Archive for August, 2009

MARLON JACKSON’S VISIT MAKES CONNECTION OF THE JACKSON’S TO THEIR ROOTS IN NIGERIA!-FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPERS AND THEBJOSHUAFANCLUB.FILES.WORPRESS.COM-with UPDATES ON THE JACKSON’S PLANS FOR NIGERIA

August 27, 2009

fromngrguardiannews.com

Slave Route project reunites Jacksons with their Badagry root
By Anote Ajeluorou

ACTIVITIES will commence tomorrow, Saturday, August 22, 2009 for the celebration of the 10th anniversary of the ‘International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition’ in the ancient slave port of Badagry. This year’s celebration will assume a distinct dimension as the famous Jackson’s family has identified the ancient town, famous for slave trade in the 18th century as their place of ancestral origin.

To this end also, an oracular pronouncement has identified Alaga, a sub-tribe from Egun in Badagry as the home of the Jackson’s from the Ajanemusan family (shortened ‘Ajanesan’). This was revealed in a world press conference, which the organising committee for the Badagry Folk Festival addressed on Tuesday at the Badagry Local Government Council Secretariat, Ajara, Badagry.

As a result, the late music superstar is now called Michael Jackson Ajanesan in Badagry. According to a traditional priest from the Egun community, the fame that Michael Ajanesan attained in the US had long been foretold by the deity to which the family belonged as Michael Ajanesan was a deity himself. He claimed that it was only a god that could perform the feat that Jackson Ajanesan attained in life, and that he deserved to be given proper traditional rite of passage to join his ancestors peacefully.

And to properly accord their late superstar kinsman the burial rites befitting of a god, his yoko or spirit will be ritually invoked in the form of sand particles taken from his graveside and brought to a shrine or yoho for ritual internment. It is from this yoho that the necessary rites of passage will be performed to lay his spirit to rest among his ancestors from which the Ajanesans, taken into slavery these several years will again be reconnected to their kin.

Giving an account of how this bit of history was reconstructed to trace the Jacksons family back to Badagry, Special Adviser on Tourism at the Badagry Council, Hon. Prince Yomi Ajose gave account of his meeting with Marlon Jackson in Michigan, US, back in 1996. He stated that then it appeared as a haunch to the superstar’s elder brother, who said he strongly felt that his ancestry was from Badagry. He was to match his belief with action when he made a dramatic visit to Badagry in 2008.

At that visit, Jackson undertook to visit the infamous slave trade route. On getting to the Point of No Return, Prince Ajose recalled, “Marlon became hysterical beyond words. And at the spot where slaves were buried alive, where no grass or tree has grown ever since, Marlon completely broke down”. These manifestations became the first intimations that the Jacksons had their roots from Badagry. But beyond a possible DNA test to finally confirm this assertion, Prince Ajose also stated that with the consent of His Majesty De-Wheno Aholu Menu-Toyi, the Akran of Badagry, the oracle was consulted to resolve the Jacksons ancestral link.

It did; hence the Ajanemusan connection to Alaga at Egun.

The theme for this year’s celebration is ‘Family Reunion’. For the people of Badagry, this year’s remembrance day is significant as it will reunite them with their long lost kinsmen, particularly Michael Jackson Ajanesan, whom Prince Ajose said had personally pledged to visit Badagry after the proposed London show, which did not materialise before he passed away in a heart-attack that is still shrouded in suspicious circumstances.

Now instead of receiving Michael Ajanesan in person to perhaps give further historical significance to the ancient sleepy town, it is only his yoko that will be received. But to Badagry people, such is life. Whether in death or alive, they are treating the event with so much emotional attachment, particularly the reunification with a part of the Diaspora.

The Badagry people are also thrilled that at last the Lagos State Government has finally recognised the historical and tourism significance of the town and was deploying resources to developing them. The long neglected ‘Slave Route’ will now receive attention and plans are underway towards developing it into an international resort and tourism centre. Work has started at the Marina Beach line. Lekki Beach Resort Limited, a sports and recreation developer has started work to transform it into a world class golf course.

The Jackson Ajanesan family is not left out either in this quest to turn international attention to this otherwise sleepy town with a lot of history behind it. With their Motherland Group Inc, USA, the Jackson Ajanesan family, according to Prince Ajose and Sunday Balogun, who represented the Badagry Local Council chairman, Hon. Husitode Moses Dosu, are partnering with the Lagos State Government to build the Badagry Historical Resort that will also include the Michael Ajanesan Museum, where memorabilia from the late superstar will be kept.

The Badagry Folk Festival will add colour to the commemorative event that is a collaborative work of Badagry Local Government, African Renaissance Foundation and Ijinla Tours. The Badagry Folk Festival will include activities such as Zangbeto festival in Ajido, Vothun festival in Ajara, Water Sports in Gbaji and Royal Carnival procession in Badagry will mark highlights of the celebration.

However, the traditional funeral rites for the late Michael Ajanesan will start on Saturday 22, 2009 starting from 6am. A candle light procession will commence at 9pm of the same day in memory of the slaves, who were forcibly taken away from their homelands to unknown destinations. The following day Sunday 23, a drama presentation Wailing from Badagry will be performed at the Badagry Town Hall from 3pm to end with a lecture on slave trade. The drama is the initiative of African Renaissance Foundation. The celebration will finally climax on Saturday 29, 2009 at the Badagry Grammar School playground with a cultural exhibition, musical performance and book presentation.

A statement from the council chairman read, “This year’s celebration christened ‘Family Reunuion’ is the 10th celebration since 1999 of this programme and it is dedicated to the repose of the spirit and soul of one of Africa’s legends Michael Joseph Jackson (Ajanesan), whose ancestors have their roots in Badagry and are spiritually attached to us. A mega tourist resort known as the Badagry Historical Resort will be constructed in Badagry by members of the Jackson’s family and some prominent African Americans. We are once again joining countries of the world in celebrating the UNESCO declared International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition (every August 23) with a series of activities including the Badagry Folk Festival”.

