idling about in ones and twos, conversing in soft, measured tones. They were students of Ola Oluwa Muslim Grammar School, one of the first generation secondary schools situated along Ilawe Road in Ado-Ekiti, the Ekiti State capital.

On Monday, October 2, students of public primary and secondary schools resumed across Ekiti State for the 2012/2013 academic session. While a few of the students went about their normal duties, many were those that could not hide their excitement as they stared, with mouths agape, at the changes that their schools had undergone during the eight-week school break.

“When we came back from the long vacation, we were surprised that our school had been totally transformed,” Adebayo Ojo, a Form Two student of the school, informed the reporter last week. “Although we had been told that the government would renovate our school, we are still surprised at the way they have touched everything here. We are very, very happy. Even though somebody had told me during the break that our school was being renovated, I did not know that it was something of this nature. We are very happy with Governor Fayemi. We have been praying for him and we are also assuring him that we will not do anything to damage the new facilities here.”

Ojo is not alone; neither are the prayers and the excitement restricted to the Ado-Ekiti based school. In many towns and villages in the three senatorial districts in Ekiti State, not a few are those that daily go on bended knees to seek divine blessings for the state governor, Dr. Kayode Fayemi over the renovations that his administration is carrying out in the state-owned schools.

In truth, hardly will you resist the urge to join the applauding crowd, unless you’re ignorant of the pitiable state of public schools in Ekiti before Fayemi’s intervention.

Along Ilawe Road in Ado-Ekiti, a new Ola Oluwa Grammar School smiles at you. The school wears a refreshing robe, with its new and renovated buildings radiating in yellow and red even as the red aluminium roofing sparkles in the afternoon sun.

Ten kilometres away, at the Corpus Christi College, Ilawe-Ekiti, a similar situation obtains. From the road, the school buildings look palatial, covered by a neat line of gangling trees, with the smiles on the pupils’ faces betraying the joy in their souls.

In Ijero, Ilejemeje, Moba, Ise, Ido-Osi and all the local government areas in Ekiti, many schools are wearing new looks, as the government concludes the first phase of the Operation Renovate All Schools in Ekiti (ORASE) scheme, an initiative of the Kayode Fayemi administration.

Right now in Ekiti, public schools are undergoing massive renovation. Of the 183 public secondary schools in the state, about 100 have just been renovated under the ORASE scheme. The remaining 83 have been scheduled to benefit from the programme during the first term holidays in December.

Yet, just a few weeks back, most schools in the state were in a sorry state. The buildings were dilapidated, while many of the roofs had already caved in. Many classrooms had neither doors nor windows, and water flooded the classrooms and staff rooms at the slightest drop of rain. Naturally, coming from such decayed environment, many students recorded abysmal grades in the local examinations as well as in the national SSCE and NECO examinations. A state that had always prided itself as one inhabited by a people of high intellect with a passion for scholarship suddenly metamorphosed into an abode of half-baked, barely literate men and women.

When Fayemi mounted the saddle as governor two years ago, the activist-politician wasted no time before convening an education summit in the state. Various experts and stakeholders converged on the state capital to ruminate over and propose solutions to the crisis that had enveloped the education sector in the state once celebrated for its knack for academic excellence. Over the years, education in the place nicknamed the Fountain of Knowledge had been buffeted by a surfeit of problems. Participants at the summit came up with a number of recommendations to upgrade the quality of basic, secondary and tertiary education in the state.

According to the experts, one of the major causes of the woes in the secondary education system in Ekiti was the dilapidated infrastructure in public schools. The summit noted that excellence had taken a flight from the public school system since the schools lacked good buildings, access roads, functional libraries and laboratories and other basic amenities. The summit recommended that the government should embark on a number of projects and processes, including the renovation of existing structures, perimeter fencing of schools, rehabilitation of access/intra-premises road network, employment of retired, seasoned teachers as neighbourhood inspectors and in-service training, seminars and conferences for school teachers.

No sooner was the summit concluded than Fayemi commenced implementing the recommendations with a view to permanently arresting the rot in the secondary education system. The renovation of schools could not commence immediately though, as the schools were in session. But as soon as students went on holidays in July, Fayemi flagged off the Operation Renovate All Schools in Ekiti (ORASE), and massive rehabilitation work started in 100 of the 183 schools.

