Archive for March, 2011

>ALAGBA ADEBAYO FALETI ON WHY HIS "FILA" THE WAY HE DOES!

March 30, 2011

>

nationalmirroronline.net/…/3/19/index.2.html

The man with the cap ‘It’s easy for me to just bend it anyhow’

Font size: YEMISI ADENIRAN 19/03/2011 00:26:00

Not many people know why Adebayo Faleti wears his Fila (cap) the way he does.The 73 yearold actor and culture icon shared the secret behind his unusual style with YEMISI ADENIRAN

what informs your peculiar way of donning your cap?

Nothing, I do not know how to style it and with it sewn this long, it is easier for me to just bend it anyhow.

Where did you grow up and what fond memories of your childhood do you have?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.

What were the circumstances of your birth?

Were you born with a silver spoon in your mouth?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.
image

Let’s talk about your love life. What was it like and when did you get married?

I’m an African man and in those days, our styles were different from the way you people do it these days. We weren’t careless and were straight forward than you people. I did not marry early, I think I got married at the age of 30 or so and that was some 10 years after my peers. My mother was worried but like I said, my father was supportive and more tolerant. And you really can’t blame her, she was acting normally; she wanted to be sure that all was well with me. I had almost everything late; education and marriage, but we thank God all has ended well.

Are you a polygamist?

No, I am not. I am married to just one woman. I live with one wife at a time. But really, I would have loved to be a polygamist.

Why?

It is the best way to manage women. You know, it is only one woman that can inflict any punishment on a man. If they are two, it is not possible. You will simply boycott her room and go to the other. By the time you go to her afterwards, she will receive you with open arms.

But they can gang up against you?

That is not possible. I would not have permitted unity or friendliness between them. I would have made sure they were poles apart and this would disallow them from conspiring against me. The best way is to make them enemies and you will enjoy yourself. I really want to work on a movie that talks about true friendship, true love. The movie will dwell on the recipe for a good marriage which will be based on true friendship. Couples to be should be true friends who are ready to bear each other’s burden. It is good to have your friend as your wife or husband. Friendship should precede everything. That is why the olden days’ marriages lasted longer. The courtship was usually long enough and that availed them enough space to study and know each other well.

FILA- YORUBA MALE HEAD COVER- IN ALL IT’S BEAUTY AND BLACK MANHOOD!

March 29, 2011

>YORUBA MALE DRESS-THE FILA IS THE MALE VERSION OF HEAD WEAR!

March 29, 2011

>

OUR FAMOUS YORUBA WRITER ADEBAYO FALETI WEARS HIS CLASSIC STYLE OF FILA!

>GABOUREY SIDIBE-OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IS "THE CAPTAIN OF HER SHIP!|

March 28, 2011

>

Gabourey Sidibe: “I’m Captain of This Ship – Without a First Mate!”

She might not fit the mold of a Hollywood starlet, but Gabourey Sidibe is bowling ‘em over anyway!
“Growing up, there weren’t a lot of actresses and singers who looked like me,” admits the breakout star of the gritty drama Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire in V magazine’s Size Issue (on sale Jan. 14.). That’s why her costar Mo’Nique, who plays her mother in the film, has been such an inspiration to the 26-year-old student-turned-actress.
8 Things You Should Know about Gabby Sidibe
“There were no real times that I thought maybe I can do it until Mo’Nique came along,” reveals Brooklyn-born Gabby. “She’s a plus-sized woman who didn’t care about one day being skinny. All my life I’ve been hearing that I’ll never amount to anything until I am skinny. And she disproved everything that everyone has ever told me.”
With a Golden Globe nomination and tons of Oscar buzz for her role in Precious, Gabby admits, “My life is so much different than I ever imagined it being.”
For example, she’s gained confidence and a thicker skin along the way.
Take a look at Gabby’s style evolution

“I used to get hurt so badly. Any bit of criticism, I would cry. But at some point I just realized, I count more than anyone else, or anybody’s opinion, because I’m living my life — I’m captain of this ship, without a first mate. And I really, really like who I am. I really, really dig me.”
Did you see Gabby’s performance in Precious? Think she deserves an Oscar? Talk back below.
Follow Twinkle on Twitter.


