Archive for April, 2010

>AWON EDE NAIJIRIA

April 29, 2010

>
lati owo wikipedia.org

Ìpè láti kópa nínu Wikimania 2010 ti jáde. O gbódò fi oun tí o bá fé fi hàn ránsé saaju ojó ‘Karunla(20) osù Kerin(May). [Bòmọ́lẹ̀]
[Ẹ rànwálọ́wọ́ pẹ̀lú àwọn ìyédèpadà]

Àwọn èdè Nàìjíríà
Lát’ọwọ́ Wikipedia
Lọ sí: atọ́ka, àwárí

Linguistic map of Nigeria, Cameroon, and Benin.Iye awon èdè ti a mo ni Naijiria je 521.

Awon ede ti wo gbajumo julo ni Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba, Fulfulde, Kanuri, Ibibio.

1.Ede Abanyom
2.Ede Afade
3.Ede Afemai
4.Ede Angas
5.Ede Angas proper
6.Ede Angas-Gerka
7.Ede Bacama
8.Ede Bade
9.Ede Bade
10.Ede Bade-Ngizim
11.Ede Bali (Nigeria)

Àyọkà yí le fẹ̀ jù báyìí lọ. Ẹ ran Wikipedia lọ́wọ́ láti fẹ̀ẹ́ jù báyìí lọ![àtúnṣe] Itokasi
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Ọjọ́ tí a ṣe àtunṣe ojúewé yi gbẹ̀yìn ni 16:29, 28 December 2009.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.Ètò àbòNípa WikipediaIkìlọ̀Expedition to the Mount of Thought: The third saga : being a free translation of the full text of D.O. Fagunwa’s Yoruba novel Irinkerindo ninu Igbo elegbejeThe development of the Yoruba novel, 1930-1975The modern Yoruba novel: An analysis of the writer’s art
Aspects of Yoruba cosmology in Tutuola’s novels ([Collection U du C.R.P.])

>NIGERIAN LANGUAGES

April 29, 2010

>

FROM wikipedia.org

Languages of Nigeria
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Linguistic map of Nigeria, Cameroon, and Benin.Part of a series on the
Culture of Nigeria
Languages
Literature
List of Nigerian writers
List of Nigerian poets

——————————————————————————–
Nigeria Portal
v • d • e

The number of languages currently estimated and catalogued in Nigeria is 521. This number includes 510 living languages, two second languages without native speakers and 9 extinct languages. In some areas of Nigeria, ethnic groups speak more than one language. The official language of Nigeria, English, the former colonial language, was chosen to facilitate the cultural and linguistic unity of the country. The major languages spoken in Nigeria are Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba, Fulfulde, Kanuri, Ibibio. Even though most ethnic groups prefer to communicate in their own languages, English, being the official language, is widely used for education, business transactions and for official purposes. English, however, remains an exclusive preserve of a small minority of the country’s urban elite, and is not spoken in rural areas. With approximately 75% of Nigeria’s populace in the rural areas, the major languages of communication in the country remain tribal languages, with the most widely spoken being Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba. Foreign minorities speak their own languages aside from English and/or major native languages as their second languages.

Nigeria’s linguistic diversity is a microcosm of Africa as a whole, encompassing three major African languages families: the Afroasiatic, Nilo-Saharan, and the Niger-Congo A branch of the Niger-Congo family. Nigeria also has one unclassifiable language, Cen Tuum, spoken by a few old people among the Cham in Gombe State. This may represent a relic of an even greater diversity prior to the spread of the current language families.

Contents [hide]
1 Language families
1.1 Niger-Congo languages
1.2 Afroasiatic languages
2 Wikimedia
3 References
4 External links

[edit] Language families
[edit] Niger-Congo languages
Niger-Congo predominates in central and southern Nigeria; the main branches represented in Nigeria are Mande, Atlantic, Gur, Kwa, Benue-Congo and Adamawa-Ubangian. Mande is represented by the Busa cluster and Kyenga in the northwest. Fulfulde is the single Atlantic language, of Senegambian origin but now spoken by cattle pastoralists across the Sahel and largely in the North of Nigeria by the Fulani (sometimes Fulbe) diaspora. The Ijoid languages are spoken across the Niger Delta and include Ịjọ (Ijaw), Kalabari, and the intriguing remnant language Defaka. The Ibibio language is spoken across the coastal southeastern part of Nigeria and includes Efik, Annang, Ibibio proper. The single Gur language spoken is Baatọnun, in the Northwest. The Adamawa-Ubangian languages are spoken between central Nigeria and the Central African Republic. Their westernmost representatives in Nigeria are the Tula-Waja languages. The Kwa languages are represented by the Gun group in the extreme southwest, which is affiliated to the Gbe languages in Benin and Togo.

The classification of the remaining languages is controversial; Joseph Greenberg classified those without noun-classes, such as Yoruba, Igbo, and Ibibio (Efik, Ibibio, and Annang), as ‘Eastern Kwa’ and those with classes as ‘Benue-Congo’. This was reversed in an influential 1989 publication and reflected on the 1992 map of languages, where all these were considered Benue-Congo. Recent opinion, however, has been to revert to Greenberg’s distinction. The literature must thus be read with care and due regard for the date. It should be noted that there are several small language groupings in the Niger Confluence area, notably Ukaan, Akpes, Ayere-Ahan and Ọkọ, whose inclusion in these groupings has never been satisfactorily argued.

Former Eastern Kwa, i.e. West Benue-Congo would then include Yoruboid, i.e. Yoruba, Itsekiri and Igala, Akokoid (eight small languages in Ondo, Edo and Kogi state), Edoid including Edo in Edo State, Igboid, Ibibio-Efik, Idomoid (Idoma) and Nupoid (Nupe) and perhaps include the other languages mentioned above. East Benue-Congo includes Kainji, Plateau (46 languages, notably Eggon), Jukunoid, Dakoid and Cross River. Apart from these, there are numerous Bantoid languages, which are the languages immediately ancestral to Bantu. These include Mambiloid, Ekoid, Bendi, Beboid, Grassfields and Tivoid languages. The geographic distribution of Nigeria’s Niger-Congo languages is not limited to south-central Nigeria, as migration allows their spread to the linguistically Afro-Asiatic northern regions of Nigeria, as well as throughout West Africa and abroad. Yoruba is spoken as a ritual language in cults such as the Santeria in the Caribbean and South-Central America, and the Berbice Dutch language in Surinam is based on an Ijoid language.

Even the above listed linguistic diversity of the Niger-Congo in Nigeria is deceptively limiting, as these languages may further consist of regional dialects that may not be mutually intelligible. As such some languages, particularly those with a large number of speakers, have been standardized and received a romanized orthography. Nearly all languages appear in a Roman script when written, often with modifications allowing for a language’s particularities. The Yoruba, Igbo and Efik languages are notable examples of this process; Standard Yoruba came into being due to the work Samuel Crowther, the first African bishop of the Anglican Church and owes most of its lexicon to the dialects spoken in Ọyọ and Ibadan. Since Standard Yoruba’s constitution was determined by a single author rather than by a consensual linguistic policy by all speakers, the Standard has been attacked regarding for failing to include other dialects and spurred debate as to what demarcates “genuine Yoruba”. The more historically recent standardization and romanization of Igbo has provoked even more controversy due to its dialectical diversity, but the Central Igbo dialect has gained the widest acceptace as the standard-bearer; however many such as Chinua Achebe have dismissed standardization as colonial and conservative attempts to simplify a complex mosaic of languages. Such controversies typify inter- and intra-ethnic conflict endemic to post-colonial Nigeria.

Linguistically speaking, all demonstrate the varying phonological features of the Niger-Congo family to which they belong, these include the use of tone, nasality, and particular consonant and vowel systems; more information is available here.

[edit] Afroasiatic languages

Afroasiatic speaking peoples in NigeriaThe Afroasiatic languages of Nigeria divide into Chadic, Semitic and Berber. Of these, Chadic languages predominate, with 70+ languages. Semitic is represented by various dialects of Arabic spoken in the Northeast and Berber by the Tuareg-speaking communities in the extreme Northwest.

The Hausa language is the most well-known Chadic language in Nigeria; though there is a paucity of statistics on native speakers in Nigeria, the language is spoken by 24 million people in West Africa and is the second language of 15 million more. Hausa has therefore emerged as lingua franca throughout much of West Africa and the Sahel in particular. The language is spoken primarily amongst Muslims, and the language is often associated with Islamic culture in Nigeria and West Africa on the whole. Hausa is classified as a West Chadic language of the Chadic grouping, a major subfamily of Afroasiatic. Culturally, the Hausa people have become closely integrated with the Fulani following the jihadist establishment of the Sokoto Caliphate by the Fulani Uthman dan Fodio in the 19th century. Hausa is the official language of a number states in Northern Nigeria and the most important dialect is generally regarded as that spoken in Kano,an Eastern Hausa dialect, which is the standard variety used for official purposes. Eastern dialects also include some dialects spoken in Zaria, and Bauchi; Western Hausa dialects include Sakkwatanchi spoken in Sokoto, Katsinanchi in Katsina Arewanchi in both Gobir and Adar,Kebbi, and Zamfara. Katsina is transitional between Eastern and Western dialects. Northern Hausa dialects include Arewa and Arawa, while Zaria is a prominent Southern tongue version; Barikanchi is a pidgin formerly used in the military.

Hausa is a highly atypical Chadic language, with a reduced tonal system and a phonology influenced by Arabic. Other well-known Chadic languages include Ngas, Mwaghavul, Bole, Ngizim, Bade and Bacama. In the East of Nigeria and on into Cameroun are the Central Chadic languages, such as Bura, the Higi cluster and Marghi. These are highly diverse and remain very poorly described. Many Chadic languages are severely threatened; recent searches by Bernard Caron for Southern Bauchi languages show that even some of those recorded in the 1970s have disappeared. However, unknown Chadic languages are still being reported, witness the recent description of Dyarim.Issues in African Languages and Linguistics: Essays in Honour of Kay Williamson (Ninlan book series)

Hausa, as well as other Afroasiatic languages like Bade (another West Chadic language spoken in Yobe State), have historically been written in a modified Arabic script known as ajami, however, the modern official orthography is now a romanization known as boko first introduced by the British regime in the 1930s.
Nigerian languages yesterday, today, and tomorrow: Proceedings of the Twentieth Year Commemorative Symposium of the Centre for the Study of Nigerian Languages, Bayero University, Kano
[edit] WikimediaNigerian languages and cultural development: Proceedings of the National Seminar on the Use of Local Languages for Cultural Development and Application, held at Durbar Hotel, Kaduna 22-24 June, 1981
Systematic graphic of the Niger-Congo languages with numbers of speakers
[edit] References
Blench, Roger (2002) Research on Minority Languages in Nigeria in 2001. Ogmios.
Blench, Roger (1998) ‘The Status of the Languages of Central Nigeria’, in Brenzinger, M. (ed.) Endangered languages in Africa. Köln: Köppe Verlag, 187-206. online version
Crozier, David & Blench, Roger (1992) An Index of Nigerian Languages (2nd edition). Dallas: SIL.
[edit] External links
Ethnologue Listing of Nigerian LanguagesFundamentals of syntax and the study of Nigerian languages
Blench, Roger (n.d.) Atlas of Nigerian Languages, ed. III (revised and amended edition of Crozier & Blench 1992)A Vocabulary of primary science and mathematics in nine Nigerian languages
Lamle, Elias Nankap , Coprreality and Dwelling spaces in Tarokland. NBTT Press. Jos Nigeria in “Ngappak” jounrla of the Tarok nation 2005Teaching and learning in Nigerian languages

[show] Articles Related to Languages of Nigeria Duka sentence, clause and phrase (Studies in Nigerian languages)
http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=9783422561&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr
[show]v • d • eLanguages of Africa

Africa Cameroon · Liberian · Malawian · Namibian · Nigerian · South African · Ugandan http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=3639239946&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrAPNILAC A Journal of Nigerian Languages and Culture Volume 1 (October 1997) Numbers 1 and 2
Twelve Nigerian Languageshttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B001GZU4AE&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr
An Index of Nigerian LanguagesTwelve Nigerian languages: A handbook on their sound systems for teachers of English,The Early Study of Nigerian Languages: Essays and Bibliographies (Modern Revivals in African Studies)The Early Study of Nigerian Languages: Essays and BibliographiesHigi phonology (Studies in Nigerian languages)The development and preservation of Nigerian languages and cultures: The role of the local http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=3639239946&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrgovernment.
(Linguistics).: An article from: Studia Anglica http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1592211739&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1592211739&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr… international review of http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=9781291737&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrEnglish Studieshttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0415022916&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

April 29, 2010

>FROM wikipedia.org

African literature
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
African literature refers to literature of and from Africa. As George Joseph notes on the first page of his chapter on African literature in Understanding Contemporary Africa, while the European perception of literature generally refers to written letters, the African concept includes oral literature.[1]

As George Joseph continues, while European views of literature often stressed a separation of art and content, African awareness is inclusive:

“Literature” can also imply an artistic use of words for the sake of art alone. Without denying the important role of aesthetics in Africa, we should keep in mind that, traditionally, Africans do not radically separate art from teaching. Rather than write or sing for beauty in itself, African writers, taking their cue from oral literature, use beauty to help communicate important truths and information to society. Indeed, an object is considered beautiful because of the truths it reveals and the communities it helps to build. [2]
Contents [hide]
1 Oral literature
2 Precolonial literature
3 Colonial African literature
4 Postcolonial African literature
5 Noma Award
6 Major African novels
7 Major African poets
8 Secondary literature
9 See also
10 References
11 External links

[edit] Oral literature
Oral literature (or orature) may be in prose or verse. The prose is often mythological or historical and can include tales of the trickster character. Storytellers in Africa sometimes use call-and-response techniques to tell their stories. Poetry, often sung, includes: narrative epic, occupational verse, ritual verse, praise poems to rulers and other prominent people. Praise singers, bards sometimes known as “griots”, tell their stories with music. [3] Also recited, often sung, are: love songs, work songs, children’s songs, along with epigrams, proverbs and riddles.[4]

[edit] Precolonial literature
Examples of pre-colonial African literature are numerous. Oral literature of west Africa includes the Epic of Sundiata composed in medieval Mali, The older Epic of Dinga from the old Ghana Empire. In Ethiopia, originally written in Ge’ez script is the Kebra Negast or book of kings. One popular form of traditional African folktale is the “trickster” story, where a small animal uses its wits to survive encounters with larger creatures. Examples of animal tricksters include Anansi, a spider in the folklore of the Ashanti people of Ghana; Ijàpá, a tortoise in Yoruba folklore of Nigeria; and Sungura, a hare found in central and East African folklore. [5] Other works in written form are abundant, namely in north Africa, the Sahel regions of west Africa and on the Swahili coast. From Timbuktu alone, there are an estimated 300,000 or more manuscripts tucked away in various libraries and private collections[6], mostly written in Arabic, but some in the native languages (namely Peul and Songhai)[7]. Many were written at the famous University of Timbuktu. The material covers a wide array of topics, including Astronomy, Poetry, Law, History, Faith, Politics, and Philosophy among others.[8] Swahili literature similarly, draws inspiration from Islamic teachings but developed under indigenous circumstances. One of the most renowned and earliest pieces of Swahili literature being Utendi wa Tambuka or “The Story of Tambuka”.

In Islamic times, North Africans such as ibn Khaldun attained great distinction within Arabic literature. Medieval north Africa boasted Universities such as those of Fez and Cairo, with copious amounts of literature to supplement them.

[edit] Colonial African literature
The African works best known in the West from the period of colonization and the slave trade are primarily slave narratives, such as Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789).

In the colonial period, Africans exposed to Western languages began to write in those tongues. In 1911, Joseph Ephraim Casely-Hayford (also known as Ekra-Agiman) of the Gold Coast (now Ghana) published what is probably the first African novel written in English, Ethiopia Unbound: Studies in Race Emancipation [9] Although the work moves between fiction and political advocacy, its publication and positive reviews in the Western press mark a watershed moment in African literature.

During this period, African plays began to emerge. Herbert Isaac Ernest Dhlomo of South Africa published the first English-language African play , The Girl Who Killed to Save: Nongqawuse the Liberator in 1935. In 1962, Ngugi wa Thiong’o of Kenya wrote the first East African drama, The Black Hermit, a cautionary tale about “tribalism” (racism between African tribes).

African literature in the late colonial period (between the end of World War I and independence) increasingly showed themes of liberation, independence, and (among Africans in French-controlled territories) négritude. One of the leaders of the négritude movement, the poet and eventual President of Senegal, Léopold Sédar Senghor, published the first anthology of French-language poetry written by Africans in 1948, Anthologie de la nouvelle poésie nègre et malgache de langue française (Anthology of the New Black and Malagasy Poetry in the French Language), featuring a preface by the French existentialist writer Jean-Paul Sartre. [10]

Nor was the African literary clerisy of this time relatively divorced from the issues that it tackled. Many, indeed, suffered deeply and directly: censured for casting aside his artistic responsibilities in order to participate actively in warfare, Christopher Okigbo was killed in battle for Biafra against the Nigerian movement of the 1960s’ civil war; Mongane Wally Serote was detained under South Africa’s Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967 between 1969 and 1970, and subsequently released without ever having stood trial; in London in 1970, his countryman Arthur Norje committed suicide; Malawi’s Jack Mapanje was incarcerated with neither charge nor trial because of an off-hand remark at a university pub; and, in 1995, Ken Saro-Wiwa died by the gallows of the Nigerian junta.

[edit] Postcolonial African literature
With liberation and increased literacy since most African nations gained their independence in the 1950s and 1960s, African literature has grown dramatically in quantity and in recognition, with numerous African works appearing in Western academic curricula and on “best of” lists compiled at the end of the 20th century. African writers in this period wrote both in Western languages (notably English, French, and Portuguese) and in traditional African languages.

Ali A. Mazrui and others mention seven conflicts as themes: the clash between Africa’s past and present, between tradition and modernity, between indigenous and foreign, between individualism and community, between socialism and capitalism, between development and self-reliance and between Africanity and humanity. [11] Other themes in this period include social problems such as corruption, the economic disparities in newly independent countries, and the rights and roles of women. Female writers are today far better represented in published African literature than they were prior to independence.

In 1986, Wole Soyinka became the first post-independence African writer to win the Nobel Prize in literature. Algerian-born Albert Camus had been awarded the 1957 prize. [[WHAT WE HAVE TO KNOW ]]The first novel in Rwanda.Mes trances a trente ans by Saverio Nayigiziki

[edit] Noma Award
The Noma Award for Publishing in Africa, begun in 1980, is presented for the outstanding work of the year in African literatures.

[edit] Major African novels
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (Nigeria)
Nuruddin Farah, From a Crooked Rib (Somalia)
Alan Paton, Cry, The Beloved Country (South Africa)
Gracy Ukala, Dizzy Angel (Nigeria)
Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa, Ogboju odẹ ninu igbo irunmalẹ (The Forest of a Thousand Demons) (Nigeria)
Dalene Matthee, Kringe in ‘n bos ([[:Template:Circles in a forest]]) (South Africa)
Mariama Bâ, Une si longue lettre (So Long a Letter) (Senegal)
Ousmane Sembène, Xala (Senegal)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, A Grain of Wheat (Kenya)
Benjamin Sehene, Le Feu sous la Soutane (Fire under the Cassock) (Rwanda)
Thomas Mofolo, Chaka (South Africa/Lesotho)
Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (Zimbabwe)
Dambudzo Marechera, The House of Hunger (Zimbabwe/Rhodesia)
Yvonne Vera, Butterfly Burning (Zimbabwe)
Mia Couto, Terra Sonâmbula (A Sleepwalking Land) (Mozambique)
Ayi Kwei Armah, The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born (Ghana)
Ben Okri, The Famished Road (Nigeria)
J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (South Africa)
Bessie Head, “When Rain Clouds Gather” (Botswana)
Sarah Ladipo Manyika, In Dependence (Nigeria)
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun (Nigeria)
Charles Mangua, A Tail in the Mouth (Kenya)
Camara Laye, The Radiance of the King (Guinea)
Nnedi Okorafor, Zahrah the Windseeker (Nigeria)
Monenembo Tierno, King of Kahel (Guinea)
Sefi Atta Everything Good Will Come (Nigeria)
[edit] Major African poets
Chinua Achebe (Nigeria)
Wole Soyinka (Nigeria)
Christopher Okigbo (Nigeria)
Lenrie Peters (Gambia)
Kofi Anyidoho (Ghana)
Dennis Brutus (South Africa)
Kofi Awoonor (Ghana)
Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal)
Glynn Burridge Seychelles
[edit] Secondary literature
Encyclopedia of African Literature, ed Simon Gikandi, London: Routledge, 2003.
The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature, ed Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi, 2 vls, Cambridge [u.a.]: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Table of contents
Daughters of Africa: An International Anthology of Words and Writing by Women of African Descent”, ed Margaret Busby (Random House, 1992).
General History of Africa vol. VIII, ed. Ali A. Mazrui, UNESCO, 1993, ch. 19 “The development of modern literature since 1935,” Ali A. Mazrui et al.
Understanding Contemporary Africa, ed. April A. Gordon and Donald L. Gordon, Lynne Rienner, London, 1996, ch. 12 “African Literature”, George Joseph
[edit] See also
Literature portal
List of African writers
African cinema
Nigerian literature
[edit] References
1.^ George, Joseph, “African Literature” ch. 12 of Understanding Contemporary Africa p. 303
2.^ ibid p. 304
3.^ http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0802673.html
4.^ George Joseph, op. cit. pp. 306-310
5.^ “African Literature – MSN Encarta”. Archived from the original on 2009-10-31. http://www.webcitation.org/5kwDV5p8Q.
6.^ http://www.sum.uio.no/research/mali/timbuktu/project/timanus.pdf
7.^ http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,569560,00.html
8.^ http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/mali/
9.^ African Literature.
10.^ “Leopold Senghor – MSN Encarta”. Archived from the original on 2009-10-31. http://www.webcitation.org/5kwDVhgpr.
11.^ Ali A. Mazrui et al. “The development of modern literature since 1935” as ch. 19 of UNESCO’s General History of Africa vol. VIII p. 564f Collaborating with Ali A. Mazrui on this chapter were Mario Pinto de Andrade, M’hamed Alaoui Abdalaoui, Daniel P. Kunene and Jan Vansina.
[edit] External links
New African Literature resource
The Africa_(Bookshelf) at Project Gutenberg
African Languages and Literature at the University of Wisconsin–Madison
African Literature Association
[show]v • d • eAfrican Literature

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Geography Countries and territories · Impact craters · Islands · Natural history · Regions · Rivers

History Colonisation (European exploration · African slave trade · Atlantic slave trade · Scramble for Africa) · Decolonization · Economic history · Empires · Military history (List of conflicts)

Politics African Union · Elections · Human rights · Pan-Africanism · United States of Africa

Society Caste system · Media (Radio stations · Television stations) · Philosophy

Sport African Cricket Association · Afro-Asian Games · All-Africa Games · Australian rules football · Confederation of African Football (Africa Cup of Nations) · Confederation of African Rugby (Africa Cup) · FIBA Africa · Stadiums by capacity · Tour d’Afrique

Years 2004 in Africa · 2005 in Africa · 2006 in Africa · 2007 in Africa · 2008 in Africa · 2009 in Africa

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_literature”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1405112018&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0521398347&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrAfrican Writing
http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1588264912&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B00004SH5I&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=080328604X&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0195086198&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B0009GJ0WY&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B003NTLD6K&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0415549620&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B001F0RIUO&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrBaobab : South African Journal of New Writinghttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1400095204&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0231130422&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B003H05IE8&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=025320710X&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=159569031X&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1400067596&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=BIB-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=1603290389&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr Against All Odds: African Languages and Literatures into the 21st Century
Categories: African culture | African literatureViews

April 29, 2010

>LATI OWO wikipedia.org

Àkójọ àwọn olùkọ̀wé ará Nàìjíríà
Lát’ọwọ́ Wikipedia
Lọ sí: atọ́ka, àwárí
Àwọn àkóónú [bòmọ́lẹ̀]
1 A
2 B-E
3 F-K
4 L-N
5 O – P
6 R-T
7 U-Z
8 Itokasi

[àtúnṣe] A
(Abimbola Adelakun)
Aderemi Adegbite
Adam Abdulahi
Yusufu Adamu
Carol Azams
Chris Abani
Chinua Achebe (1930– )
Wale Adebanwi
Bayo Adebowale (1944–)
Remi Adedeji (1937– )
Abiola Adegboyega
Dapo Adeniyi
Mobolaji Adenubi
Kole Ade-Odutola
Kayode Aderinokun
Pius Adesanmi
Akin Adesokan
Nwaizu Charles Chioma(1982-)
Anne Omolola Famuyiwa
Sean Adetula
Toyin Abiodun
Toyin Adewale-Gabriel
Dapo Adeleke
Sola Adeyemi (1965– )
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (1977– )
Emeka Agbayi
Rita Aghadiuno
Tolu Ajayi (1946– )
Segun Akinlolu
Segun Akinyode
Akilu Aliyu
Odinaka Anudu
Isiaka Aliagan
Olufunmi Aluko
T.M. Aluko (1918– )
Elechi Amadi (1934– )
Ifi Amadiume
Peter Anny-Nzekwue
Ike Anya
G. O. Apata
Sefi Atta (1964– )
Babatunde Awoyele
Anne Axis
Unoma Nguemo Azuah
Nnorom Azuonye
Tunde Akinloye
Ayotokunbo Ajewole
((Rosemary Shimite Erazua-Oniha))
[àtúnṣe] B-E
Babafemi Badejo
Francoise Balogun
Biyi Bandele
A. Igoni Barrett (1979– )
Charles Bodunde
Qasim Bolaji-Ashogbon
Tubal Rabbi Cain (1964–)
Chin Ce (1966– )
John Pepper Clark (1935– )
Samuel Ajayi Crowther (1809–1891)
Olumbe Bassir
Folasayo Dele-Ogunrinde
Umaru Dembo
David Diai
Jude Dibia (1975– )
Ebereonwu
Philip Effiong
[1]