“Yes, we are very educated, but we lack skills,” Fayemi said in an interview at the Government House in Ado-Ekiti. “The people we’re producing from our university system, yes, they carry the paper degree and the certificate, but they cannot function in the work environment competently. These are challenges that are long-term, that our people do not see in the immediate, but that we must address. For me, leadership is about that. Leadership is not just about physical projects that people can see now. It is what we make of those physical projects.”

At the flag-off of the programme, Fayemi had declared: “Our resolve to ensure that this impartation of functional educational is done under a conducive atmosphere informed the Operation Renovation All Schools in Ekiti (ORASE). We cannot afford to live on past glory or allow our education system to continue to produce half baked products neither good for higher education nor for job creation and wealth generation which are our focus.”

Under ORASE, government set aside the sum of N2.2 billion for the renovation of the schools even as contracts for their renovation were awarded to competent firms. The government also set up a Bureau of Special Projects in the Office of the Governor, headed by a Special Adviser, Mr. Bayo Kelekun. The contractors were directed to hand over the renovated schools before the commencement of the new academic calendar in September.

They were mandated to pull down the ramshackle school buildings and replace them with new ones. They were to also cover the buildings with new, state-of-the-art aluminium roofs. To ensure compliance with government specifications, Fayemi traversed the entire state, inspecting the handiwork of the contractors.

At Ola-Oluwa, the contractors were putting finishing touches to the buildings when The Sun team called. The project manager, Mr. Akeem Momodu, said his firm’s mandate was to deliver 24 totally renovated schools in Ekiti Central Senatorial District to the state government. The schools being renovated by his company were virtually ready, he said.

“As you can see, the job is 80 per cent completed. We are rounding off on the issue of aluminium roofing and the rest. We’re putting windows and doors and painting the rooms.”

Besides renovating schools, the governor also came up with the idea of putting a laptop on the desk of every child in the state. When he mooted the idea, not a few people were unconvinced. Many were even suspicious of the governor’s intentions. But Fayemi, a product of the esteemed Christ’s School located in the state capital, was determined. He said by 2014, no fewer than 100, 000 children would have benefitted from the computers. Already, 33, 000 laptops have been distributed free of charge to students. The governor said the importance of the distribution of the laptops could not be exaggerated, saying they would assist the students get introduced to the modern trends in information technology.

“The laptop initiative is not an end in itself,” the governor explained. “It’s a means to a better end in which our children would be competing in a world that they do not make, in a world in which the children that they are dealing with globally are also playing in that field or in a much more sophisticated field. And we started this before WAEC introduced ICT into the curriculum, which is now a compulsory subject. If you want to do some national exams now, you must do it online, via the computer. So, it’s like we anticipated this.”

By TOPE ADEBOBOYE

GOMINA KAYODE FAYEMI IS SERVING THE PEOPLE BY GIVING THE AGED POOR AN AMOUNT EVERY MONTH FOR ‘SOCIAL SECURITY’ SO THEY WON’T STARVE AS THEY WERE DOING BEFORE!-WHO SAYS NOTHING GOOD IS HAPPENING IN NIGERIA!-FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY WE HAVE MANY GOMINAS WHO ARE SERVING THE PEOPLE- ONDO,OSUN,EDO,LAGOS,RIVERS,IMO GOMINAS ARE SERVING THE MASSES IN AGRIC,EDUCATION AND ROADS,ECONOMIC IMPROVEMENTS-CHECK THEM OUT!- IT’S A REVOLUTION HAPPENING IN NIGERIA!-FROM SUN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

October 21, 2012

GOMINA OF THE PEOPLE-HE IS HELPING THE MASSES WHO ARE OLD AND WERE STARVING EVERY MONTH FOR FOOD!-WHO SAYS GOOD THINGS ARE NOT HAPPENING IN NIGERIA! OTHER PEOPLES’ GOMINAS LIKE EDO STATE,RIVERS STATE,OSUN STATE,LAGOS STATE,IMO STATE,ONDO STATE ARE ACTING FOR THE MASSES AND INCREASING AGRIC FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE HISTORY OF NIGERIA! OLODUMARE OTI SE O!


You are here: Home » Featured » Fayemi Kindles Joy In Old People’s Hearts
Fayemi Kindles Joy In Old People’s Hearts

Gov. Fayemi with a senior citizen.

A revolution of some sorts is sweeping through Ekiti State, and it is kindling the kiln of joy in the hearts of senior citizens. Their lives have been set aglow by what the Governor Kayode Fayemi administration calls the Social Security Scheme. How does it work?