Prince Ajose lamented the long awaited development of the Slave Route in Badagry into a world heritage site. He stressed that while those in other parts of West African coastlines such as Ghana and Senegal had been developed and were contributing meaningfully to the economies of those countries, the one in Badagry, perhaps the most famous, was yet to enjoy similar status. The result being that the town is as impoverished as was possibly during the slave era. He maintained that the late realisation of the potentials of the Badagry Slave Route, and consequent action being taken to redress it were due to the nation’s reliance on oil as the sole foreign exchange earner for the country. He expressed happiness at the late attention the ancient town was enjoying from the international arena, saying that though long overdue, it would finally put Badagry at her rightful historical place.

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MARLON IS TOP LEFT

MARLON IS TOP LEFT

JULY 28,2009   Marlon Jackson In Nigeria, Visits TB Joshua

JULY 28,2009 Marlon Jackson In Nigeria, Visits TB Joshua

MARLON JACKSON 2ND TIME IN NIGERIA

MARLON JACKSON 2ND TIME IN NIGERIA

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FROM mjjnews.worpress.com
July 24, 2009
Marlon Jackson is in Nigeria (talks about Michael)
Filed under: Uncategorized — bhullarg24 @ 5:44 pm

Michael Jackson’s older brother Marlon was in Lagos, Nigeria, on Wednesday, July 22 and had an interactive session with journalists at the press centre of the International Airport. He was received by former Performing Musicians Association of Nigeria (PMAN) presidents, Tee Mac Omatshola and Bolaji Rosiji.
The event began with a short musical performance by Debina Abraham, a Michael Jackson impersonator and up-and-coming artiste who performed a song he had specially composed for the late pop icon.
Jackson, who was visibly still mourning, dressed in a yellow track suit and black shades, briefly expressed gratitude for the kind words and condolences shown his family. While speaking on the Badagry Historical Project, which he was working on, he revealed that his late brother had a special interest in it.
“Michael was interested in the Badagry project because he had never been to Nigeria and looked forward to the completion of the project because he wanted to come and see things for himself”.
He also added that it was imperative that the historical artefacts such as those in Badagry be preserved, so that the generation yet unborn will get an opportunity to appreciate the sufferings of our forefathers who were part of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.
The Niger-Delta issue also came to the fore at the event and Jackson said he looked forward to a peaceful resolution of the crisis and was willing to meet with the Nigerian government and representatives of the Niger Delta militants, in order to reach an amicable understanding between both parties.
Tee Mac also intimated journalists of plans to stage a major charity concert which will be held on Michael Jackson’s birthday, August 29.
“It is going to be one of a kind African affair; a gathering of major African and Nigerian artists. It is basically to celebrate the life and achievements of one of the world’s greatest entertainers. Proceeds form the event will be channelled to major charities around the world as advised by Marlon.”
Tee Mac also added that the celebration will be an annual event.
When asked if his late brother had converted to Islam before his death during the Q&A session, Marlon said he wasn’t aware of that as all he knew was that his brother was a Christian until he died. He also hinted that the Jackson 5 had considered touring together once more before Michael’s untimely death. He said that what was primary to the Jackson family was to provide a secure future for his late brother’s children.
On circumstances surrounding Michael’s death, he said the family was not going to comment on that since the case was still being investigated.

The lingering PMAN crisis seems to be far from over as not only was the body absent at the event but all attempts by this reporter to get either Bolaji Rosiji or Tee Mac’s comment on why the body was not present at the gathering proved abortive.
Rosiji however said, “these are the kind of things PMAN should be doing but they are not here. When I was the PMAN president I used to organized a legends night, where we celebrated some of our late music icons like sunny okosuns and Oliver de Coque.”
Marlon left after about 20 minutes saying he had another appointment to catch up with. However Tee Mac hinted that Marlon will brief the press one more time before he leaves Nigeria.

http://www.234next.com/csp/cms/sites/Next/Home/5438456-146/story.csp

“As you know my family is still mourning and hurting over the death of my brother and it is something that I will learn to live with. I want to tell a little story. I was here in May, 2009 and went back to the United States of America (USA) on May 14 and that same day, my family had a function for my mother and father and the entire family, including Michael Jackson, was there. That was the last time I saw my brother alive,” Marlon said.
Marlon added that Michael had promised him that he would come to Nigeria to see the project he is undertaking in Badagry.

His words: “He knew I had just come back from Nigeria and he asked what I went to do in Nigeria because he had never visited Nigeria and I told him about the historical Badagry project that we are doing in Nigeria and he felt the same way I felt; he felt that the project must be done because it is imperative that we understand what our forefathers and fore mothers went through.
“He looked forward to the finishing of the project because he wanted to come and see it and I assured him that we would get the project done. The only thing is that when we do finish this project he will not be there physically, but he will be there in spirit.”
Marlon also revealed that his organistaion, Study Peace Foundation, has resolved to wade into the Niger Delta crisis and negotiate peace between the militants and the Federal Government
According to him, the group, and managers of the Study Peace Foundation would work towards reaching a peaceful resolution on the Niger Delta crisis.

http://allafrica.com/stories/200907230149.html

Another sibling of Michael Jackson has come forward to speak about the singer’s sudden death. Marlon Jackson recently told Jet magazine that he believes his brother is finally resting in peace. He admits it has been extremely tough to accept Michael’s passing, but credits prayer and his strong faith for helping him to understand it.
“That’s where I find my comfort because I really do feel that he’s at peace now,” said Marlon. “I feel in my heart that the Lord had to call Michael to come home because he had finished what he wanted him to do on planet Earth.”
He said the entire Jackson family is “still in a state of shock” because “none of us saw this coming.” But they are working though the pain to accept the loss of Michael.

http://www.eurweb.com/story/eur54901.cfm

OBAMA’S BLACK KENYAN STEP-GRANDMOTHER GETS SOLAR LIGHT IN HER VILLAGE DUE TO THE OBAMA EFFECT!

August 26, 2009
US President Barack Obama's step-grandmother Sarah flicks on the lights on August 19, 2009 after Greenpeace installed a solar power system at her home in Kogelo Village.  The environmentalist group is hosting a workshop on renewable energy in the country drawing youth from Sarah's Kogelo village in western Kenya and the country's largest slum in Nairobi, Kibera.

US President Barack Obama's step-grandmother Sarah flicks on the lights on August 19, 2009 after Greenpeace installed a solar power system at her home in Kogelo Village. The environmentalist group is hosting a workshop on renewable energy in the country drawing youth from Sarah's Kogelo village in western Kenya and the country's largest slum in Nairobi, Kibera.