Etebom Ekpo
Michael Echeruo (1937– )
Amatoritsero (Godwin) Ede
Eyitemi Egwuenu
Victor Ehikhamenor
Cyprian Ekwensi (1921– )
Buchi Emecheta (1944– )
E. Nolue Emenanjo
Perpetual Emenekwum-Eziefule
Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745–97)
Rosemary Esehagu (1981– )
Femi Euba
Awal Idris Evuti
Chielozona Eze
Vera Ezimora
Abitogun Oladipo Ojo
Itunu-Abitogun Oyinlade Oladipo
Akinbami Oluseyi Macaulay
Aderinola Richardson (nee Aderemi)
[àtúnṣe] F-K
Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa
Adebayo Faleti
Toyin Falola
Healson Adedayo Farore, Sr.
Dan Fulani
Bilkisu Funtuwa
Haliru Audu
Harry Oludare Garuba (1958– )
Jumoke Giwa
Helon Habila
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Ogaga Ifowodo
Anita Omoiataman Ihaza
Rita Ihekwaba
Senator Ihenyen
Ikhide R. Ikheloa (Nnamdi)
Esiaba Irobi
Akinwunmi Isola
Uzodinma Iweala
Obi “Obiwu” Iwuayanwu
Festus Iyayi
Abubakar Imam
Oritsegbemi Emmanuel Jakpa
Femi Jeboda
Prince Joshua Olawuyi
Biodun Jeyifo (1946– )
Mike Jimoh
Samuel Johnson
Kokalu O. Kalu
Uduma Kalu
Hamzat Kassim
Sulaiman Ibrahim Katsina
Olubukola Kwegan
[àtúnṣe] L-N
Abimbola Lagunju
Obakanse S. Lakanse
Akeem Lasisi
Amina Mama
Oliver Mbamara
Ayodele Morocco-Clarke (1973–)
John Munonye
Akanji Nasiru
Uche Nduka
Austyn Njoku
Obi Nwakanma
Martina Awele Nwakoby (1937– )
Nkem Nwankwo (1936–2001)
Flora Nwapa (1931–1993)
Njideka Nwapa-Ibuaka
Chuma Nwokolo
Angela Nwosu
Maik Nwosu
Nkechi Nwosu-Igbo
Azuka Nzegwu
Onuora Nzekwu
Godwin Ubong Akpan
[àtúnṣe] O – P
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Olu Obafemi
Iheoma Obibi
Obinna Charles Okwelume
Hyacinth Obunseh
Sunny E. Ododo
Taiwo Odubiyi
Odia Ofeimun
Chike Ofili
Sarah O’Gorman
Olu Oguibe
Ike Oguine
Molara Ogundipe
Samuel Olagunju Ogundipe
Tolulope Ogunlesi
Denrele Ogunwa
Omolola Ijeoma Ogunyemi
Yemi D. Ogunyemi
Ijeoma Ogwuegbu
Francis Ohanyido[2] (1970– )
Tanure Ojaide
Steve Nezianya
Bamiji Ojo
Akinloye Ojo
Olatubosun Oladapo
Gabriel Okara (1921– )
Oladejo Okedeji
Wale Okediran
Chika Okeke
Remi Okere
Niran Okewole
Christopher Okigbo (1932–1967)
Onookome Okome
Ike Okonta
Nnedi Okorafor
Dike Okoro
Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo
Wole Oguntokun
Osita Okoroafor
Ben Okri (1959– )
Afolabi Olabimtan
Simbo Olorunfemi
Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju
Esho Oluborode
Alade E. Oluwadamilola
Kole Omotosho (1943– )
Nduka Onwuegbute (1969– )
Osonye Tess Onwueme (1955– )
Dillibe Onyeama
Frank Onyebu
Nwando Onyeabo
Alexander Orok
Nnaemeka Oruh
Dennis Osadebay
Femi Osofisan
Chinye Phiona Osai
Sanya Osha
Sola Osofisan
E.C. Osondu
Niyi Osundare (1947– )
Tony Nduka Otiono
Helen Ovbiagele (1944– )
Jamin Owhovoriole
Stella Dia Oyedepo
Bunmi Oyinsan
Dupe Olorunjo
Naan Pocen
Seni Ogunkola
Tolulope Popoola
[àtúnṣe] R-T
Remi Raji
Aderemi Raji-Oyelade
Ken Saro-Wiwa (1941–95)
Lola Shoneyin
Mudi Sipikin
Ladipo Soetan
Zulu Sofola (1935–95)
Bode Sowande (1948–)
J. Sobowole Sowande
Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye
Wole Soyinka (1934– ), awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Literature
Emmanuel Sule
Mohammed Sule
Muritala Sule
Kola Tubosun
Adebisi Thompson
Amos Tutuola (1920-97)
Morenike Taire
Odijie Ehis Michael
[àtúnṣe] U-Z
Uche Nworah
Ebele Uche-Nwakile
Françoise Ugochukwu
Clarius Ugwuoha
Odili Ujubuonu
Gracy Ukala (formerly Osifo)
Adaora Lily Ulasi (1932– )
Sumaila Isah Umaisha
Karo Umukoro
Chika Unigwe
Emman Usman Shehu
Ronnie Uzoigwe
Jumoke Verissimo
Ugonna Wachuku (1971– )
Segun Williams
Ken Wiwa (1968– )
Molara Wood
Oladipo Yemitan
Sa’adu Zungur
Ubong Alfred

Àyọkà yí le fẹ̀ jù báyìí lọ. Ẹ ran Wikipedia lọ́wọ́ láti fẹ̀ẹ́ jù báyìí lọ![àtúnṣe] Itokasi
1.↑ Philip Effiong, Jr.
2.↑ [http://www.africanwriter.com/authors/102/Francis-Ohanyido
Jẹ́ kíkójáde láti “http://yo.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%80k%C3%B3j%E1%BB%8D_%C3%A0w%E1%BB%8Dn_ol%C3%B9k%E1%BB%8D%CC%80w%C3%A9_ar%C3%A1_N%C3%A0%C3%ACj%C3%ADr%C3%AD%C3%A0”
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Ọjọ́ tí a ṣe àtunṣe ojúewé yi gbẹ̀yìn ni 23:05, 5 November 2009.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of

>LIST OF NIGERIAN WRITERS-FROM WIKIPEDIA.ORG

April 29, 2010

>FROM wikipedia.org

List of Nigerian writers
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

——————————————————————————–

1 A
2 B-E
3 F-K
4 L-N
5 O – P
6 R-T
7 U-Z

[edit] A
Abimbola Adelakun
Gbola Adiamoh
Aderemi Adegbite
Adam Abdulahi
Yusufu Adamu
Carol Azams
Chris Abani
Chinua Achebe (1930– )
Wale Adebanwi
Bayo Adebowale (1944–)
Remi Adedeji (1937– )
Abiola Adegboyega
Dapo Adeniyi
Mobolaji Adenubi
Kole Ade-Odutola
Kayode Aderinokun
Pius Adesanmi
Akin Adesokan
Nwaizu Charles Chioma(1982-)
Anne Omolola Famuyiwa
Sean Adetula
Toyin Abiodun
Toyin Adewale-Gabriel
Dapo Adeleke
Sola Adeyemi (1965– )
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (1977– )
Emeka Agbayi
Rita Aghadiuno
Tolu Ajayi (1946– )
Segun Akinlolu
Segun Akinyode
Uwem Akpan
Akilu Aliyu
Odinaka Anudu
Isiaka Aliagan
Olufunmi Aluko
T.M. Aluko (1918– )
Elechi Amadi (1934– )
Ifi Amadiume
Peter Anny-Nzekwue
Ike Anya
G. O. Apata
Sefi Atta (1964– )
Babatunde Awoyele
Anne Axis
Unoma Nguemo Azuah
Nnorom Azuonye
Tunde Akinloye
Ayotokunbo Ajewole
((Rosemary Shimite Erazua-Oniha))
[edit] B-E
Babafemi Badejo
Francoise Balogun
Biyi Bandele
A. Igoni Barrett (1979– )
Olumbe Bassir
Charles Bodunde
Qasim Bolaji-Ashogbon
Tubal Rabbi Cain (1964–)
Chin Ce (1966– )
John Pepper Clark (1935– )
Samuel Ajayi Crowther (1809–1891)
Folasayo Dele-Ogunrinde
Umaru Dembo
David Diai
David Numshi Musa
Jude Dibia (1975– )
Ebereonwu
Philip Effiong
Etebom Ekpo
Michael Echeruo (1937– )
Amatoritsero (Godwin) Ede
Eyitemi Egwuenu
Victor Ehikhamenor
Cyprian Ekwensi (1921–2007)
Buchi Emecheta (1944– )
E. Nolue Emenanjo
Perpetual Emenekwum-Eziefule
Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745–97)
Rosemary Esehagu (1981– )
Femi Euba
Awal Idris Evuti
Pedus Chidiebere Eweama
Chielozona Eze
Vera Ezimora
Abitogun Oladipo Ojo
Itunu-Abitogun Oyinlade Oladipo
Akinbami Oluseyi Macaulay
Aderinola Richardson (nee Aderemi)
[edit] F-K
Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa
Adebayo Faleti
Toyin Falola
Healson Adedayo Farore, Sr.
Dan Fulani
Bilkisu Funtuwa
Haliru Audu
Harry Oludare Garuba (1958– )
Jumoke Giwa
Helon Habila
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Ogaga Ifowodo
Anita Omoiataman Ihaza
Rita Ihekwaba
Senator Ihenyen
Ikhide R. Ikheloa (Nnamdi)
Esiaba Irobi
Akinwunmi Isola
Uzodinma Iweala
Obi “Obiwu” Iwuayanwu
Festus Iyayi
Abubakar Imam
Oritsegbemi Emmanuel Jakpa
John Jea
Femi Jeboda
Prince Joshua Olawuyi
Biodun Jeyifo (1946– )
Mike Jimoh
Samuel Johnson
Kokalu O. Kalu
Uduma Kalu
Hamzat Kassim
Sulaiman Ibrahim Katsina
Olubukola Kwegan
Chime, Hilary Uchenna
[edit] L-N
Lawrence Onuzulike
Abimbola Lagunju
Obakanse S. Lakanse
Akeem Lasisi
Amina Mama
Oliver Mbamara
Ayodele Morocco-Clarke (1973–)
John Munonye
Akanji Nasiru
Uche Nduka
Austyn Njoku
Obi Nwakanma
Martina Awele Nwakoby (1937– )
Nkem Nwankwo (1936–2001)
Flora Nwapa (1931–1993)
Njideka Nwapa-Ibuaka
Chuma Nwokolo
Angela Nwosu
Maik Nwosu
Nkechi Nwosu-Igbo
Azuka Nzegwu
Onuora Nzekwu
Godwin Ubong Akpan
[edit] O – P
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Olu Obafemi
Iheoma Obibi
Obinna Charles Okwelume
Ogunade Jude Adebosoye (1968–)
Hyacinth Obunseh
Sunny E. Ododo
Taiwo Odubiyi
Odia Ofeimun
Chike Ofili
Sarah O’Gorman
Olu Oguibe
Ike Oguine
Molara Ogundipe
Samuel Olagunju Ogundipe
Tolulope Ogunlesi
Denrele Ogunwa
Omolola Ijeoma Ogunyemi
Yemi D. Ogunyemi
Ijeoma Ogwuegbu
[[Francis Ohanyido] (1970– )
Tanure Ojaide
Steve Nezianya
Bamiji Ojo
Akinloye Ojo
Olatubosun Oladapo
Gabriel Okara (1921– )
Oladejo Okedeji
Wale Okediran
Chika Okeke
Remi Okere
Niran Okewole
Christopher Okigbo (1932–1967)
Onookome Okome
Ike Okonta
Nnedi Okorafor
Dike Okoro
Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo
Wole Oguntokun
Osita Okoroafor
Ben Okri (1959– )
Afolabi Olabimtan
Simbo Olorunfemi
Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju
Esho Oluborode
Alade E. Oluwadamilola
Kole Omotosho (1943– )
Nduka Onwuegbute (1969– )
Osonye Tess Onwueme (1955– )
Dillibe Onyeama
Frank Onyebu
Nwando Onyeabo
Alexander Orok
Nnaemeka Oruh
Dennis Osadebay
Femi Osofisan
Chinye Phiona Osai
Sanya Osha
Sola Osofisan
E.C. Osondu
Niyi Osundare (1947– )
Tony Nduka Otiono
Helen Ovbiagele (1944– )
Jamin Owhovoriole
Stella Dia Oyedepo
Bunmi Oyinsan
Dupe Olorunjo
Naan Pocen
Seni Ogunkola
Tolulope Popoola
[edit] R-T
Remi Raji
Aderemi Raji-Oyelade
Ken Saro-Wiwa (1941–95)
Lola Shoneyin
Mudi Sipikin
Ladipo Soetan
Zulu Sofola (1935–95)
Ayo Sogunro
Bode Sowande (1948–)
J. Sobowole Sowande
Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye
Wole Soyinka (1934– ), awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Literature
Emmanuel Sule
Mohammed Sule
Muritala Sule
Ogunade Jude Adebosoye (1968–)
Kola Tubosun
Adebisi Thompson
Amos Tutuola (1920-97)
Morenike Taire
Odijie Ehis Michael
[edit] U-Z
Uche Uzoebo
Uche Nworah
Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike
Ebele Uche-Nwakile
Françoise Ugochukwu
Clarius Ugwuoha
Odili Ujubuonu
Gracy Ukala (formerly Osifo)
Adaora Lily Ulasi (1932– )
Sumaila Isah Umaisha
Karo Umukoro
Chika Unigwe
Emman Usman Shehu
Ronnie Uzoigwe
Jumoke Verissimo
Ugonna Wachuku (1971– )
Segun Williams
Ken Wiwa (1968– )
Molara Wood
Oladipo Yemitan
Sa’adu Zungur
Ubong Alfred
Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nigerian_writers”
Categories: Lists of writers by nationality Nigeria-related lists Nigerian writersViews

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A SISTER FROM GHANA TELLS OF HER HEALING OF A LIVER CONDITION!-’GOD WILL HEAL ALL OUR DISEASES!”