Every aged person without a pension, and without support from either accomplished children or relations, is registered, and paid the sum of five thousand naira monthly. Yes, every month. And they do not go through the indignities you see with government pensioners, who are made to queue monthly in the scorching sun to collect their stipends, with some of them collapsing and dying in the process. The old people in Ekiti, in excess of 20,000, who have been duly registered, stay in their homes, and are paid by local government officials. Miracle? Well, that is how the old people describe it. And they pray daily for their governor, asking that God will continue to bless him, “and he will never beg for food in his old age.”

Daily Sun spoke with some beneficiaries of the scheme, and their joy can only be imagined:

Chief Olatunbosun Falana (85 years old herbalist): ‘They pay me, though I used to be PDP member’

I used to be a member of the Peoples Democratic Party when I was still strong enough to participate in politics, but I thank God for Governor Fayemi, that he did not consider my political affiliation but registered my name, and since five months ago, I have been collecting the five thousand naira monthly allowance.

I use some of the money to employ the service of laborers who work on my farm, since I can no longer do the work myself. I use the remaining to buy food to eat.

I advice the government not to ever stop this programme, but continue to extend the benefits to other elderly ones who have not been registered for the scheme, so that they can all benefit from it.

I pray that God will continue to bless our governor and give him more wisdom to continue to govern the state very well.

Mrs. Comfort Ogunyemi (70 years old petty trader): ‘Help me tell the governor he will never beg for food’

I’m a petty trader from Ijero-Ekiti. And I was registered along with the second batch of the scheme. I have collected money for about five months now. And I can tell you that since I was born, I have never seen a government in this country, which paid monthly allowance for the aged.

Each time, I buy garri and other food items to eat. In September, they did not pay us the August allowance, so we thought maybe they want to stop it, but the first week of this October, they paid us the two months together. In fact, when I received it I was so happy. I know this man Fayemi is keeping his promise. And God will honour him. Just help us tell him he should not stop it and God will continue to bless him in a miraculous way. He will not beg for food.

Mrs. Felicia Ishola (Over 105 years): ‘How can someone who does not know me send money to me?’

I’m from Odo-Ado area of Ado-Ekiti. I don’t know my age, but I know I’m over 105 years. I used to work on farm as a laborer and engaged in petty trading before I grew old. Fayemi is now sending money to me every month. He first said they should go and bring my name; that they want to put my name down in their register because he wants to be giving me money. I said, but he does not know me now? How can someone who does not know me be sending money to me? They said he is the governor. But (Chief Obafemi) Awolowo was not sending money to old people at home. He was doing free education, roads, free health, and so on when he was in government. I said, I hope this one is not only trying to deceive us?

Truly they gave me the money. And since then I’ve collected for five months now. I’m so happy. I pray that God will continue to be with him and his family. You can tell him he should try to see me. If not because I’m too old to start looking for him, I would have gone to see him. Help me thank him a lot and say I’m very grateful. Tell him also that I pray for him, that he will not cry in old age. He will not bury any of his children. He will get favour of people in this world and that of God.

Mrs. Ojuolape Oladimeji (85 years old): ‘I don’t beg for food again’

I should be around 85years old. I used to sell garri and yam before I stopped about 12 years ago when old age began to set in. I’m one of the first beneficiaries of the scheme. And the money has been very useful to me. I buy food and eat. I don’t lack food again. I don’t beg for food. I have been collecting the N5,000 monthly for about a year now.

Fayemi is wise because I don’t know the person who gave him that idea. He knows there are old people in the town, who will be suffering because of poverty. Tell him that we old people are praying for him. And it will be well with his government, he will not be implicated by wicked people. If only you can take me to him I will tell him he should ensure that he doesn’t stop it. God will continue to provide. I pray that in a miraculous way, God will continue to provide money for his government.

Mrs. Rachael Aina Ajiboye (About 90 years): ‘If they do anything to Fayemi, we elders will fight them’

Although I’m not really sure of my age because I didn’t go to school and there was no record that contains my age, I think I should be around 90 years now. I started benefiting from the scheme last year because I’m lucky to be one of the first that registered when the scheme began. With the money, I now eat regularly and take care of myself because I don’t work again. Once I eat, I pray that God will give our governor long life and sound health till old age.