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-A FASHION DESIGNER, MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN-SHE GOT HER BLACK MAN AND YOU CAN TOO!

August 22, 2009

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM HAITI. MARIE IS A POPULAR FASHION DESIGNER,MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM HAITI. MARIE IS A POPULAR FASHION DESIGNER,MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY GETS HER MAN A BLACK BEAUTY HIMSELF WYCLEF JEAN ! YOU TOO WILL GET A WONDERFUL BLACK MAN TO MARRIED WHO WILL LOVE YOUR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY GETS HER MAN A BLACK BEAUTY HIMSELF WYCLEF JEAN ! YOU TOO WILL GET A WONDERFUL BLACK MAN TO MARRIED WHO WILL LOVE YOUR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN!

AT BET AWARDS

AT BET AWARDS

MARIE CALUDINETTE AND WYCLEF JEAN GET MARRIED!

MARIE CALUDINETTE AND WYCLEF JEAN GET MARRIED!

wyclef_claudinette_largerfusha83fusha1
BLACK BEAUTY MEETS BLACK BEAUTY!

BLACK BEAUTY MEETS BLACK BEAUTY!

OBAMA-A BLACK PRESIDENT BREAKS DOWN ANTI-BLACK PREJUDICE FROM ALL OTHER RACES!-FROM ASIAINVIEW.WORDPRESS.COM

August 22, 2009
THIS IS THE BEGINNING OF THE BREAKDOWN OF THE YELLOW RACE'S IDEA OF BLACK INFERIORITY! OBAMA OUR BLACK PRESIDENT WILL INCREASE RESPECT FOR THE BLACK RACE EVERYWHERE!

THIS IS THE BEGINNING OF THE BREAKDOWN OF THE YELLOW RACE'S IDEA OF BLACK INFERIORITY! OBAMA OUR BLACK PRESIDENT WILL INCREASE RESPECT FOR THE BLACK RACE EVERYWHERE!

from asiainview.wordpress.com

Chinese Sentiment Towards Black Americans: The Obama Phenomenon in China

The election of Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential election was a watershed in race relations in America. For many of us, it displayed that race issues, although still in existence, are not as rampant in the United States now as they were in the past. However, I believe that this election revealed something more than the state of race relations in America. In China, it served as a proverbial litmus test of Chinese perceptions of Black Americans. Barack Obama’s political campaign reinforced images of Black Americans as powerful political figures. Moreover, the Chinese positive reception to these images is a new phenomenon that is important to understanding contemporary Chinese sentiment towards Blacks.

During the presidential election, Chinese overwhelmingly supported Barack Obama. An online poll conducted by the US embassy on the China Daily’s website revealed that 75 percent of the Chinese supported Obama as a candidate for president. In a survey by the Horizon research group, of 2,791 Chinese between the ages of 18 and 60, Obama received 17.8 percent more votes than McCain. But, how could this be? Why would Chinese choose Obama over John McCain? If we look at the situation from a foreign policy perspective, McCain’s position on trade was more favorable towards China than Obama’s position. According to the China Daily, “McCain supports increasing global integration”. He also urges Americans to reject the “siren song of protectionism’ and embrace a future of free trade”. In contrast, the article pointed out that Obama “adopted an increasingly critical tone on global trade and support legislation that would allow US companies to seek anti-dumping duties on Chinese imports, based on the received undervaluation of the Chinese currency” and that “he would amend the North American Free Trade Agreement. In addition to having an unfavorable position on trade, Obama’s opponent was white. Under the assumption by scholars who argue that Chinese are generally racist towards Blacks and more accepting of Whites, it is reasonable to assume that McCain should have won the polls.

However, this was not the case. To many Chinese, Obama has become a symbol of hope and achievement. Some Chinese analysts believe that Obama being Black, rather than being a disadvantage, actually added to his popularity in China. Song Zhiyuan, an analyst of the surveys, opined: “Perhaps his age, energy, and even complexion, which signify the US dream, are more appealing to the Chinese”. To many Chinese, Obama’s victory would be a symbol of America’s break from a culture of white superiority. “I want to see if a Black American could become the president…by electing Obama the Americans could prove the US is not only a white people’s country” stated a Chinese real estate agent interviewed by Xie. This type of statement was echoed by Zhang Meng, a Chinese student who stated, “it was good a Black man could be elected president for the first time in a predominantly white country”. Even in a survey I conducted on Chinese opinions of Obama and the 2008 Presidential election respondents shared similar opinions, “In the US presidential election, his breaking the barriers of race, and shows his ability to the whole world, and tries to transfer a different value”, and “he is one of the great Black people. His success represents the fact that everyone could realize his dream whatever the color he is”.

THE DEATH OF BLACK COLLEGES?-SAVE THEM FOR WE NEED ALL THE BLACK INSTITUTIONS WE CAN GET!-FROM ALUMNIROUNDUP.COM

August 22, 2009

from alumniroundup.com

D.o.B.C. Death of Black Colleges?
Posted on 19 August 2009 by aka Tito

Once a beacon of hope for thousands of Black students denied access to higher education by predominantly White institutions, historically Black colleges and universities have educated generations of Black scientists, doctors, lawyers, educators and social activists. But today, these institutions face serious challenges. Questions of relevance have reached a fever pitch as today’s Black colleges work to address declining enrollment, low graduation rates and financial instability. Despite the challenges, however, HBCUs for many Black students – and others – remain the last best hope of succeeding in the higher education arena. As the age-old debate for and against Black colleges rages on, Diverse has identified five threats facing HBCUs and five opportunities that could define their futures.

Threats
Prolonged Recession, Funding and Development Issues: When traditionally White institutions catch a cold, HBCUs catch pneumonia. Such is the case with the contagious economic virus that all of higher education is exposed to. HBCUs, like many others in the higher education sector, rely on student tuition dollars, government programs, corporate donations and foundation giving to sustain their institutions. All of these are unreliable revenue sources that point to the need for a stable income source typically found in a sustainable endowment.

