Archive for May, 2011

BLACK MALE RITES OF PASSAGE!- “BEAUTILLIONS-A RITE OF PASSAGE FOR BLACK MEN !-FROM MANBC.MSN.COM

May 27, 2011

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http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=091354308X&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0913543284&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrA comprehensive Afrocentric rites of passage program for black male adolescents.: An article from: Health and Social Workhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0687099374&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrFROM MSNBC.MSN.COM

BLACK MALE RITES OF PASSAGE -””BEAUTILLIONS”” -BLACK RITES OF PASSAGE FOR BLACK BOYS! -FROM msnbc.msn.com

FROM msnbc.msn.com

‘Beautillions’ a rite of passage for black males

Group hosts black-aimed coming out functions for youths

Below:

x Jump to discussion Loading comments…

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x Next story in Race & ethnicity Rare anti-slavery booklet acquired by U.Va.

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AdChoices. Lisa Billings / AP

Mark Turner II, left, and Kevin J. Wyatt, Jr., perform a ceremonial dance marking the rite of passage from boyhood to manhood during Phi Beta Sigma’s 6th annual Scholarship Beautillion on June 10, in Richmond, Va.The Associated Press

updated 6/17/2007 3:24:41 PM ET 2007-06-17T19:24:41

Share Print Font: +-RICHMOND, Va. — Just 30 minutes before the Phi Beta Sigma “beautillion” starts, a year of planning for the boys’ glittering debutant ball threatens to unravel: What should be a trio of white-gowned female escorts is only a duo.

That could mean one “beau” won’t have a partner for the intricate ballroom dance the boys have practiced for weeks.

“I think it’s gonna turn out OK,” organizer Elmer Seay Jr. says.

There’s more at stake than a fancy dance. The beaus in white tails and glinting white shoes are young black men, honor roll students bound for college.

Seay has challenged statistics showing young black males battling grim rates of joblessness, poverty and unintended fatherhood. He has arranged career forums and corralled the teens into dance classes and etiquette lessons.

Most important, he and his fraternity brothers have offered genuine concern for their future.

By evening’s end, beaus Jarratt Day, Mark Turner II and Kevin Wyatt will emerge as upright, goal-oriented men.

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.The Links, a Washington-based social group for affluent black women, has spent 50 years hosting black-aimed coming-out functions — cotillions for girls and increasingly popular beautillions for boys as young as 9.

‘Fed up’ with media portrayals

“African-Americans weren’t permitted to participate in the cotillions that were held mainly by white, aristocratic social clubs,” explains Janet Walker, head of The Links.

Today, these events draw black parents seeking opportunities to highlight the good in their sons.

“A lot of people are just fed up with the way that black men are portrayed in the media,” Walker says.

In addition, beautillion participants get scholarships, and contacts.

“If you want to go to fraternities or college and stuff, this is a step,” says 17-year-old Julian Alford, who is eyeing the University of Virginia.

In a studio, Kevin Wyatt claps and tumbles to African music as the beaus practice a celebratory dance.

There’s plenty to celebrate. For starters, no more stiff ballroom moves.

“The type of dancing we were doing? Boring, I’m not going to lie to you,” the 17-year-old says after practice.

His ball cap tilted to the side, a tiny diamond dotting his ear, Wyatt is an academic-minded baseball player who volunteers with children. But he worries about his future.

“I fear that I’m going to give up and not keep going,” he says, as the studio clears.

‘We lost ourselves’

While others celebrated the desegregation of schools in the ’50s, Charles Crute Jr. remembers an uncle warning that blacks would abandon their sense of community.

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.“I’ve grown and matured to understand what he meant — we lost ourselves,” the 58-year-old former detective says as six professional black men with him agree.

It’s five days before the beautillion, and the men of Phi Beta Sigma have met to iron out details.

They’re multi-degreed, representing decades of black male success. They’ve paved the way and worry today’s black men have fallen behind.

“We need black men to look at the home and at the children that are theirs,” says James Quash Sr., 84. “We need them to take a look and do something.”

The men created the Richmond beautillion in 2001, mimicking an event they saw in Washington.

The idea is to recognize young black males who are doing right, while giving them an official ceremony that says it’s time to grow up.

They’ve groomed 42 boys and seen them off to schools like Howard University in Washington and Morehouse College, in Atlanta.

Still, what started as 16 potential beaus this year shrank to eight by the second group meeting. And five of the remaining group — including Julian Alford with his two jobs, church and wrestling — were just too busy to commit.

A prideful evening

On the night of the beautillion, Seay can finally relax as the third young woman arrives. Soft string music starts and the starched beaus take the spotlight, twirling their dates in dainty pirouettes.

As Mark Turner II finesses his way across the floor, his father watches with pride. The elder Turner drove eight hours from Atlanta to attend, one of several recent gestures to smooth a relationship strained by distance and tension with his former wife.

“He’s going to start to deal with things that unfortunately his mother can’t help him with,” the elder Turner says.

Mark, 18, a tennis player with a 3.7 grade point average, says things have been “in the middle” since his dad began visiting more. “I was open to the opportunity, but bitter,” he says.

As the music winds down, the three fathers line up across from their sons. Mark holds a blue candle, his father a medallion, as a man in African garb explains the significance of the ceremony transforming three boys into three men.

One by one, each dad offers his son words of encouragement.

Turner hangs the medallion around his son’s neck, whispers “I love you,” and hugs the newfound man.

BLACK MALE RITES OF PASSAGE -“”BEAUTILLIONS”” -BLACK RITES OF PASSAGE FOR BLACK BOYS! -FROM msnbc.msn.com

May 27, 2011

FROM msnbc.msn.com

‘Beautillions’ a rite of passage for black males
Group hosts black-aimed coming out functions for youths
Below:

x Jump to discussion Loading comments…
.discussion

x Next story in Race & ethnicity Rare anti-slavery booklet acquired by U.Va.
related

.Advertise | AdChoices. Lisa Billings / AP
Mark Turner II, left, and Kevin J. Wyatt, Jr., perform a ceremonial dance marking the rite of passage from boyhood to manhood during Phi Beta Sigma’s 6th annual Scholarship Beautillion on June 10, in Richmond, Va.The Associated Press
updated 6/17/2007 3:24:41 PM ET 2007-06-17T19:24:41
Share Print Font: +-RICHMOND, Va. — Just 30 minutes before the Phi Beta Sigma “beautillion” starts, a year of planning for the boys’ glittering debutant ball threatens to unravel: What should be a trio of white-gowned female escorts is only a duo.

That could mean one “beau” won’t have a partner for the intricate ballroom dance the boys have practiced for weeks.

“I think it’s gonna turn out OK,” organizer Elmer Seay Jr. says.

There’s more at stake than a fancy dance. The beaus in white tails and glinting white shoes are young black men, honor roll students bound for college.

Seay has challenged statistics showing young black males battling grim rates of joblessness, poverty and unintended fatherhood. He has arranged career forums and corralled the teens into dance classes and etiquette lessons.

Most important, he and his fraternity brothers have offered genuine concern for their future.

By evening’s end, beaus Jarratt Day, Mark Turner II and Kevin Wyatt will emerge as upright, goal-oriented men.

Advertise | AdChoicesAdvertise | AdChoices
Advertise | AdChoices
.The Links, a Washington-based social group for affluent black women, has spent 50 years hosting black-aimed coming-out functions — cotillions for girls and increasingly popular beautillions for boys as young as 9.

‘Fed up’ with media portrayals
“African-Americans weren’t permitted to participate in the cotillions that were held mainly by white, aristocratic social clubs,” explains Janet Walker, head of The Links.

Today, these events draw black parents seeking opportunities to highlight the good in their sons.

“A lot of people are just fed up with the way that black men are portrayed in the media,” Walker says.

In addition, beautillion participants get scholarships, and contacts.

“If you want to go to fraternities or college and stuff, this is a step,” says 17-year-old Julian Alford, who is eyeing the University of Virginia.

In a studio, Kevin Wyatt claps and tumbles to African music as the beaus practice a celebratory dance.

There’s plenty to celebrate. For starters, no more stiff ballroom moves.

“The type of dancing we were doing? Boring, I’m not going to lie to you,” the 17-year-old says after practice.

His ball cap tilted to the side, a tiny diamond dotting his ear, Wyatt is an academic-minded baseball player who volunteers with children. But he worries about his future.

“I fear that I’m going to give up and not keep going,” he says, as the studio clears.

‘We lost ourselves’
While others celebrated the desegregation of schools in the ’50s, Charles Crute Jr. remembers an uncle warning that blacks would abandon their sense of community.