Please, I want you to help me tell troublemakers that they should not come near Fayemi. If they try it, the elders in Ekiti will fight them. They should allow him to stay long there so that he can continue to take care of us. If they make arrangement for how the aged can vote, I will vote for him again during election. You know we are old, we cannot go and queue up among the young people, so that they will not push us down. But if we vote for him, tell those people that they should not do it the way they did that of (Chief M.K.O.) Abiola.

Mr Adewoye Adeoti (pensioner, Okemesi): ‘Let Jonathan also pay the jobless every month’

I’m in my late 60s. I retired in 2007 as Head of Project Financial Management Unit in the Office of Ekiti Accountant General. I am not a beneficiary of the Fayemi Social Security Scheme because pensioners are not supposed to benefit from the scheme. You know pension is our own version of the scheme. But I want to talk. I want to commend Fayemi for that good initiative. It is a common thing in Europe and America. All those who are unemployed are also given, because that is how to have security. You know a hungry man is an angry man.

Let President Jonathan emulate our governor and start the social security scheme across the country. Let it not be for the aged alone but for youths who are unemployed as well. Let all the governors also embrace this and start it in their respective states as well. The real security problem in this country is that of poverty and lack.

I commend Gov Fayemi on this because it will make a lot of our old people whose children are not rich enough to take care of them to live longer.
By CHARLES ADEGBITE
This article was first published in The Sun on 15 October 2012.

NIGERIA’S FIRST COMMUNIST GOVERNOR IS SERVING THE PEOPLE AND SETTING A BLACK EXAMPLE FOR ALL TO CARE FOR THE MASSES! -FROM OSUN DEFENDER, NIGERIA

October 1, 2012

Friday, September 21, 2012
OUR FIRST COMMUNIST NIGERIAN GOVERNOR IS MAKING SERVICE TO THE MASSES HIS GOAL! -GOMINA RAUF AREGBESOLA IS PERFORMING MIRACLES IN OSUN STATE FOR THE PEOPLE!- FROM OSUN DEFENDER.COM
from osundefender.com