The peril of weak endowments and low alumni giving is consequential in the economic environment. HBCU endowment information is hard to come by. Just five schools responded to the National Association of College and University Business Officers Endowment Survey. For those that responded, the average endowment market value was $244.7 million, compared with an average of $521.9 million for all non-Black institutions. The proposed sale of portions of Fisk University’s prized art collection donated by Georgia O’Keefe to raise much-needed cash and the proposal by the Georgia state Legislature to merge financially troubled Savannah State and Armstrong Atlantic State Universities to cut costs illustrate the financial volatility impacting many Black colleges.

Getting Them and Keeping Them: HBCUs provide a supportive environment where Black students thrive, but a 2006 Ed Sector report showed that just 37.9 percent of Black students attending HBCUs earn an undergraduate degree within six years, 4 percentage points lower than the national college graduation rate for Black students and 7 points lower than the overall graduation rates of predominantely White institutions. The graduation disparity could be a lot worse given the economic and educational disadvantages that often accompany these students, the vast majority of whom qualify for federal Pell Grants. But in a society that is becoming less tolerant of excuses, HBCUs will have to undertake some creative means of addressing the retention problem.

New Competition: For-profit institutions have become destination institutions for many Black and Hispanic students. A disproportionate percentage of degrees from proprietary colleges go to Black and Hispanic graduates. In this year’s Diverse Top 100, the University of Phoenix “online campus” overtook Florida A&M and Howard universities as the No. 1 producer of bachelor’s degrees awarded to African-Americans. While Black students earned 8.9 percent of bachelor’s degrees in the United States in 2005, they accounted for 15 percent of the degrees conferred by proprietary institutions, according to data in the National Center for Education Statistics report, “Postsecondary Institutions in the United States.”

Conservative Ethos/Constricting Campus Culture: Many news accounts have portrayed HBCUs as conservative, traditional institutions that are led by well-intentioned disciplinarians. While the accuracy of such accounts may be dubious, they raise warning points. The value of thoughtful reviews of HBCU campus climates and environments for faculty and students cannot be underestimated. Wholesome and welcoming environments at HBCUs were the stock of legends and huge selling points in attracting students and faculty. Today, many Black institutions continue to impose conservative policies that have long since lost their appeal, such as setting curfews, meddling in student media and limiting support for faculty research and expression.

Fear of Impending Doom: Black institutions on the brink of closure, such as Morris Brown, and those facing accreditation woes, such as Paul Quinn, continue to make headlines. As one account after another emerges, the fear of self-fulfilling prophecies usurps reality. But only a relatively small number of these schools have suffered irreparable damage. While some have had negative encounters with accreditation agencies, the vast majority have survived and often thrived. Unfortunately, these incidents can serve to erode enrollment and morale while also giving opponents ammunition to question HBCUs relevance in this so-called ‘post-racial’ era.

Opportunities

Safe Place: At the 20th-anniversary luncheon of this publication in 2004, Dr. Johnnetta B. Cole challenged a large gathering of Black educators to seriously consider how difficult it would be today to build a network of over 100 colleges dedicated to primarily educating African-American students. Everyone conceded that it would be nearly impossible. HBCUs provide refuge for Black students to define their place and identity in American society. Instead of being vehicles for diversity as “underrepresented minorities” at majority schools, Black students are simply students at HBCUs. These schools serve as sources of pride and affirmation for thousands of alumni, friends and supporters from around the world. At a time when the threat of marginalization looms large in the psyche of many African-Americans, these schools are strategically positioned to become the focal point of the African-American community in many new and important ways.

Decoders of Disparities: HBCUs have the propensity to lead higher education in disparity research. Research that documents racial and ethnic health disparities can play a key role in understanding and eliminating such disparities. The major funding organizations, including the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, have struggled for decades in trying to get at the root causes of racial disparities. A key player could and should be HBCUs. Take the qualified teacher disparity that is closely tied to the achievement gap: Even a cursory review of the statistics indicates that HBCUs are the nation’s premier institutions for graduating Black teachers. Yet these programs continue to be underfunded at the state and federal level.

Specialty Programs: HBCUs can be the pipeline for science, technology, engineering, mathematics and teacher education, considering they already do the bulk of the work. While composing about 3 percent of the nation’s 3,688 institutions of higher learning, the 103 HBCUs annually produce 23 percent of African-American bachelor’s degree and 13 percent of all master’s degree recipients, according to recent statistics. Spelman and Bennett colleges produce over half of the nation’s Black women who go on to earn doctorates in all science fields; Xavier University ranks No. 1 nationally in sending African-Americans to medical school. HBCUs that develop specialty programs can cement their place in the higher education arena by becoming the go-to institutions for in-demand talent.

Access: HBCUs can expand educational access and opportunity to underserved populations, particularly Hispanics. Additionally, HBCUs should tap into the market of students who start out at community colleges. HBCUs, which disproportionately serve students from low-income communities of color, can provide greater access to other underserved students in the Hispanic community. St. Philip’s College in San Antonio, founded in 1898 by the Episcopal Church as a sewing school for Black girls, has evolved into a comprehensive public community college with a for-credit enrollment exceeding 10,000. Hispanics make up the largest ethnic group on campus, and St. Philip’s, part of the Alamo Community Colleges District, is now the only college to be federally designated as both a historically Black college and a Hispanic-serving institution. The missions of Black colleges must evolve to serve a larger population of students.

Global Influence: HBCU students and faculty continue to carry the torch of academic excellence to other countries, building linkages throughout the African Diaspora and expanding the global impact of Black institutions. Florida A&M University President James Ammons signed an agreement with a Canadian organization that will allow FAMU students to intern in Cairo, Egypt. Howard University’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders served communities in Kenya and Brazil this year. Spelman students helped to build a library for the 10,000 Girls program in Senegal.

Courtesy of DiverseEducation.com
By MICHELLE J. NEALY

BLACK COLLEGES ARE THE PLACE WHERE BLACK YOUTH CAN GET THEIR BLACK SELF-ESTEEM AND BLACK DIGNITY BACK-SAVE THEM-WE NEED THESE BLACK INSTITUTIONS,AND ALL THE BLACK INSTITUTIONS WE CAN GET IN amerikkka!

BLACK COLLEGES ARE THE PLACE WHERE BLACK YOUTH CAN GET THEIR BLACK SELF-ESTEEM AND BLACK DIGNITY BACK-SAVE THEM-WE NEED THESE BLACK INSTITUTIONS,AND ALL THE BLACK INSTITUTIONS WE CAN GET IN amerikkka!