Advertise | AdChoicesAdvertise | AdChoices
Advertise | AdChoices
.“I’ve grown and matured to understand what he meant — we lost ourselves,” the 58-year-old former detective says as six professional black men with him agree.

It’s five days before the beautillion, and the men of Phi Beta Sigma have met to iron out details.

They’re multi-degreed, representing decades of black male success. They’ve paved the way and worry today’s black men have fallen behind.

“We need black men to look at the home and at the children that are theirs,” says James Quash Sr., 84. “We need them to take a look and do something.”

The men created the Richmond beautillion in 2001, mimicking an event they saw in Washington.

The idea is to recognize young black males who are doing right, while giving them an official ceremony that says it’s time to grow up.

They’ve groomed 42 boys and seen them off to schools like Howard University in Washington and Morehouse College, in Atlanta.

Still, what started as 16 potential beaus this year shrank to eight by the second group meeting. And five of the remaining group — including Julian Alford with his two jobs, church and wrestling — were just too busy to commit.

A prideful evening
On the night of the beautillion, Seay can finally relax as the third young woman arrives. Soft string music starts and the starched beaus take the spotlight, twirling their dates in dainty pirouettes.

As Mark Turner II finesses his way across the floor, his father watches with pride. The elder Turner drove eight hours from Atlanta to attend, one of several recent gestures to smooth a relationship strained by distance and tension with his former wife.

“He’s going to start to deal with things that unfortunately his mother can’t help him with,” the elder Turner says.

Mark, 18, a tennis player with a 3.7 grade point average, says things have been “in the middle” since his dad began visiting more. “I was open to the opportunity, but bitter,” he says.

As the music winds down, the three fathers line up across from their sons. Mark holds a blue candle, his father a medallion, as a man in African garb explains the significance of the ceremony transforming three boys into three men.

One by one, each dad offers his son words of encouragement.

Turner hangs the medallion around his son’s neck, whispers “I love you,” and hugs the newfound man.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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>BLACK RITES OF PASSAGE FOR BLACK GIRLS!-SAVE OUR GIRLS FROM HEARTACHE! -FROM ASSATASHAKUR.COM

May 27, 2011

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#1 (permalink) 08-29-2004

IfasehunReincarnated

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

——————————————————————————–

Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

Synade Jackson, a divorced mother of two, was filled with anxiety as her 14-year-old daughter, Kemikaa, moved toward womanhood. So to reinforce the lessons she had been teaching her at home about being a strong Black woman, Jackson enrolled Kemikaa in the Sojourner Truth Adolescent Rites Society (STARS) in New York City.

“I had wondered whether my daughter would choose education over adolescent pregnancy,” Jackson says. “I wanted her to learn African history and spirituality. I wanted these values to be ingrained in her.”

Jackson seems to have gotten her wish. As Kemikaa and 13 other girls finished the ten-month program (which included classes on spirituality, sexuality, cooking-and even quilting), Jackson says she watched her daughter become a more confident, responsible young lady. And Kemikaa, too, was happy with the results. “I got a lot out of the group,” she says, “especially the self-love and self-esteem class, where we talked about our ,body temple, and how we feel about ourselves.”

Jackson is not alone in her desire to play a greater role in the socialization process of her child. According to Audrey “Ayo” Hunter, founder and executive director of the Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, Inc., in Detroit, African-American rites-of-passage programs like hers have been going on since the 1960’s. Meanwhile, the Afrikan National Rites of Passage United Kollective, a St. Louis, Missouri-based umbrella organization that has been conducting these programs for ten years, has annual meetings to develop and hone African-American passage programs around the country.

“Historically our people have always used certain requirements or tasks to move on to the next level,” says Darryl “Kofi” Kennon, executive director of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective. “African people have been doing rites for thousands of years.”

Bruce “Olamina Osatunde” Stevenson, assistant director of operations programming of the Baltimore rites group, adds “As a direct result of the enslavement of African people, our rites of initiation were stolen. Every culture has a process where children must become adults. We use these rituals to let children know that it’s time to take on roles and responsibilities.”

There are other benefits as well. Because negative images of the Black community abound, says Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock, a Washington, D.C., psychologist who has written several books on African-American rites of passage, these programs help ensure that our children have healthy self-images. “Society does not provide a mirror for our kids to see themselves positively,” says Warfield-Coppock, whose three children have all participated in these rituals.

“With these programs,” sums up Dr. Wade W. Nobles, executive director of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture in Oakland, “our children belong to something greater than themselves. And that’s important.”

ESSENTIALS OF A RITES PROGRAM

While there is no “correct” way to do it, Stevenson of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective recommends the following components for a successful passage program:

* Let African traditions or influences be at the core. At the African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program in Washington, D.C., for example, boys learn about the history and culture of Africans in the diaspora through lectures, films and visits to museums. * Involve parents, relatives and guardians in the process. For instance, the West Dallas Community Centers have bonding sessions between the children and parents or guardians to emphasize the importance of extended family and mentors. * Make the rites program an ongoing one. “Rites of passage are lifelong,” says Warfield-Coppock. Consequently, the process is continuous, spanning birth and adolescence to marriage, eldership and finally death. Although programs typically revolve around young adolescents, they can be performed with toddlers, 7-year-olds and late teens too. * Give the participants tasks to master. Use emotional, spiritual and physical tests to prepare children for adulthood. At Detroit’s Kabaz Center, children go to the woods to become more attuned with nature and also participate in precision drills that instill discipline. * Let the community witness the ceremony. At the STARS program, Kemikaa and her friends dressed in African attire for their final ceremony in New York City’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, where they shared speeches with their families and other witnesses. * Include rituals and ceremonial activities. Children at the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective, for instance, form a unity circle to give thanks to the Creator and offer libations to remember their ancestors.

PASSAGE PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE

While we can’t list all rites-of-passage programs around the country, here are a few: * Baltimore Rites of Passage, Kollective, Harambee Kollective Services, Inc., 3645 Cottage Ave., Baltimore MD 21215; (410) 462-1494. With “positive, preventive and proactive” curricula, the Kollective trains boys and girls (ages 7 to 18) to become strong, responsible adults. The program, which lasts at least 20 weeks, is broken down into five major phases: family orientation, rites of separation, curriculum, retreat and naming ceremony, and the transformation ceremony. * HAWK Federation, 175 Filbert St., Ste. 202, Oakland CA 94607; (510) 836-3245. HAWK–High Achievement, Wisdom and Knowledge–was designed initially as an African-based manhood training program, but today, HAWK’s female counterpart, the Aset Society, offers a parallel operation for girls. Based on a series of tests that each child must master to build courage, character and consciousness, Hawk targets 12-to-14-year-old boys. Both programs, however, are open to children between the ages of.5 and 18. * West Dallas Community Centers, Inc., 8200 Brookriver Dr., Ste. N704, Dallas TX 75247; (214) 634-7691. After receiving a $1.4 million grant in 1989, the West Dallas Community Centers developed a rites-of-passage program that focuses on youths who have been involved with the correctional system or in family intervention. The curriculum incorporates the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles celebrated during Kwanzaa), counseling, and language, karate and history classes. This coed program generally lasts two years and targets children between ages 9 and 17. * Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, 3619 Mount Elliott, Detroit MI 48207; (313) 924-1140. Kabaz, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary last year, claims to teach “the art of manhood and womanhood by connecting to our past.” The coed program, lasting from three months to a year, trains children starting at age 5, using a 12-formula Dlan to in still Afrocentric values and norms. * Concerned Black Men, Inc. (D.C. Chapter), 1511 K St., N.W., Ste. 1100, Washington DC 20005; (202) 783-5414. The five-year-old African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program is a year-round operation in which 8-to-13-year-old boys meet two Saturdays a month. It’s based on five principles: economic intuition, leadership, health and physical fitness, cultural awareness and academic competence. * African American Women on Tour, 3914 Murphy Canyon Rd., Ste. 216-B, San Diego CA 92123-4423; (800) 560-AAWT. At five conferences around the country, AAWT holds rites-of-passage programs for 12-to-19-year-old girls. The three-day workshop focuses on self-empowerment, teen sexuality and African culture and history.

For information on how to set up a passage program in your community, contact one of the organizations listed above. If you want to read up on the topic, check out Transformation: A Rites of Passage Manual for African American Girls by Mafori Moore, Gwen Akua Gilyard, Karen King and Nsenga Warfield-Coppock (STARS Press, $15) and Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage by Nathan Hare and Julie Hare (Black Think Tank, $6). Warfield-Coppock can also provide a wealth of information; she can be reached at Baobab Associates, Inc., 7614 16th St., N.W., Washington DC 20012.