April 27, 2010

from spirituality.com

A Christian Science nurse from Ghana
Imelda Ammah
Reprinted from the January 2009 issue of The Christian Science Journal.

The day I walked into a Christian Science Reading Room for the first time, I had no idea what a wonderful spiritual journey lay ahead. Five years before, I had come to London from Ghana (West Africa) to become a medical nurse. But for three months before I had come into the Reading Room, I had been very ill. A severe reaction to the medicine I was taking for a urinary infection resulted in liver damage and severe weight loss. The doctor finally told me that nothing else could be done medically. He discharged me from the hospital, asking that I come back every two weeks for blood tests.

During that time, my husband saw an advertisement for a Christian Science Reading Room that stated “Christian Science Heals.” I found the Reading Room and said to the librarian, “You people heal. Can you help me?” This wonderful librarian gave me Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures and a copy of The Christian Science Journal to look for a practitioner. She also gave me a Christian Science Sentinel, which I read on the bus ride home. By the time I got home, I had already had a healing of painful boils on my ankles and legs.

The librarian had invited me to the Wednesday testimony meeting. At that time, it was unusual for people of color to go into any British church, and if they did they usually faced an unfriendly reception. Besides that, due to my physical condition, I wasn’t a pleasant picture to see. But everyone lovingly welcomed me. I felt such a great sense of love at that service. I went home and read the whole chapter “Prayer” in Science and Health. What I read greatly relieved me from the fear that my ill health was punishment for something I had done wrong. I went to bed, and for the first time in a long time I slept peacefully through the night.
I held dear in my heart the idea of becoming a Christian Science nurse.

The following day I went to see a practitioner. She prayed for me and told me to go home and lead a normal life. Two weeks later, I went to the hospital for a blood test and was told that I was well and didn’t need to come anymore. This healing took place in 1976, and I have had no recurrence of this condition since.

At that time, I wanted to serve the Christian Science movement in any way I could. I joined a branch Church of Christ, Scientist, and The Mother Church, and I took Christian Science primary class instruction. I also learned about Christian Science nursing and held dear in my heart the idea of becoming a Christian Science nurse.

I left medical nursing as a career, but I took a job in nursing recruitment to support my three young children. Mary Baker Eddy wrote in Science and Health, “Emerge gently from matter into Spirit.” I guess you could say I emerged gently, as it took almost 20 years before I seriously pursued Christian Science nursing.
I have witnessed many healings, including tumors dissolved and aggressive wounds healed.

My first step into Christian Science nursing was a short course on Christian Science home nursing. During the course we discussed in detail the Christian Science Nurse By-Law in the Church Manual (p. 49). After this, I went on private-duty cases with nurses who advertised in the Journal. They served as my mentors. In another three years, I also began to advertise in the Journal. I was the London Visiting Nurse for five years before moving back to Ghana to look after my very senior mother and to offer my services as a Christian Science nurse to those in my own country.

In Africa, Christian Science nursing is in its infancy. We do not have Christian Science nursing facilities as in Europe and America. Families still look after their own, so I do not receive many requests for my services as a nurse. I spend part of the year working at a Christian Science nursing facility near London. I’m very active in my branch church in Ghana, and I continue to pray to know how Christian Science nursing can be supportive for Christian Scientists in my country.

As a Christian Science nurse, I have witnessed many healings, including tumors dissolved and aggressive wounds healed. I pray to see every patient as the perfect “image of God,” as the Bible says. I continually remind myself that I can only see what God sees. In this way, I am obeying the commandment not to bear false witness against my neighbor. All nursing is an art, but the spiritual dimension of Christian Science nursing is awesome.

Imelda Ammah now lives in Tema, Ghana.
Spiritual Man:
Science and Health:
485:14 (only)
King James Bible:
Gen. 1:27

SICKLE CELL ANEMIA BLACK PEOPLE! THERE IS HOPE AND EVEN HEALING FOR THIS TRAGIC BLACK DISEASE-THIS BROTHER IS 61 YEARS WITH IT AND HE IS A GREAT FILM MAKER IN NIGERIA!

April 27, 2010

from punchng.com

When I was 13, doctors told my mother I would not live beyond 21–Wale Fanu

By ADEOLA BALOGUN, Published: Saturday, 17 Apr 2010
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Wale Fanu, 60-year-old sickle cell anaemia patient

The Managing Director of Cinekraft, Mr Wale Fanu, is the producer of two popular Nigerian films, Owo Blow and Mirror in the Sun. The associate of notable filmmaker, Tunde Kelani, recounts his battles with sickle cell anaemia to ADEOLA BALOGUN.

My battle with sickle cell anaemiaToday, there is a medical principle that says your personal attitude to starting things will help you to get over certain problems in life. In most cases, it might contradict the medicals. In some cases, you may be advised not to do it again. This reminds me of a very critical time in my life. I think it was 1968. We were three days away from writing our school certificate examination.

At that time, the school certificate was more than the first degree to most students. I had a crisis and for four days, only my classmates and friends knew about it. Surprisingly, our head cook at St Paul’s College, Zaria noticed that I was going to sit the examination in three days, and since I was not in the dinning hall, something must be wrong with me. My friends told him that I had been sick for three days and I could not get up on my feet. He came to me in the hostel, carried me on his shoulders and went straight to the kitchen. He sent for one of their fellow mallams. He said to the mallam, ‘This boy wants to start taking his exams in three days time, what can we do?’

The mallam boiled some water and brought out the horn which they used to drain bad blood and started work. It got to a point that I did not know whether the water was hot or cold as they massaged vigorously. That day, I slept very well.

The following morning, I was relieved. I went to the examination hall and managed through. Two things happened here: God will send you a helper, but you have to let people know what you are. If not for Sahiru, the head cook, I don‘t know where I would be today, because I certainly would not take the exams, and in those days it was unheard of to miss exams. I am happy that the cook was sent by God to assist me.

When I left secondary school and got to what today is called The Polytechnic Ibadan, which was then known as the Technical College, Ibadan, I had another critical crisis. You know that in life, you learn from your last experience. When the pain became unbearable, stupidly, I went round Dugbe, because our house was not far from there, to look for the mallams to come and do what they did for me the previous year.

The people I met didn‘t know how to manage the crisis. As I grew older in life and still nursing this ailment, I started on my own to search for what could give me relief anytime I had a crisis.

I have crisis in very odd situations, home and abroad. Sometimes I am lucky to be with members of my family or friends who are ready to assist with whatever I tell them I want. This is one of the weaknesses of a sickler. He can tell you what he needs to be relieved. In most cases, from my own personal experience, the things you want to get a relief can be very troublesome. I will tell you the odd ones. When I had an attack in London, I lived in one small room with a friend of mine who was like a brother to me. We had only one bed in the room. I needed to boil water at very odd hours to massage my hands and take my medications to relieve the pain. I needed somebody to help massage my body, serious massage. But if you keep on doing what your body needs when you are in crisis in three or four days, you will forget it until the next one comes.

Out of pity for my mother, the family doctor who was taking care of me from a tender age sent me to Kano to do a blood test. He was confused about my condition. When they brought the result of the test, the doctor said to my mother, ‘I am sorry, this boy may not live beyond 20 or 21 years‘. I was 13 years-old at the time, and I did not even know what it meant, so it didn‘t bother me. I didn‘t know the meaning of dying and I didn‘t know how my mother felt. The same doctor was then posted to the University College, Ibadan and he discovered I had stupidly made an attempt to repeat what happened during my school certificate examination in Ibadan.

I use the word stupid because that man felt like whipping me for doing that. He then explained to me the risk I took in calling a mallam in. We are talking about sometime between 1968 and 1969. The man told me never to call in the mallam again. If you know what the sickler goes through in acute pains, depending on what part of the body the attack is coming from, you will not blame any sickler for doing anything to get a relief. When the pain gets to the climax, if they tell you to jump into the ocean, you will jump. It is like when a woman is in labour and the pain becomes unbearable and the woman starts to scream and says she wants a Caesarian Section. A lot of people will say, no, no, push. It is only the woman that knows what she feels.

When it was three or four months to my 20th birthday, around Christmas, I had a terrible crisis. The crisis always comes at very odd hours, say around 2 am or 3 am. At that time, the strongest pain relief drugs we had then was Codeine, which was sold in a bottle containing about 100 tablets. By the time the pain had fully registered, I had taken half a bottle. And then, by the time my father realised that the crisis was getting out of hand, he quickly rushed me to Dr Ajayi. Ajayi told my father to take me to the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. In 1969, LUTH was like one of the best hospitals you could talk about. By the time we got to the hospital, there was this young doctor who was also God-sent.

I was wheeled into the emergency area and the doctor (I don‘t know how God directed him) put a pipe through my nose right into my brain and started draining the excess Codeine I had taken. But I was on emergency bed for four days. When I finally came out of that situation by God‘s grace. It was the first major life-threatening attack that my father witnessed. It was not the first one I had suffered. My mother was still in the north. She had to quickly make an arrangement to return to Lagos.

Before then, another major crisis had occurred around October 1 1963. I will never ever forget that day. As small as I was, I begged God to take my life. Stark naked, I screamed and nobody could even hold me. I said, ‘God, this is more than enough; I will rather die than continue like this.’ All the nurses, the doctors wept and took pity on me and my mother because after going in and out of hospital almost every four weeks, they all became my friends. Dr Oshodi, the man who God sent to my father‘s family, was quickly called in because it was a public holiday.

When the man came and met me in that condition, he ordered for something called enema, which dislodges the bowels. Immediately they emptied my bowels, I slept like a dead wood. The lesson I learnt from that incident was that I started to watch my waste everyday. I ask myself, have you gone to the toilet today before you start putting another thing in your stomach? As a 13-year old, I learnt that as long as you are a living soul, when you eat, you must pass out the waste. It is the man that wears the shoe that knows where it pinches. All of us can only pity. It was so bad that when I was in secondary school, because that was the time I came back with that result from Kano, that the doctor said I should come for a letter to present to my school principal.

In those days, we were not sleeping on mattresses. We slept on the spring bed. We used cardboard at St Paul College, Zaria. I was the first person to be allowed to use a mattress. I was exempted from manual labour and permitted to use hot water for my bath. Then we had an Irish house master who would bring me hot water from his house. If the cook could not come, this man would bring it himself when I was in crisis. Any head boy we had became my mother’s friend, because they must monitor me. That made me very special and I started to develop a don‘t-treat-me-like-an-invalid attitude. That is why most sicklers believe they can do ten times what a non-sickler can do, because they are not even aware of their status. It is only when crisis comes that they know. Tell a sickler to take a heavy object to anywhere, he is more than ready to do so. Sometimes you feel it when the crisis is coming, because you feel some sensations.

I had another bad one and it was about the time we were producing Owo Blow. You know that the cast of Owo Blow was a large one, and when you have a large cast, you have all sorts of people. Not knowing that I was developing a crisis, they thought that I did not want to pay them their money. So they punctured the tyres of my car. By the time I left Surulere that night, my clutch had already leaked and I began to think about how to get to Alagbado where I lived. I managed to start the car. Looking back at the incident, if there is what is called a miracle, then I will tell you that was one. I drove through the Apapa- Oshodi expressway, via the airport, straight to Agege Motor Road, till I got to the gate of my residence. I never had cause to stop once. And when I struggled to enter, I knew I was in trouble. I always do one thing, if I am going out of my station for production and I am going to stay more than two weeks, I always find the nearest hospital and explain my status to the doctor there, in case I suffer a crisis.