OBAMA AND HEALTHCARE!-OUR BLACK PRESIDENT HAS HIS BLACK GAME PLAN AS ALWAYS SO WE JUST MUST CONTINUE OUR PRAYERS-THIS TOO WILL PASS!-FROM THE NEW REPUBLIC MAGAZINE,AUG.20,2009

August 22, 2009

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS A BLACK GAME PLAN LIKE ALWAYS SO JUST CONTINUE YOUR PRAYERS-THIS TOO WILL PASS!

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS A BLACK GAME PLAN LIKE ALWAYS SO JUST CONTINUE YOUR PRAYERS-THIS TOO WILL PASS!

FROM tnr.com

The New Republic

Don’t Sweat It
by Ed Kilgore
Obama sure looks to be in trouble, but we’ve seen this summertime hysteria before.
Post Date Thursday, August 20, 2009

As the Dog Days of August descended upon us, there developed across the progressive chattering classes a deep sense of malaise bordering on depression, if not panic–much of it driven by fears about the leadership skills of Barack Obama. The polling numbers seemed to weaken every day, and Democratic unease was matched by growing glee on the airwaves of Fox and in Republican circles everywhere.

View Larger Image
Courtesy of the AP

Within ten weeks, however, Obama was elected president and joy returned to the land.

Yes, dear reader, I am suggesting that this August’s sense of progressive despair feels remarkably similar to last August’s. This week last year, the Gallup Tracking Poll had McCain and Obama in a statistical tie. The candidates were fresh from a joint appearance at Rick Warren’s Saddleback Church, which was widely viewed by progressives as a strategic error by Obama. More generally, Democratic confidence, so high earlier in the year, was sagging. “Liberals have been in a dither for several weeks now over Barack Obama’s supposedly listless campaign performance following his return from Europe,” influential blogger Kevin Drum summed up sentiments at that time, “and as near as I can tell this turned into something close to panic.”

These doldrums dissipated by the time of the Democratic convention later in the month, but reemerged in September, when McCain actually moved ahead in some polls. And the diagnosis of the problem was typically that Obama was too passive, and wasn’t articulating a clear enough message. This should sound familiar to connoisseurs of contemporary progressive concerns about Obama.

Now, this deja vu sensation I’m having obviously doesn’t guarantee that the current struggles over health care reform and climate change will have as happy an ending as the presidential contest. But it may well provide a plausible argument for giving the president the benefit of the doubt today as we should have done a year ago.

Part of the psychological problem now may be a matter of unrealistic expectations. Much of the trouble Obama has encountered in promoting his agenda has been entirely predictable. His approval ratings are gradually converging with the 2008 election results. Health care reform is a complicated challenge that threatens a lot of powerful interests and unsettles people happy with their current coverage. Major environmental initiatives lose steam in a deep recession. A new administration gradually begins to assume blame for bad conditions in the country. Republicans, adopting a faux populist tone, are fighting Obama tooth and nail. Democratic activists are frustrated by compromises and sick of having to put up with the Blue Dogs. The Senate is still the Senate, a monument to inertia, pettiness, and strutting egos.

Progressives are waiting for Barack Obama and his team to work the kind of political magic they seemed to work in 2008–except when they didn’t. Cutting through all the mythologizing of the Obama campaign, the real keys to his stretch-run success last year were his legendary calm (“No Drama Obama”); his confidence in his own long-range strategy; his ability to choose competent lieutenants and delegate to them abundantly; and his grasp of the fundamentals of public opinion and persuasion. There was zero sense of panic in the Obama campaign itself late last summer, because they stuck with their strategy and organization and didn’t let the polls or news cycles force them off the path they had chosen.

The administration’s demure approach should thus not be terribly surprising, nor a sign that it has lost its heart or its mind. Obama has not, presumably, lost the qualities he showed in the tougher moments of the 2008 campaign. As it planned its legislative agenda for 2009, Team Obama knew health care reform was going to be challenging, and also knew they could probably get away with blaming the economic emergency for paring it back or slowing it down. They decided this was the right time to act, and it’s far too soon to assume they were wrong.

This particular moment might be more endurable if, as it used to be, August was a political and legislative dead zone. We’d all get a breather, maybe calm down and look ahead to the real deal going down in the fall. But the “August Doesn’t Matter” era has ended–perhaps dating back to the grand jury testimony in the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal in August 1998, if not earlier. (It arguably began to fade when Washington got air-conditioning.) Now, even if nothing substantive is actually happening this month, the absence of action is itself painful, and feels like defeat.

While I certainly don’t know if the Obama game plan for the next couple of months is going to be successful, I’m reasonably sure a game plan exists. On the issue most on everyone’s mind, I certainly don’t know how to reconcile the sharply contrasting demands of House Democrats and Senate “centrists” on sticking points like the public option. But the odds remain good that the House will pass a bill, the Senate will pass a bill, and then we will find out if the White House and the Democratic congressional leadership have the skill to make something happen that we will be able to recognize as “change,” and perhaps even a victory for progressives. Until then, it’s probably a good idea to drink a tall glass of cold water and wait out the August political heat.

Ed Kilgore is managing editor of The Democratic Strategist, a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute, and a frequent contributor to a variety of political journals.

THIS BLACK MAN,IBO MAN IN NIGERIA BELIEVES IN POLYGAMY!-HOW THIS IBO KING MANAGES HIS 5 WIVES SUCCESSFULLY!-FROM SUN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

August 17, 2009

from sunnewsonline.com

ROYAL CONFESSION
• Why I don’t support one man, one wife and how I manage my five wives
By Geoffrey Anyanwu, Awka
Wednesday, November 28, 2007

THIS STRONG BLACK IBO KING CAN HANDLE HIS 5 WIVES FAIRLY AND WELL!

THIS STRONG BLACK IBO KING CAN HANDLE HIS 5 WIVES FAIRLY AND WELL!


•Igwe Kelly
Photo: Sun News Publishing

His Royal Majesty, Igwe Dr. Nkeli Nzekwe Kelly, the Okalakwu Igboariam of Okalakwu kingdom, is a traditional ruler with a difference. This is shown in his attire, carriage and the way he rules his people with love and care.

