Archive for December 15th, 2006

BLACK BEAUTY

December 15, 2006

THE GRANDASSA MODELS TRAVEL EVERYWHERE AND WERE WARMLY RECEIVED WITH THE FIRST TASTE ORIGINAL BLACK NATURAL BEAUTY THAT HAD BEEN PROMOTED ON THIS LEVEL1

THE GRANDASSA MODELS TRAVEL EVERYWHERE AND WERE WARMLY RECEIVED WITH THE FIRST TASTE ORIGINAL BLACK NATURAL BEAUTY THAT HAD BEEN PROMOTED ON THIS LEVEL1

BLACK ROSE(ROSE NELMS) AND JIMMY ABU

BLACK ROSE(ROSE NELMS) AND JIMMY ABU

ABBEY LINCOLN,SINGER THEN(HAS AFRICAN NAME NOW).SHE IS MY FIRST BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLE MENTOR AND TAUGHT ME HOW TO GO A NATURAL ETHIOPIAN UPSWEEP NATURAL)

ABBEY LINCOLN,SINGER THEN(HAS AFRICAN NAME NOW).SHE IS MY FIRST BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLE MENTOR AND TAUGHT ME HOW TO GO A NATURAL ETHIOPIAN UPSWEEP NATURAL)

CARLOS COOKS REVIEWING AFRICAN LEGION

CARLOS COOKS REVIEWING AFRICAN LEGION

As a Black amerikkkan,I remember in my high school days in New York City,
in the ’60’s,when West Indian Black Nationalists organized a real BLACK
beauty contest and the Queen chosen was a very Black-skinned,full
African
featured,very hippy beauty with all the other contestants representing
all
the shades of Black Beauty and shape!

Thatis the answer to white standard of beauty contests! Black people
everywhere must reject this white standard and replace it with a BLACK
standard of beauty! Last year in Nigeria,where I have gone “Back to
Africa” these past 25 years, they had a real BLACK Beauty contest
too!They
had announced that they would have an African standard (no swim suit
competition also), and full-shaped Black Beauties entered and a Black
skinned,hippy full featured Black skinned beauty won! There must be
replacement of white standards with Black, rejecting this old “white
slave-mentality”!

Jan.11,2007
Just saw this on the net!These are the original Black Beauty Contest people I’m talking about that I viewed in the ’60’s.Abbey Lincoln is my mentor and styled my first real Afro hair style for me!

NATURALLY 2002 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF
“BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL”
A SALUTE ABBEY LINCOLN AND LATE GRANDASSA MODELS
Sunday, April 28th
The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard @ 135th Street in Harlem.

Tickets are available in advance only.
For information call, (212) 410-7892
or e-mail: ncanewyork@aol.com
The National Conference of Artists (NCA) and The African Jazz-Art Society & Studios (AJASS) will pay tribute to singer, songwriter actress, Abbey Lincoln at their 40th Anniversary production, “Naturally 2002”, the show that gave birth to the theme “Black is Beautiful” beginning in 1962.

The show subtitled “The Original African Coiffure and Fashion Extravaganza Designed to Restore Our Racial Pride & Standards” is credited with projecting Black pride in general and uplifting the image of Black women in particular with their productions that continued from 1962 thru 1979 before giving way to decade celebrations.

This fashion and cultural show was inspired by the “Miss Natural Standard of Beauty” contest conducted by Carlos A. Cooks and the African Nationalist Pioneer Movement held at the annual Marcus Garvey Day celebrations, where contestants were required to compete without the use of hair straightening or make-up.

The idea for the show began after the 1961 celebration where Elombe Brath, Kwame Brathwaite, and members of AJASS witnessed the event and decided to create the conditions for Black women to feel proud of their natural beauty.

AJASS decided to package a show and established the fact that “Black Is Beautiful”. AJASS, quoting from a 1927 article in the Amsterdam News describing why Garvey attracted so many people to his cause, is that “he taught that “Black is Beautiful.” The show featured the Grandassa Models, a group they created to show Black women (and the world) that our Black skin, kinky hair and full lips were a thing of beauty, not something to be ashamed of. The show also gave rise to the wearing of African traditional and African inspired fashions, a phenomenon that has exploded into an industry in our communities in many major cities, including a strip of Brooklyn’s Fulton Street that is called “Bogulan Brooklyn” after the mudcloth fabric from Mali in West Africa.