The interesting part of it was that as a man, I knew that I had to work to earn my living. Since I did not have to depend on my father for life, I started meeting people who told me they had children who were afflicted with sickle cell anaemia. But how did they manage? I was rudely shocked when a close family lost two adult children in six months. It pained me. Before then, I had a friend called Gbenga. Before I knew it, he was dead. I used to wonder if this was a killer disease. I hear people tell me, you are lucky, you are lucky.

Why I limp

My story started to change in 1970 when I started to limp. People thought I had an accident or something and I used to tell them that I had a very bad accident. I was referred to Professor Henshaw who ran the Orthopaedic and pathology department at LUTH at the time. He is late now. The professor then told me to do a series of X-rays and when he looked at the results, he said to me, ‘Now I know why you limp. But to resolve this limping, you have to wait until you are 40 years old. I said okay, I would not mind, I would wait. Then I had the opportunity to travel to America and my brother who knew how much trouble my condition gave to the family, had arranged for a doctor for me. And so on my arrival, we went to see the doctor. The doctor told me that the operation was no big deal, but I should not do it then. He said I should take my time and wait till I was 50 years old. He said he could even come over to Nigeria and do it for me. By the time I was 50, some friends and old colleagues of mine who were working with the British Broadcasting Corporation, hosted a party for me.

They hosted the party in Richard Taylor‘s house. Taylor‘s wife had just undergone a hip replacement surgery and after the party, he said, ‘Wale, I think that is what is wrong with you. Maybe we should take you to her surgeon and then you discuss with him. So we went to see him. The man looked at my X-ray and said ‘Yes, it is what you need to do. But if you are still able to make money by working, don‘t do it.’ I asked when I could do it, at least to become a normal human being. He said no, just go on. When you cannot do any work again, come back and we will do it, because the management of that operation is not easy. You know that after that time, which was 10 years ago, I promised myself not to think about it again. So each time the pain is about to get to the point where it becomes unbearable, I take my little everyday medicine and I am okay.

I told you in the beginning that God would always send a helper. When Tunde Kelani and I became friends, and from being friends, professional colleagues, from becoming professional colleagues, we became business partners, I always told him, ‘If tomorrow you see me, then we will continue.’ But I always tell myself, this thing cannot stop me. I have never been to the Sickle Cell Foundation. When they were at Onikan and each time I passed through the place, I ask myself what I am contributing to the foundation. So when I got in touch with Professor Akinyanju, I told myself that for my 60th birthday, I would organise a talk on sickle cell disease. Before then, Funmi Iyanda had begged me to come and talk about sickle cell anaemia in her early morning programme on TV. I told her in confidence that this sickle cell thing is like having a headache, because it is only you that know how to treat it, apart from the general knowledge of it.

Some people sleep with only one pillow, I sleep with four pillows because every part of my body has to be supported with pillows. So it is a personal thing that you have to develop. You have to start to monitor yourself. I told her I could not accept her invitation to come to TV because I didn‘t want to make people feel bad. But when I meet people one-on-one, and I know that we are in the same club, then we can talk.

I notice too that each time a family has a child whose genotype is SS, the child dies. So, I am waiting for the lecture to ask the professor, must we die? If we must die, then tell us what to do, because I don‘t really know why. When I read about a single lady nursing a sickler child, I wept for her. I met another friend through a cousin in London and he said to me, ‘How do you manage? Because my son is SS and anytime he is in crisis, the doctor pumps morpheme into him.’ Then I wonder if at this tender age, the boy is being given morpheme, what will happen when he grows up?

When they were talking about the painkillers Michael Jackson took before he gave up, I said to myself, people don‘t know what pain is. You cannot tell somebody who has never been in labour how pleasant or unpleasant it is to be in labour. It is the person in pain that knows what he is passing through. Before Michael Jackson died, did we ever imagine that he could be in pain? No, but by the time he got back to his base from the stage, he quickly called his doctor.

For many years I used to have a colleague here. Whenever I was leaving London, I would call him and say, ‘Tell Dr Rotimi that I am on my way. Let him get ready.‘ This is because I know myself. There are times I tell you I can drive from here to Sokoto. There are times I tell you, please as I am sitting in front of you, I cannot stand up. I am a Yoruba man. My parents expected me to prostrate before elderly people when I meet them. But I had to open up to my dad. I told him that the pain would not allow me to do that, so accept the bit I can do. But I don‘t know how you want to explain that to other people who think you are too proud to prostrate to elders. This is because the hips have become fused together and so movement here is so much restricted. It is better in the morning and gets a bit difficult in the day, especially after running around. So that is my history. Having endured this problem for 60 years, I think I owe it to the nation to educate fellow Nigerians that this thing may not be a killer, if only we know how to manage it.

Why I didn‘t associate with the Sickle Cell Foundation

I started from a time when nobody knew about sickle cell anaemia. Even when my mother was told that I would not live beyond 20, I didn‘t even think about it. I used to see the sign board of the foundation and I was tempted to go in there. But what whould I have told them? I always wonder whether there is a common forum there for all of us to discuss our common problems. Some of us don‘t even know that as sicklers, we must run away totally from malaria. Professor Akinyanju has asked me to write a book on this. I told him I was not a writer, that what I could do was talk about it. That is why I am arranging a forum for people to come and share in my story.

Source of the disease

Why I never ever thought that it could be from one of my parents is that my mother and I shared the same birthday and we had a lot in common. She stood by me through thick and thin. When I was 40, I told myself I would give my mother a special birthday present, because she suffered. She left me a few months after our birthday and so, whenever my birthday approached, I would break down in tears. She had four children and I am the only sickler and she died at 70. My father had six children and I am the only sickler among them. I am talking about the days when you could not ask anybody any question. In fact, it was not done. It was not like these days that people say I can‘t marry an SS. But now, I beg anybody to be mindful of the status of their spouse in order to reduce the population of sickle cell sufferers. If the two of you truly love each other, why would you want to go through this stress? If my mother was working in the civil service, how would she be able to take care of me? She was a petty trader and so she was able to stay with me for weeks. When they told me to go to Ugheli for HSC at that time, my mother came to my principal and wept. For two reasons. One, she said she could not afford it. Two, the civil war was going on. I was to go to Molusi College in Ijebu Igbo but I ended up not attending the school.

How I got a job

My job is not only stressful, it is energy consuming. The equipment is becoming heavier, not like the camera area that is getting smaller. I told you that when I was approaching 20 years, I slipped into a coma for four days and my father called me with tears in his eyes not to do anything; that if it was feeding, he would feed me. He begged me not to go back to school in Ibadan where I was studying electrical engineering in 1969.

I was searching for a job when I ran into one of my father‘s friends in Obalende. He didn‘t see me, but when he came to my father‘s house in the evening, I told him that I saw him in Obalende and I couldn‘t call him. I told him I was looking for a job that was chemistry based. He said I was lucky, that he was about to employ some people in their film laboratory, which then happened to be the Federal Ministry of Information film unit.

I got in there and I loved the job a lot. In two years, I left there for the NTA that had just opened a new lab and they wanted competent hands to run the place. The challenge they had was that the lab had to start operating when the National Stadium was opened. So we needed to turn out films that would be sent out to regional stations so that people could watch what happened on the day they opened the stadium. So I started working at the NTA even before I was employed.

From 13 pounds 10 shillings that I was receiving at the ministry, my salary was raised to 52 pounds at the NTA, so I moved. I moved not because of the money, but because of the professional challenge. I was sent to Belgium for training and by the time I came back, Tunde Kelani and I had started talking about what to do technically to improve the situation. We were constructing even when we were not making money for production.

My father was very supportive, though each time he gave us money for production, we paid back. My father had another emotional problem: he did not know what to tell his friends what his son Wale did for a living, since he was neither a doctor nor a lawyer. But one day, I had to do something for a neighbour. By then we had started Mirror in the Sun. On the crew list of Mirror in the Sun was a certain Wale Freeman and he used to ask which of the Freeman he was seeing on the screen until one day when I told him that I was the one; that I was using the name Freeman because I was then working with government. He was very pleased. The man passed on peacefully on a Friday morning when I was coming to collect money from him to buy a brand new car.

Blessed with an SS-free home

Even though I would not like discussing marriage, I would tell you that I didn‘t think about it for a second. But by the special Grace of God, none of my children is SS. But now, I want to tell people that they should be very careful when they choose a spouse. Another advice I have for people who have sicklers around them is that they should never allow them to have access to painkillers. Even when they have to dispense to them, they should make sure they don‘t know the source. Otherwise, I would not have taken half a bottle of codeine when I suffered crisis.

Comments :

* Indeed Sir, you are an inspiration, you dont how much of hope you are giving sickle cell sufferers like me who might have read this article. You still need to do more of this.I pray you will enjoy more of good health and live longer!

Posted by: Moo , on Saturday, April 17, 2010

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* Moving story, well told. May you live loooooooooong& may God continue to send you help in time of trouble/crisis.

Posted by: Debo Mabo , on Saturday, April 17, 2010

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* Mr. Wale Fanu, Thank you for sharing with us your ordeal with sickel cell anaemia. My four year old son has the same affliction. He had had several crises already during his first 18 months of life. He takes DIOSCOVITE now – a food suppliment produced by a Nigerian in the US where my family and I live. My son has not had any crisis for 3 years now due to this Dioscovite. Please, email me for more info. It is our wish for every sickler to get the same benefit our son is getting from Diosco

Posted by: C , on Saturday, April 17, 2010

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* Sir i belive dat GOD is wit u.despite ur conditn,GOD kept u alive sir. Sir am standing in the power in the name of jesus that every sickness in ur lyf shl be consume in the name of jesus. Nd i pray 4 any one who is surfring 4rm dis sickness. dat d power of d mst high GOD will rst upon there lyf in jesus name. Sir the lord is there 4 u any day any time,only if u serve him in spirit nd in truth. The lord is ur strength.

Posted by: Owolabi , on Saturday, April 17, 2010

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* Wale, I am glad to read about you and to know that you are still alive and keeping well. I know some of the stories you told because both our mums of blessed memory were close friends in Zaria. Your strength of character has surely seen you through these ordeals. Remain blessed

Posted by: Lola VisserMabogunje , on Saturday, April 17, 2010

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT KNOWS HOW TO TRAIN HILLARY CLINTON AND HE DID!

April 27, 2010

http://www.newsweek.com/id/236938?from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+newsweek%2FTopNews+%28UPDATED+-+Newsweek+Top+Stories%29

Obama’s Bad Cop

Clinton’s played the heavy with Iran, Russia, and even Israel—and her sometimes hawkish views are finding favor with the president.

By Michael Hirsh | NEWSWEEK
Published Apr 23, 2010
From the magazine issue dated May 3, 2010

It was almost like one of those moments in a buddy-cop movie when the two partners who dislike each other at the beginning finally bond while taking on the bad guys. In mid-December Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were in Copenhagen, where the leaders of more than 100 countries had gathered to negotiate a new agreement to combat global warming, and the summit was on the verge of collapse. Clinton later described it as the most disorganized meeting she’d seen since her eighth-grade student council. It “was just disintegrating right before everybody’s eyes,” she recalled to NEWSWEEK in an interview last week. Clinton and her former political rival, now the president, found themselves up against most of the rest of the world. At the last minute Obama sought a one-on-one meeting with the Chinese leader to rescue some kind of agreement, only to be told that Premier Wen Jiabao and his team still weren’t ready to meet (after two years of prior procrastination). “No, we’re going in now,” Obama declared, looking at Clinton. “Absolutely,” she said. “Let’s go.”

Clinton’s played the heavy with Iran, Russia, and even Israel—and her sometimes hawkish views are finding
FAVOR WITH THE PRESIDENT.

The former political rivals suddenly morphed into a diplomatic version of Starsky and Hutch. “I felt a particular responsibility since I had urged the president to come,” Clinton said. “Because I knew nothing was going to happen unless we gave it our all.” Striding down the hallway, with the Chinese protocol officer sputtering protests behind them, America’s two best-known politicians barged into the meeting room. There they found Wen conferring secretly with the leaders of Brazil, India, and South Africa; behind the scenes, Beijing had been trying to block all efforts to impose standards for measuring, reporting, and verifying progress on carbon reduction. Smiling and shaking hands, Obama and Clinton worked the room together, as they had each done so many times before as contending politicians. Then the president sat down and started negotiating, with Clinton sliding position papers to him as needed. When the Chinese finally caved, both Obama and Clinton knew that it wasn’t just because they had crashed the meeting. Two days before, the secretary of state had flown in to Copenhagen by surprise to deliver a sweetener to help win over developing countries. In essence, it was a global bribe: $100 billion a year from rich nations by 2020 to help poorer countries cope with climate controls. It was political hardball, Hillary style, and it had helped to isolate Beijing. Now Obama was closing the deal Clinton had set up.