Comments

If you know more about this story, contact us at tips@starmagazine.com or 1-800-609-8312
lol..at everyone
the movie was okay,but i don’t see oscar,there was nothing exceptional,we all know these kind of things happens every day in someone’s life.it’s a sad fact.
finally!!!! a real girl in a fake world! love it!
Glamorizing obesity is just plane wrong and unhealthy!!!!
Absolutely beautiful-inside & out! Wishing her the best
Preface: We live in an existential age of alienation. We are strangers to each other until we take time to get to know each other better and, frankly, that takes work. Cinema is a short cut to viewing ourselves as a people. “In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.” Albert Camus
The actress Gabourey Sidibe was born in 1983 in Brooklyn, New York. She became known for her movie debut portraying the main character in Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire.
Gabby once made a memorable statement about the public’s perception of her: “They try to paint the picture that I was this downtrodden, ugly girl who was unpopular in school and in life, and then I got this role and now I’m awesome. But the truth is that I’ve been awesome, and then I got this role.”…
http://psychicnahu.blogspot.com/2009/12/gabourey-sidibe-rare-gift.html
did’nt watch the movie. the previews reminded me too much of a welfare mentality…………..
THIS IS A REAL WOMEN! STOP SHOWING THOSE SKANKY SKINNY GIRLS AND MAKING US BIG WOMEN FEEL LIKE SHIT! THIS IS WHAT A REAL WOMEN LOOKS LIKE! EXCEPT US AMERICA!!!!
yes she deserves an Oscar folks are so prejudiced against not only race but size along with the grade of hair and length of hair BRAVO to Gabby she is beautiful inside and out!!!!!I am sure Tyler Perry is watching you God has opened up the door now walk boldly on through!!!!!

I love her spunk, I haven’t been able to see the movie yet, but I saw an interview she gave and I think she is fun and deserving of all her success.

GABOUREY SIDIBE- OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IN STAR MAGAZINE!

March 28, 2011

http://web.starmagazine.com/blog/gabourey-sidibe-%E2%80%9Ci%E2%80%99m-captain-ship-%E2%80%93-without-first-mate%E2%80%9D?page=1&comment_page=1

OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY BREAKING THE SKINNY/NO/SHAPE/WHITE/GIRL IMAGE GLASS CEILING FOREVER!

Gabourey Sidibe: “I’m Captain of This Ship – Without a First Mate!”

She might not fit the mold of a Hollywood starlet, but Gabourey Sidibe is bowling ‘em over anyway!

“Growing up, there weren’t a lot of actresses and singers who looked like me,” admits the breakout star of the gritty drama Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire in V magazine’s Size Issue (on sale Jan. 14.). That’s why her costar Mo’Nique, who plays her mother in the film, has been such an inspiration to the 26-year-old student-turned-actress.

8 Things You Should Know about Gabby Sidibe

“There were no real times that I thought maybe I can do it until Mo’Nique came along,” reveals Brooklyn-born Gabby. “She’s a plus-sized woman who didn’t care about one day being skinny. All my life I’ve been hearing that I’ll never amount to anything until I am skinny. And she disproved everything that everyone has ever told me.”

With a Golden Globe nomination and tons of Oscar buzz for her role in Precious, Gabby admits, “My life is so much different than I ever imagined it being.”

For example, she’s gained confidence and a thicker skin along the way.

Take a look at Gabby’s style evolution

“I used to get hurt so badly. Any bit of criticism, I would cry. But at some point I just realized, I count more than anyone else, or anybody’s opinion, because I’m living my life — I’m captain of this ship, without a first mate. And I really, really like who I am. I really, really dig me.”

Did you see Gabby’s performance in Precious? Think she deserves an Oscar? Talk back below.