Abbey Lincoln, who was a charter supporter of the show, became both commentator and featured vocalist for the production that featured the original models, Clara Lewis, Helene White, Black Rose, Wanda Sims, Priscilla Bardonille, Beatrice Cranston, Mari Toussaint and Esther Davenport. Abbey also served as “ambassador”, for the “Naturally” show, charting new territory for the show while on her travels performing in various cities.

The new millinium edition of Grandassa Models, will be seen wearing fashions by some of today’s top wearable art and Africentric designers, Brenda Brunson-Bey creator of the Tribal Truths Collection, Adunni Oshupa Tabasi and her Alkebu-lan Designs, Khalil and Threads by Khalil, Nigeria’s Moshood and Jonathan Adewunmi’s Nigerian Fashions & Fabrics.

Spoken word artists Tehut-Nine whose latest CD, Mind Magician is one of the most positive and inspirational new releases on the market; Abiodun Oyewole and the Original Last Poets; Louis Reyes Rivera, and Poet Laureate of the African Liberation Struggle, George Edward Tait. Providing libation, words and music for the show will be Atiba Kwabena Wilson & Songhai Djeli. A Theatrical Anthology Recitation by Robinson Frank Adu, and the special tribute to Special Guest Abbey Lincoln Aminata Moseka will round out the show.

This fortieth anniversary show will also be dedicated to the memories of Grandassa models who have made their transition, Beatrice Cranston, Priscilla Bardonille, Wanda Sims, Jean Egyptia Gumbs and Pat Thomas and AJASS members David K. Ward and Kojo Carter, all who have gone on to meet their creator, as have the ANPM’s Carlos Cooks (whose teachings inspired the show); former Amsterdam News writer and publisher of Black History Magazine, Abiola Sinclair (who published a book on the era) and acting teacher Max Glanville (who trained AJASS Repertory Theatre Company members, Robinson Frank Adu, Leroy Satch Giles, Gus Williams, Ernest Baxter and the late David K. Ward).
Tickets are available in advance only. For information call, (212) 410-7892
or e-mail: ncanewyork@aol.com.

Najami in Adunni Jean, Wanda & Beatrice Julette

Abbey Lincoln

Dele, Nigeria

1963 Grandassas

Lauraine

Cooks crowning Clara

Ifeshola

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ATI(AND): SAW THIS NEW ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THIS MOVEMENT AT:

ncanenewyork.com
(from “The Black Arts Movement Revisited”