The two came away from Copenhagen with a partial triumph and a new sense of maturity—both about their relationship and their sense of how to lead. Clinton later called it one of “the most extraordinary 48 hours she’s spent in public life,” said her global-warming negotiator, Todd Stern—which is saying something for a woman who’s lived through political tumult for 18 years, including several presidential and senatorial campaigns. Clinton told NEWSWEEK that it was important for America to be seen taking the lead in tackling seemingly impossible problems, particularly in an era with rising new powers at the table, if only to show what the country stands for. “We can’t just walk out of the arena and leave these important decisions to somebody else because it’s messy, it’s difficult, it requires compromise. That is what you have to do on the world stage today,” she said. “We remain the strongest country in the world, but the way we exercise that leadership has changed dramatically.”

Copenhagen also provided further evidence that the sharp differences between Obama and Clinton over foreign policy on the campaign trail were, as many on both sides now acknowledge, largely political theater. In fact, their views of American power had never been that far apart. “We’re both, at bottom, problem solvers and practical, realistic people,” Clinton says now. “As Mario Cuomo said, ‘You campaign in poetry and you govern in prose.’?” Critics dismissed the climate targets as vague and voluntary, and the administration faces a separate onslaught from global-warming skeptics. But since the summit, 120 nations have signed on and 75 have submitted carbon-reduction plans, Stern says.

It took some time after the election for Obama and Clinton to find their balance together. They had fought one of the fiercest wars in American political history, and the wounds were still raw in the early months of the new administration. Clinton’s aides felt a chill from the advisers around Obama, especially loyalists like David Axelrod, Robert Gibbs, and Valerie Jarrett. Though Clinton kept her head down while she mastered her brief as secretary of state—it was the way she took on every new task, methodically and tirelessly—she was also feeling a little deflated. Obama’s plea to join his administration had been enticing: he had his hands full with the collapsing economy, the new president said, and he needed someone of her stature to handle foreign policy. The implication was that she would have the dominant voice when it came to dealing with the world. Instead, friends and admirers were baffled at her seeming lack of influence. She “was not in the inner circle. That was clear,” says one aide who, like several others quoted in this story, did not want to be named discussing internal politics. Her bluntness abroad occasionally caused consternation in the West Wing, and Clinton, in turn, “complained about a lack of dissenting voices in the administration,” says an old friend who knows her from her first-lady days. “In the beginning she would say, ‘They want this, they want that,’?” meaning the White House. “It took a while for her to start saying ‘we.’?” Clinton and Obama had already begun bonding on previous trips abroad, but in Copenhagen the “they” truly became “we,” Clinton aides say.

Today, the metamorphosis of bitter combatants into bona fide partners is not quite complete, but it is far along. Clinton herself says she and Obama quickly established a “collegial partnership,” though she acknowledges that some of their aides “may have taken longer to shake off the vestiges of a very hard-fought campaign.” Some friends marvel at the equanimity with which she accepted defeat and quickly allowed herself to be absorbed into the new administration. “If you look at defeated presidential candidates, the ones who thought they had a chance, a lot of them go into deep funks,” says a former member of the Clinton administration who knows her well. “Kerry, John McCain. Al Gore took a while, too.”

Some of Obama’s most loyal aides have nothing but good things to say about their former political foe. “The bottom line is the president has always had a very deep respect for Secretary Clinton’s capabilities and contributions to the country,” says Denis McDonough, who is formally National Security Council chief of staff but plays a powerful role behind the scenes as a longtime Obama confidant. Obama was always one of her biggest fans, even in the immediate aftermath of the primaries, McDonough says, believing “that she made him that much better a candidate” and would do the same for his presidency. National-security adviser Gen. James Jones credits Clinton with being “one of the articulators of the overall strategy that we all adopted” on Iran and China.

“THE BIBLE AS BEST BLACK HISTORY BOOK-THE GLORY OF HAM-WAS ABRAHAM BLACK?” FROM JOELAND7.WORDPRESS.COM-PROVES THAT THE JEWS,JESUS CHRIST,EGYPTIANS WERE ALL BLACK THEN!

April 20, 2010

FROM joeland7.wordpress.com

The Bible As Best Black History Book – The Glory of Ham – Was Abraham Black?
Posted on February, 26, 2010 by joeland7
The Sons of Ham–Cush (Ethiopians) & Mizraim (Egyptians)
& Phut (ancient Lybians or Somilians) & Canaan – “Genesis 10:6″

For years scholars, theologians, and archaeologists have debated the answer to the question, “How did the Israelites look physically?” Although the Bible and other historical documents have left much proof of the physical appearance of the biblical Israelites, much of this information is still unknown to the masses.The popular belief today among Christians, scholars and theologians, is that the people known as “Ashkenazi Jews” are the direct descendants of the biblical Israelites. Can this be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt? The answer to that is NO. The Bible, which will be used here as the main source, supported by history and archaeology proves that the Ashkenazi Jews are not the physical descendants of the biblical Hebrews. In addition, it reveals who the true descendants are. The answer may leave you in shock.Israel is mentioned in the bible over 2,500 times. The scriptures contain the Hebrews’ entire history. In fact, no other people on the face of the Earth have such an extensive recorded history, not even the ancient Egyptians. Every thing we need to know about the ancient Hebrews is contained in Scripture. So, let’s examine these facts, information that to this day remains unknown or hidden to many bible readers.
Gen.10:6 Ham’s descendants were Cush, Egypt, Put, and Canaan.
7 Cush’s descendants were Seba, Havilah, Sabtah, Raamah, and Sabteca. Raamah’s descendants were Sheba and Dedan.
8 Cush was the father of Nimrod, the first mighty warrior on the earth.
9 He was a mighty hunter whom the LORD blessed.
(God’s Word Translation)
10 The first cities in his kingdom were Babylon, Erech, Accad, and Calneh in Shinar Babylonia. 11 He went from that land to Assyria and built Nineveh, Rehoboth Ir, Calah,
The history of the Israelite nation began in Egypt, the Land of Ham. They entered Egypt 66 in number, (not including Joseph, his wife and two sons who were already in Egypt), and left numbering over two million people. Ancient Israel spent 430 years in Egypt. For half that time they enjoyed good favor with the Egyptians, but for the remainder of those years they were enslaved and horribly mistreated by them.
One of the first facts the Bible gives us about Israel (Ysrayl in the Hebrew tongue) is in regard to their physical appearance. Throughout scripture Israel is described as looking like the sons of Ham (Khawm in the Hebrew tongue).
Ham was one of Noah’s three sons, Shem and Japhet were the other two. Noah’s descendants repopulated the Earth after the Great Flood. Ham’s descendants are traced to the families of Africa. Ham (Khawm) in Hebrew means BLACK, HOT AND BURNT.
Ham had four sons,
CUSH (Ethiopians / Cushites),
MIZRAIM (Egyptians / Khemet),
PHUT (Ancient Libyans or Somalian),
and CANAAN (Canaanite, the original inhabitants of the Land of Israel) Genesis 10:6-19.All four of Ham’s sons and their descendants settled in and around the Continent of Africa. This includes the so called “Middle East” that is also a part of the Continent of Africa. Let us begin with the story of Jacob’s second Youngest son Joseph, and his time in Egypt. Joseph was one of the twelve sons of Jacob (Yaaqob in Hebrew). Jacob sired Joseph in his old age, and he was clearly his favorite son. This caused Joseph’s brothers to become jealous of him. Ultimately, their jealousy resulted in Joseph being sold by Arab merchants as a slave to Egyptians.
The foundations of ancient Chaldea, were laid as early as those of Egypt. In fact they were the sister colonies of a parent state. The earliest civilized inhabitants were Sumerians. 5000 B. C. the land was full of city-states. The Sanskrit books of India, called Chaldea one of the divisions of Cusha-Dwipa, the first organized government of the world. These Sumerians were the inventors of the cuneiform system of writing, which was later adopted by their Semitic conquerors.
The northern division of Babylon was called Accad, comprehending Babylon, the southern Sumer, including Erech and Ur. North of Accad were the Semitic (Hamitic) tribes which so largely made up the blood of Assyria in later days.
Gen.10:8 Cush was the father of Nimrod, the first mighty warrior on the earth. 9 He was a mighty hunter whom the LORD blessed. (God’s Word Translation)
10 The first cities in his kingdom were Babylon, Erech, Accad, and Calneh in Shinar Babylonia. 11 He went from that land to Assyria and built Nineveh, Rehoboth Ir, Calah,
We know that Nimrod was the son of Cush. Babylon had two elements in her population in the beginning. The northern Accadians and the southern Sumerians were both Cushites. The finds of recent explorations in the Mesopotamian valley reveal that these ancient inhabitants were black, with the cranial formation of Ethiopians.
nThe art, science and culture of the earlier unmixed Chaldeans was Cushite.
Rawlinson speaking in his Ancient Monarchies decided that the ruins of Chaldea show Cushite origin. The names of Chaldea and Ethiopia are linked in a way to render any other interpretation impossible. The great city of the earlier period was Niffer a corruption of Nimrod. The language of the ruins is radically different from the Semitic tongue of the Assyrian empire.
Rawlinson said concerning the Babylonians said, “Though not possessed of many natural advantages, the Chaldean people exhibited a fertility of invention, a genius of energy which places them high in the scale of nations and most especially those descended from Hamitic stock.”
The Chaldean Noah entered the ark with his wife and children. Upon the recession of the waters he sent out three birds three times. He built an altar and offered sacrifice.
nThe life of the Semitic and Hamitic races must have been closely associated after the deluge. So close is the apparent relationship, that some authorities have looked upon Abraham as Hamitic. Abraham came from Ur of the Chaldees. But he descended by direct line front a Semitic father. His mother may have been Hamitic for Abraham was spoken of as a Chaldean.
Over the course of time Joseph became Viceroy of Egypt and was second in command to Pharaoh in authority. There was a famine in Canaan, where Jacob and his sons lived. (Pharaoh had a dream which Joseph interpreted. His dream told of the forthcoming famine and gave Egypt an opportunity to prepare by storing food.) So, Jacob sent his ten sons to Egypt to buy bread. When Joseph’s ten brothers came into Egypt they were brought before him. Joseph recognized his brothers, but they didn’t recognize him (Genesis 42:1-8).
Since the biblical Egyptians were a black-skinned people, Joseph had to be black-skinned also. If he were white skinned, as over half the world’s Jews are today, his brothers would have recognized him easily among the black- skinned Egyptians, or they would have been very curious as to why this white-skinned Hebrew was ruling in Egypt. But his brothers just thought Joseph was another Egyptian.
The ancient Egyptians of Joseph time were indeed what we know today as black skinned. This is a fact attested to by many.
Gerald Massey, English writer and author of the book, Egypt the Light of the World wrote, “The dignity is so ancient that the insignia of the Pharaoh evidently belonged to the time when Egyptians wore nothing but the girdle of the Negro.” (p 251)
Sir Richard Francis Burton, a 19th century English explorer, writer and linguist in 1883 wrote to Gerald Massey, “You are quite right about the “AFRICAN” origin of the Egyptians. I have 100 human skulls to prove it.”
Scientist, R. T. Prittchett, states in his book The Natural History of Man, “In their complex and many of the complexions and in physical peculiarities the Egyptians were an “AFRICAN” race (p 124-125).
The Ancient Greek historian Herodotus, who visited Egypt in the 5th century B.C.E., saw the Egyptians face-to-face and described them as black-skinned with woolly hair.
Anthropologist, Count Constatin de Volney (1727-1820), spoke about the race of the Egyptians that produced the Pharaohs. He later paid tribute to Herodotus’ discovery when he said:
“The ancient Egyptians were true Negroes of the same type as all native born Africans. That being so, we can see how their blood mixed for several centuries with that of the Romans and Greeks, must have lost the intensity of it’s original color, while retaining none the less the imprint of its original mold. We can even state as a general principle that the face (referring to The Sphinx) is a kind of monument able, in many cases, to attest to or shed light on historical evidence on the origins of the people.”
The fact that the ancient Egyptians were black-skinned prompted Volney to make the following statement:

“What a subject for meditation, just think that the race of black men today our slaves and the object of our scorn, is the very race to which we owe our arts, science and even the use of our speech.”
The testimony of the ancients, the Bible, many Egyptologists, along with archaeology confirms that the Egyptians during biblical times were a BLACK-SKINNED PEOPLE. This is important to know, as we continue, we will see that the bible on multiple occasions describes the ancient Hebrews as looking like the Egyptians.
Next, in Genesis chapter 50 verses 7-11, scripture will describes ALL the Hebrews as looking like the ancient Egyptians.
After Jacob (who’s name was changed to Ysrayl – Israel) died in the Land of Egypt, all the Hebrews and Egyptians went down to the Land of Canaan to bury him (He asked his son to bury him in the Land of Canaan with his forefathers Genesis 49:29-30).
Verses 7-8 state that all the elders of Pharaoh’s house and all the elders of the Land of Egypt along with all the Hebrews (except for their small children) went down.
VERSE 9 says, “It was a very great company.”
VERSE 11 says, that the Canaanite saw the funeral procession and said “THIS IS A GRIEVOUS MOURNING TO THE EGYPTIANS”.
But remember this was a mixed multitude of Hebrews and Egyptians going to bury a HEBREW, and the Canaanite identified them both as Egyptians. WHY? Because the Canaanites saw a great company of black-skinned people who were all probably dressed according to the customs and fashions of Egypt, and they all looked liked native (black) Egyptians.
If the Hebrews were a white-skinned people, as we have been led to believe, the Canaanite who were familiar with both the Hebrews and Egyptians would have acknowledged them both by saying, “THIS IS A GRIEVOUS MOURNING TO THE EGYPTIANS AND HEBREWS.” The scripture goes on to say that the Canaanite named the place where they saw this great mourning for a HEBREW Abel Mizraim which means the meadow of Egypt/Mizraim or Mourning of the Egyptians.
Now let’s go to the most famous story, of the Hebrews sojourn in Egypt, which would be the story of Moses. Many years after the death of Joseph, His brothers and all that generation that entered Egypt during the time he was viceroy. The Hebrew population in Egypt grew tremendously. Because of this, they were no longer looked upon as friendly neighbors. In fact, the Egyptians considered them hostile enemies and enslaved them. (Other ethnic groups were enslaved by the Egyptians during this time also.)
Because of the Hebrews’ population growth the Egyptians decided they would impose upon them their own form of birth control. Pharaoh decreed that all Hebrew males are killed at birth (Exodus 1), this brings us directly to the story of Moses.
Moses was born a Hebrew – Israelite from the tribe of Levi (Exodus 2:1-3). He spent 40 years in the House of Pharaoh (Acts 7:23) and from the time he was an infant, passed as the Pharaoh’s grandson (Exodus 2: 6, 10). This was during the same time that Pharaoh ordered all Hebrew males under the age of two to be killed. So, if Pharaoh, was a black-skinned descendant of Khawm / Ham, which he was, it would of course follow that Moses was black-skinned also.
Many Scholars say the Pharaoh who was on the throne of Egypt at the time of Moses’ birth, was Pharaoh Seti I. He was the father of Rameses II, the Pharaoh of the oppression, also known as Rameses the Great.
George Rawlinson, an English author wrote a book entitled History of Egypt. On page 252, he gives a description of Seti I. He states: “SETI’S FACE WAS THOROUGHLY AFRICAN. HE HAD A STORMY FACE WITH A DEPRESSED FLAT NOSE, THICK LIPS AND HEAVY CHIN.”
Moses had to have the same physical characteristics because again, he was raised in the house of Pharaoh, as the grandson of Pharaoh, when Pharaoh ordered all other Hebrew males to be killed at birth. If the Israelites were a white-skinned people, how could Moses the Hebrew survive (secretly) in the house of Pharaoh among black-skinned Egyptians for 40 years, and not be noticed.
Furthermore, after giving the decree (himself) to kill all Hebrew males, how could Pharaoh face and rule over his people, if he knowingly had one living in his house with all the rights and privileges of his own family? Moses survived 40 years in the palace of Pharaoh because he was a black-skinned man just as the Egyptians were. Just as the Canaanite couldn’t tell the Hebrews from the Egyptians. Pharaoh couldn’t either, or Moses would have been killed instantly.

Temple Drawing Of Pharoah Seti I 1306 B.C.E – 1290 B.C.E.

This is an actual temple drawing of Pharaoh Seti I, taken from a temple in Egypt. This is the Pharaoh who scholars identify as being on the throne of Egypt at the time of Moses’ birth. It is believed that Seti I was Moses’ “foster grandfather”.
Ancient Egyptian Queen Tiye 1391 B.C.E – 1353 B.C.E.

This is a bust of the ancient Egyptian Queen Tiye. She was the wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III and the mother of the Pharaoh Amenhotep IV (Akenaton). She was also the grandmother of the boy, King Tutankhamen, more commonly known as King Tut. Below is a statue of him. This is how the Egyptians looked during biblical times.
STATUE OF KING TUT 1334 – 1325 B.C.E.

This is a statue of the boy king (King Tut), this statue was found in his tomb, among many of his treasures in Egypt, during an archaeological excavation in 1922. Scholars say king Tut was on the throne of Egypt, a few years before the Israelites’ Exodus.
One of the newly reconstructed images of King Tut

Above is one of the pictures of the reconstructed image of King Tut. This image comes from the Discovery.com website, it is from a soon to be aired program called the “Assassination of King Tut”. The image was put together from the skeleton of the King by using forensic science and sophisticated computer programs. King Tut and the Egyptians of biblical times were a black skinned people. Let the pictures tell the story. The Truth is beginning to come forth, Praise Yah.

Scripture tells us that Moses killed an Egyptian, after he saw him mistreating a Hebrew. So Moses had to flee from Egypt for his life because Pharaoh found out and sought to kill him (Exodus 2:12-15).
Moses fled to the land of Midian where he helped seven daughters of the priest of Midian water their flock, after chasing away some bully shepherds. The girls went home to their father, Reuel and told him what happened.
They told him that an EGYPTIAN saved them and watered their flock (Exodus 2:16-19). Notice they didn’t say a Hebrew in Egyptian clothing saved us, and they described Moses as a black-skinned descendant of Ham (Egyptian). Further proof that Moses was black-skinned can be found in Exodus 4:6-7.
In this passage YHWH, (The Creator’s name in Hebrew) is showing Moses miracles so that he can prove to the children of Israel who sent him. YHWH or the abbreviated Yah tells Moses to put his hand into his bosom, which he does. When he takes his hand out, it is LEPROUS (White) as snow. If Moses was already white-skinned, what would have been the miracle in turning his hand white?
But, since Moses and the rest of the Hebrews were a black skinned people, this would have been a very powerful miracle, to turn his hand (skin) the opposite color of the rest of his flesh.
Verse 7 says, Yah told Moses to put his hand back into his bosom, and it turned as his other flesh. Meaning that the rest of his body (skin) was other than white or the opposite of white, which is black.
In the book of Numbers, chapter 12 verse 1, Moses’ sister and brother, Miriam and Aaron spoke out against him because he married an Ethiopian woman, (not because she was black skinned, but because she was of another culture. / Nation) their behavior angered Yah. Verse 10 says, He TURNED MIRIAM LEPROUS, WHITE AS SNOW. Once again if Miriam, who was a Hebrew, was white to begin with, what would have been the curse of turning a white-skinned person white?
HOLLYWOOD VERSION OF
MOSES AND THE PHARAOH RAMESES II

From what history has taught us concerning the Hebrews Physical appearance, it is apparent that the Hollywood depiction of Moses is at the very least inaccurate, and at the most could be viewed as a racist misrepresentation.

Donnelly affirms that Egypt, Chaldea, India, Greece and Rome passed the torch of civilization from one to another. They added nothing to the arts that existed at the earliest period of Egyptian history. These arts continued without material change until two or three hundred years ago. For all these years men did not improve, but perpetuated. The age of Columbus possessed only printing that was unknown to the Egyptians. Egyptian civilization was highest at its first appearance showing that they drew from a fountain higher than themselves. In that day Egypt worshipped only one supreme being. At the time of Menes, this race had long been architects, sculptors, painters, mythologists and theologians. What king of modern times ever
ndevoted himself to medicine and the writing of medical books to benefit mankind, as did the son of Menes? For six thousand years men did not advance beyond the arts of Egypt.
Imhotep lived during the reign of King Djoser (2630-2611BC) and was the architect of the step pyramid at Saqquara, the first pyramid ever built in Egypt. Born a commoner, he quickly rose through the ranks of the temple and court to become a vizier and high priest. As a member of the Pharaoh’s court he was an architect, scribe, priest and physician. He pioneered the building of pyramids and was later deified.
Acts 21:37-38 states that Paul, (Shaul in Hebrew) the apostle, was being led into a castle by a chief captain. Paul spoke to the chief in Greek, asking permission to speak with him. The chief captain was surprised that Paul could speak Greek and in Verse 38, asks Paul, “Are not you that EGYPTIAN?” Paul responded, (Verse 39) “I am a man of Israel (Hebrew).”
In order for this chief captain to mistake Paul (the Hebrew) for a black-skinned Egyptian, Paul had to look like an Egyptian, as scripture tells us the whole nation of Israel did. This is why in the book of Matthew 2:13, the angel of Yah told Joseph to arise and take the young child Yahshua, (The Messiah’s true Hebrew name is Yahshua) and his mother Mary (Miriam in Hebrew) and FLEE INTO EGYPT. He was told to stay there until he received further instruction, because Herod would seek the young child to destroy him.
Joseph, Miriam and Yahshua were told to flee into Egypt, (Africa) not for military protection, because during this time, Egypt was a Roman province under Roman control. They fled into Egypt because Egypt was still a “black” country, populated by a majority of black-skinned people (Egyptians). Joseph, Miriam and Yahshua would have been just another black-skinned family among many. Remember, they fled into Egypt to HIDE from Herod who was seeking to kill Yahshua.
If Yahshua and the rest of the Hebrews looked like those pictures of the “Christian Christ”, it would have been hard for him to hide in Egypt and not be noticed. NOTE: the above fact about Yahshua hiding in Egypt was attested to by a biblical scholar on a BBC produced program last year (2001).
The Program was called ‘THE COMPLETE JESUS’. The scholar stated that it would have been hard for Yahshua to hide among the Egyptians, if he didn’t look like the Egyptians, he was saying that Yahshua could not have been white skinned. He admitted in the program that Yahshua was a dark /black-skinned man.
Now back to our lesson.
He also made mention that the Israelites of the first to third centuries wore their hair in Afro’s. This is only the tip of the iceberg, you can’t hold down the truth.
Herod was put on the throne of Israel by the Romans, and Egypt was under Roman dominion. All Herod had to do was check with the Roman officials in Egypt to find out if there were any Hebrews with baby boys around. But, since the Hebrews and the Egyptians looked the same physically, it would have been hard to single out a Hebrew family among the Egyptians.
Ancient Egyptians

When Joseph, Miriam and Yahshua fled into Egypt, they were among people who look like the couple in the above picture. As was mentioned, the ancient Egyptians were the descendants of Noah’s son, Khawm, or Ham in English. Khawm means black, hot and burnt. The ancient Egyptians of biblical times called their land and themselves Khemet, which in their tongue means “THE LAND OF BLACKS.” The word Khemet is nothing but a variation on the word Khawm in the language of ancient Egypt.
In Psalm 78:51, Egypt is called “The House of Ham (Khawm).”
“…AND SMOTE ALL THE FIRSTBORN IN EGYPT; THE TABERNACLES (HOUSE) OF HAM (KHAWM).”
Psalm 105:23,27 calls Egypt the land of Khawm (Ham),
Verse 23 “ISRAEL ALSO CAME INTO EGYPT; AND SOJOURNED IN THE LAND OF HAM (KHAWM).”
Verse 27 “THEY SHOWED HIS SIGNS AMONG THEM, AND WONDERS IN THE LAND OF HAM (KHAWM).”
The Bible calls Egypt the land of Khawm, and remember one of the meanings of Khawm is black, so The Bible is calling Egypt “The Land of Black” which is what Khemet means. Egypt is called the land of Khawm because the Egyptians were descendants of Noah’s son Khawm. This is more than likely the reason they called themselves Khemet. The Bible supports the fact that the Egyptians were a black-skinned people.
Statue Of Pharaoh Mentuhotep II 2040 B.C.E.

Pictured above is a statue of Mentuhotep II, found in his tomb in Egypt. He unified Egypt / Khemet and relocated the capitol to Waset (Thebes / Luxor). He is the father of the princess captioned below. By now it should be clear what color the Egyptians were. Don’t forget, this is what THE BIBLE says the children of Israel looked like.

Tomb Drawing of an Ancient Egyptian Princess

Above is a tomb drawing of the ancient Egyptian Princess AU-Shead (This may not be the correct spelling, but it is how her name is pronounced). She was the daughter of Pharaoh Mentuhotep II (above). This painting was taken from the wall of her father’s tomb.

YORUBA LANGUAGE IS DYING! EVERYDAY YORUBAS ARE BUSY REPLACING IT WITH ENGLISH,MIXING IT IN THEIR SPEAKING,PRAYING,YORUBA WEDDING CEREMONIES,EVERYWHERE THEY ARE KILLING IT! YORUBA ACADEMY TO THE RESCUE!

April 19, 2010

nigeriabestforum.com

SOYINKA, FAFUNWA, OTHERS HEAD YORUBA ACADEMY
Written by furtune Education Mar 30, 2010

Soyinka, Fafunwa, others head Yoruba Academy
By Gbenga Adeniji, Published: Tuesday, 30 Mar 2010

Nobel Laureate, Prof. Wole Soyinka; former Minister of Education, Prof. Babatunde Fafunwa; Prof. Bolanle Awe; lecturer and playwright, Prof. Akinwunmi Isola, and many other distinguished indigenes of Yoruba land are to serve as members, Board of Trustees of The Yoruba Academy, whose governing organs will be inaugurated in Ibadan, Oyo State, on Wednesday.

The centre was conceived at the Yoruba Retreat held at the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan in October, 2007.