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#2 (permalink) 08-08-2005

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HELP: Searching For Rites-of-Passage in LA

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Hello everyone. I am just coming out of the “Matrix”. I have a 10yr old son

that I want to help stay clear of it. I am looking for a rite-of-passage group

in LA to put him in. If anyone can help, please write back or phone me @

858-414-3434. Thank you so much for any and all assistance given.

Oh, I am also looking for an African based church, thanks again.

#3 (permalink) 08-08-2005

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I worry the same about Atlanta, GA I heard about a rites-of-passage a while back but I’m not sure of the details or if it still exsist. If anyone knows let a brotha know.

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

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#1 (permalink) 08-29-2004

IfasehunReincarnated

Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors Join Date: Jan 2004

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

——————————————————————————–

Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

Synade Jackson, a divorced mother of two, was filled with anxiety as her 14-year-old daughter, Kemikaa, moved toward womanhood. So to reinforce the lessons she had been teaching her at home about being a strong Black woman, Jackson enrolled Kemikaa in the Sojourner Truth Adolescent Rites Society (STARS) in New York City.

“I had wondered whether my daughter would choose education over adolescent pregnancy,” Jackson says. “I wanted her to learn African history and spirituality. I wanted these values to be ingrained in her.”

Jackson seems to have gotten her wish. As Kemikaa and 13 other girls finished the ten-month program (which included classes on spirituality, sexuality, cooking-and even quilting), Jackson says she watched her daughter become a more confident, responsible young lady. And Kemikaa, too, was happy with the results. “I got a lot out of the group,” she says, “especially the self-love and self-esteem class, where we talked about our ,body temple, and how we feel about ourselves.”

Jackson is not alone in her desire to play a greater role in the socialization process of her child. According to Audrey “Ayo” Hunter, founder and executive director of the Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, Inc., in Detroit, African-American rites-of-passage programs like hers have been going on since the 1960’s. Meanwhile, the Afrikan National Rites of Passage United Kollective, a St. Louis, Missouri-based umbrella organization that has been conducting these programs for ten years, has annual meetings to develop and hone African-American passage programs around the country.

“Historically our people have always used certain requirements or tasks to move on to the next level,” says Darryl “Kofi” Kennon, executive director of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective. “African people have been doing rites for thousands of years.”

Bruce “Olamina Osatunde” Stevenson, assistant director of operations programming of the Baltimore rites group, adds “As a direct result of the enslavement of African people, our rites of initiation were stolen. Every culture has a process where children must become adults. We use these rituals to let children know that it’s time to take on roles and responsibilities.”

There are other benefits as well. Because negative images of the Black community abound, says Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock, a Washington, D.C., psychologist who has written several books on African-American rites of passage, these programs help ensure that our children have healthy self-images. “Society does not provide a mirror for our kids to see themselves positively,” says Warfield-Coppock, whose three children have all participated in these rituals.

“With these programs,” sums up Dr. Wade W. Nobles, executive director of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture in Oakland, “our children belong to something greater than themselves. And that’s important.”

ESSENTIALS OF A RITES PROGRAM

While there is no “correct” way to do it, Stevenson of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective recommends the following components for a successful passage program:

* Let African traditions or influences be at the core. At the African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program in Washington, D.C., for example, boys learn about the history and culture of Africans in the diaspora through lectures, films and visits to museums. * Involve parents, relatives and guardians in the process. For instance, the West Dallas Community Centers have bonding sessions between the children and parents or guardians to emphasize the importance of extended family and mentors. * Make the rites program an ongoing one. “Rites of passage are lifelong,” says Warfield-Coppock. Consequently, the process is continuous, spanning birth and adolescence to marriage, eldership and finally death. Although programs typically revolve around young adolescents, they can be performed with toddlers, 7-year-olds and late teens too. * Give the participants tasks to master. Use emotional, spiritual and physical tests to prepare children for adulthood. At Detroit’s Kabaz Center, children go to the woods to become more attuned with nature and also participate in precision drills that instill discipline. * Let the community witness the ceremony. At the STARS program, Kemikaa and her friends dressed in African attire for their final ceremony in New York City’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, where they shared speeches with their families and other witnesses. * Include rituals and ceremonial activities. Children at the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective, for instance, form a unity circle to give thanks to the Creator and offer libations to remember their ancestors.

PASSAGE PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE

While we can’t list all rites-of-passage programs around the country, here are a few: * Baltimore Rites of Passage, Kollective, Harambee Kollective Services, Inc., 3645 Cottage Ave., Baltimore MD 21215; (410) 462-1494. With “positive, preventive and proactive” curricula, the Kollective trains boys and girls (ages 7 to 18) to become strong, responsible adults. The program, which lasts at least 20 weeks, is broken down into five major phases: family orientation, rites of separation, curriculum, retreat and naming ceremony, and the transformation ceremony. * HAWK Federation, 175 Filbert St., Ste. 202, Oakland CA 94607; (510) 836-3245. HAWK–High Achievement, Wisdom and Knowledge–was designed initially as an African-based manhood training program, but today, HAWK’s female counterpart, the Aset Society, offers a parallel operation for girls. Based on a series of tests that each child must master to build courage, character and consciousness, Hawk targets 12-to-14-year-old boys. Both programs, however, are open to children between the ages of.5 and 18. * West Dallas Community Centers, Inc., 8200 Brookriver Dr., Ste. N704, Dallas TX 75247; (214) 634-7691. After receiving a $1.4 million grant in 1989, the West Dallas Community Centers developed a rites-of-passage program that focuses on youths who have been involved with the correctional system or in family intervention. The curriculum incorporates the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles celebrated during Kwanzaa), counseling, and language, karate and history classes. This coed program generally lasts two years and targets children between ages 9 and 17. * Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, 3619 Mount Elliott, Detroit MI 48207; (313) 924-1140. Kabaz, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary last year, claims to teach “the art of manhood and womanhood by connecting to our past.” The coed program, lasting from three months to a year, trains children starting at age 5, using a 12-formula Dlan to in still Afrocentric values and norms. * Concerned Black Men, Inc. (D.C. Chapter), 1511 K St., N.W., Ste. 1100, Washington DC 20005; (202) 783-5414. The five-year-old African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program is a year-round operation in which 8-to-13-year-old boys meet two Saturdays a month. It’s based on five principles: economic intuition, leadership, health and physical fitness, cultural awareness and academic competence. * African American Women on Tour, 3914 Murphy Canyon Rd., Ste. 216-B, San Diego CA 92123-4423; (800) 560-AAWT. At five conferences around the country, AAWT holds rites-of-passage programs for 12-to-19-year-old girls. The three-day workshop focuses on self-empowerment, teen sexuality and African culture and history.

For information on how to set up a passage program in your community, contact one of the organizations listed above. If you want to read up on the topic, check out Transformation: A Rites of Passage Manual for African American Girls by Mafori Moore, Gwen Akua Gilyard, Karen King and Nsenga Warfield-Coppock (STARS Press, $15) and Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage by Nathan Hare and Julie Hare (Black Think Tank, $6). Warfield-Coppock can also provide a wealth of information; she can be reached at Baobab Associates, Inc., 7614 16th St., N.W., Washington DC 20012.

COPYRIGHT 1996 Essence Communications, Inc.S

__________________

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#2 (permalink) 08-08-2005

STUDENT

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HELP: Searching For Rites-of-Passage in LA

——————————————————————————–

Hello everyone. I am just coming out of the “Matrix”. I have a 10yr old son

that I want to help stay clear of it. I am looking for a rite-of-passage group

in LA to put him in. If anyone can help, please write back or phone me @

858-414-3434. Thank you so much for any and all assistance given.

Oh, I am also looking for an African based church, thanks again.

#3 (permalink) 08-08-2005

Im The Truth

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I worry the same about Atlanta, GA I heard about a rites-of-passage a while back but I’m not sure of the details or if it still exsist. If anyone knows let a brotha know.

Uhuru Sasa!!!

__________________

“If the enemy is not doing anything against you, you are not doing anything”

-Ahmed Sékou Touré

“speak truth, do justice, be kind and do not do evil.”

-Baba Orunmila

“Cowardice asks the question: is it safe? Expediency asks the question: is it political? Vanity asks the question: is it popular? But conscience asks the question: is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor political, nor popular – but one must take it simply because it is right.”