There were a number of great presentations, but absent from this “ revisiting” of the “Black Arts Movement” was the first nine years of activity that started in the Bronx in 1956 and quickly migrated to Harlem as it was influenced by the Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey as taught by Carlos A. Cooks and his African Nationalist Pioneer Movement (ANPM). The melding of Black political thought and the arts occurred during the Garvey years, but the contemporary movement that is widely thought of as the movement of the sixties, started in the summer of 1956, when seven young artists from the High School of Industrial Arts (SIA), now the School of Art & Design, Elombe Brath (Class of ’54), Kwame Brathwaite, Emilio Cruz, Andy Baron, and Frank Adu Robinson (Class of ’55) and Robert Gumbs and Bobby Diggs (Class of ’56) and several other young Bronxites, Al Young, Phillip Mungin, and the lone female, Shirley Anderson, all leaving their “doo woop” music past to graduate to more “progressive music”, before it was the “Boogie Down Bronx”, it was “The Be-Bop Bronx”). They began to embrace jazz and formed the Jazz-Art Society. Around about August 17, Marcus Garvey’s birthday, the Brathwaite’s started to draw close to the ANPM and the teachings of Garvey and African nationalism. (At this time in history, there was no other organization that had in its name “African Nationalist” or “African Nationalism” as its purpose. Elombe quickly moved to amend the name to African Jazz-Art Society, which met with opposition from some, but the militants prevailed.
Using their artistic and promotional talents, they began to utilize the teachings of the ANPM lectures at the ANPM headquarters, and the street speakers at the corner of 125th Street and 7th Avenue and translate it into a form that those who would pass the street speakers ladder without bothering to listen would more readily receive the same thoughts as it was repackaged and fed back to them in an artistic form. AJAS produced its first jazz concert on December 24, 1956 at Small’s Paradise, with Lou Donaldson and the Bill English Quartet and a group of young budding jazz artists, George Braith, Bobby Capers, Vinnie McEwen, Oliver Beener, Pete LaRoca, Ray Draper and others. During those days, when you had a dance or music event in Harlem, there would be a break and there would be a “floor show”, which usually was a “shake dancer” or stripper. Instead of following the “norm”, AJAS ventured to the north Bronx, to 2404 Barnes Avenue, where a young African dance group led by Tina Potter auditioned for them, and were quickly hired.
At that event, they had an art exhibition on the walls of Smalls, and one of the pieces was collected…not how we wanted. A Duke Ellington illustration by Elombe, created as an album cover design for his SIA graduating portfolio, just disappeared off the wall.
AJASS not only changed the model of club shows, but the graphic design of the advertising posters that announced the events. Prior to their artistic posters, events usually utilized block type, linotyped letterpress posters that left a lot to be desired. Designers, Elombe, Gumbs and then Milton Tuitt began to do layouts and designs for offset printing of the flyers and posters. They began politicizing the jazz artists, who were, although the great jazz stars of the day, were being underpaid and further disrespected in their accommodations and dressing room facilities, compared to the less capable and lesser known white musicians. AJAS used that formula until on August 17, 1961, at the Marcus Garvey Birthday Celebration, when during one of the featured events, “The Miss Natural Standard of Beauty Contest”, (a contest that was held every Garvey Day since 1942, one year after the founding of the ANPM, and two years after Garvey’s death), a young lady, named Clara Lewis – extremely Black and beautiful, won the title. The contest, in which the girls competed without make up and were required to washout any chemicals so that there hair was in its natural state, also asked the contestants questions on racial history, racial pride and tested how they thought about their people. The AJAS members had observed this contest year after year, and saw that by the time that the winner came to receive her $100 prize at the next Sunday night meeting, their hair was straightened again, since they didn’t feel that they could go to school or work without straightening it. Elombe decided that we would put together a fashion show that would promote the natural beauty of our women. AJAS approached fellow promoter, Jimmy Abu, who was a male model, drummer and top-notch trainer of models, and AJAS began to recruit young ladies to train as for the group. AJAS moved its meetings from the Brathwaite basement in the Bronx, to a space they rented next to the Apollo Theatre, on October 1, 1961, and amended their name to the African Jazz-Art Society & Studios, adding art production, photo studio and rehearsal space and became AJASS. They devised a show which they called “Naturally ’62: The Original African Coiffure and Fashion Extravaganza Designed to Restore Our Racial Pride and Standards ”, with the first show held at Harlem’s Purple Manor on January 28, 1962. The goal of the show was to prove to the world that “Black Is Beautiful.”
The first show starred Abbey Lincoln as guest singer and commentator for the show, and famed jazz drummer, Max Roach as Abbey’s accompanist on piano, Oluoju and Her Souls of the Earth African Dancers and Pucho and His Latin Soul Brothers band (who was the house band that offered us the space) and Jomo Logan providing some additional commentary on the African fashions.
While promoting the show, the comments were mixed. One “brother” told Elombe, “you mean you’re gonna put some nappy headed Black ‘bitches’ on stage to model? I’m gonna be right there in the first row laughing.”. Elombe just replied, just buy a ticket and come to the show.
The day of the show, the house was packed and people that couldn’t get in lingered outside. The show featured Clara Lewis, Black Rose, Nomsa White (now Brath), Priscilla Bardonille, Wanda Sims, Marie Toussaint, Esther Davenport and Beatrice Cranston, and male models Jimmy Abu, and Frank Adu, and actor Gus Williams opening the show with the models as he recited Marcus Garvey’s poem “Black Woman”. The show drew a standing applause and when the show was over and we looked outside, the crowd that couldn’t get in, was still there. We cleaned up the space and gave a second show that same day. The show was such a success, it inspired all of us and we planned for a follow-up show at a larger venue.
By now the word had gotten out, and people in the community were taking sides, pro and con. Some of the Harlem beauticians were up in arms, saying that the trend, if allowed to take hold, would take away a lot of their business. We booked a ballroom on 125th Street called the Sunset Terrace Ballroom for a follow-up show.. If memory serves me right, this would be the first event at the newly renovated space.
Ticket sales were brisk for the new date, April 1, 1962, and we were sold out before the show. The morning of the show, we got a call from Jimmy Abu who was in Harlem and he told us that “the ballroom is on fire” and the firemen were chopping the place up. We rushed to the scene on this rainy “April Fools Day” and sure enough, the place was destroyed.. Not to be outdone, I went to, first the Hotel Theresa, at 125th & 7th, which had a top floor ballroom and inquired, but to no avail, the room was booked. I went to the Celebrity Club, further east on 125th, which was also booked. I rushed up to Small’s Paradise, the venue of our first show eight years earlier, and asked what was going on in the ballroom that evening. They said “nothing” and I said I wanted to book it. They asked, “for when?” I said “for today!”. They freaked out. I, being the treasurer, had the receipts for the sold out event with me, and paid them on the spot. We stationed someone outside the burned out ballroom and someone on the phones at our studios as the phone kept ringing with people thinking the fire story was an “April Fool” joke.