But Igwe Kelly, who has been on the throne for 16 years, has great passion for women. In fact, he told Daily Sun that his target is to marry seven wives. Presently, he has five wives who have given him 13 children.

The traditional ruler has been a lucky man as it is not difficult for him to get his women. According to him, all he needs to do to get a new wife is to just declare his interest and the woman automatically becomes his wife.
In this encounter with Daily Sun, he spoke about his kingdom, his scholarship, the agricultural heritage of his kingdom and other services to his people.

What stands me out
The only thing I know is that nobody is an angel. But I’m trying as much as I can to do what I learnt from abroad where I lived. And that is, to be straightforward in whatever I do and to tell my people the truth. That’s one thing that perhaps makes me special. I don’t know that I am special. But I believe my people love me because I love them, too. I make sure whoever I am dealing with will understand me, where I am coming from and where I am going. You will see my front and back. That’s what makes me special, nothing more than that.

Regalia
I have all the traditional attire from the various kingdoms, I have them in my kingdom. I have other attires because this kingdom emanated from Benin. Initially, there was only one kingdom in Nigeria. That was the Benin Kingdom. If you watch me sometimes during my Ofala, you see the Ibiwe. Ibiwe means the bead-makers in Benin language. We have bead makers here, they make my wears. Because during the time that King Oba na Edo ruled up to this area, we called him Oba Nidu. I have the history in my kingdom. What my ancestors left behind, I’ve gone through them. The one written in Igbo and in English. I have gone through them and I discovered that there was a time those people extended up to here. There was a king that came into this place and wore the same attire.

So, what happened is, if you want to know my real attire, come on my Ofala day. Other attires, I can change to Emir attire, provided it is a Nigerian attire, but you may not know. Sometimes, I wear attire from the northerners, the Yorubas, the Tivs, the Ibibios, the Anambras, the Imos and so on. So, that’s what makes my dressing different. But if you look into it deeply, you will still see some Igbo cultural wears or traditional wears in those attire.

Life is what you make out of yourself; you cannot depend on your father’s wear because fashion changes all the time. If you are wearing this dress now, if I bought this dress last year for about, let’s say, N50, you may not find that type or style again this year. And if you buy it, they will take you as one who is not current with trends. So, I have brought everything to this level.

Wives and how I choose them
Actually, I have five wives and I am ready to marry more. It depends, because my target is seven. But I don’t know: Life and finance will determine. That is, my pocket will determine how many wives I will be able to accommodate in my kingdom. It is the tradition. You see, one man, one wife, I do not believe in it because there are a lot of women in the society now. Even sometimes, women claim that they own your house with you, the husband.
It is not done; it is only done in England where the man contributes money to the dowry with his wife, contributes money for the dowry, for feeding and every other thing from morning to night. But when you go to a woman’s house, organise a big party, sew uniforms for your wife’s friends, your in-laws, extended families, then tomorrow, will somebody say she owns your house with you? She did not contribute in building the house. How does she own the house? So, that’s why I have my wives with me and they are living happily with me and they are okay.
I choose my wives as a king. When I see somebody I like and I say I will marry you, she will follow me, that is the end of it. Then we do the next things. I will tell my people this is my wife. I don’t go to oracle, I don’t go anywhere. When any girl attracts me or any time I see a woman that attracts me, I will say it: I want to marry you. And from then on, my men will walk in there and I will leave that place and they will dig it out, get the business done for me and bring the lady home.

Managing five wives
The more wives you get, the better for you in your house. If you have only one wife, you will have more than 10 problems. If you have 10 wives, you have only one trouble in the house because instead of fighting you, they will fight themselves. All of them will be fighting to get you, to get your love and attention and you will stay quiet in your house and live long.
But if you marry only one, even if you go out, she will say why did you go and drink? But when they are many, you can go and drink, you can even sleep outside for one month and come back. Provided you know you are not cheating in any way. It depends on the individual, because I don’t like cheating someone. If you are straightforward, then you can marry more. They will not be able to stop you. The more you go in marriage, but watch always your pocket, as I said. You must be financially okay before you go into such marriages, because it involves a lot of money, a lot of spending. What you spend for one wife, times 10 or more, including on extended families. You must make sure you are sound before you go in for the second or third wife.

Our traditional stool
It means I am the servant of my people. I am working for my people and I am happy discharging my duties. I am happy working for them; it is not easy because they say uneasy lies the head that wears the crown. So, it is not easy for me. You must have a lot of challenges. But remember, challenges make you wise. When you have challenges from people, you get wiser, you get stronger, more powerful. But if you have no challenges, you become powerless; you behave like one of your subjects. I like challenges; I like people challenging me from left, right, everywhere. So, if I can defend and bring them down, then I am a good leader. If I cannot defend them and they bring me down, I am not a good leader.

Most memorable time on the throne
I enjoyed my 16 years on the throne from day one to today. I enjoyed every bit, every day of it, but Ofala days are always special times. My community is very good. They are very nice people, they are educated, they are quiet, they are not troublesome and they have understanding. I am happy throughout the 16 years I have been the king of this kingdom.

Changes in the kingdom
Very, very many changes. They have scholarships, they have light, they have everything. There have been a lot of changes since I became the king. Formerly, they were paying school fees. Today, they don’t pay anything, for over 10 years now. Even foreigners who are here do not pay, provided you pay your community dues or any communal contribution. You have to make it otherwise, your children will not be allowed in the schools. You must contribute; you must work with the community to grow the economy. We like people who work like my people. If you come here in the afternoon, you can’t see anybody here. They are all in the bush, rivers, looking for what to eat.
We have achieved a lot. Scholarships, agriculture, we grow food and grow more and more. We have loans from the government and from myself that make them do more work on their farms. If you go to where we farm now, you will see that we have extended the farms. We are even trying to pay for lands, lease lands from other communities in order to cultivate and do our farming business. The land is even not enough for us to farm.

Future vision for the kingdom
My future vision for my kingdom is to make them happy, make them grow economically and make their future bright. Through this scholarship scheme, I know we will get more educated people and from there, they will now spread to all the other parts of the world. What I want is to make them a big community, big town with rich and educated people. That’s my aim and target.