–Dr. Martin L. King

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May 27, 2011

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#1 (permalink) 08-29-2004
IfasehunReincarnated
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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

——————————————————————————–

Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

Synade Jackson, a divorced mother of two, was filled with anxiety as her 14-year-old daughter, Kemikaa, moved toward womanhood. So to reinforce the lessons she had been teaching her at home about being a strong Black woman, Jackson enrolled Kemikaa in the Sojourner Truth Adolescent Rites Society (STARS) in New York City.

“I had wondered whether my daughter would choose education over adolescent pregnancy,” Jackson says. “I wanted her to learn African history and spirituality. I wanted these values to be ingrained in her.”

Jackson seems to have gotten her wish. As Kemikaa and 13 other girls finished the ten-month program (which included classes on spirituality, sexuality, cooking-and even quilting), Jackson says she watched her daughter become a more confident, responsible young lady. And Kemikaa, too, was happy with the results. “I got a lot out of the group,” she says, “especially the self-love and self-esteem class, where we talked about our ,body temple, and how we feel about ourselves.”

Jackson is not alone in her desire to play a greater role in the socialization process of her child. According to Audrey “Ayo” Hunter, founder and executive director of the Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, Inc., in Detroit, African-American rites-of-passage programs like hers have been going on since the 1960’s. Meanwhile, the Afrikan National Rites of Passage United Kollective, a St. Louis, Missouri-based umbrella organization that has been conducting these programs for ten years, has annual meetings to develop and hone African-American passage programs around the country.

“Historically our people have always used certain requirements or tasks to move on to the next level,” says Darryl “Kofi” Kennon, executive director of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective. “African people have been doing rites for thousands of years.”

Bruce “Olamina Osatunde” Stevenson, assistant director of operations programming of the Baltimore rites group, adds “As a direct result of the enslavement of African people, our rites of initiation were stolen. Every culture has a process where children must become adults. We use these rituals to let children know that it’s time to take on roles and responsibilities.”

There are other benefits as well. Because negative images of the Black community abound, says Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock, a Washington, D.C., psychologist who has written several books on African-American rites of passage, these programs help ensure that our children have healthy self-images. “Society does not provide a mirror for our kids to see themselves positively,” says Warfield-Coppock, whose three children have all participated in these rituals.

“With these programs,” sums up Dr. Wade W. Nobles, executive director of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture in Oakland, “our children belong to something greater than themselves. And that’s important.”

ESSENTIALS OF A RITES PROGRAM

While there is no “correct” way to do it, Stevenson of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective recommends the following components for a successful passage program:

* Let African traditions or influences be at the core. At the African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program in Washington, D.C., for example, boys learn about the history and culture of Africans in the diaspora through lectures, films and visits to museums. * Involve parents, relatives and guardians in the process. For instance, the West Dallas Community Centers have bonding sessions between the children and parents or guardians to emphasize the importance of extended family and mentors. * Make the rites program an ongoing one. “Rites of passage are lifelong,” says Warfield-Coppock. Consequently, the process is continuous, spanning birth and adolescence to marriage, eldership and finally death. Although programs typically revolve around young adolescents, they can be performed with toddlers, 7-year-olds and late teens too. * Give the participants tasks to master. Use emotional, spiritual and physical tests to prepare children for adulthood. At Detroit’s Kabaz Center, children go to the woods to become more attuned with nature and also participate in precision drills that instill discipline. * Let the community witness the ceremony. At the STARS program, Kemikaa and her friends dressed in African attire for their final ceremony in New York City’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, where they shared speeches with their families and other witnesses. * Include rituals and ceremonial activities. Children at the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective, for instance, form a unity circle to give thanks to the Creator and offer libations to remember their ancestors.

PASSAGE PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE

While we can’t list all rites-of-passage programs around the country, here are a few: * Baltimore Rites of Passage, Kollective, Harambee Kollective Services, Inc., 3645 Cottage Ave., Baltimore MD 21215; (410) 462-1494. With “positive, preventive and proactive” curricula, the Kollective trains boys and girls (ages 7 to 18) to become strong, responsible adults. The program, which lasts at least 20 weeks, is broken down into five major phases: family orientation, rites of separation, curriculum, retreat and naming ceremony, and the transformation ceremony. * HAWK Federation, 175 Filbert St., Ste. 202, Oakland CA 94607; (510) 836-3245. HAWK–High Achievement, Wisdom and Knowledge–was designed initially as an African-based manhood training program, but today, HAWK’s female counterpart, the Aset Society, offers a parallel operation for girls. Based on a series of tests that each child must master to build courage, character and consciousness, Hawk targets 12-to-14-year-old boys. Both programs, however, are open to children between the ages of.5 and 18. * West Dallas Community Centers, Inc., 8200 Brookriver Dr., Ste. N704, Dallas TX 75247; (214) 634-7691. After receiving a $1.4 million grant in 1989, the West Dallas Community Centers developed a rites-of-passage program that focuses on youths who have been involved with the correctional system or in family intervention. The curriculum incorporates the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles celebrated during Kwanzaa), counseling, and language, karate and history classes. This coed program generally lasts two years and targets children between ages 9 and 17. * Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, 3619 Mount Elliott, Detroit MI 48207; (313) 924-1140. Kabaz, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary last year, claims to teach “the art of manhood and womanhood by connecting to our past.” The coed program, lasting from three months to a year, trains children starting at age 5, using a 12-formula Dlan to in still Afrocentric values and norms. * Concerned Black Men, Inc. (D.C. Chapter), 1511 K St., N.W., Ste. 1100, Washington DC 20005; (202) 783-5414. The five-year-old African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program is a year-round operation in which 8-to-13-year-old boys meet two Saturdays a month. It’s based on five principles: economic intuition, leadership, health and physical fitness, cultural awareness and academic competence. * African American Women on Tour, 3914 Murphy Canyon Rd., Ste. 216-B, San Diego CA 92123-4423; (800) 560-AAWT. At five conferences around the country, AAWT holds rites-of-passage programs for 12-to-19-year-old girls. The three-day workshop focuses on self-empowerment, teen sexuality and African culture and history.

For information on how to set up a passage program in your community, contact one of the organizations listed above. If you want to read up on the topic, check out Transformation: A Rites of Passage Manual for African American Girls by Mafori Moore, Gwen Akua Gilyard, Karen King and Nsenga Warfield-Coppock (STARS Press, $15) and Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage by Nathan Hare and Julie Hare (Black Think Tank, $6). Warfield-Coppock can also provide a wealth of information; she can be reached at Baobab Associates, Inc., 7614 16th St., N.W., Washington DC 20012.

COPYRIGHT 1996 Essence Communications, Inc.S
__________________
All is Well. Workin’ Hard – Tryin’ to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

Photos of members wearing Hands Off Assata Shirts 6/3/06
Buy: Afrikan Spirituality Books & Videos (300+ in stock)
Meaningless Blog #1 | Blog # 2

#2 (permalink) 08-08-2005
STUDENT
Premium Member Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2
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HELP: Searching For Rites-of-Passage in LA

——————————————————————————–

Hello everyone. I am just coming out of the “Matrix”. I have a 10yr old son

that I want to help stay clear of it. I am looking for a rite-of-passage group

in LA to put him in. If anyone can help, please write back or phone me @

858-414-3434. Thank you so much for any and all assistance given.

Oh, I am also looking for an African based church, thanks again.

#3 (permalink) 08-08-2005
Im The Truth
Organizer Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Atlanta, GA by way of Afrika
Posts: 5,910
Blog Entries: 11
Thanks: 2,684
Thanked 1,843 Times in 1,052 Posts
Gender: Brother
Rep Power: 591

Member’s Picture Albums

I worry the same about Atlanta, GA I heard about a rites-of-passage a while back but I’m not sure of the details or if it still exsist. If anyone knows let a brotha know.

Uhuru Sasa!!!
__________________
“If the enemy is not doing anything against you, you are not doing anything”
-Ahmed Sékou Touré

“speak truth, do justice, be kind and do not do evil.”
-Baba Orunmila

“Cowardice asks the question: is it safe? Expediency asks the question: is it political? Vanity asks the question: is it popular? But conscience asks the question: is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor political, nor popular – but one must take it simply because it is right.”
–Dr. Martin L. King

Get Involved!

>BACK TO AFRICA ! -DAN FOSTER,THIS BLACK AMERIKKKA HAS COME BACK HOME WITH A BANG AND IS FREE,BLACK AND RISING IN THE MOTHERLAND!