As people came in cabs to the Sunset Terrace we told them, “don’t turn off the meter, go to Smalls. Miraculously we started the event only about one-half hour late, as the crowd came to the new location, in the pouring rain and our “fired up” crew gave a show even greater than we had expected. By now we had added some satirical skits, “Fantasy in a Barber Shop” being one of them, where actor David K Ward comes into the barber shop to get his hair “conked”, i.e. straightened. This pantomimed skit was hilarious and thus we successfully combined, art, music, fashions, dance, acting, poetry and comedy into political “edutainment”. We named the models, The Grandassa Models, the name Grandassa taken from Grandassaland, one of the many names for Africa before the time of the great erosion, when the continents of Africa and Asia split. This was 1962 and a movement encompassing all of the arts had begun. AJASS and the Grandassa Models, and the AJASS Repertory Theatre Company, (later to be renamed the AJASS Griots) formed a production that began to play various New York venues before taking to the road. The Sunset Terrace was never rebuilt and nothing took place on that site until last year when a new structure was erected.
We played the Fez Ballroom in Brooklyn, the “It’s Time” Concert with Max Roach Orchestra and Chorus with Abbey Lincoln, and Coldridge Perkinson conducting in a benefit show trying to save a Black private hospital, the Mount Morris Park Hospital, and began looking for larger ballrooms. The cry “Black Is Beautiful” began to be heard throughout the city.
During their travels, Max and Abbey contacted progressive brothers and sisters in Detroit and Chicago and helped us book the show in those cities. We arranged a show in New York at The Audubon Ballroom for January 17, and shows in Chicago at Roberts Show Club on February 22 and one at Mr Kelly’s in Detroit on February 23, 1963, and took the show on the road. In Detroit, LeRoy Mitchell and Omar Shabazz, two art students at Wayne State University, were absolutely fabulous. They decorated Mr. Kelly’s with replicas of the Grandassa Model logo, a silhouetted black head in profile, with a Nefertitti-like hairstyle. Both Mitchell and Shabazz went to live and teach in Ghana.
In Chicago, the beauticians were far more progressive than those in Harlem. I went to Chicago after our January Show, to promote the upcoming event. Beauticians invited me to come to a beauty school and show the slides of the shows and the hairstyles, and they began to add our natural hairstyles to the hairstyles that they offered. I received such a welcome, and help from all areas of the Black community. I even went into bars and was allowed to set up my slide projector and show images of the shows and the models, fashions and hairstyles. I would never had the opportunity to do that even in our home base in Harlem.
I had met a photographer in New York at the Randall’s Island Jazz Festival in 1959 or 60, when we both were photographing the festival. He was from Chicago. His name was Funde Abernathy. I remembered that I had his card, and dug it out before going to Chicago. When I contacted him, he informed me that his father had a cab company, the Abernathy Cabs, and they put cars at my disposal, often at no charge for the time that I was out there. Funde later came to Harlem in about 1965, when Amiri Baraka came to Harlem and formed the Black Arts Repertory Theatre. With him came several white women from the village. They were quickly run out of Harlem by the sisters.
Needless to say, both shows were successes, but sparked more controversy. That was the first of our road shows, that later took us to Lincoln University where a Black student group which included by Sam Anderson and Gloria Dulan-Wilson; Cornell University where Brother Makaza (a.k.a. Herbert Callendar) sponsored the show; North Babaylon for the National Council of Negro Women, among other places, spreading the nationalism and art that traversed the globe.
In 1963, Herbert Manangatheri, an editor of eleven African newspapers and African Parade Magazine, publications that were printed and distributed in the still colonized countries then known as Northern and Southern Rhodesia (Zambia and Zimbabwe) and some neighboring territories, visited our 125th Street studios with Max and Abbey. He interviewed us and I gave him photos of the Grandassa Models and some of our brochures and press material. Soon after he ran three successive cover stories in African Parade Magazine about the show, the first and third of the issues featured Grandassa Models on the cover, and the issue in-between them featured Abbey Lincoln on the inside cover. We read an article describing how they copied the show in Lusaka (Zambia), and a campaign began to replace the images that were coming from what they saw from Black publications in the US, that featured Black women wearing blonde and red wigs, “candy” lipstick and “hot pants”, with a natural image like the Grandassa Models and our African fashions. In the magazine they reported that bands of Black youth were snatching wigs off of the heads of the African girls that were adopting what we called the “Congo Blondes and Zulu Redhead” styles, and wiping their lipstick off with sandpaper.
In 1963, AJASS formed The Black Standard Publishing Company, which created two publications, The Naturally ’63 Portfolio and the now collector’s item, “Color Us Cullud: The Official American Negro Coloring Book”, written and illustrated by Elombe Brath. The book targeted the weaknesses of the civil “rites” movement and their non-violent, turn the other cheek, integrationist policies. The last thing that Malcolm X said to me directly was “tell your brother he’s a genius”, referring to Elombe’s analysis in the book, of the ban that Malcolm was under and the source of the problem.
Abby performed with us until the fall of ’64 when she left to go to Hollywood to star with Ivan Dixon in “Nothing But A Man” one of the most important Black films of all time. By then, with her and Max’ help, the production had been so popular we were able to dare book the largest ballroom in Harlem, Rockland Palace which held 4,200 people. We set is our shows banquet style, to seat 1,500 or so people and used the rest of the floor for our show. We packed it each time through Naturally ’78, performing usually two large shows in New York each year, while AJASS produced other theatre productions, “Caste Life Revue” and “A Portrait of Patrice Lumumba”. The “Naturally” shows drew many of the top artists. Even Nina Simone and Miriam Makeba came to one of the events together.
This year, AJASS is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The Naturally shows alone lasted 16 years, and AJASS nine years before and the Black Arts Repertory Theatre was formed in Harlem, and eleven years after they left. They, Baraka, Larry Neal, Ed Bullins, et.al, did some great work in the short time that they were in Harlem, but an honest review of the record should reflect the true history of the Black Arts Movement from AJASS, to The 20th Century Art Creators (1964), which became the Weusi Nuymba ya Sanaa (Swahili for “House of Black Art”), 1965 and now celebrating their 41st anniversary – all before the arrival of Baraka’s Black Arts Repertory Company. They started the outdoor art shows in Harlem. Likewise the Benin Gallery and Grinnell Gallery get no mention in these scholarly meetings which compromises their accuracy.
At the colloquium and in most of the writings on the “Black Arts Movement”, “Black Is Beautiful” is mentioned in passing, but no one mentions its importance or how it started or when it was born. We can assure you that it was not like Topsy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. When she was asked when she was born, she answered, “I wasn’t born…I just grew up”
Article & photos © by Kwame Brathwaite