Follow Twinkle on Twitter.
Comments
If you know more about this story, contact us at tips@starmagazine.com or 1-800-609-8312

lol..at everyone
— jus me (not verified)

* reply

the movie was okay,but i don’t see oscar,there was nothing exceptional,we all know these kind of things happens every day in someone’s life.it’s a sad fact.
— kew1224 (not verified)

* reply

finally!!!! a real girl in a fake world! love it!
— stephanie (not verified)

* reply

Glamorizing obesity is just plane wrong and unhealthy!!!!
— lisa (not verified)

* reply

Absolutely beautiful-inside & out! Wishing her the best
— MMB (not verified)

* reply

Preface: We live in an existential age of alienation. We are strangers to each other until we take time to get to know each other better and, frankly, that takes work. Cinema is a short cut to viewing ourselves as a people. “In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.” Albert Camus

The actress Gabourey Sidibe was born in 1983 in Brooklyn, New York. She became known for her movie debut portraying the main character in Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire.
Gabby once made a memorable statement about the public’s perception of her: “They try to paint the picture that I was this downtrodden, ugly girl who was unpopular in school and in life, and then I got this role and now I’m awesome. But the truth is that I’ve been awesome, and then I got this role.”…

http://psychicnahu.blogspot.com/2009/12/gabourey-sidibe-rare-gift.html
— Nahu (not verified)

* reply

did’nt watch the movie. the previews reminded me too much of a welfare mentality…………..
— perfin (not verified)

* reply

THIS IS A REAL WOMEN! STOP SHOWING THOSE SKANKY SKINNY GIRLS AND MAKING US BIG WOMEN FEEL LIKE SHIT! THIS IS WHAT A REAL WOMEN LOOKS LIKE! EXCEPT US AMERICA!!!!
— Anonymous (not verified)

* reply

yes she deserves an Oscar folks are so prejudiced against not only race but size along with the grade of hair and length of hair BRAVO to Gabby she is beautiful inside and out!!!!!I am sure Tyler Perry is watching you God has opened up the door now walk boldly on through!!!!!
— Miz P (not verified)

* reply

I love her spunk, I haven’t been able to see the movie yet, but I saw an interview she gave and I think she is fun and deserving of all her success.

>MORE YORUBA GREETINGS # 2

March 25, 2011

>

FROM yeyeolade.wordpress.com


MORE YORUBA GREETINGS #2

By Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Greetings: Various sentences used in Yoruba
English Yoruba
Greetings: Good Morning
reply: Good Morning/morning
Ekaaro/Ekuojomo
Ekaaro?Ekuojomo (O)
How are you?
Fine, thank you/I’m fine Se daadaa ni/Salaafia ni?
Adupe
Greeting Good afternon
Reply: Good afternoon Ekaasan
Ekaasan(O)
How are you?
Fine, thank you. Salaafia ni/Sedaadaa ni?
Adupe
Greeting: Good Evening
Reply: Good evening Ekuirole (Ekaale from 7pm)
Ekuirole (O) (Ekaale o) Ina wuni
How are you?
Fine, thank you. Se daadaa ni/Salaafia ni?
Adupe
Greeting: Goodnight
Reply: Goodnight Odaaro
Odaro (O)
Ka obo o
Have a nice sleep Orun n re lao sun
My friend Ore mi
How is Work? Bawo nise/ise n ko?
How is family? Awon ebi n ko?
How is wife? Iyawo re n ko?
How is husband? Oko re n ko?
How is everything? Bawo ni n nkan?
Come and eat Wa jeun
Thanks you. Ese/Aagbabire
Be the first to like this post.

6 Responses to “MORE YORUBA GREETINGS #2”

  1. Jide Sadiku Says:
    Dear Sir/Madam,
    Kindly enlightene me: On what occasions does one use the greeting expression – E ku eti’gbo? Is it for good news or for bad news? e.g. can we greet someone who has just received a bad news about a loved one with the expression: E ku eti igbo?
    A relative told me that we use ‘E ku eti’gbo’ only for good news, e.g. news of success. Please advise.
    Thank you,
    Jide
  2. Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade Says:
    Brother Jide Sadiku, ore mi(my friend )tells me that it is used only for BAD news. Don’t be surprised if certain Yorubas conflict on what a term or how a word is used because there are many dialects involved so ..now this ore is from Oyo,and speaks the core Yoruba that standard Yoruba comes from so evidently originally this expression was used only to break bad news. So any Yoruba who says otherwise either has limited knowledge of Yoruba or in his dialect they have a different use.
  3. kayode Says:
    Dear sir,the expression “e kuetigbo can be used both ways,either for badnews or goodnews
  4. fromAfricaWeCame Says:
    Yoruba is beautiful! Got A1 in WAEC so proud
  5. Rochelle Says:
    Hello,
    please I need some help I am in search for the Youruba name ör meaning word for Ubuntu zulu philosophy can you help?