May 26, 2011

>

CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)


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Nairaland [Nigerian Forum] Home Help Search Who is currently online? Recent Posts Login Register Nairaland Forum  |  General | Welcome  |  Politics (Moderators: aisha2, Jarus)  |  CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)

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Author Topic: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)  (Read 5257 views)
Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin,   Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there.  This guy neva jam  Grin Grin


Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.
Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments  Grin


Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!


gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria


deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Also, True !


PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there.  It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.


Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?,  Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis  Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio,  lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?


JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

 A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food.  Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East


* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??


shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.


rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps.  Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.


FROM THENETNG.COM

Opinion

« Breaking News – Emeka Ike Wins GUS Celebrity Showdown!Smart BasketMouth Escapes Branson Push »Dan Foster Gets Baby No 3

By Victoria Ige

Mr Foster and wife pose with their first baby in this picture obtained from the official Dan Foster Facebook account

Popular on-air personality Dan Foster an his wife Lovina are celebrating the arrival of their second child together.

Foster’s wife Lovina delivered a baby boy, Thursday May 27 in a Lagos hospital.

The couple already had a girl together; while Foster, an American, has a grown boy from an earlier marriage.

‘Baby boy has landed and mommy is safe and God is great… We’re so full of joy, join us for a thought of praise’ Dan Foster wrote in an SMS blast to friends.

The baby weighed 3.8 kg at birth.
777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

But besides all these and many other goodies abut Dan, he has his other side. Dan Fo

BACK TO AFRICA !- THIS BLACK AMERIKKKAN DAN FOSTER DID SO WELL ADJUSTING IN NIGERIA THAT HE’S WRITING A BOOK ABOUT HOW TO DO BUSINESS IN NIGERIA- IMAGINE! BLACK ON!-FROM NAIRALAND.COM

May 26, 2011


FROM NAIRALAND.COM
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
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Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa”

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

–Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin, Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there. This guy neva jam Grin Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!

gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria

deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.
Also, True !

PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there. It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.

Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?, Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio, lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?

JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food. Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East

* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps. Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.

>BACK TO AFRICA! -LLOYD WEAVER CAME HOME AND NEVER LOOKED BAC

May 23, 2011

>

I’ll be disappointed if my children return to America
By NONYE BEN-NWANKWO  
Saturday, 13 Jun 2009  
   
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Lloyd Weaver

But for your American accent, anyone would take you for a full blooded Nigerian…I am very proud of Nigeria. I am proud of living in Nigeria. I tell people that Nigeria is my land of opportunities. When I was in the US, I was in the television business, and by some people’s standard, I was doing very well. I worked at a top network, which was CBS Television. I reached the rank of a producer. I was okay. However, that wasn’t what I wanted to do.

What did you want to do?

I got into television in the first place for the artistic challenge, because I loved the medium and because television speaks so strongly to people. It influences people’s habits, their behaviours and the way they think. That means that people that produce in television are very powerful. As an African American, I have a high regard for Africa. I always hated the way the American media reported and still does report news about Africa. I wondered how Africa was doing. I could see that American television was really shaping the way Americans think. I came to Nigeria on a visit once and I saw that there were televisions in Nigeria too. That was in 1969. NTA was just starting then. I think it was known as WNTV then. But by the time I came back in 1979, television stations were almost in every state of this country, which means that televisions could be used by Nigerians, the way Americans use televisions over there to sustain our line of thoughts.

Was that when you decided to live in Nigeria?

No. In 1982, I was invited to come to Nigeria to train the personnel in NTA. We went all over the country training about half the TV stations in Nigeria. I got the chance to really see and experience the place that African Americans call the Motherland. I fell in love with Nigeria and I loved the people I worked with. We were fairly successful in NTA at that time. Our contract was extended for another year. CBS had already given me a one year leave of absence, so I went back to America and said goodbye to CBS. I headed back to Nigeria and spent the second year, until somebody decided that President Shehu Shagari had had enough time. General Babangida came along and decided that all contracts should be cancelled. Here I was in Nigeria. I didn’t want to go back to America. By that time, I had got to know people in the private sector as well, since I was a friendly guy. Some of the advertising agencies were asking me and some other guys I worked with in the training project if we would do television commercials for them. That was why I said Nigeria was my land of opportunities. In 1982, there were very few black people doing commercials in the US and it wasn’t even going to change.

So you stayed back in Nigeria because of that?

I tell you, America is more tribalistic than Nigeria is. The Irish Americans own one economic sector, the Jewish America own another and the Chinese Americans own another. The TV commercial business was kind of locked up too. I just happened to slip in between the cranks at the point when black people were making a lot of noise in the US. People were hiring us in tokens; that was how I got into it. I have always wanted to do a TV commercial. We had never done it before, but we didn’t admit it. We had to figure it out. Nigerians were able to tell their clients that an American company was doing their commercial, and we compromised. That was how we started. But remember one of the reasons I was in Nigeria in the first place was to influence African people to use television for development. Even though I was doing commercials, I tried to do that as well. I noticed that if the heroine of an advert was a female, she would always wear a Western dress and she would always be as light as possible. I always protested against that. But the agencies knew that that was what their clients wanted. And since I was talking to the agency and not the client, the agency would always want to fight me back. I kept telling them that they were insulting their mothers and sisters by saying that only a light skinned woman was beautiful. One of the biggest breakthroughs I had was doing a commercial for a deodorant company. The creative director was interested in great legs. The only great legs that came our way were those of Kate Henshaw, who you know is quite dark. They looked at me and said they knew she was my choice and I said yes. They said if anything should go wrong it would be my fault. But the commercial ran for about four or five years. It has been a great experience thereafter. Like I said, I came over here to train people. A lot of the film makers I trained are beginning to make waves now. They are certainly making a lot more money than me. Blood is thicker than water. I am a Nigerian but I still talk funny. I don’t have many blood relatives here except my wife and children, so these people tend to get more work than me. But then, we have been so successful. I spent 13 years in American television and I have spent 23 years in Nigerian television. I think I can say that I am a Nigerian television producer.

So you would rather call yourself a Nigerian…

I spent my career here, working in this environment, dealing with Nigerian values, having to reflect them and being successful, which means I tried real hard and I have done pretty well. So, I would say yes, I am a Nigerian. Most of the experiences that helped me to grow in my own craft happened in Nigeria. In fact, I can say I have spent 27 years in Nigeria since I came in 1982.

If Nigeria had not provided these opportunities to you, would you have gone back to America?

Like people say, money talks. Somebody said ‘Lloyd, you left a job that was paying you upwards of $60,000 a year to take $6,000 a year.‘ Even with overtime and all that, I was making close to $100,000 a year in 1982 when I left CBS. But I didn’t go back to the US. That says something. But you know something, I never decided to stay in Nigeria either.

So what made you stay back?

I still haven’t decided. It is just that one good thing led to another. I found usefulness, I found purpose and I fell in love. I have got a wife and three children and I don’t want my children to have the experience of being African Americans when they have the opportunity to be Africans. The idea is for your life to have some meaning. I eat three square meals a day no matter where I am. I am professionally successful. Other than families and attachments and things like that, there is very little that can draw me away from the meaningful life that I have here. It is just divine, even though it is by accident.

So, you would rather call Nigeria home than US?

If you live in a place for as long as 23 years, I think you might as well call that place home or you are fooling yourself. US is home of some type, but people migrate. I migrated back home, you can put it that way. Nigeria is ancestral to me and to every African American. I did a course in history that showed that well over 50 per cent of those slaves that were taken came from the coastal area that we now identify as Nigeria. It is not impossible for any African American not to have blood that comes back to this soil.

It is not even a matter of roots search. I just feel very much at home. I look forward to becoming a citizen of Nigeria one day, though I resent the idea that I have to go through a process. My ancestors didn’t have a visa or passport when they left here. A different rule should be made for those of us who are returning from the Diaspora because, after all, we are coming back home.

But doesn’t the negative perception about Nigeria out there worry you?

Yes, there is a bad perception. When I mention Nigeria to people over there, they say, ‘Oh, that is the place they are kidnapping people.‘ That is because that‘s the word that gets out. My job is to get a better word out. If somebody mentions America, I can say ‘Oh, it is the place where the powers that be put drugs into the black community so that they can all die or become stupid?‘ You describe a place according to what your perception is. Your perception is about the word that gets out to you, the word that reaches you and what people want. When I think of America, I think of a lot of good, but I also think of a lot of negative. I listen to music where people use profane language. People who are stars are perverts and they talk about women in a negative way.