Site designed & Maintained by CeeLee Productions

IBALOPO OBINRIN SOBINRIN NI ORILE EDE NAIJIRIA IYALENU EETIRI!

December 15, 2006

— Lati Tiwantiwa@yahoogroups.co.uk, “Iyaafin Yeye Akilimali Funua
Olade” so:

IBALOPO OBINRIN SOBINRIN NI ORILE EDE NAIJIRIA IYALENU EETIRI
Lati Owo Iyaafin Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
Akoko iru e lati The Sun Newspaper Thursday Nov. 27 2003 Pg 39

Ni ti temi mo ni igbagbo wipe ojise olorun chris okotie ni o to
gbangba sun loye ni ode oni (mmo fe kio di mimo wipe emi kii se omo
ijo re, ile isisn miran ni mo nlo) kin ni obi oro yii? Emi alawo
dudu
tii se omo bibi orile ede Amerika tio yan orile ede Naijiria laayo
bi
ilu abinibi re lati bii odun meedogbon. Nitori ohun nikan ni ogun
nagbongbo ojise olorun tio tako atankale asakasa ibalopo laarin
okunrin si okunrin ni orile ede yii. Ojise olorun yii, ni o se ikilo
fun wa ni odun 2002 wipe “ibalopo okunrin sokunrin tin gbogbo
kaakiri’ (Ninu iwe iroyin The new Treasure Magazin ni ojo
kokanlelogun titide ikerindinlogun (odun Alumoni) tio jade ninu osu
agemo ni oju ewe kewa de ikeedogun. Bakanna ninu iwe re The Last
Outcast Ojise Olorun yii kan na ni won so fun mi pe ni igb ekeji
tio
se tako ibalopo laarin obinrin sobinrin gegebi ohun ija esu adun
koko
moni.