The compassionate state
Compassionate Governor
By Sam Omatseye
Before he became governor, Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola always let the world know that he was a communist. That is yesterday’s ideology, even if North Korea and Cuba still latch on to the fragile and terminal gasps of the idea.
Yet students of history know that communism saved capitalism after the Second World War. The welfare state enjoyed a rebirth when countries, especially those in Europe lying prostrate after the conflagrations, kindled a romance with the idea Marx and Lenin wrought. The liberal canons of democracy and free market became lost in the cloud when the ordinary citizen craved the heres and nows of food and shelter.
The West, including the United States, strengthened the social buoy of the poor and vulnerable although the idea dated back to the years of German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck in the 19th century. That way, the countries kept the communists on the fringes while the Soviet Union glamorised the fantasy in the so-called Third world with champions like Cabral, Ortega, Lumumba and Castro.
Yet, the capitalists could not deny the idea of compassion for the poor. You cannot joy in the spoils of capitalism while the poor gnashed their teeth. In The Secret Agent, Joseph Conrad observes that the condition for luxury and opulence is security.
Long before either capitalism or socialism became organized ideas, Shakespeare expressed the philosophy of compassion in his play, Coriolanus: “that distribution undo excess and each man have enough.”
What Ogbeni is practising in the State of Osun is not communism, but the beginnings of what the Western countries did to save their system: protecting the vulnerable.
In his world, the vulnerable are those in the underbelly of a rabid capitalist system. They are the old who cannot earn any more money, the young and old who cannot get healing, the children too poor to afford books and food at schools, the disenfranchised business person who cannot get seed money to pursue the dreams of independence. They are the people whom Abraham Lincoln referred to as the reason for government: those who cannot stand well on their own.
I had an opportunity to sit as an observer at the state of Osun’s executive council recently and observed the essence of his style. The meeting lasted about eight hours, and two main commissioners were asked to present their stewardships in the past two years. One of them impressed me: the deputy governor who also doubles as the commissioner for education, Titilayo Laoye-Tomori.
Its uniform and feeding projects in schools were the most telling. As Laoye-Tomori showed in her power-point presentation, in the past year the inflow into schools had leaped from between 25 percent and 30 percent. The students would now have school uniforms, spinning an industry and a jobs spur that locals are taking advantage of to tailor and provide the uniforms all over the state.
This narrative is touching in that education is perhaps the greatest driver of development in the modern world. American dominance has been attributed to education as the supreme driver. The world we know today is American, whether it is the car, airplane, the internet, the cell phone, the ipad, the movie, the suburb, the radio, television, the electric bulb, etc. They did it because they drove innovation. It is a country that makes things because it knows things. The thousands of children in Osun who are abandoning idleness at home and on the streets for school are witnessing the greatest liberation: of the human mind.
At one stage at the meeting, when he referred to the ambitious education programme, he burst into a Sunny Ade song “aiye nreti eleya mi o…”. He stood up in his characteristic soulfulness and some of his executives wafted along with him. It was a song of irony. It meant his detractors were waiting for his failure, but it was also a caution to his team not to disappoint. It costs N30 billion, the biggest project in the country.
The tablet of knowledge, a computer that would have all the lessons and books for the students is a new thing, and the deputy governor said it was close to readiness. I anticipate that as it combines modernity with the potential for commerce and jobs.
The other point of compassion is Agba Osun, and it is not its N10, 000 a month to elders that so touched me as the medical system that provides treatment to the vulnerable, especially the elderly and handicapped, in their homes. This cannot work without having all of them in a data base, and the young of the OYES programme built the data base. This is what the youth are doing but interlopers, in their willful ignorance, said they are militias for secession. The state has obviously a mobile medical system where communication between the deprived and the caregiver is streamlined. It is not perfect, and I am not sure everyone has enjoyed this even if the government is impressed with what it has done so far. I recall, too, that in the number of intakes in schools, the deputy governor’s figures were questioned in one of the districts, if for a negligible discrepancy.
What is being done for the elderly in terms of free healthcare in some states, like Lagos, Delta, Rivers, Akwa Ibom, Ekiti, will help improve life expectancy. But personalised care in Osun raises the stakes.
A peep into his style was his conversation with permanent secretary. Ogbeni had accused the ministry of not making an input into the education programme. It is a tribute to his open-mindedness that the permanent secretary was at ease to lash back in her courteous way. She said they actually offered their proposals but the governor did not implement. It turned out she was right. But ever the irrepressible Ogbeni with his tuft of beard, lean face, eyes alert, he asked the ministry to express the ideas and they were debated. I learnt that the Aregbesola administration in less than two years has convened more executive meetings than the seven and a half years of Oyinlola’s Gestapo era.
After the U.S. won the war of independence, Jefferson accused President Washington of apostasy for creating an elite society with Alexander Hamilton when he set up institutions for a strong federal state. This tension led to the birth of the two-party system with Jefferson breaking away from the Federalists to form the Republicans that protected the weak. That tension exists today with those who believe that anyone who is poor and fails is necessarily lazy. Philosopher Herbert Spencer says welfare institutionalises indolence. From the droves of children going to school in Osuns now, we know that is not true.
It takes an Ogbeni to prove that.
Culled From THE NATION newspaper
(Visited 479 times)
Other Related Stories

August 6, 2012 — Aregbesola Launches “Agba Osun” Senior Citizens Welfare Scheme (6)

Short URL: http://www.osundefender.org/?p=37764
Posted by admin on Sep 17 2012. Filed under AFRICA, EDITORIAL, FEATURE, FOR THE RECORDS, Front Page Story, NEWS, News Across Nigeria, PHOTO GALLERY, POLITICS, South West News, X-RAYS. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

olayiwola Tayo
September 17, 2012 – 4:04 pm
This is good omen for the state of Osun. But to make these program last, the State should establish all these in bill passed by the State Assemble and signed by the governor. The things that make other nation great is the laws and order. It will be difficult once the program is base on the law of the land for anyone to comeby abolish it.

RICK ROSS BACK TO AFRICA FOR THE 2ND TIME IN NIGERIA AND LOVES NIGERIAN WOMEN-BLACK WOMEN!-‘

August 24, 2012

http://yeyeolade.blogspot.com/2012/08/black-women-are-best-rick-ross-arrives.html NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES-VENUS AND SERENA WILLIAMS-THE MOST FAMOUS BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES IN THE WORLD BEFORE MICHELLE OBAMA(B.M.0.)-WIN AT WIMBLEDON,2012!ON

August 21, 2012

NGUGI WANTS TO SAVE AFRICAN LANGUAGES! =TO DO THAT YOU MUST START SPEAKING ONLY YORUBA-OTHER AFRICAN LANGUAGES IN THE HOME TO YOUR CHILDREN! =THEN YOU MUST NOT MIX YOUR LANGUAGE WITH ENGLISH AS THE YORUBAS HAVE DONE AND COMPLETELY DESTROYED YORUBA-BLACKS IN THE DIASPORA WHO LOVE YORUBA LANGUAGE MUST LEARN TO SPEAK IT TO RE-TEACH YORUBAS AT HOME WHO NO LONGER SPEAK REAL YORUBA!!!