The business that I am in is a very serious business. It tells people how to act and think. I want to see black Americans imitating Africans as opposed to the other way round. If you see a Chinese American, he is talking like a Chinese; he is not talking like a 50 Cent. I like what Nigerians are now doing with hip hop. They are ‘Africanising’ it and they are putting their own values, and that is nice. People in entertainment should understand they have a responsibility to make sure that people are building platforms for taking control of this country in the nearest future.

You are working on a television drama about how Nigeria got her independence. Why?

Absolutely. I am raising Nigerian children and I found that my kids didn’t study history in school. I was raised in America and from the first grade to my second year of university, history was compulsory, which meant that Americans are Americans because they were deliberately taught to be Americans. They are not allowed to think any other way. We hear negative things about our country Nigeria because nobody is pounding positive images or ideas into the heads of Nigerian young people. So, there is no heritage. What we know is what has happened to Nigeria since independence, which has been a calamity. But the day of independence is every nation‘s reference point. The founding fathers are your heroes. We have heard more negative stories about our founding fathers than positive ones because nobody is preoccupied with telling the positive story about how this country was found. When I found out that my children didn’t have history, where will they get it if they don’t get it from me? I had to undertake an intensive study of Nigerian history on my own. What I found was amazing. The history of how Nigeria came about is the same as how America came about. We did fight for this country and I think we all should know the story. I am not giving you the details.

So the details is what you want to put in the drama series?

The details include a lot of things. It includes the battles along the way. How the British came in and how they fooled everybody. For example, the day Kano fell; we see the brave warriors on horseback who fought for days to prevent this. We want to show and name the heroes of those battles. Those people are our role models. We are going to show all the kingdoms that existed in Nigeria. We are going to show these heroes growing up. We will show (Obafemi) Awolowo and Hannah falling in love, and all that.

Is it really feasible to put all this in a motion picture?

We have to. The countries we say we want

to be like, their citizens know those kinds

of things about their countries. You

know all kinds of stories about your

parents, and that is why they are your parents. We have to know this about our country. We have to understand these personalities. Nigerians will be fascinated to see their actors and actresses actually playing these people, to see the day they became inspired to do the great things they did and to see them arguing with each other.

Won’t this cost a lot of money?

It will cost a lot of money, but hey, so what? Look at how important this is. Since I am looking for sponsors, I am looking for the credit that can go to the sponsor. It costs a lot of money, but television also is a revenue earner. TV commercials cost a lot of money and this will be run for a long time. So, somebody is going to make a lot of money as well. This is one of the situations where you have to put up the money to make the money. I am hoping somebody will have the motive to partner with us in this. I intend to use Nigerian actors and actresses. It is a Nigerian story, so it should be better told by Nigerians. Nollywood has developed talents. We want to give those talents an outlet. They have the chance to say this is the best that they did with their craft and their art in their lives. We are using about four directors and it is going to be exciting and challenging because we are going to create history. We have to create an accurate history of the things we never saw. It is an exciting challenge and that is what I want to do.

What aspect of your childhood influenced your journey to Africa…

I grew up in Harlem. When I was nine years old, I was sent to an all white school. I remember when everybody in school was asked to do something that reflected their ethnic group. I asked myself what my tribe was. I had to figure it out. It was a dilemma. So, I went and got some drums and I listened to some records from one guy. Then Mariam Makeba was just coming up, and I listened to some of her songs and I did my own performance in school. My mother still talks about when she came to the PTA meeting after that performance. Parents were telling her that their kids loved her son because he taught them all about Africa. My mother wondered what I knew about Africa at that age.

Then again, when I was in the sixth grade, remember I was in New York and it was in the days of apartheid. Apartheid was fought very bitterly in the United Nations and in South Africa. This thing will come up in the United Nation‘s Security Council and I would notice that the US would vote down any anti-apartheid motion. I was in New York and our field trip was to the United Nation. We would stand up there and look down at these guys voting against Africa. Harlem was a hotbed of radical black politics. We had speakers that would stand on ladders and talk about how blacks should stick together. I became more and more knowledgeable about movements in Africa and how they related to us as African Americans. I always had this belief that someone forced us to be Americans and we never made the decision, and I wanted to make the decision for myself if I was going to remain in America. And the only way to make that decision was to go to Africa and see if I would decide to go back to America. I have never made the decision. I am very proud to be an African American. That is my tribe. I am an African person but I belong to the tribe of people that found themselves over there, connected themselves together and sort of formed a monarch and culture.

Did your parents support the idea of you coming to live in Africa?

They were never comfortable with it. They were always amused by my interest in Africa. I was a different kid. There is always an odd person in every family; I was the odd one. I remember when I turned 60 years old, my mother sent me a gift; it was an American history book. They never understood. Nobody wants his child to go halfway round the world and live there for the rest of his life. But the different kid is usually the most loved kid. Because you are different, everybody talks about you and always wants to do something for you.

What if your kids decide that they want to be Americans?

I hope they don’t. They will be disappointing their father. Why do I say that? I say that because when I had children here in Nigeria with a Nigerian wife, everybody was on my neck to get them American passports. But my kids were born here. Why shouldn’t they be proud of being Nigerians? If I am here to work as an African person, why should they look over my shoulders as Americans? If my wife wasn’t talking about American passport, I probably wouldn’t have got the passport. But I have been fortunate. My kids do listen to me. I think I am a role model. I do show them that they can have an extraordinary sense of purpose in Nigeria. My first daughter is schooling in America, but she has her head in the right place. She is going to the only home that she knows. She does not think of herself as a person that has two nations. She cannot. Where is your loyalty? Where is your passion? Yes, she was heavily influenced by me, but maybe some of the things I have to say make a little sense to her and she is a sensible person. I hope the other two would be like her. They may not be because you can’t really predict what your kids would become. But my oldest daughter was born when I was 50. Why would someone that old have children if they werent part of a life‘s plan.

How come you married that late?

I fell in love that late. I waited till the real thing came along. Let me tell you the truth: I had been married in the US to a wonderful lady who didn’t want to live in Africa. She lived here for two years and I couldn’t cut it loose. After 10 years of living in Africa, I realised I wasn’t going to go back to America, to CBS News that would have me do what I didn’t want to do with my God-given talent. We got married in the first place, we had agreed that we would live part of our lives in Africa. But for any woman that grew up in America, this society is a lot harder because of the position it relegates women to. Women are even more tribalistic than men. It was more difficult for her to find true friends and colleagues that were going to sustain the relationship for as long as it looked like we were going to be here. Also, she had a very important career back in the US. There was a lot more for her to drop than me.

By now you must have got used to our Nigerian meals…

Right now, my bones are made of Nigerian food. But let me tell you, I love our soul food the best. I still love my cornbread, hotdogs best. I can’t get my folks here to cook it as much as I like it, though they are pretty good with the preparation. That is one of the things I miss the most–African American cooking. If I get any visitor from America, they are usually surprised because they would want to do everything African. They would want to eat amala and pounded yam and I tell them to enter the kitchen and make some mashed potatoes for me and fries and chickens cooked our way. I miss food a lot. I miss music and I miss the sounds and smells of the neighbourhood that I came from in New York. However, I still love Nigeria.

 
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>BACKTO AFRICA!- LLOYD WEAVER COMES BACK AND IS THRIVING IN BLACK FREEDOM IN NIGERIA!

May 23, 2011

>

http://64.182.81.172/webpages/features/blockbuster/2010/june/12/blockbuster-12-06-2010-003.htm

‘MY FILM celebratES Awo, Zik, Ahmadu Bello’

By DENNIS UGBUDIAN

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Mr. Lloyd Weaver is an African-American who has lived in Nigeria with his family for over two decades. He is an artiste and currently a producer with The Serengeti Network. Right now, the dramatist is working on a drama series about Nigeria’s independence entitled, Roots Style. He, however, lamented lack of funds to achieve his dream. In a chat with Blockbuster, Weaver opens up on his sojourn in Nigeria and challenges of celebrating our past heroes in film. Excerpts:

Background

I am an African-American, who at a very early age in life became very interested in my African heritage. Probably because I lived in New York City, it became a melting point in terms of ethnicity. I lived among people mostly from Europe who were aware and proud of their own ethnic heritage. So, I heard people who said that their ancestors came from Hungary or China. I wanted to know where my own ancestors came from. And I became interested in how we came to America, which was different from other Americans. We were stolen from Africa and in the process of slaves mixing together in the US, our specific ethnicity was lost but it still became a source of fascination to me.