Pupo omo orile ede yii ti mo ba fi oro jomitoro oro lori iwa ibaje
ko
tile ni igbagbo wipe asakasa yii nbe lawujo wa latari wipe awon
alawo
funfun nikan ni ibaje yi gbewo bi ewu. Sugbon iwakiwa yii n se jamba
gbemigbemi fun opolopo idi le le yi ti igbehin re silee so gbogbo
awon orile ede wa si oko iparun.
“Orisirisi awon iwe iroyin wa gbogbo ni onse afihan asa buburu yii
bere latori iwe iroyin Fame okiki ojo ojo kerin osu owada (Sept.) ni
odun 2002 pelu akole “Lesbian in Lagos State house (Ibalopo Obinrin
sobinrin ni ilu eko.
Bakanna iwe ikroyi City People (olaju Eniyan) ti ojo keedogun osun
sawere (October) ni odun 2003 pelu akole “Abuja Lesbians Forum Club”
(Alabanilopo laarin obinrin sobinrinAbuja da egbe sile) Eyi si je
ategun fun awon olori ile iwe giga lobinrin lati maafa awon akeko
won
obinrin sinu egbe yii. Iroyin yii jeyo ninu iwe iroyin Sunday
Vanguard to ojo keedogun osu okudu ti odun2003 ni oju ewe
kejilelogun
titi de ikefalelogun (June 15, 2003 P22-23) lati mu iwa ibaje yi wa
sopin ni akoko gbogbo.
Obinrin orile ede yii gbodo doju ija ko iwakiwa yii pelu orisirisi
ona bii adura gbigba gbogbo idile, Ile Iwe papa julo ile iwe
onibagbe
akeko, ipade oluko ati awon obi ati awon omo ile ijosin gbogbo
musulumi ati awon omolehin jesu gbogbo ni Atari wipe iwakiwa yii le
bi orile ede yi wo patapata nipase awon omo wa.

Gbogbo iya gbodo mu eko nipa ibalopo ni okunkundun fun awon omo
won “o gbodo je mimo fun awon omo wa wipe mimo ni eya abe won eyi ti
enikeni ko gbodo se oun kohun pelu je.
Kinidi? Idi eyi ni wipe awon ogo were ode oni awon ore, oga, ati
alabagbe won fa si inu iwakiwa yii (Fun apere iwe iroyin city people
ojo keedogun osu okudu ti odun 2003 ni oju ewe kerinla) se afihan bi
omo odun mefa se di ara awon oniwakuwa yi pelu akole “How I became a
homosexual” (Bi mo se di alabalopookunrin sokunrin)
Gbogbo onise iroyin ni orile ede yii gbogbo gbaradi lati maa tu
asiri
opolopo awon iwakiwa yii awon naa si gbodo gbogun ti iwa ibaje yii
lati lodi si wiwa enikeji fun awon oniwakiwa yii nipase iwe iroyin.

Idun koko moni iwakiwa yii tile poju to aarun Ibalopo kogboogun
AIDS
Ni ayaba omo odun metadinlogbon kan ti ao so siwaju wipe iwakiwa yii
nda abo bo oun lati ma ko arun kogboogun nii AIDS E je kia kilo fun
wipe gbogbo ibalopo laarin eleya ara kanna nipase atenubonu ma nse
okunfa arun kogbogun AIDS ni kiakia ati pelu irorun fun ore at ebi
ti
e ba ka iwakiwa yii mo lowo, e gbodo gba adura fun gidigidi lehin
opolopo ibawi, kie si mu iru eni bee lo si iwaju awon eni olorun fun
itusile ninu igbekun iwakiwa yi.
Awon oyinbo alawo funfun tile ma npa iro funfun wipe abimo ni iwa yi
je fun awon eniyan kan. Ogoro eniyan n wu iwakiwa yii ni ipase olaju
ati idaamu okan tin se adina gboku fun igbogun ti iwakiwa yii.
Iwakiwa le di ohun igbagbe pelu adura ati ohun ija lati inu emi. Eyi
ni ona kan soso gege bi ose ti awon ese nlanla tio ku. Ibalopo
Okunrin si Okunrin yii je nkan to lewu pupo gege bi “se”
Gbogbo iwe ijoba ati adani gbodo ko awon akeko won lati lodi si iwa
yi. Won gbodo se ofintoto lati mu iwakiwa yii laarin ile-iwe ati
ibugbe awon akeeko wa gbogbo.

Ni ipari, mo gbagbo wipe isoro ti n koju ebi gbogbo ni orile ede yii
ni ibalopo Obinrin sobinrin. Emu wa si Ero oko tio fe iyawo ti nwu
iwakiwa yii pelu ore re laihan si oko re (ti o n kigbe wipe kosi
okunrin ti loe temi lorun) Iru aya wo ni eyi je, Iru iyawo wo ni yio
ya? Nje koni mo ko awon omo re ni iwakiwa yi pelu apeere eyi ti asa
ati ise ile alawodudu ko fowo si.