According to a statement issued on Tuesday by the National Publicity Secretary of Afenifere Renewal Group, Mr. Yinka Odumakin, the organs to be inaugurated are; the Board of Trustees and Governing Council.

Also, the event is expected to attract distinguished sons and daughters of Yoruba land both at home and in the Diaspora.

Other members of the Board of Trustees are Mrs. Francesca Emmanuel; Prof. Wale Omole; Gen. Alani Akinrinade (rtd); Justice Bolarinwa Babalakin; Prof. Olabiyi Yayi; Mrs. Jumoke Anifowose; Mr. Wale Oshun; and the Democratic Peoples Alliance governorship candidate in Lagos State in 2007, Mr. Jimi Agbaje. The Chairman of the Board is Fafunwa.

Besides, the statement added that members of the Governing Council include Prof. Wale Omole, who is the chairman; Dr. Tunde Adegbola; Chief Adebayo Faleti; Dr. Charles Akinola; Prof. Mobolaji Aluko, Mr. Kayode Samuel, Dr.Wale Adebanwi, Mr. Tola Mobolurin, Miss Yetunde Sekoni, Mr. Dipo Famakinwa, Prince Oye Oyewumi, Dr. Iyabo Bassir, Dr. Sola Olorunyomi; Mr. Tunde Kelani, Mr. Francis Ojo; Prof. Kunle Lawal; and Dr. Tunji Olowolafe.

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FROM chidioparareports.blogspot.com

Monday, March 29, 2010
News Release: Yoruba Academy for inauguration
[Yoruba Art]

The Yoruba Academy, which was conceived at the Yoruba Retreat, held at the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan in 2008 becomes real with the inauguration of the Governance organs in Ibadan on Wednesday, March 31, 2010.

Billed for the Academy’s House at 25, Dejo Oyelese Street, Old Bodija Estate, Ibadan at 11.00am prompt, the event attracts who-is-who in the Yoruba nation-homeland and Diaspora.

The two organs for inauguration are the Board of Trustees and Governing Council make up as follows:

Members of the Board of Trustees:
1. Professor Babatunde Aliyu Fafunwa – Chairman
2. Professor (Mrs.) Bolanle Awe
3. Professor Wole Soyinka
4. Mrs. Francesca Emmanuel
5. Professor Akinwunmi Isola
6. Professor Wale Omole
7. General Alani Akinrinade
8.Justice Bolarinwa Babalakin
9. Professor Olabiyi Yayi
10. Mrs. Jumoke Anifowose
11. Hon. Wale Oshun
12. Mr. Jimi Agbaje

Members of the Governing Council:
1. Professor Wale Omole – Chairman
2. Dr. Tunde Adegbola
3. Alagba Adebayo Faleti
4. Dr. Charles “Diji Akinola
5. Mr. Tola Mobolurin
6. Miss Yetunde Sekoni
7. Mr. Dipo Famakinwa
8. Prince Oye Oyewumi
9. Dr. Iyabo Bassir
10. Dr. Sola Olorunyomi
11. Mr. Tunde Kelani
12. Engr. Francis Ojo
13. Dr. Tunji Olowolafe
14. Professor Kunle Lawal
15. Mr. Kayode Samuel
16. Dr. Wale Adebanwi
17. Professor Bolaji Aluko

‘Yinka Odumakin
For: The Yoruba Academy
Posted by Public Information Project Management(PIPROM) at 9:02 AM

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from newstarng.com

Yoruba Academy to the rescue PDF Print E-mail
Written by OLAIDE OYELUDE
Monday, 05 April 2010 02:57

NEWS STAR

On Wednesday, March 31, a very unique event that signified very sincere and pragmatic steps towards protection and preservation of Yoruba race and heritage took place in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital. The event was the inauguration of the Board of Trustees and Governing Council for the Yoruba Academy. Emeritus Professor Olu Akinkugbe was the chairman at the occasion witnessed by notable personalities in the Yorubaland including Speaker of the House of Representatives, Hon. Dimeji Bankole, former Governor of Osun State, Chief Bisi Akande and Speaker, Oyo State House of Assembly, Hon. Moroof Atilola, among others.
The Yoruba Academy is an independent, non-profit governmental organization created as a multi-disciplinary institution, charged with the task of bringing together everyone committed to the best traditions of the promotion of modern democratic life and ensure the preservation of Yoruba language, culture, social practices, values and institutions. The Academy is also committed to engaging in, encouraging and funding research and systematic reflections on the history, culture, position and future of the Yoruba in the context of Nigeria and in a globalizing world, towards helping to create and sustain freedom for all and life more abundant.
The Yoruba Academy is borne out of concern that the race is being relegated in virtually all spheres of life especially in such areas as education, commerce and business. A retreat was subsequently organized in 2007 by a group of Yoruba professionals and activists. The retreat which took place in Ibadan was attended by Yoruba political leaders, business men and women with the aim of charting a way forward for the Yoruba. One of the outcomes of the retreat was a declaration that a Yoruba Academy is needed to ensure renaissance of Yoruba culture, capture the soul of its youth and re-establish the pride of the Yoruba race and increase its capacity to contribute to the international community. The Yoruba Academy subsequently opened office in Ibadan in August 2008.
Activities of the Academy focus on such programmes as children and youth, resource repository/database, Research into such indicative focus areas including Yoruba culture, Yoruba religion and divinity, Yoruba language and linguistics, science and technology in Yoruba, Yoruba jurisprudence, as well in Yoruba strategic development studies, among others.
Expectedly, the event attracted comments and suggestions. Speaker Bankole urged the Academy to look into the areas the Yoruba are lagging which they used to play leading roles before, especially in education, banking and information management. His words: “The race before the Academy is not a one hundred metres race. It is indeed a long distance race and I believe the Academy needs to pursue it with vigour and zeal so that our future generation will be proud of our race. In the last 10 years, it seems the Yoruba have been relegated from the leading role they used to play in the areas of education, business and commerce and even in information management. These are the things the Yoruba Academy has to face so that we may have a better future.”
Speaking on the importance of the Academy, Professor Akinkugbe said: “The idea of the Yoruba Academy has become very critical, to further the need for the promotion of self-confidence, a strong Yoruba identity to develop our intellectual capacity and colour, to propel our minds, body and spirit, to identify with the urgent need to preserve and continue to nurture who we are, as well as being able to assert our Yorubaness without reservations about our history not living merely on our past glory.”
Fafunwa also noted that: “Yoruba is a complete race and the Academy is out to promote all aspects of the Yoruba including our culture, our enterprises, our uniqueness and so on. Yoruba as a language, ranks sixth among the world spoken languages after English language, French, Arab, Spanish and Portuguese. Yoruba should not be relegated to the background for whatever reasons. Is it the complete gentlemanness of the Yoruba or the Yoruba flair for fair hearing before deciding on any issue? Is it the beauty of Yoruba language or its versatility? We should bequeath a worthy legacy that our future generation will be very proud of.”
In his contribution, the chairman of the Governing Council, Prof. Omole, said: “The Yoruba Academy is not partisan. Rather the Academy is to protect the interests of all Yoruba irrespective of their political leanings, religious persuasions and business interests. All that the Academy is out for is to ensure that Yoruba either now or in the future, continue to enjoy the pride of place while our culture, our heritage which makes us unique, are protected and preserved for the sake of the present and future generations. Yoruba are a proud people and the Academy will strive to make us discover that pride again.”
The 12-member Board of Trustees(BOT) for the Academy former Education Minister, Professor Aliyu Babatunde Fafunwa as chairman. Other trustees are General Alani Akinrinade, Mrs Jumoke Anifowose, Professor Bolanle Awe, Justice Bolarinwa Babalaki, Mr. Jimi Agbaje, Mrs Francesca Emmanuel, Professor Akinwunmi Isola, Professor Wale Omole, Hon. Wale Osun, Professor Wole Soyinka and Professor Olabiyi Yayi. The BOT is a team of eminent Yoruba persons from diverse professions, representing the Yoruba in Nigeria and in the Diaspora. The Board is expected to provide strategic direction and set the agenda for the Academy. It also ensures that the activities of the Academy remain mandate-focused while it also safe-guards independence of the Academy.
Former Vice Chancellor of Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Professor Wale Omole, is the chairman of the Academy’s 17-member Governing Council. Other council members include Dr. Wale Adebanwi, Dr. Tunde Adegbola, Dr. Charles ‘Diji Akinola, Professor Bolaji Aluko,Dr. Iyabo Basir, Alagba Adebayo Faleti, Mr. Dipo Famakinwa, Mr. Tunde Kelani, Professor Kunle Lawal, Mr. Tola Mobolurin , Engineer Francis Ojo, Dr. Sola Olorunyomi, Dr. Tunji Olowolafe, Prince Oye Oyewunmi, Mr. Kayode Samuel and Ms Yetunde Sekoni.
Just like BOT, members of the Governing Council are drawn from professionals with significant relevant skills and experience to guide the management of the Academy. The Council is responsible for the overall governance of the Academy while it sets up, empowers and mandates committees of the Academy as required. The Council is also responsible for the maintenance of programme integrity while it equally provides strategic direction for the management and operations of team of the Academy. The Council also provides support and external linkages while at the same time, provides ‘custodian, stewardship and accountability’ roles in the Academy.
No doubt, the younger generation of Yoruba looks up to the sustenance of an enviable legacy of a race that the future generation will equally be proud of.

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FROM tribune.com

Yoruba Academy: Fighting the cause of the Yoruba people

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Written by Segun Taiwo

Recently, members of the Board of Trustees and Governing Council of the Yoruba Academy were inaugurated in Ibadan. Segun Taiwo, who was at the event, reports on the resolve of the body to advance the understanding and appreciation of Yoruba history, language, culture and civilisation.

[From right, Justice Bolarinwa Babalakin; Chief Bisi Akande and Professor Bolanle Awe, during the inauguration of members of the Board of Trustees and Governing Council of the Yoruba Academy in Ibadan last week. Photo: Tunde Babajide.]

From right, Justice Bolarinwa Babalakin; Chief Bisi Akande and Professor Bolanle Awe, during the inauguration of members of the Board of Trustees and Governing Council of the Yoruba Academy in Ibadan last week. Photo: Tunde Babajide.
In a bid to promote the Yoruba language, social practices, norms, values and institutions, Yoruba leaders have come together to form the Yoruba Academy, with the recent inauguration of the body’s Board of Trustees and Governing Council members in Ibadan.

Concerned about the rate at which Yoruba values and institutions are being relegated to the background, the body will ensure the preservation of the Yoruba language, social practices, norms and values, through research and systematic reflections on the history, culture, position and future of the Yoruba in the context of Nigeria and in a globalising world.

Also, in a bid to meet its objectives, the Academy will welcome individuals and organisations interested in the development of the Yoruba as a distinct ethnic entity.

In his opening address at the inauguration, the chairman of the event, Professor Oladipo Akinkugbe, expressed confidence that the Academy would restored the glory and pride of the Yoruba people.

Prof. Akinkugbe, who lamented the present state of the Yoruba nation, then called on all Yoruba people, irrespective of political, social or educational differences, to come together and salvage the situation.

While also speaking, the highest ranking Yoruba man in the current political dispensation, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Hon. Dimeji Bankole, lamented that Yorubas were no longer in the scheme of things in the country.

Citing the area of education and communications as example, Hon. Bankole said it was unfortunate the woeful performance of students from the South West in their final school certificate examinations, while saying the race has also lost its grip on the electronic and print media in the country.

“It is, therefore, a good development that the Yoruba Academy is being inaugurated to put the race in its rightful position in the country,” the Speaker said.

Other eminent Yoruba personalities at the event, also spoke on the need for the Yoruba people to retake its place in the scheme of things in the country, and in the world at large.

A former Osun State governor and chairman of the Action Congress (AC), Chief Bisi Akande, said Yoruba people should set aside their differences and work for the progress of the race.

Members of the Board of Trustees comprising Prof. Babatunde Fafunwa, who is chairman; Mr. Jimi Agbaje, General Alani Akinrinade, Mrs. Jumoke Anifowose, Prof. Bolanle Awe, Justice Bolarinwa Babalakin, Mrs. Francesca Emmanuel, Prof. Akinwumi Isola, Prof. Wale Omole, Hon. Wale Oshun, Prof. Wole Soyinka and Prof. Olabiyi Yai, were then presented and inaugurated, while members of the governing council, comprising Prof. Wale Omole (chairman), Dr. Wale Adebanwi, Dr. Tunde Adegbola, Dr. Charles ‘Diji Akinola, Prof. Bolaji Aluko, Dr. Iyabo Bassir, Pa. Adebayo Faleti, Mr. Dipo Famakinwa, Mr. Tunde Kelani, Prof. Kunle Lawal, Mr. Tola Mobolurin, Engr. Francis Ojo, Dr. Sola Olorunyomi, Dr. Tunji Olowolafe, Prince Oye Oyewumi, Mr. Kayode Samuel and Ms. Yetunde Sekoni, were also installed.


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