OBAMA IN GHANA:”I HAVE THE BLOOD OF AFRICA WITHIN ME!”

August 8, 2009

"WELCOME HOME"GREETS YOU WHEN YOU GO BACK TO AFRICA FOR A VISIT LIKE OBAMA!

AT THE HOSPITAL STILL

AT THE HOSPITAL STILL

THE OBAMAS AT THE LA GENERAL HOSPITAL,ACCRA

THE OBAMAS AT THE LA GENERAL HOSPITAL,ACCRA

THE OBAMAS ARRIVING IN GHANA JULY 2009

THE OBAMAS ARRIVING IN GHANA JULY 2009

PH2009071003540FROM huffingtonpost.com

– Obama In Ghana: “I Have The Blood Of Africa Within Me” First Posted: 07-11-09 08:33 AM | Updated: 07-12-09 03:20 PM

(AP) ACCRA, Ghana — America’s president and Africa’s son, Barack Obama dashed with pride onto the continent of his ancestors Saturday, challenging its people to shed corruption and conflict in favor of peace. Campaigning to all of Africa, he said “Yes you can.”

“I say this knowing full well the tragic past that has sometimes haunted this part of the world,” Obama told a riveted Ghanaian Parliament. “I have the blood of Africa within me.”

In the faces of those who lined the streets and in many of Obama’s own words, this trip was personal. Beyond his message, the story was his presence _ the first black U.S. president coming to poor, proud, predominantly black sub-Sahara Africa for his first time in office.

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy
The emotional touchstone of his visit: a tour of Cape Coast Castle, the cannon-lined fortress where slaves were kept in squalid dungeons, then shipped in chains to America through a “Door of No Return” that opens to the sea.

Obama absorbed the experience with his wife, Michelle, and their girls, Sasha and Malia.

“I’ll never forget the image of my two young daughters, the descendants of Africans and African-Americans, walking through those doors of no return but then walking back (through) those doors,” he said later at a grand departure ceremony. “It was a remarkable reminder that, while the future is unknowable, the winds always blow in the direction of human progress.” Ghanaians lined up on the tarmac lingered for a time even after Air Force One disappeared into the nighttime sky.

The White House said Obama held no big public events in a city frenzied to see him because Obama wanted to put the light on Africa, not himself. But reality proved otherwise.

Obama billboards dotted the roads. Women wore dresses made of cloth bearing his image. Tribal chiefs, lawmakers, church leaders, street vendors _ to them, it felt like history.

Story continues below

“All Ghanaians want to see you,” lamented Ghana’s president, John Atta Mills, before feting Obama to a breakfast banquet of hundreds of guests at the coastal presidential castle.

To their disappointment, most people did not see him. The lack of open events and the heavy security kept many in this West African nation away from Obama. They watched him on TV.

Overall, there was no dampening the tone of joy. Headlines screamed of Obama fever.

“It makes us proud of Ghana,” said Richard Kwasi-Yeboah, a 49-year-old selling posters of the American president. “We’re proud he chose us. It proves that Ghana is really free.”

At the heart of Obama’s message here: African nations crippled by coups and chaos, like Ghana has been in the past, can reshape themselves into lawful democracies. He said it takes good governance, sustained development, improved health care.

And that the moment is now.

“Africa doesn’t need strongmen,” Obama said. “It needs strong institutions.”

The son of a white woman from Kansas and a black man from Kenya, Obama bluntly told Africa to take more responsibility for itself but proclaimed: “America will be with you.”

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the poorest places in the world.

Obama also got openly personal _ recalling the grandfather who endured being called “boy” as a cook for the British in Kenya, the father who once herded goats in a small Kenyan village. Not mentioned was the path of his wife, Michelle, who is a descendant of slaves.

In essence, Obama’s history with Africa seemed to give him freer license to speak about the continent, as if he were being honest with a friend. He gave an unsentimental account of squandered opportunities, brutality and bribery in postcolonial Africa.

About every time Obama cited his basic argument _ that democracy is about more than holding elections, that Africa resist the drug trade and enforce a rule of law _ members of Parliament raucously cheered him on. Then again, this audience was friendly. When Obama left, a choir sang a song to his campaign theme of “Yes we can,” a line he used himself.

Evoking the memory of American civil rights giant Martin Luther King Jr., Obama noted that King was in Ghana in 1957 to hail Ghana’s independence from the British. He quoted King as calling the moment a triumph of justice, and told young Africans they must remember that.

“You can conquer disease, end conflicts and make change from the bottom up,” Obama said. “You can do that. Yes you can. Because in this moment, history is on the move.”

All together, Obama was spending less than 24 hours in Ghana. But they packed in personal moments, in contrast to his summit-heavy travels across Russia and Italy over the last week.

At a maternal health clinic in Accra, he turned into a sentimental dad when he met a group of mothers holding newborns. “This is the highlight of the trip,” he said, beaming.

By afternoon, he was contemplating the human capacity for evil at the castle, which served as a headquarters for the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Obama walked with his arm around Malia, 11. The first lady held the hand of Sasha, 8.

“Hopefully one of the things that was imparted to them during this trip was their sense of obligation to fight oppression and cruelty wherever it appears,” the president said.

Ghana and the U.S. have something of a diplomatic kinship. Obama is the third straight U.S. president to visit this tropical nation; George W. Bush was here just last year.

That reflects just how much the United States, which dwarfs Ghana’s size, wants this country to be a model of democracy and invests tens of millions of tax dollars to help it.

But what the Obama White House did not want on this trip was the Bill Clinton moment. In 1998, on a blisteringly hot day, a crowd at a Clinton rally nearly caused a horrific trample.

That also affected why Obama did not hold an outdoor event of his own.

Obama will be back to Africa. But he suggested that he won’t go for the traditional model of devoting a trip to Africa alone, as if it is separated from world affairs. Instead, African nations might be wrapped into his multinational travels more often.

“What happens here,” he said, “has an impact everywhere.”

___

Associated Press writers Mark S. Smith and Todd Pitman contributed to this story from Accra.