Olorun nife orile ede yii. Olorun nikan ati adura gbogbo eniyan
orile
ede yii ati atunbi awon tio ti se agbako iwakiwa yii nikan lole gba
orile ede yi lowo idaamu apanirun igbehin yi, mo joko nile itawe
omolehin Jesun kan ni Ibadan tio nta nkan mimu ibile kan ti a pe ni
zobo bakanna ni bi mo ti gbadun oun mimu yi ni mo sa deede ri iwe
iroyin awon kirisitieni (Family Encounters) kan pelu akole
yii ” Ibalopo Obinrinsobinrin ni ibi gbogo wan”
“Lakiriboto go de”. Obi gbodo Ji giri.
Mon sokun bi mo ti nka Ibalopo aileto yii pelu eto ni ile iwe
alakobere ati giga pelu iranlowo awon oluko koda ni igbamiran pelu
olori ile iwe ni pa mimu awon omo kekere wo egbe buburu yii
lorekore.
Awa iya orile ede yii gbodo ji giri si ija ati wa egbo dekun fun
iwakiwa yii, eyi ti o mo ju ninu awon ogun mimo lati da aabo to peye
bo awon ogo were wa.

BLACKTOWN.NET-ANGRY BLACK MEN AT SISTERS WHITE ACTIONS!

December 15, 2006

THE CRUCIFIXION OF THE BLACKMAN IS THE ONLY STORY THAT NEEDS TO BE PREACHED IN THE BLACK CHURCH ON SUNDAYS; AND NOT THAT 2000 YEAR OLD MYTH ABOUT A WHITE JESUS!!!

AMEN!!!

THIS IS A REAL CRUCIFIXION…
First the white lynch mob would advertise that there will be a lynching of a blackman to attract a large crowd.

Then the black man will be put on display to arouse excitement, suspense and awe.

As the crowd grows large they start screaming for his blood.

Then the crowd may be allowed to walk past the blackman while they spit on him and throw rocks and bricks at him.

Then he is slowly cut up, beginning with his ears and fingers. These will be sold later and passed around as souvenirs or trophies.

Then his penis is cut off and put in a jar for everyone to look at.

Finally, the black man will be either hung high in a tree for all to see, or he will be set on fire; and thereby ending his torture and agony!!!

In the late 1800s, in small western towns, white criminals were usually lynched as a form of punishment and criminal justice; but during the 1920s, public lynchings of innocent blackmen were considered entertainment and were the modern equivalent of the popular Jerry Springer show; or a socalled radio shock jock!!! They happened every weekend and is where the word PICNIC comes from:

PICK-A-NIGGA

Apparently, celebrity comedian Bill Cosby has totally forgotten how black people have suffered for many generations at the direct hands of white racists like the ones in the picture above.

Mr. Cosby seems to think that money and integration will instantly solve hundreds of years of it being illegal for blacks to learn how to read write; or even to speak decent English.

During slavery and segregation, blacks were not even allowed to act like they had an education and had to “play dumb” in order to avoid insulting whites. Blacks could not look whites in the face nor even walk on the side walk; but had to walk around whites.

The classic movie Night John does an excellent job of showing this.

So, it is no coincidence that Bill Cosby

!

NO FEMINIST WOMEN ALLOWED!!!

BLACK MEN, ARE YOU EMBARRASSED AND IN DENIAL OF WHAT SLAVERY HAS TURNED YOU INTO???

ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE PRICE OF FREEDOM???

STOP LOOKING AT “VIRTUAL” WOMEN (PORN) ON YOUR COMPUTER AND LEARN TO CLAIM, TAME AND TRAIN THE BLACK WOMAN TO BE YOUR QUEEN ONCE AGAIN.

IT’S 2005; THE MILLION MAN MARCH WAS TEN YEARS AGO, DAMMIT!!!

NEXT PAGE

…EXPOSING THE FEMINIST CONSPIRACY TO TRICK BLACKWOMEN INTO HATING BLACKMEN!!!

That white baby will grow up and “own” that blackwoman the same way someone might own a set of tools, or clothing. Blacks were literal property; from birth to death!!!
Black women have totally forgotten what slavery was all about.
Black women have forgotten how she was forced to forsake nurturing and nourishing her own black children, and instead give white children her own breast milk!!!!

This type of slave was called a mammy. And it has often been said that the reason talk show host Oprah Winfrey is so successful is because she used the old fashion formula of being a mammy for whites.

When blackwomen were recruited into the white Feminist movement in the 1970s, she was once again expected to be the doting, nurturing mammy who would accomadate whites every need and forsake serving the needs of her own men and boys!!!