BACK TO AFRICA!! -THESE BLACK AMERIKKKANS CRIED WHEN WELCOMED BACK HOME TO AFRICA!

March 25, 2011

from yeyeolade.blogspot.com

Thursday, March 24, 2011
BACK TO AFRICA! – THESE BLACK MAYORS/SISTER VANESSA WILLIAMS WEPT WHEN THE OBA(KING) WELCOMED THEM BACK HOME! -GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA,FEB. 2011
FROM ngrguardiannews.com.

Why Yoruba Obas Kept Vigil For Ooni In 1903
Sunday, 13 March 2011 00:00 By Tunde Akingbade/in Ile-Ife and Osogbo Sunday Magazine – Sunday Magazine
Ooni-and-exec-sec-good
ITwas the day of historical facts. It was an evening of reminiscences. It turned out to be another occasion for flashbacks. And the spot was the palace of His Imperial Majesty, Ooni of Ile-Ife, Oba Okunade Sijuwade Olubuse II, the Aroole Oduduwa, progenitor of the Yoruba race.
Prof. Siyan Oyeweso, Provost, School of Humanities and Culture, Osun State University, Ikire campus and Chairman of 4th World Conference of Mayors went down historical lane. Oyeweso narrated how the great grandfathers of Oba Olubuse II and the institution of the Ooni was revered and feared as the spiritual head of Yoruba nation.
The story went thus; the Ooni was asked to come to Lagos in 1903 by the British Colonial government to testify in a case between the Akarigbo of Remo and Elepe. In those days, no one could look in the face of the Ooni. All Yoruba kings under his authority and who domiciled along the route the Ooni was to pass to Lagos moved out of their bases and they did not sleep until the Ooni returned to Ile-Ife.
The Ooni was feared as a spiritual head. Yoruba Obas had reasoned that what the colonial government demanded from the Ooni was an abomination. For him to leave his palace at Ife and journey to Lagos was unfathomable. A sacrilege!
As Prof. Oyeweso recalled the historical feat, Oba Olubuse II who sat in splendor on the throne, nodded. Then Oyeweso, threw another historical bombshell.
“Only Ede and Ibadan remain cities that developed from military settlements (Army) to state that has people and not state (People) to army!” he said.