July 25, 2012


Wednesday, July 25, 2012
NGUGI FIGHTS TO SAVE AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND WE MUST TOO! STOP MIXING YORUBA WITH ENGLISH!-SPEAK YORUBA,YOUR AFRICAN LANGUAGES IN THE HOME TO YOUR CHILDREN ONLY!
from the PUNCH NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA
Ngugi laments dying African indigenous languages
Ngugi laments dying African indigenous languages
July 24, 2012 by Segun Olugbile 6 Comments
Popular author, Prof. Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, has lamented the rate at which Africans are abandoning their indigenous languages for foreign languages, saying this trend is tantamount to self-enslavement.
Wa Thiong’o said this on Monday while speaking at the second edition of the Read Africa initiative of the United Bank for Africa Foundation to promote reading culture among pupils in Lagos.
According to him, most Africans are neglecting their indigenous languages in preference for foreign languages, noting that this trend was dangerous for the sustenance of Africans and their traditions.
He noted that Africans who have the mastery of other people’s languages at the expense of their own indigenous languages have subjected themselves to “second slavery.”
The Kenyan writer, who teaches at Yale University, added that those who were proficient in their indigenous languages and added mastery of other foreign languages had truly empowered themselves.
The writer of the popular Weep Not Child, warned Africans against killing their indigenous languages, noting that the consequences of this would be too much to bear.
“For me, enslavement is when you know all the languages of the world but you don’t know your own language. Empowerment is when you know your own language and you add other languages to it. We should promote our languages. We should encourage our children to speak our own language,” he said.
The author, who was accompanied to the formal inauguration of the second edition of the Read Africa by his 17-year-old son, Thiongo Ngugi, said he stopped writing in English Language about 10 years ago, to spearhead this campaign.
“I stopped writing in English Language 10 years ago because Africa is our base and we must not lose our base and our indigenous languages. Since then I have been writing in Nkiyu language and I later do translation myself or I look for somebody to do it for me,” he said.
Addressing the audience including pupils and top officials of UBA led by the Group Managing Director, Mr. Phillip Odoza, the writer called for the development of young African writers.
He, however, told the pupils that they should cultivate a robust reading culture if they hoped to become good writers.
“Reading is an integral part of imagination and without reading your imagination will shrink. It’s like food, when you don’t eat, your body will shrink and when you don’t feed your spirit with religious books, your moral value will shrink,” he said.
Wa Thiong’o, who said he wrote his first two books within his first two years in college, urged the students to start writing now.
“See yourself as a person first before you see yourself as a student and don’t think you are too small to write, start now,” he said.
Earlier, the Chief Executive Officer of the UBA Foundation, Miss Ijeoma Azo, had explained that the foundation would distribute Wa Thinog’o’s Weep Not Child freely to all secondary school pupils across Africa to promote reading.