WHEN WILL BLACKWOMEN SERVE HER OWN RACE??

WHEN WILL BLACKWOMEN WAKE UP???

…WHEN WE BLACKMEN WAKE HER UP!!!!!

AMEN!!!

Black women have SOLD OUT…

Blackmen invented the afro,
but black women wanted to look white!!!

YES, BLACKWOMEN HAVE
SOLD OUT HER RACE!!!

THE EVIDENCE OF BLACKWOMEN’S TREASON TO BLACKMEN AND THE BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL MOVEMENT IS AS OBVIOUS AS THE COLOR OF HER FAKE BLONDE HAIR!!!

BLACKWOMEN SPEND BILLIONS TRYING TO LOOK LIKE A WHITE WOMAN!! YET, IT WAS BLACKMEN WHO INVENTED THE AFRO FOR HER TO WEAR!!!

BLACKWOMEN ARE THE ONES RESPONSIBLE FOR KEEPING BLACK SELF HATRED ALIVE!!!

ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT IT WAS BLACKWOMEN WHO RAN OFF WITH WHITE FEMINIST WOMEN; NOT BLACKMEN!!!

AMEN!!!

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Hair weaves like Europeans!!!
Fake nails done by Koreans…

No one can deny that blackwomen spend lots of money and lots of time on their hair. It is becoming very obvious that blackwomen spend their money on the wrong things.

The 1970s Women’s Liberation movement did indeed give blackwomen the freedom they asked for, but now she is lost like the little girl in the Wizard of Oz.

Blackwomen have failed to realize: FREEDOM AIN’T FREE!!!

Blacktown.net is not afraid of exposing the truth of how black Feminists have made a total mockery out of the blackman and the black race in general. And the fact that blackmen won’t seek to put the blackwoman back in her proper place is proof of how much of a chump the Feminists have turned him into. And the jails are overcrowded with blackmen who are chumps and sissies; LITERALLY!!! AND IT IS ALL BLACKWOMEN’S FAULT!!! TOTALLY!!!

Instead of making the racist Koreans rich, black women should be building a black nation for her sons to inherit!!!

NEXT PAGE…

Hair weaves like Europeans,
fake nails done by Koreans…

Blackwomen have fallen…

Blackwomen have fallen from her former glory and greatness as a powerful Queen!!!
Once upon a time, black women were Queens and knew exactly how to rule a nation. She knew how to govern and plot strategy for her people.

But now we see that blackwomen have done nothing to attain her former glory as a Queen; nor does she want the blackman (her own sons) to attain his former glory as a mighty King and fearless warrior. She contradicts his every move!!! Now, many blackmen don’t know a good black woman when he sees one. Thus, the cycle of heartbreat and social problems continues!!!

Although there are a few good blackwomen who are ready to serve a good black King, the white lesbian Feminists have taught blackwomen that blackmen are her competition, and to contradict his every edict and commandment; EVEN HER OWN SONS!!!

EVE DID ADAM THE SAME WAY;
THEN CAIN KILLED ABLE!!!!

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During the early 1970s, afro wearing actress Pam Grier was the epitome and the embodiment of the new black beauty standard that black men created during the 1960’s Black Power and Black Is Beautiful era. Pam Grier was like a black version of Marilyn Monroe.
The beautiful Pam Grier symbolized that black women were totally united with blackmen in the stuggle and “revolution” for dignity and black pride. And the fact that hollywood made movies with the afro wearing Pam Grier demonstrated how effective the growing crusade of Black Power was!!!! (Although the movies were considered socalled, black explotation!!!)

The song, Say It Loud I’m Black And I’m Proud by James Brown also typifies and summarizes the mood and attitude of black pride during the 1960s era.

But inspite of all of this glorious achievement, black women deserted this growing movement and joined onto the white Feminist Revolution!!! Then, all of sudden, blackwomen began to preach and practice “gender pride” instead of “race pride”. And no one can deny this historical fact.

THUS, BLACKWOMEN WERE THE FIRST TO RUN OFF WITH WITH WHITE WOMEN; NOT BLACK MEN!!! AMEN!!!

IT WAS AN ACT OF ABSOLUTE TREASON FOR BLACKWOMEN TO ACCEPT GENDER PRIDE OVER RACE PRIDE!!!

AND HER TREASON HAS CONTINUED INTO THE YEAR 2000 AND BEYOND…

BLACK WOMEN OWE BLACKMEN AN APOLOGY!!!

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“Back to Africa “:physically,spiritually,culturally, and morally!
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