That night a crowd of Mayors from all over the world had paid a courtesy visit to the Ooni in the course of the World Conference of Mayors, which took place in Osogbo. Oyeweso, the Chairman of the organising team for the conference, which was supported by the Federal Government, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Osun State Government, said, “he is a son of the palace because the former Timi of Ede was one of those who used to pay his school fees in those days. This appeared stunning to the Ooni. Oyeweso called himself the ‘son of the warlord’ — the Timi of Ede who was a warrior in those days. It was believed that the arrows of the Timi carried furnaces whenever he shot them. That has become the praise name of descendants of the town.
The professor said Ile-Ife, the cradle of Yoruba race was not a kingdom but an empire. The Ooni of Ile-Ife then gave Prof. Oyeweso an assignment to find out if Ile-Ife, which existed about 8,000 years ago and 4,000 years before Abraham, the patriarch of Jews and Arabs was a Kingdom, Empire or what?
Earlier, Ms. Vanessa Williams, Executive Director of the National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM) thanked the Ooni for the warm reception and for his leadership and for being the king of all kings in Nigeria.
“I have had the opportunity to see the Presidents and Kings all over the world. I have never been so nervous as I have been tonight,” said Ms. Williams.
Robert Bowser, President of NCBM looked in her direction. Tears began to roll down her cheeks. Then she added; “we are happy to be back home. We thank you for preserving our history here.”
It was an emotional moment. The entire hall was in deep silence. Then the royal court’s praise singers interjected; Omi ki o! The King is greeting you! The Ooni beckoned on Ms. Williams to move closer to him. He then began to comfort her. The other visiting Mayors were also moved into tears. They were introduced one after the other.
More surprises were to come. Just as Ms. Williams introduced Dr. Jeffrey, one of the members of the American Mayors entourage, Oba Aderemi Adeniyi-Adedapo, the Olojudo-Alayemore of Ido-Osun, one of the Obas in the Kingdom exclaimed: “that’s my teacher!”
Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo called on Funlola Olorunnishola, the Media Advisor of the Ooni, Folusho Adedigba and Mr. Smollett Shittu-Alamu — members of the committee in charge of the visit to the palace to give him the microphone. Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo began to make some revelations.
The Oba told the gathering that Dr. Jeffrey was his teacher in the United States when he was studying for a degree in Architecture.
Said he; “Dr. Jeffrey, you will remember that I used to tell you in America that I am a prince in Africa. I am so overwhelmed tonight. I want to let you know that I am now a king under His Imperial Majesty, the Ooni of Ile-Ife, Kabiyesi, Oba Okunade Sijuwade Olubuse II”
Turning to the Ooni, Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo said: “these are the people who made me what I am when I was in America for 25years. Architecture was my major. Dr. Jeffrey gave us moral, financial support and everything when I was in America. He was a father figure to us.”
Looking in the direction of Dr. Jeffrey, the Oba said; “I cannot thank you enough. You are back home in Nigeria even though I am aware you are very close to Ghana. But this is your real home. The Ashantehene and the King of Accra know their father king is His Imperial Majesty, the Ooni of Ile- Ife. You are welcome back home. I thank you and I thank America your country for harbouring me for 25years. I went there with nothing and I came back home as an Architect and I am so proud of that country. God bless America, God bless the black race, God bless Ooni and God bless Nigeria!”
The Ooni later told the visitors that the population of those who claim ancestry to Yoruba race is about 240 million. They are found in Nigeria, USA, the Caribbean, Haiti, Venezuela, Argentina etc. He said even though in a place like Argentina, you have predominantly white people, a large percentage became white because of years of inter marriage.
The Ooni noted that there are several countries outside the USA where blacks also rule like President Barak Obama.
Earlier, Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola, the Governor of Osun State said at the opening ceremony that urbanisation in Nigeria had brought municipal challenges like insecurity, housing, food, transportation, health care provision, education, jobs, waste disposal and social welfare.
“While the development countries still grapple with these problems, the situation in developing countries can be worse”, said Aregbesola.
At the closing ceremony of the one-week event Mr. Robert Bowser, President of National Conference of Black Mayors, Atlanta, said that it was a great opportunity for the Mayors to be present in Osun State. Bowser said the Mayors had seen Osun State and they had also seen the challenges the people face in the area of health, waste management, sanitation, infrastructure, education etc. He called on the state government to involve them in schemes to tackle some of the problems facing the state.
A Feast of Return, a dance drama written and produced by the poet, Odia Ofeimun, was performed at the event with other cultural dances. Present at the event were many traditional rulers in Osun State including Oba Oladele Olashore, the Aloko of Iloko-Ijesha; Oba Dokun Abolurin, the Oragun of Oke-Ila, Oba Rasheed Olasubomi, the Aragbiji of Iragbiji.
Posted by YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE at 7:11 AM Comments (0)
Labels: AFRICA, AFRICAN AMERICANS, ANCESTRY, BACK TO AFRICA, BLACK CHILDREN, BLACK MEN, BLACK PEOPLE, BLACK WOMAN, BLACKS IN AMERIKKKA, NIGERIA, THE BLACK RACE

THE OONI,THE HIGHEST YORUBA KING COMFORTING VANESSA AFTER SHE STARTED CRYING AT THE "WELCOME BACK HOME" FROM THE KING!

>YORUBA WORLD- HELP SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE!

March 25, 2011

>

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/yorubaworld/message/3136

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Reply <!–document.writeln("< Prev Message“);// –>< Prev Message <a href=”/group/yorubaworld/message/3135?var=1&amp;p=1″><&nbsp;Prev Message</a>  |  Next Message > 
Re: [YorubaWorld] Re: Help Save Yoruba Language!

i love nice because he is proud of his yoruba heritage, some of his songs have
very positive messages, his musical style is diverse enough to appeal to a
wide audience, and he is especially loved by the younger generations….and i
believe we need to utilize anything positive to keep young people interested in
their own language and culture.Â
Â
Chief Aikulola Fawehinmi, Gbawoniyi Awo of Osogbo
Yoruba priest of West African Orisa Tradition
Ijo Asaforitifa Community of Orisa, Ile Oloosa Mokanla
http://www.gbawoniyi.com

Miami cell 1-786-709-3343
New York cell 1-347-419-0427
Mexico cell 011-52-33-1460-1471
Nigeria cell (MULTILINK) 011-234-70-9029-4292
   (GLO) 011-234-70-5802-3833
Venezuela cell 011-58-412-568-4632
Spain cell 011-34-673-987-727Â
International Association for Orisa Tradition and Culture (Orisa World
Congress)…member and supporter!

________________________________
From: Akin Akinrujomu <aakinrujomu@…>
To: “yorubaworld@yahoogroups.com” <yorubaworld@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, February 18, 2011 6:33:07 PM
Subject: [YorubaWorld] Re: Help Save Yoruba Language!

Â
A sad state of affairs here in the UK but the situation is even more disturbing
back
home in Nigeria. That said the music industry in Nigeria utilises Yoruba a lot
thanks to artistes like 9ice and co. No song is complete now without a Yoruba
phrase which is a good thing.

Sent from my iPad

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:19 pm

iwindara
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Dear All ‘The Yoruba language is declining in use’ (Wikipedia 2011) ‘Languages of United Kingdom, Yoruba speakers 12,000’ (Ethnologue Languages of the World…
sir_lawie
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Feb 18, 2011
2:44 pm

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A sad state of affairs here in the UK but the situation is even more disturbing back home in Nigeria. That said the music industry in Nigeria utilises Yoruba a…

Akin Akinrujomu
aakinrujomu
Online Now Send Email
Feb 18, 2011
5:27 pm

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i love nice because he is proud of his yoruba heritage, some of his songs have very positive messages, his musical style is diverse enough to appeal to a …

Gbawoniyi Awo of Osog…
iwindara
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Feb 19, 2011
1:59 am


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>BACK TO AFRICA! – THESE BLACK MAYORS/SISTER VANESSA WILLIAMS WEPT WHEN THE OBA(KING) WELCOMED THEM BACK HOME! -GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA,FEB. 2011

March 24, 2011

>

FROM ngrguardiannews.com.

Why Yoruba Obas Kept Vigil For Ooni In 1903

Ooni-and-exec-sec-good
ITwas the day of historical facts. It was an evening of reminiscences. It turned out to be another occasion for flashbacks. And the spot was the palace of His Imperial Majesty, Ooni of Ile-Ife, Oba Okunade Sijuwade Olubuse II, the Aroole Oduduwa, progenitor of the Yoruba race.
Prof. Siyan Oyeweso, Provost, School of Humanities and Culture, Osun State University, Ikire campus and Chairman of 4th World Conference of Mayors went down historical lane. Oyeweso narrated how the great grandfathers of Oba Olubuse II and the institution of the Ooni was revered and feared as the spiritual head of Yoruba nation.
The story went thus; the Ooni was asked to come to Lagos in 1903 by the British Colonial government to testify in a case between the Akarigbo of  Remo and Elepe. In those days, no one could look in the face of the Ooni. All Yoruba kings under his authority and who domiciled along the route the Ooni was to pass to Lagos moved out of their bases and they did not sleep until the Ooni returned to Ile-Ife.
The Ooni was feared as a spiritual head. Yoruba Obas had reasoned that what the colonial government demanded from the Ooni was an abomination. For him to leave his palace at Ife and journey to Lagos was unfathomable. A sacrilege!
As Prof. Oyeweso recalled the historical feat, Oba Olubuse II who sat in splendor on the throne, nodded. Then Oyeweso, threw another historical bombshell.
“Only Ede and Ibadan remain cities that developed from military settlements (Army) to state that has people and not state (People) to army!” he said.

That night a crowd of Mayors from all over the world had paid a courtesy visit to the Ooni in the course of the World Conference of Mayors, which took place in Osogbo. Oyeweso, the Chairman of the organising team for the conference, which was supported by the Federal Government, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Osun State Government, said, “he is a son of the palace because the former Timi of Ede was one of those who used to pay his school fees in those days. This appeared stunning to the Ooni. Oyeweso called himself the ‘son of the warlord’ — the Timi of Ede who was a warrior in those days. It was believed that the arrows of the Timi carried furnaces whenever he shot them. That has become the praise name of descendants of the town.
The professor said Ile-Ife, the cradle of Yoruba race was not a kingdom but an empire. The Ooni of Ile-Ife then gave Prof. Oyeweso an assignment to find out if Ile-Ife, which existed about 8,000 years ago and 4,000 years before Abraham, the patriarch of Jews and Arabs was a Kingdom, Empire or what?
Earlier, Ms. Vanessa Williams, Executive Director of the National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM) thanked the Ooni for the warm reception and for his leadership and for being the king of all kings in Nigeria.
“I have had the opportunity to see the Presidents and Kings all over the world. I have never been so nervous as I have been tonight,” said Ms. Williams.
Robert Bowser, President of NCBM looked in her direction. Tears began to roll down her cheeks. Then she added; “we are happy to be back home. We thank you for preserving our history here.”
It was an emotional moment. The entire hall was in deep silence. Then the royal court’s praise singers interjected; Omi ki o! The King is greeting you! The Ooni beckoned on Ms. Williams to move closer to him. He then began to comfort her. The other visiting Mayors were also moved into tears. They were introduced one after the other.
More surprises were to come. Just as Ms. Williams introduced Dr. Jeffrey, one of the members of the American Mayors entourage, Oba Aderemi Adeniyi-Adedapo, the Olojudo-Alayemore of Ido-Osun, one of the Obas in the Kingdom exclaimed: “that’s my teacher!”
Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo called on Funlola Olorunnishola, the Media Advisor of the Ooni, Folusho Adedigba and Mr. Smollett Shittu-Alamu — members of the committee in charge of the visit to the palace to give him the microphone. Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo began to make some revelations.
The Oba told the gathering that Dr. Jeffrey was his teacher in the United States when he was studying for a degree in Architecture.
Said he; “Dr. Jeffrey, you will remember that I used to tell you in America that I am a prince in Africa. I am so overwhelmed tonight. I want to let you know that I am now a king under His Imperial Majesty, the Ooni of Ile-Ife, Kabiyesi, Oba Okunade Sijuwade Olubuse II”
Turning to the Ooni, Oba Adeniyi-Adedapo said: “these are the people who made me what I am when I was in America for 25years. Architecture was my major. Dr. Jeffrey gave us moral, financial support and everything when I was in America. He was a father figure to us.”
Looking in the direction of Dr. Jeffrey, the Oba said; “I cannot thank you enough. You are back home in Nigeria even though I am aware you are very close to Ghana. But this is your real home. The Ashantehene and the King of Accra know their father king is His Imperial Majesty, the Ooni of Ile- Ife. You are welcome back home. I thank you and I thank America your country for harbouring me for 25years. I went there with nothing and I came back home as an Architect and I am so proud of that country. God bless America, God bless the black race, God bless Ooni and God bless Nigeria!”
The Ooni later told the visitors that the population of those who claim ancestry to Yoruba race is about 240 million. They are found in Nigeria, USA, the Caribbean, Haiti, Venezuela, Argentina etc. He said even though in a place like Argentina, you have predominantly white people, a large percentage became white because of years of inter marriage.
The Ooni noted that there are several countries outside the USA where blacks also rule like President Barak Obama.
Earlier, Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola, the Governor of Osun State said at the opening ceremony that urbanisation in Nigeria had brought municipal challenges like insecurity, housing, food, transportation, health care provision, education, jobs, waste disposal and social welfare.
“While the development countries still grapple with these problems, the situation in developing countries can be worse”, said Aregbesola. 
At the closing ceremony of the one-week event Mr. Robert Bowser, President of National Conference of Black Mayors, Atlanta, said that it was a great opportunity for the Mayors to be present in Osun State. Bowser said the Mayors had seen Osun State and they had also seen the challenges the people face in the area of health, waste management, sanitation, infrastructure, education etc. He called on the state government to involve them in schemes to tackle some of the problems facing the state.
A Feast of Return, a dance drama written and produced by the poet, Odia Ofeimun, was performed at the event with other cultural dances. Present at the event were many traditional rulers in Osun State including Oba Oladele Olashore, the Aloko of Iloko-Ijesha; Oba Dokun Abolurin, the Oragun of Oke-Ila, Oba Rasheed Olasubomi, the Aragbiji of Iragbiji.

>"SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE"IS ON FACEBOOK NOW! – JOIN THE CAMPAIGN TO SAVE OUR GREAT LANGUAGE!