So, I began to study more about African history, African nationalities, culture and traditions and anything that has to do with Africa. But my interest began when I was a child in primary school. I grew older and began to study more and I discovered that majority of slaves taken were from the area that is now called Nigeria, along this coast which is called the Slave Coast. I knew that Nigeria was more than likely ancestral to me, and a lot of other places. But later on in life, I went to Columbia University where I took a course in African Studies with one Professor Adugbowoyin, and he showed statistically that more slaves came from Nigeria than any other area of Africa. So, if you considered this you would understand. But this is not really what brought me to Nigeria.

Journey to Nigeria

I think it was a spiritual journey. I think I have been sent by God to go where He wanted me to be on this planet, to bring down certain things that I have the advantage of gaining in the US. I came to Nigeria out of curiosity in 1969. By then I was already involved professionally in the television business. And I was very curious about the television stations. Then I went to Ibadan. I looked around out of curiosity and it stayed in my memory. By coincidence in 1982, I was asked by a fellow African/American to join the television in the US, a programme that I studied in order to come to Nigeria and train personnel working with the Nigerian Television Authority. Of course, I was very pleased to do this, I was working in a place called CBS News (US) at a time so I was pleased to take that trip to come over here.

On Roots Style

Americans have a heritage, they believed that somebody fought and many people died that is why they can enjoy certain things, and enjoying them they should always uphold as the ensemble of the things done by their forefathers. We need to teach our young people to feel that way or else they would forget the idea of a nation, knowing that my first idea was to write a series of text books for Nigerian schools and to begin a campaign to get history back into the curriculum, but later somebody said to me, ‘Lloyd, you forget that you are a television producer’, and I began to organize a group of people to study Nigerian history understand the past that was a glory that brought about the independent that’s being written into drama. The opportunity presented itself with this year that is going to be the 50th anniversary of our independence.

Best hands

You’ve all seen Roots and seen how history was made into drama, you probably watch BBC History, there has been a lot of history on television, and so the idea of dramatizing history is nothing new. We always see European films about the great battles of their ancestors. So, doing historical film is nothing new, we’ve got some of the best actors and actresses in the world right here in Nigeria. We have some of the best television and film technicians as Nigerians though they are scattered all over the world, but we have the best of them here, so we are going to draw on writers who are Nigerians including cameramen and directors who are Nigerians.

Wherever they are in the world, we are asking all of them to come home and create ultimate television or film of their lives the one that is going to inspire Nigerians to understand who they are as a single people and be able to rally themselves together. Because we all exist under a single flag, we want to teach Nigerians to honour their flag, to honour what their ancestors accomplished, to forget what happened between 1960 and today, to go back to what a common heritage is. We’ve been talking to the families of all the founding fathers and we have been traveling all over the country even to England to talk to descendants, the so-called colonial masters.

Celebration

We are going to air 13 episodes at an episode per hour. Our intention is to go on air on July 1, 2010. There are 13 weeks preceding the celebration on October 1. Our final episode where we would show the raising of Nigeria’s flag would be on September 29, the eve of the anniversary. Nigerians would have watched the whole thing and finally for the first time maybe since independence, Nigerians will fully understand what they are to celebrate and it is going to be such as you have never seen in your life.

Heroes and villains

This is drama, and drama at its best, if you know anything about drama then you will know that the drama is built on conflict, there is a good guy and a bad guy, usually in the beginning of the drama, there is a bad guy that is doing very well and the story is on what the problem is. In this case, Nigerians are the protagonists, and the common problem is the British colonialism. So, British colonialism is the bad guy. At the beginning of the story, you might say European colonialism of one kind or another because we know that the British is preceded by the Portuguese who came to rob and steal and there were also the French and Germans. Our people still fought and there were heroes that every Nigerian should know about like Obafemi Awolowo, Ahmadu Bello and Nnamdi Azikwe.

>FELA ANIKULAPO KUTI -OUR GREAT NIGERIAN MUSICIAN COMES BACK ALIVE THRU BROADWAY SHOW SHOWING AT HIS AFRICAN SHRINE IN LAGOS!

May 20, 2011

>

http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/nigerian-music-nigeria-from-broadway-to-afrika-shrine-a-feast-for-fela-in-lagos
Source: The Sun, Feb 1, 2011

Ordinarily, any public show in honour of Afrobeat legend, Fela Anikulapo-Kuti is a crowd puller. Particularly when it holds at the New Afrika Shrine where everyone believes the spirit of Fela still hovers round. And for the British Council Nigeria which played host to Fela! For the first time in the country last Sunday, the screening of the musical show was indeed a cultural feast for Afrobeat lovers.
Although a musical menu prepared and dished in the Diaspora, Fela! was well served in Lagos for his kinsmen and fans who trooped to the Shrine in celebration of the late Abami Eda. The show attracted notable Nigerians, artistes, culture workers and journalists, among whom were Chief Rasheed Gbadamosi; former National Planning Minister, Robin Gwynn; British Deputy High Commissioner, David Higgs; Country Director,British Council, Rukki Shein; Fela’s Manager at the musical show tagged Fela Event, Lanre Arogundade; former NUJ chairman in Lagos State and Fela’s children; Yeni Anikulapo – Kuti and Seun Anikulapo – Kuti.
After a brief welcome address by Yeni, the musical opened via a large screen with a number of young female dancers emerging on stage, ahead of their leader and hero-Fela. The dancers wore captivating costumes depicting the essentricity and versatility of Fela’s musical world. They took positions on stage while one of Fela’s classics; Rere Run, played rhythmically at the background. Minutes later,Fela the lead singer/dancer was ushered to the stage in a heroic manner by some male dancers. With his two hands raised, Fela stormed the stage amid a loud ovation, and saluted the crowd with the familiar refrain ‘’Everybody say Yeye’’ . And an elated crowd dominated by whitemen and women responded ‘’Ye-ye’’.
An energetic and boisterous performer, Fela soon dazed the audience with a heavy dose of his music, which he boosted with songs, dancesteps and talks that reminisce on Fela Anikulapo-Kuti’s vision and philosophy. In the same way, the other male and female dancers complemented his efforts in highly creative and elaborate choreography. At intervals, the dancers sang tunes and wriggled their waists provocatively to echo some of the features of the late Fela’s live shows. And while doing these, some of the best songs of the late musician, such as I No Be Gentleman, Break It Down (BID), Water No Get Enemy, Palava, Teacher, Don’t Teach Me Nonsense and Kerekeke Ji Keke, were creatively played and interpreted through mimes and gestures.
On another level of creativity, the hero of Fela!and the entire National Theatre, London ensemble recalled some of the issues that Fela addressed through his music. Popular subjects like Igbo(Marijuana), 419 (Advanced Free Fraud), ITT(International Thief Thief), Yansh(An euphemism for bottom power), Colonial Mentality and Lagos life were all illustrated by the artistes in the Nigerian context.
Also using the narrative technique, the lead character paused at intervals to engage the audience. His joker in this area was proved by his mastery of Fela’s stagecraft, voice modulation, dexterity on saxophone, his brandishing and inhaling of the long wrapped substance as wellas his simple Afrobeat attire of a long sleeve shirt over a pair of long James Brown (JB) trousers.
On the technical side, the Broadway and award winning show made creative use of virtually all facilities in the theatre. It explored generously the use of the round stage, the staircases, steps, cubicules, the cyclorama and ladders. The huge modern equipment on stage expectedly complemented artistes’ versatility and speed, just as lighting helped greatly in depicting moods and highlighting historical situations and events. The audience also savoured a fair dose of highlife music from which Fela discovered Afrobeat as demonstrated in several scenes that reminded of Fela’s relationship with the Koola Lobitos, James Brown, Tony Allen, Funmilayo Ransome Kuti(His mother) among many others.
At the end of the two-part show, which lasted about two hours, the audience were thrilled beyond expectation. Some of them engaged in a debate over the incredible energy and vigour with which the cast celebrated Fela and his Afrobeat in a single entertaining musical show. They also wondered how the show could have been if some of Afrobeat’s disciples in Nigeria, such as Dede Mabiaku, Kola Ogunkoya and others featured in the musical show. But the fact that it was an entirely a Broadway project seemingly ruled out the possibility of featuring Nigerians in it.
Produced and widely showcased on Broadway in London, Fela! had won three Tony awards including Best Choreography. It explores dance, music and drama to celebrate the life and times of Afrobeat legend who was better known as political activist and lover of the masses. The February 6 screening in Lagos was part of the British Council’s work in the Arts, aimed at showcasing the best of United Kingdom’s creativity overseas while at the same time, working with the best creative talents to develop innovative events and collaborations for artists and cultural institutions across the globe.
Nigerian Music Nigeria Fela Kuti