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OF THE BLACK WORLD SAYING THE PLEDGE IN THE GHANA PARLIMENT

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OF THE BLACK WORLD SAYING THE PLEDGE IN THE GHANA PARLIMENT

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FROM huffingtonpost.com

Obama’s visit to fort a ‘full-circle experience’
Ghana’s coastal castle was departure point for African slaves

George Osodi / AP
On Saturday, President Barack Obama and his family will visit this coastal castle in Ghana that was Britain’s West Africa headquarters for the shipment of millions of slaves to Europe and America. Video

updated 3:29 p.m. ET July 10, 2009
CAPE COAST, Ghana – From the rampart of a whitewashed fort once used to ship countless slaves from Africa to the Americas, Cheryl Hardin gazed through watery eyes at the route forcibly taken across the sea by her ancestors centuries before.

“It never gets any easier,” the 48-year-old pediatrician said, wiping away tears on her fourth trip to Ghana’s Cape Coast Castle in two decades. “It feels the same as when I first visited — painful, incomprehensible.”

On Saturday, Barack Obama and his family will follow in the footsteps of countless African-Americans who have tried to reconnect with their past on these shores. Though Obama was not descended from slaves — his father was Kenyan — he will carry the legacy of the African-American experience with him as America’s first black president.

For many, the trip will be steeped in symbolism.

“The world’s least powerful people were shipped off from here as slaves,” Hardin said Tuesday, looking past a row of cannons pointing toward the Atlantic Ocean. “Now Obama, an African-American, the most powerful person in the world, is going to be standing here. For us it will be a full-circle experience.”

Built in the 1600s, Cape Coast Castle served as Britain’s West Africa headquarters for the trans-Atlantic slave trade, which saw European powers and African chiefs export millions in shackles to Europe and the Americas.

Nearly two centuries later, misery still lingers
The slave trade ended here in 1833, and visitors can now trek through the fort’s dungeons, dark rooms once crammed with more than 1,000 men and women at a time who slept in their own excrement. The dank air inside still stings the eyes.

Visiting for the first time, Hardin’s 47-year-old sister Wanda Milian said the dungeons felt “like burial tombs.”

“It felt suffocating. It felt still,” said Milian, who like her sister lives in Houston. “I don’t know what I expected. I didn’t expect to experience the sense of loss, the sense of hopelessness and desolation.”

Those who rebelled were packed into similar rooms with hardly enough air to breath, left to die without food or water. Their faint scratch marks are still visible on walls.

Down by the shore is the fort’s so-called “Door of No Return,” the last glimpse of Africa the slaves would ever see before they were loaded into canoes that took them to ships that crossed the ocean.

Horrible history contrasts with present
Today, the door opens onto a different world: a gentle shore where boys freely kick a white soccer ball through the surf, where gray-bearded men sit in beached canoes fixing lime-green fishing nets, where women sell maize meal from plates on their heads.

Behind them is Africa’s poverty: smoke from cooking fires rises from a maze of thin wooden shacks, their rusted corrugated aluminum roofs held down by rocks. Children bathe naked in a tiny dirt courtyard.

“I just can’t wrap my mind around this,” said Milian, who works at a Methodist church. “If it weren’t for all this” — for slavery — “I wouldn’t be standing here today. I wouldn’t be who I am. I wouldn’t have the opportunities I do. I wouldn’t practice the religion I do.”

Milian also grappled with the irony that fort housed a church while the trade went on, and that African chiefs and merchants made it all possible, brutally capturing millions and marching them from the continent’s interior to be sold in exchange for guns, iron and rum.

“It’s mixed up,” Milian said. “It’s not an easy puzzle to put together.”

Though slavery in the U.S. ended after the Civil War in 1865, its legacy has lived on. The U.S. Senate on June 18 unanimously passed a resolution apologizing for slavery and racial segregation.

“This is part of our history,” said Hardin, who first visited Ghana in the late 1980s and later married a Ghanaian engineer she met in the U.S.

Her 15-year-old son was along for the first time. “I want him to understand what his liberty really means, who he really is,” Hardin said.

But racism, both sisters agreed, would not end with Obama’s visit.

“Let’s not be naive. When your skin is darker, you are still going to be treated differently,” Hardin said. But Obama’s trip “will be a turning point, not just for America but for the world.”

Milian said Obama’s journey would also bear a message to those who organized the trade.

“It will say they failed, it all failed,” she said. “The human mind is capable of horrible things, but the fact that we’re standing here, the fact Obama will be standing here, proves we are also capable of great resilience.”

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FROM blog.taragana.com

Obama says tour of Ghanaian slave fortress should be eye-opener for daughters
Bureau News July 11th, 2009
Obama: Daughters should learn from slave tour

CAPE COAST, Ghana — President Barack Obama says he hopes his family’s tour of a former slave fortress on the coast of Ghana shows his daughters that history can take very cruel turns.

Eleven-year-old Malia and eight-year-old Sasha accompanied Obama on a tour of Cape Coast Castle Saturday.

Speaking afterward, Obama said his daughters are “growing up in such a blessed way.” He said one of the things he hopes they picked up from the tour is a sense of their obligation to fight oppression and cruelty everywhere.

Cape Coast Castle was the place where shackled Africans were held in squalid dungeons before they were shipped off into slavery.

——————————————————————————–

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!-THIS NIGERIAN MOTHER TAUGHT HER BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED DAUGHTER TO LOVE HER BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN UNLIKE MICHAEL JACKSON’S FATHER AND OTHER MISGUIDED BLACKamerikkkan PARENTS! TEACH YOU CHILD TO LOVE ALL HIS BEAUTIFUL BLACK FEATURES!

August 5, 2009

http://www.tribune.com.ng/02082009/children.html

AS you can see, I’m a beautiful girl because I’m dark in complexion. I like to look nice and beautiful always. My mum always encourages me every time I appear clean, that, I’m black and I’m shining. I sweep my room, lay my bed and clean our sitting room always. I learn how to be clean from my mum because she dresses well. She is my role model when it comes to looking good. - Iremide Oyelaja, 10-year-old, Pry 4.

AS you can see, I’m a beautiful girl because I’m dark in complexion. I like to look nice and beautiful always. My mum always encourages me every time I appear clean, that, I’m black and I’m shining. I sweep my room, lay my bed and clean our sitting room always. I learn how to be clean from my mum because she dresses well. She is my role model when it comes to looking good. - Iremide Oyelaja, 10-year-old, Pry 4.


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