March 24, 2011

>

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THIS IS A GROUP TO WORK AT WAYS TO SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE WHICH IS DYING THROUGH MIXING WITH ENGLISH AND NOT SPEAKING YORUBA IN THE HOME TO YORUBA CHILDREN AND NOT READING YORUBA BOOKS AND ALAROYE WHICH IS READILY AVAILABLE.
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SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE !

Ojiboye Adegbite
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Kofoworola Taiwo Ogundapo

Kofoworola Taiwo Ogundapo I am proud to be a Yoruba child, Yoruba is rich & sweet to listen to, and am also proud to be one of this group,…. yes we will save YORUBA LANGUAGE…..O je iwuri funmi lati je omo Yoruba, Yoruba kun, o peye , o si tun dunn lati teti si, o si tun je iwuri funmi lati je okan ninu igbimo yi,…………..beni ao gba EDE YORUBA la.

April 14, 2010 at 7:34am · LikeUnlike ·

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Linda Lyons

Linda Lyons I agree. To many languages&customs have been permanetly lost because children not taught things they need2know and polititians bow2money,do what they want after elected/take control! Same every where,just more obvious in some places. I would love2learn the Yoruba tongue! Have friend in Lago’s i would love2speak his tongue! Even a few words2start. As…hello my friend-i send you my love and prayers- with much love-how has your day been? Thanks for your help.Linda

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February 28, 2010 at 7:49am · LikeUnlike ·

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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade DAILY WHEN YORUBAS ARE SPEAKING TO YOU AND THEY MIX ENGLISH IN,CORRECT THEM BY SAYING THE CORRECT FULL YORUBA-E.G. MA WORRY,YOU WILL SAY MA SE YONU! WHEN THEY CALL YOU AUNTIE,MOMMY,DADDY BROZ,SUPPLY ABURO,IYA BABA,EGBON…

January 15, 2009 at 9:23am

Gbenga Sunday Fakoya

Gbenga Sunday Fakoya pls let us uplift our culture, languge and style in anywhere we found ourself, teni teni akisa n tatan, Oyinbo will never come down to develop our culture, language and style for us. Aji se bi oyo la ri oyo oni se bi baba enikankan. Karaole o.

October 17, 2008 at 12:27am

Gbenga Sunday Fakoya

Gbenga Sunday Fakoya pls let us uplift our culture, languge and style in anywhere we found ourself, teni teni akisa n tatan, Oyinbo will never come down to develop our culture, language and style for us. Aji se bi oyo la ri oyo oni se bi baba enikankan. Karaole o.

October 17, 2008 at 12:25am

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade How insulting it is to Yoruba people when our Yoruba leaders get up at a Yoruba meeting and speak in English as if Yoruba language is nothing! Can a French,Lebanese,Chinese,Hausa person do that! Shame on the educated Yoruba elites who think that speaking english shows that they are educated and that english is the best language to be spoken!Eewoo!

March 1, 2008 at 7:13am

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade Lagos State House of Assembly in in a battle between those who are against the proposed use of Yoruba as an alternative language and those who want Yoruba to be used. The miseducated Yorubas are the ones trying to destroy Yoruba language by using English for everything,even with their children at home! Black on to the fighting Legislators who insist that we must have Yoruba spoken in the Assembly!

See MoreMarch 1, 2008 at 7:08am

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
SAVING YORUBA LANGUAGE
Oloogbon Adeboye Babalola’s response to my article “The Death of Yoruba Language?” in Guardian,August 8th2005,was enlightening. It is the tiredless efforts of such Yoruba Scholars that has academically placed Yoruba on the World map. Now we have Google in Yoruba as a result of such hardworking scholars! We want to build on this solid foundation that Oloogbon Babalola,Akinwunmi Isola, Oladipupo Yemitan, Adebayo Faleti and so many others have laid. In an ammended version of the same article I have advanced that all State legislatures in Yorubaland must declare Yoruba as their lst language of discourse. Here the legislative terms already worked out in Yoruba,Ibo and Hausa will come into use! Also it should be noted that Yoruba on the World Wide Web is booming. Tiwantiwa,(uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/tiwantiwa), created by Sister Molara Wood in London is protecting the purity of the Yoruba Language and should be supported by clicking on and joining!

See MoreMarch 1, 2008 at 6:41am

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