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Source: The Sun, Feb 1, 2011
<p><iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B002AAZM1K&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr” style=”padding-top: 5px; width: 131px; height: 245px; padding-right: 10px;” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ align=”left” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”><iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B002AAZM1K&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr” style=”padding-top: 5px; width: 131px; height: 245px; padding-right: 10px;” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ align=”left” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”></p>
Ordinarily, any public show in honour of Afrobeat legend, Fela Anikulapo-Kuti is a crowd puller. Particularly when it holds at the New Afrika Shrine where everyone believes the spirit of Fela still hovers round. And for the British Council Nigeria which played host to Fela! For the first time in the country last Sunday, the screening of the musical show was indeed a cultural feast for Afrobeat lovers.
Although a musical menu prepared and dished in the Diaspora, Fela! was well served in Lagos for his kinsmen and fans who trooped to the Shrine in celebration of the late Abami Eda. The show attracted notable Nigerians, artistes, culture workers and journalists, among whom were Chief Rasheed Gbadamosi; former National Planning Minister, Robin Gwynn; British Deputy High Commissioner, David Higgs; Country Director,British Council, Rukki Shein; Fela’s Manager at the musical show tagged Fela Event, Lanre Arogundade; former NUJ chairman in Lagos State and Fela’s children; Yeni Anikulapo – Kuti and Seun Anikulapo – Kuti.
After a brief welcome address by Yeni, the musical opened via a large screen with a number of young female dancers emerging on stage, ahead of their leader and hero-Fela. The dancers wore captivating costumes depicting the essentricity and versatility of Fela’s musical world. They took positions on stage while one of Fela’s classics; Rere Run, played rhythmically at the background. Minutes later,Fela the lead singer/dancer was ushered to the stage in a heroic manner by some male dancers. With his two hands raised, Fela stormed the stage amid a loud ovation, and saluted the crowd with the familiar refrain ‘’Everybody say Yeye’’ . And an elated crowd dominated by whitemen and women responded ‘’Ye-ye’’.
An energetic and boisterous performer, Fela soon dazed the audience with a heavy dose of his music, which he boosted with songs, dancesteps and talks that reminisce on Fela Anikulapo-Kuti’s vision and philosophy. In the same way, the other male and female dancers complemented his efforts in highly creative and elaborate choreography. At intervals, the dancers sang tunes and wriggled their waists provocatively to echo some of the features of the late Fela’s live shows. And while doing these, some of the best songs of the late musician, such as I No Be Gentleman, Break It Down (BID), Water No Get Enemy, Palava, Teacher, Don’t Teach Me Nonsense and Kerekeke Ji Keke, were creatively played and interpreted through mimes and gestures.
On another level of creativity, the hero of Fela!and the entire National Theatre, London ensemble recalled some of the issues that Fela addressed through his music. Popular subjects like Igbo(Marijuana), 419 (Advanced Free Fraud), ITT(International Thief Thief), Yansh(An euphemism for bottom power), Colonial Mentality and Lagos life were all illustrated by the artistes in the Nigerian context.
Also using the narrative technique, the lead character paused at intervals to engage the audience. His joker in this area was proved by his mastery of Fela’s stagecraft, voice modulation, dexterity on saxophone, his brandishing and inhaling of the long wrapped substance as wellas his simple Afrobeat attire of a long sleeve shirt over a pair of long James Brown (JB) trousers.
On the technical side, the Broadway and award winning show made creative use of virtually all facilities in the theatre. It explored generously the use of the round stage, the staircases, steps, cubicules, the cyclorama and ladders. The huge modern equipment on stage expectedly complemented artistes’ versatility and speed, just as lighting helped greatly in depicting moods and highlighting historical situations and events. The audience also savoured a fair dose of highlife music from which Fela discovered Afrobeat as demonstrated in several scenes that reminded of Fela’s relationship with the Koola Lobitos, James Brown, Tony Allen, Funmilayo Ransome Kuti(His mother) among many others.
At the end of the two-part show, which lasted about two hours, the audience were thrilled beyond expectation. Some of them engaged in a debate over the incredible energy and vigour with which the cast celebrated Fela and his Afrobeat in a single entertaining musical show. They also wondered how the show could have been if some of Afrobeat’s disciples in Nigeria, such as Dede Mabiaku, Kola Ogunkoya and others featured in the musical show. But the fact that it was an entirely a Broadway project seemingly ruled out the possibility of featuring Nigerians in it.
Produced and widely showcased on Broadway in London, Fela! had won three Tony awards including Best Choreography. It explores dance, music and drama to celebrate the life and times of Afrobeat legend who was better known as political activist and lover of the masses. The February 6 screening in Lagos was part of the British Council’s work in the Arts, aimed at showcasing the best of United Kingdom’s creativity overseas while at the same time, working with the best creative talents to develop innovative events and collaborations for artists and cultural institutions across the globe.
Nigerian Music Nigeria Fela Kuti

Straight From The Source

VENUS AND SERENA WILLIAMS- BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES SUPREME -“TENNIS QUEEN’S STYLE” -FROM THE NATION NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

May 20, 2011

FROM nationonlineng.com

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES SUPREME!


Tennis queens’ style: Centre court or nightclub wear?
By Patience Saduwa 15/05/2011 00:00:00
Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font
Tennis queens’ style: Centre court or nightclub wear?

BACK in the day, sportswear particularly that of tennis was a simple affair-usually a pair of shorts and a T-shirt worn with sneakers. And the colour was mostly white. Now tennis wear has evolved to such a level that observers are wondering if a dress code for the game has become necessary. Their stance is understandable considering the type of ‘outfits’ worn by some of the major female players in recent times. Many of the top female players can often been seen on court in skimpy or revealing outfits, in a kaleidoscope of colours and garish designs that at times look more like nightclub than tennis gear.

A few top professional players are fuelling this trend in raunchy outfits on court. And top in the league of provocative court dressers are the dynamic duo-Serena and Venus Williams. In fact, since these hard-hitting sisters hit the courts and tennis circuits in the 90s, courtside fashion has been taken to a level never seen before in the over 100 year history of the game. It’s like just playing tennis is no longer enough. High fashion, entertainment and lots of drama have

been added to the game. Between them, they’ve turned centre court into a fashion runway, bringing some bling bling factor to it. While all these have helped to ‘spice up’ the somewhat sedate sport, the racy court style has raised a few questions as well as controversy. Many have wondered if the sisters have gone too far in their sexy ‘sports’ dressing and its time to tone down the outfits worn on court.

Courtside nightgown wearers

Indeed, some of the outfits look like anything but sportswear. They seem like a cross between evening wear (for a cocktail party for instance) and something that the average call girl in town will don in order to display all her ‘assets’ before hitting the streets for the day’s ‘business.’ An example is the black negligee-inspired dress (pictured) that Venus wore to the French Open last year. She looked underdressed, like a woman who, after wearing her undies forgot to put on her clothes before leaving home. More was to come. The spectators, already surprised at the player’s boldness for choosing such a bedroom look for the court, were simply ‘dazed’ by her weird underwear- a flesh-coloured design that gave her a nude look, prompting the question among onlookers: “Is she naked?”. Amid whistles, catcalls and waves of disapproval from spectators mostly used to more traditional tennis gear, an unfazed Venus defended the controversial outfit which she described as being all ‘about illusion.’

She remains unperturbed by cries that her outfits are becoming too sexy for the sport, continuing with her sister Serena to push the tennis fashion envelope to new style heights. For instance, last month, Serena made a comeback to the court after a series of injuries and ailments in an outfit that was sure to grab attention- a bright-pink body-hugging catsuit. In that outfit she looked more like catwoman Patience (a namesake please) in the movie Catwoman played by sultry Hollywood actress Halle Berry than a professional tennis player with many grand slams under her belt. But the Williams’ sisters aren’t the only ones who have set tongues wagging with their style. Another top player, Maria Sharapova looked ready for a night on the town in the blue dress worn under a see-through ‘nightie’ she wore at the Australian Open in January.

Many have considered the clothes at best distracting and at worse, tacky, tasteless and unbecoming of an elitist and serious sport like tennis. Then there’s the role model aspect, with many young girls looking up to them. As a spectator put it succinctly: “She (Venus) is an ambassador of black women to the world, whether she likes it or not. There’s a way to grab attention without letting your belly and booty hang out.” Indeed, many observers are of the view that these girls, being so talented don’t need to wear such outlandish outfits on court to attract attention. Other tennis lovers believe a return to the time when all-white outfits in classy designs was the norm among players, is long overdue.


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