Read 168 times

Tope July 24, 2012 at 3:53 am
When i was in secondary school we were told not to speak yoruba in school or we will pay a fine of 10 naira, but as for me i spoke yoruba and when taking to my class teacher because i refuse to pay i will tell her jokely that does the chinese speak english in school or does italy speak yoruba or english in school and she will just laugh and realise me.
Reply Link Quote
Chidi July 24, 2012 at 5:14 am
And this applies also to going back to the only assurance of our daily bread – farming! Remember the age old song: Iwe kiko, lai si oko (ati ada), ko i pe o!
Reply Link Quote
Albert July 24, 2012 at 5:30 am
Yes it is very good to speak our native language
Reply Link Quote
Bamigboye Ilesanmi T. July 24, 2012 at 10:24 am
it is gud to preserve our native language, Africa is our father land not foreign country, let’s embrace our language b/4 wil think of official lang.
Reply Link Quote
Kingsley Fergie July 24, 2012 at 9:08 pm
An excellent Author with a well designed and narrated food-for-thought,very useful 4 some of us who are not married yet
Reply Link Quote
Kingsley Fergie July 24, 2012 at 9:10 pm
I am proud of James Ngugi Wa Thiongo,i read his book in my JSS3 Literature Days,where I charactered Njoroge in d school play,always close a Mwihaki;Weep Not Child,Weep Not,My Darling,With these kisses let me remove ur tears,d ravening clouds shall not yet overflow ,they shall not yet possess the sky;Nigeria must copy from this advice,not as our children do these days,by going 2 cosmopolitan cities,and 4getting their very roots dat made them.Of Course,Europeanization,Civilization,has made d afrocentric man nuts,bt its a food -for-thought especially for some of us who are not married,yet!
Reply Link Quote
Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade July 25, 2012 at 11:56 am
AFRICANS ARE KILLING THEIR LANGUAGES FIRST BY MIXING THEM FREELY WITH ENGLISH,AS THE YORUBAS HAVE DONE AND COMPLETELY FINISHED THE LANGUAGE,AND TWO BY NOT SPEAKING THEIR MOTHERTONGUE IN THE HOME TO THEIR CHILDREN! THIS MUST STOP! A VERY GOOD SOLUTION IS TO HAVE BEST YORUBA SPEAKER CONTESTS BY ALL SCHOOLS,CLUBS AND BUSINESSES SO THAT CASH PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN PEOPLE WHO CAN SPEAK THEIR MOTHERTONGUE WITH OUT MIXING! AS ANAMBRA STATE HAS DONE ALL AREAS MUST HAVE BILLS TO PRESERVE THEIR LANGUAGES FROM PRIVATE SCHOOL LEVEL UP!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
FFROM ALLAFRICA.COM
Nigeria: I Prefer Indigenous Literatures – Wa Thiong’o
By Yemi Adebisi, 15 January 2011
Comment
Lagos — Ngugi Wa Thiong’o is distinguished professor of English and Comparative Literature and director of the International Centre for Writing and Translation at the University of California at Irvine. A Kenyan writer of Gikuyu descent, Ngugi is the author of various novels such as Weep Not Child (1964), The River Between (1965), A Grain of Wheat (1967) and Petals of Blood (1977). In 1980, Ngugi published the first modern novel ever written in Gikuyu called Devil on the Cross. Ngugi’s critical works include Homecoming (1972), Detained: A Writer’s Prison Diary (1981), Decolonizing the Mind (1986) and Moving the Center (1993). As a novelist, playwright and critical thinker, Ngugi has dealt with the concerns most affecting his native Kenya including issues of colonialism, nationalism and post-colonialism.
He has severally recommended to African writers to develop indigenous literature. His claim is that African writers need to write in African language in order to project her rich culture to the whole world. No wonder he prefers to read literatures written in his local language, Gikuyu.
In his response to what his thoughts are about contemporary fiction in Kenya and the more recent texts in Gikuyu that have had an impact on him, he said, “There are several writers who now write in Gikuyu. Ms. Waithira Mbuthia is very prolific. But so is Gitahi Gititi, now a professor of English, but writing in Gikuyu. Mwangi Mutahi is another who has published three novels in Gikuyu. There is also Gatua wa Mbugua, a poet and a scientist. He has just completed and successfully defended a scientific thesis written entirely in Gikuyu for the Department of Crop Science at Cornell. There are many more. Most of these writers are contributors to the Gikuyu language journal, Mutiiri, originally based at New York University, but now at the University of California Irvine.”
During the late 70’s, his commitment to art and community led him to form communal theatre groups in villages, which showcased some of his most indicting plays. These works portrayed the political corruption of post-colonial life in Kenya and the people’s struggle to define an identity despite years of harsh political and social transitions. In 1977, Ngugi was arrested for his involvement with the communal theatres. While in prison, Ngugi reflected on the urgency in forming a truly African literature and at the same time wrote Devil on the Cross on prison- issued toilet paper. He subsequently would abandon English for his native Gikuyu for all his future novels. After being released from prison, Ngugi lost a university position and his family suffered from constant harassment. In 1982, Ngugi left Kenya and has been in exile ever since. Ngugi Wa Thiong’o is the recipient of numerous awards including the Paul Robeson Award for Artistic Excellence, Political Conscience and Integrity (1992); Gwendolyn Brooks Center Contributors Award for Significant Contribution to the Black Literary Arts (1994); Fonlon-Nichols Prize (1996); and the Distinguished Africanist Award by the New York African Studies Association (1996).


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,654 other followers

%d bloggers like this: