Archive for May, 2011

>VENUS AND SERENA WILLIAMS- "TENNIS QUEEN’S STYLE"-FROM THE NATION NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

May 20, 2011

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from nationonlineng.com

Tennis queens’ style: Centre court or nightclub wear?

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BACK in the day, sportswear particularly that of tennis was a simple affair-usually a pair of shorts and a T-shirt worn with sneakers. And the colour was mostly white. Now tennis wear has evolved to such a level that observers are wondering if a dress code for the game has become necessary. Their stance is understandable considering the type of  ‘outfits’ worn by some of the major female players in recent times. Many of the top female players can often been seen on court in skimpy or revealing outfits, in a kaleidoscope of colours and garish designs that at times look more like nightclub than tennis gear. 
A few top professional players are fuelling this trend in raunchy outfits on court. And top in the league of provocative court dressers are the dynamic duo-Serena and Venus Williams. In fact, since these hard-hitting sisters hit the courts and tennis circuits in the 90s, courtside fashion has been taken to a level never seen before in the over 100 year history of the game. It’s like just playing tennis is no longer enough. High fashion, entertainment and lots of drama have 
 been added to the game. Between them, they’ve turned centre court into a fashion runway, bringing some bling bling factor to it. While all these have helped to ‘spice up’ the somewhat sedate sport, the racy court style has raised a few questions as well as controversy. Many have wondered if the sisters have gone too far in their sexy ‘sports’ dressing and its time to tone down the outfits worn on court. 
Courtside nightgown wearers
Indeed, some of the outfits look like anything but sportswear. They seem like a cross between evening wear (for a cocktail party for instance) and something that the average call girl in town will don in order to display all her ‘assets’ before hitting the streets for the day’s ‘business.’ An example is the black negligee-inspired dress (pictured) that Venus wore to the French Open last year. She looked underdressed, like a woman who, after wearing her undies forgot to put on her clothes before leaving home. More was to come. The spectators, already surprised at the player’s boldness for choosing such a bedroom look for the court, were simply ‘dazed’ by her weird underwear- a flesh-coloured design that gave her a nude look, prompting the question among onlookers: “Is she naked?”. Amid whistles, catcalls and waves of disapproval from spectators mostly used to more traditional tennis gear, an unfazed Venus defended the controversial outfit which she described as being all ‘about illusion.’  
  She remains unperturbed by cries that her outfits are becoming too sexy for the sport, continuing with her sister Serena to push the tennis fashion envelope to new style heights. For instance, last month, Serena made a comeback to the court after a series of injuries and ailments in an outfit that was sure to grab attention- a bright-pink body-hugging catsuit. In that outfit she looked more like catwoman Patience (a namesake please) in the movie Catwoman played by sultry Hollywood actress Halle Berry than a professional tennis player with many grand slams under her belt. But the Williams’ sisters aren’t the only ones who have set tongues wagging with their style. Another top player, Maria Sharapova looked ready for a night on the town in the blue dress worn under a see-through ‘nightie’ she wore at the Australian Open in January.
  Many have considered the clothes at best distracting and at worse, tacky, tasteless and unbecoming of an elitist and serious sport like tennis. Then there’s the role model aspect, with many young girls looking up to them. As a spectator put it succinctly: “She (Venus) is an ambassador of black women to the world, whether she likes it or not. There’s a way to grab attention without letting your belly and booty hang out.” Indeed, many observers are of the view that these girls, being so talented don’t need to wear such outlandish outfits on court to attract attention. Other tennis lovers believe a return to the time when all-white outfits in classy designs was the norm among players, is long overdue.

NIGERIA,WE HAIL THEE! -THIS 15 YEAR OLD NIGERIAN GIRL IN AMERIKKKA HAS GAINED ADMISSION TO HARVARD UNIVERSITY!-TAKE IT FROM ME, A BLACK AMERIKKKAN,NIGERIANS ARE THE SMARTEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD WHEN THEY WANT TO BE!

May 20, 2011

http://www.naijafeed.com/naijafeed/2011/5/12/15-year-old-nigerian-teenager-gets-admission-to-harvard.ht

eke possibly pregnant | Main | Nigeria vs Argentina – Argentina coming with A team »
Thursday
May122011
15 year old Nigerian teenager gets admission to Harvard
DateThursday, May 12, 2011 at 9:07AM

A 15 year old Nigerian girl has been offered admission to the prestigious Harvard University in United States of America, She is Saheela Ibraheem, 15 year old daughter of a Nigerian immigrant family living in New Jersey, United States. The Harvard University new intake is the latest media sensation.

Since news broke about Saheela’s incredible acceptance to 13 of American’s prestigious Universities, local and International media have taken interests in the teen’s success story.

A source at Wardlaw-Hartridge high school, who fears that media interests in the young Nigerian-American is fast becoming overwhelming and could be a distraction during her upcoming exams said that about a dozen media organizations are schedule for possible interviews with Saheela. According to the source “She [Saheela] is amazing and because she is well spoken, media organizations wanted to have live interviews with her”.

In 2010, Saheela applied to 14 schools that includes some of America’s Ivy Leagues. All, but Yale, offered her admission. This includes, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Cornell, Brown, Williams College, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard, which she settled on after a convincing visit to the university’s campus. In an interview with Fox 5, New York, Saheela’s mother, Shakirat, attributes her daughter’s academic success to her interest in learning and knowing more. According to Shakirat,”When you teach her 1, 2, 3 she wants more,… When you teach her 1 through 5, she’d say how about this.”

Her dad, Sarafa, a graduate of Nigeria’s own ivy school, University of Ibadan, is a financial analyst and vice president at a major Financial group in New York

Besides her academic excellence, Saheela actively plays soccer, softball and the trombone. Nigerians have reacted to the good news. Bukky Adekanbi, a Nigerian residing in New York said.

“It is always joyful to hear that Nigerians are doing great things around the world regardless of how bad some international media tries to portray us. We Nigerians here in America are proud of Saheela and her parents,”

Saheela who plans to study neuroscience or neurobiology – scientific study of the nervous system. said “It all comes down to the support I’ve had at home, from my parents, even my brothers being there every step of the way.”

Vanguard

Related stories: Video – University in Canada high acceptance rate for Nigerians despite tough immigration

Chimamanda Adichie at 2009 TED Conference

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Reader Comments (2)

am proud to hear this when talking about nigeria in good things and i pray that after her school let united state allow her to come and apply what she learn to us nigeria her fatherland my daughter please try to work more harder than before
May 16, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterjackson

Na smaaat girl be that! She dey make us proud!
May 16, 2011 CommenterLawal

>NIGERIA-WE HAIL THEE! -"15 YEAR OLD NIGERIAN TEENAGER IN AMERIKKKA GETS ADMISSION TO HARVARD!"-FROM NAIJAFEED.COM-THE SMARTEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD TAKE IT FROM ME,A BLACK AMERIKKKAN, ARE NIGERIANS!

May 20, 2011

>

http://www.naijafeed.com/naijafeed/2011/5/12/15-year-old-nigerian-teenager-gets-admission-to-harvard.ht

Thursday
May12 2011

15 year old Nigerian teenager gets admission to Harvard


A 15 year old Nigerian girl has been offered admission to the prestigious Harvard University in United States of America, She is Saheela Ibraheem, 15 year old daughter of a Nigerian immigrant family living in New Jersey, United States. The Harvard University new intake is the latest media sensation.
Since news broke about Saheela’s incredible acceptance to 13 of American’s prestigious Universities, local and International media have taken interests in the teen’s success story.
A source at Wardlaw-Hartridge high school, who fears that media interests in the young Nigerian-American is fast becoming overwhelming and could be a distraction during her upcoming exams said that about a dozen media organizations are schedule for possible interviews with Saheela. According to the source “She [Saheela] is amazing and because she is well spoken, media organizations wanted to have live interviews with her”.
In 2010, Saheela applied to 14 schools that includes some of America’s Ivy Leagues. All, but Yale, offered her admission. This includes, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Cornell, Brown, Williams College, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard, which she settled on after a convincing visit to the university’s campus. In an interview with Fox 5, New York, Saheela’s mother, Shakirat, attributes her daughter’s academic success to her interest in learning and knowing more. According to Shakirat,”When you teach her 1, 2, 3 she wants more,… When you teach her 1 through 5, she’d say how about this.”
Her dad, Sarafa, a graduate of Nigeria’s own ivy school, University of Ibadan, is a financial analyst and vice president at a major Financial group in New York
Besides her academic excellence, Saheela actively plays soccer, softball and the trombone. Nigerians have reacted to the good news. Bukky Adekanbi, a Nigerian residing in New York said.
“It is always joyful to hear that Nigerians are doing great things around the world regardless of how bad some international media tries to portray us. We Nigerians here in America are proud of Saheela and her parents,”
Saheela who plans to study neuroscience or neurobiology – scientific study of the nervous system. said “It all comes down to the support I’ve had at home, from my parents, even my brothers being there every step of the way.”
Vanguard
Related stories: Video – University in Canada high acceptance rate for Nigerians despite tough immigration
Chimamanda Adichie at 2009 TED Conference

Reader Comments (2)

am proud to hear this when talking about nigeria in good things and i pray that after her school let united state allow her to come and apply what she learn to us nigeria her fatherland my daughter please try to work more harder than before
May 16, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterjackson
Na smaaat girl be that! She dey make us proud!
May 16, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterLawal

RICK ROSS STORMS LAGOS,NIGERIA,AFRICA!-BACK TO AFRICA!-WHEITHER FOR A VISIT OR FINALLY!

May 16, 2011

http://naijagal.net/2010/12/16/rick-ross-storms-lagos/

At the Storm 360/Kilimanjaro Lagos Shutdown Concert…
January 10, 2011 8:01 am
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The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.

The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

WHEN STORM360/KILIMAJARO SHUT DOWN LAGOS WITH RICK ROSS, NAETO C AND OTHERS

Rick Ross

The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.

Naeto C

The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.

For all who attended the show, one thing was obvious – Lagos shut down!

Short URL: http://gistmaster.com/?p=3044

>RICK ROSS STORMS NIGERIA AND GOES BACK TO AFRICA!

May 16, 2011

>

http://naijagal.net/2010/12/16/rick-ross-storms-lagos/

RICK ROSS STORMS LAGOS!!

By on Thursday, 16th December 2010 RICK ROSS STORMS LAGOS!! thumbnail What’s said to be the hottest concert this year happens to be Rick Ross’s concert at the Eko hotel in Lagos Nigeria! Apparently Kilimanjaro entertainment (the sponsors )in association with storm 360 have planned what has been tagged the “Lagos shutdown concert” which Rick Ross.
The concert is being headlined by Rick Ross, but guess what other superstars from Naija, including MI and Naeto C will also be featured at the mega concert. We’re excited and we will be keeping you posted on December 27 at EKO hotel! Naijagal will be in the house so stop by and say hello!

PHOTO SOURCE URBAN INK

PHOTO SOURCE URBAN INK
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Tags: RICK ROSS IN LAGOS

readers views

  1. Amebo says:

    Gawd Rick! Put a f**king shirt on & cover those nasty tattoos, flab, & dog nipples! I don’t care how much money u got, I CAN’T fux wid dat mess! Ewww!

*******************************************************************

from cp-africa.com                                             

 

At the Storm 360/Kilimanjaro Lagos Shutdown Concert…

January 10, 2011 8:01 am

The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.
The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&PHOTO SOURCE URBAN INK
 
 

from gistmaster.com                                            

WHEN STORM360/KILIMAJARO SHUT DOWN LAGOS WITH RICK ROSS, NAETO C AND OTHERS

Rick Ross

The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.

Naeto C

The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.
For all who attended the show, one thing was obvious – Lagos shut down!
Short URL: http://gistmaster.com/?p=3044

Afrigator

FELA ANIKULAPO-KUTI- OUR GREAT NIGERIAN MUSICIAN COMES BACK ALIVE TO NIGERIA THRU BROADWAY PRODUCTION COMING TO LAGOS,BACK TO FELA’S ROOTS!

May 16, 2011



FELA AND HIS FAMOUS MOTHER FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,AN ORGINAL FREEDOM FIGHTER FOR WOMEN!

FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,FELA'S MOTHER-THE GREAT WOMAN LEADER WHO FOUGHT THE OBA(KING) TO A STAND STILL OVER TAXING MARKET WOMEN AND WON!

BLACK PRESIDENT- AN ALBUM AND A MOVIE FELA MADE OUT OF THIS!

FELA MARRIED 22 WIVES INSTEAD OF THE USUAL DUMPING OF GIRLFRIENDS THAT OTHER MEN DO- BLACK POLYGAMY IS THE ANSWER TO THE BLACK WOMAN'S MEN PROBLEM AND IF AFRICAN CULTURE!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/may/15/taking-fela-kuti-home

Taking Fela Kuti home

Sahr Ngaujah has spent the last two years playing the great Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti on stage in New York and London. Last month he took the production back to Kuti’s native Nigeria. Here, he describes the extraordinary and emotional trip

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* Sahr Ngaujah
* The Observer, Sunday 15 May 2011
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sahr-ngaujah
Man on a mission … Sahr Ngaujah on the beach near Lagos, Nigeria, in April. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Observer

The air was humid and thick; a constant wind blew in from the sea, sponging up every sweat bead on our skin. A cacophony of sound permeated the air – revving and idling engines, okada motorcycle taxi horns, heavy bass lines and people talking loud. Posters bearing the faces of various smiling politicians were plastered on every inch of space.

1. Fela!
2. Sadler’s Wells,
3. London

1. Starts 20 July
2. Until 28 August
3. Box office:
0844 412 4300
4. More details

In New York and London, our task was to recreate Fela Kuti’s world in the Nigeria of the 1970s, viewed from within his club, the Africa Shrine. Now we were entering Nigeria to bring Fela back to his own people, to recreate the Shrine of the 70s at a big theatre built by his children and called the New Africa Shrine.

As our plane came over Lagos we were keenly aware that today was election day, the first round, with two weeks to go. We were arriving under curfew. It was a sunny day and as we looked out of our windows it was clear the curfew was taken seriously. All of the streets were clear, no movement save the military men at their posts at junctions throughout the city.

We disembarked amid a flurry of security personnel, some private, some state, some local. We were ushered on to our buses, and with a full military escort we tore out of the airport and began barrelling down the empty expressway to Victoria Island. Welcome to Lagos! We had no idea what would await us in this infamous African metropolis, but we had a mission and a commitment to complete it.

I first visited Nigeria in 2008, just after the off-Broadway production of Fela! closed. I was there for Felabration, a week-long festival that takes place every October to mark Fela’s birthday. I spent my nights at the New Africa Shrine and my days visiting Fela’s house, Kalakuta. I often wondered what sort of impact this type of experience would have on my colleagues after all the effort they’d put into showing other people the world of Fela. Now they were here. We were to play the New Africa Shrine and the Eko Hotel’s conference centre, both holding 3,000. First we had to settle into our new environment and prepare to meet our first audience, the people of Fela’s Shrine.

In those early days my routine consisted of a lot of sleep to get over the jet lag, rehearsing my Yoruba pronunciations and running along the ocean in the Lekki district. Some of my colleagues were having their first experience of African markets and haggling, Nigerian style. At night we could be found recounting the day’s adventures in the courtyard of the Eko Hotel, enjoying the open-air bar while paying Midtown Manhattan prices for our favourite drinks, always under the watchful eye of our no-nonsense security escorts.
fela kuti Afrobeat king Fela Kuti. Photograph: Guardian

Among the richest moments were the time we spent with Fela’s family, with his children Femi, Yeni, Kunle and Seun, along with his siblings, cousins and wives. In 2008 one of Fela’s sons, Kunle, described Fela being buried. He described the scene of thousands of people filling the streets and covering every rooftop in the area. Now here I was with all my colleagues, seeing Fela’s grave. Then they opened the door of his room. His room had been sealed for years. There was his sax, his bed, hundreds of suits, there was everything.

Kunle hadn’t been in the room for 10 years. Seun hadn’t been in for three. But they opened that room to let those people who had dedicated so much to keep his memory alive glimpse Fela, my beloved colleagues who had sacrificed so much of their bodies and their blood to bring Fela’s world to life for thousands of people every night on 49th Street in New York.

Days later I found myself filing off a bus to stand before the New Africa Shrine with those colleagues. As we crushed our way to the entrance we began to hear the sound that had become so familiar to us over the years through watching documentaries about our subject. We heard the voice of the people, calling for Fela, calling for the Kalakutans – the people of Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, the compound where he lived and recorded with his family and his band. As we crossed the threshold of the shrine it seemed as if everyone in the place agreed on what the first utterance to us should be. From the front door to the stage door, all we heard greeting us was: “Welcome home.” Indeed, we had arrived. We were humbled by the reception and had no idea of the measure of beauty awaiting us for the duration of our stay.

Fela Kuti is an immense subject, a bottomless character. Bill T Jones, our director, would say: “Fela was a tornado of a man.” When we first arrived people would say: “How can you bring Fela from America to Nigeria? Fela belongs to us.” Before we left they told us: “Fela has come home.” I don’t think they were talking about us – they were talking about his spirit.

We are holding these experiences in our hearts and can’t wait to unleash them on those planning to join us for the adventure in London this summer.

• Sahr witnessed landmark elections in Nigeria and wants you to help encourage the trend in the Democratic Republic of Congo (fallingwhistles.com/freeandfair). He wore clothes courtesy of Gozi, creative director of his new favourite brand, UMi-1 (gozi.co.uk).
*****************************8*********************************

FROM geojane.wordpress.com

Raymond Cauchetier
The women of Fela
Fela Kuti

By geojane

Apr 11 2011

Category: Uncategorized

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Fela Anikulapo Kuti October 15, 1938- August 2, 1997 Nigerian musician and composer, creator, singer, saxophonist, frontman, inventor, and pioneer of afrobeat music.

How do you say his name, Fella or Fey-la?

NOVA Professor of History, Dr. Joeseph Windham, wise and worldly, pronounces Fela like the latter. Whichever way you say it, his name stands for a powerful and humble man. A paradox that translates in the music he creates.

This is a photograph of Fela Kuti with some of the beautiful women he marries. These particular women became victims of sexual brutality, thus cast out and dishonored in their communities. Fela uses marriage as a means of protecting the women from discrimination. He makes it clear that they are heroines, deserved of the utmost respect and honor.

Picture sourced from: http://www.kalamu.com

fela 34.jpg

>FELA ANIKULAPO-KUTI-THE GREAT NIGERIAN MUSICIAN WHO FOUGHT UNTIL DEATH FOR THE RIGHTS OF THE MASSES- COMES BACK ALIVE IN A BROADWAY AMERIKKKAN PRODUCTION BROUGHT HOME TO NIGERIA!

May 16, 2011

>

<iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&amp;o=1&amp;p=8&amp;l=bpl&amp;asins=B00005O6OJ&amp;fc1=000000&amp;IS2=1&amp;lt1=_blank&amp;m=amazon&amp;lc1=0000FF&amp;bc1=000000&amp;bg1=FFFFFF&amp;f=ifr” style=”padding-top: 5px; width: 131px; height: 245px; padding-right: 10px;” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ align=”left” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”><iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&amp;o=1&amp;p=8&amp;l=bpl&amp;asins=B00005O6OJ&amp;fc1=000000&amp;IS2=1&amp;lt1=_blank&amp;m=amazon&amp;lc1=0000FF&amp;bc1=000000&amp;bg1=FFFFFF&amp;f=ifr” style=”padding-top: 5px; width: 131px; height: 245px; padding-right: 10px;” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ align=”left” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”>
FELA’S MOTHER WHO WAS A FAMOUS WOMAN ACTIVIST WHO EVEN FORCED AN OBA(KING) TO STEP DOWN AFTER OVER TAXING  MARKET WOMEN!-FUNMILAYO RANSOME KUTI

FELA WITH HIS 22 WIVES!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/may/15/taking-fela-kuti-home

Taking Fela Kuti homehttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B002AAZM1K&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Sahr Ngaujah has spent the last two years playing the great Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti on stage in New York and London. Last month he took the production back to Kuti’s native Nigeria. Here, he describes the extraordinary and emotional trip
  • The Observer, Sunday 15 May 2011
  • Article history
  • sahr-ngaujahhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=6302274125&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrStudy of the Music and Social Criticism of African Musician Fela Anikulapo-Kuti (Studies in the History and Interpretation of Music)<a target=”_blank” href=”http://www.amazon.com/Black-President-Legacy-Fela-Anikulapo-Kuti/dp/B000OLMHDS?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=bib-05-20&amp;link_code=btl&amp;camp=213689&amp;creative=392969″>Black President: The Art &amp; Legacy of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti</a><img src=”http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=bib-05-20&amp;l=btl&amp;camp=213689&amp;creative=392969&amp;o=1&amp;a=B000OLMHDS” alt=”” style=”border: medium none ! important; margin: 0px ! important; padding: 0px ! important;” width=”1″ border=”0″ height=”1″><iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&amp;o=1&amp;p=8&amp;l=bpl&amp;asins=6305863296&amp;fc1=000000&amp;IS2=1&amp;lt1=_blank&amp;m=amazon&amp;lc1=0000FF&amp;bc1=000000&amp;bg1=FFFFFF&amp;f=ifr” style=”padding-top: 5px; width: 131px; height: 245px; padding-right: 10px;” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ align=”left” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”>

    Man on a mission … Sahr Ngaujah on the beach near Lagos, Nigeria, in April. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Observer
    The air was humid and thick; a constant wind blew in from the sea, sponging up every sweat bead on our skin. A cacophony of sound permeated the air – revving and idling engines, okada motorcycle taxi horns, heavy bass lines and people talking loud. Posters bearing the faces of various smiling politicians were plastered on every inch of space.

    1. Fela!
    2. Sadler’s Wells,
    3. London
    1. Starts 20 July
    2. Until 28 August
    3. Box office:
      0844 412 4300
    4. More details

    In New York and London, our task was to recreate Fela Kuti‘s world in the Nigeria of the 1970s, viewed from within his club, the Africa Shrine. Now we were entering Nigeria to bring Fela back to his own people, to recreate the Shrine of the 70s at a big theatre built by his children and called the New Africa Shrine.As our plane came over Lagos we were keenly aware that today was election day, the first round, with two weeks to go. We were arriving under curfew. It was a sunny day and as we looked out of our windows it was clear the curfew was taken seriously. All of the streets were clear, no movement save the military men at their posts at junctions throughout the city.We disembarked amid a flurry of security personnel, some private, some state, some local. We were ushered on to our buses, and with a full military escort we tore out of the airport and began barrelling down the empty expressway to Victoria Island. Welcome to Lagos! We had no idea what would await us in this infamous African metropolis, but we had a mission and a commitment to complete it.I first visited Nigeria in 2008, just after the off-Broadway production of Fela! closed. I was there for Felabration, a week-long festival that takes place every October to mark Fela’s birthday. I spent my nights at the New Africa Shrine and my days visiting Fela’s house, Kalakuta. I often wondered what sort of impact this type of experience would have on my colleagues after all the effort they’d put into showing other people the world of Fela. Now they were here. We were to play the New Africa Shrine and the Eko Hotel’s conference centre, both holding 3,000. First we had to settle into our new environment and prepare to meet our first audience, the people of Fela’s Shrine.In those early days my routine consisted of a lot of sleep to get over the jet lag, rehearsing my Yoruba pronunciations and running along the ocean in the Lekki district. Some of my colleagues were having their first experience of African markets and haggling, Nigerian style. At night we could be found recounting the day’s adventures in the courtyard of the Eko Hotel, enjoying the open-air bar while paying Midtown Manhattan prices for our favourite drinks, always under the watchful eye of our no-nonsense security escorts. fela kuti Afrobeat king Fela Kuti. Photograph: Guardian Among the richest moments were the time we spent with Fela’s family, with his children Femi, Yeni, Kunle and Seun, along with his siblings, cousins and wives. In 2008 one of Fela’s sons, Kunle, described Fela being buried. He described the scene of thousands of people filling the streets and covering every rooftop in the area. Now here I was with all my colleagues, seeing Fela’s grave. Then they opened the door of his room. His room had been sealed for years. There was his sax, his bed, hundreds of suits, there was everything.Kunle hadn’t been in the room for 10 years. Seun hadn’t been in for three. But they opened that room to let those people who had dedicated so much to keep his memory alive glimpse Fela, my beloved colleagues who had sacrificed so much of their bodies and their blood to bring Fela’s world to life for thousands of people every night on 49th Street in New York.Days later I found myself filing off a bus to stand before the New Africa Shrine with those colleagues. As we crushed our way to the entrance we began to hear the sound that had become so familiar to us over the years through watching documentaries about our subject. We heard the voice of the people, calling for Fela, calling for the Kalakutans – the people of Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, the compound where he lived and recorded with his family and his band. As we crossed the threshold of the shrine it seemed as if everyone in the place agreed on what the first utterance to us should be. From the front door to the stage door, all we heard greeting us was: “Welcome home.” Indeed, we had arrived. We were humbled by the reception and had no idea of the measure of beauty awaiting us for the duration of our stay.Fela Kuti is an immense subject, a bottomless character. Bill T Jones, our director, would say: “Fela was a tornado of a man.” When we first arrived people would say: “How can you bring Fela from America to Nigeria? Fela belongs to us.” Before we left they told us: “Fela has come home.” I don’t think they were talking about us – they were talking about his spirit.We are holding these experiences in our hearts and can’t wait to unleash them on those planning to join us for the adventure in London this summer.• Sahr witnessed landmark elections in Nigeria and wants you to help encourage the trend in the Democratic Republic of Congo (fallingwhistles.com/freeandfair). He wore clothes courtesy of Gozi, creative director of his new favourite brand, UMi-1 (gozi.co.uk).********************************************************************************http://geojane.wordpress.com/2011/04/11/nigerian-virginian/

    Fela Kuti

     Fela Anikulapo Kuti  October 15, 1938- August 2, 1997  Nigerian musician and composer, creator, singer, saxophonist, frontman, inventor, and pioneer of afrobeat music.How do you say his name, Fella or Fey-la?NOVA  Professor of History, Dr. Joeseph Windham, wise and worldly, pronounces Fela like the latter.  Whichever way you say it, his name stands for a powerful and humble man.  A paradox that translates in the music he creates.This is a photograph of Fela Kuti with some of the beautiful women he marries.  These particular women became victims of sexual brutalityBEFORE THEY MET FELA, thus cast out and dishonored in their communities.  Fela uses marriage as a means of protecting the women from discrimination.  He makes it clear that they are heroines, deserved of the utmost respect and honor.   Picture sourced from: http://www.kalamu.comfela 34.jpg 

TWITTER MI

May 13, 2011

MALCOLM X-OUR GREAT BLACK LEADER PRESENTED THIS TO AFRICAN HEADS OF STATE -AN HISTORIC BLACK FIRST !-WE NEED TO GET BACK TO OUR AFRICAN CULTURE AND STOP BEING 21ST CENTURY SLAVES IN AMERIKKKA!-FROM NATHANIELTURNER.COM

May 9, 2011

MALCOLM X IN IBADAN NIGERIA 1964

FROM nathanielturner.com

Appeal to African Heads of State

Speech by Malcolm X

Chairman, Organization of Afro-American Unity

Throughout June, 1964, MALCOLM X spoke, agitated, educated and organized to create a new, non-religious movement to promote black unity and work for freedom “by any means necessary.” On June 28, this new movement was born under the name of the Organization of Afro-American Unit, its “statement of basic aims and objectives” was released to the public, and Malcolm was designated chairman.

Shortly thereafter, on July 9, Malcolm again left the United States for Africa and the Middle East. His immediate objective was to attend the “African Summit”—the second meeting of the Organization of African Unity, which had been formed in 1963 to bring about joint action by the independent African governments.

The OAU conference was held in Cairo July 17–21, and was attended by nearly all the heads of the thirty-four member states. The welcoming address was made by President Gamal Abdel Nasser of the United Arab Republic who, while reviewing the events of the previous year, hailed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that had recently been enacted in the United States.

Malcolm was accepted as an observer at the conference. In this capacity he was permitted to submit to the delegates an eight-page memorandum urging their support of the Negro struggle in the United States and their help in bring the plight of the American Negro before the United Nations. The memorandum, which follows, was delivered to the delegates on July 17, one day before the events that came to be called “the Harlem riots.”

Your Excellencies:

The Organization of Afro-American Unity has sent me to attend this historic African summit conferences as an observer to represent the interests of 22 million African-American whose human rights are being violated daily by the racism of American imperialists.

The Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU) has been formed by a cross-section of America’s African-American community, and is patterned after the letter and spirit of the Organization of African Unity (OAU).

Just as the Organization of African Unity has called upon all African leaders to submerge their differences and unite on common objectives for the common good of all Africans—in America the Organization of Afro-American Unity has called upon Afro-American leaders to submerge their differences and find areas of agreement wherein we can work in unity for the good of the entire 22 million African-Americans.

Since the 22 million of us were originally Africans, who are now in America, not by choice but only by a cruel accident in our history, we strongly believe that African problems are our problems and our problems are African problems.

Your Excellencies:

We also believe that as heads of the Independent African states you are the shepherd of all African peoples everywhere, whether they are still at home on the mother continent or have been scattered abroad.

Some African leaders at this conference have implied that they have enough problems here on the mother continent without adding the Afro-American problem.

With all due respect to your esteemed positions, I must remind all of you that the good shepherd will leave ninety-nine sheep, who are safe at home, to go to the aid of the one who is lost and has fallen into the clutches of the imperialist wolf.

We, in America, are your long-lost brothers and sisters, and I am here only to remind you that our problems are your problems. As the African-Americans “awaken” today, we find ourselves in a strange land that has rejected us, and, like the prodigal son, we are turning to our elder brothers for help. We pray our pleas will not fall upon deaf ears.

We were taken forcibly in chains from this mother continent and have now spend over 300 years in America, suffering the most inhuman forms of physical and psychological tortures imaginable.

During the past ten years the entire world has witnessed our men, women, and children being attacked and bitten by vicious police dogs, brutally beaten by police clubs, and washed down the sewers by high-pressure water hoses that would rip the clothes from our bodies and the flesh from our limbs.

And all of these inhuman atrocities have been inflicted upon us by the American governmental authorities, the police themselves, for no reason other than we seek the recognition and respect granted our human beings in America.

Your Excellencies:

The American government is either unable or unwilling to protect the lives and property of your 22 million African-American brothers and sisters. We stand defenseless, at the mercy of American racists who murder us at will for no reason other than we are black and of African descent.

Two black bodies were found in the Mississippi River this week; last week an unarmed African-American educator was murdered in cold blood in Georgia; a few days before that three civil-rights workers disappeared completely, perhaps murdered also, only because they were teaching our people in Mississippi how to vote and how to secure their political rights.

Our problems are your problems We have lived for over 300 years in that American den of racist wolves in constant fear of losing life and limb. Recently, three students from Kenya were mistaken for American Negroes and were brutally beaten by New York police. Shortly after that, two diplomats from Uganda were also beaten by the New York City police, who mistook them for American Negroes.

If Africans are brutally beaten while only visiting in America, imagine the physical and psychological suffering received by your brothers and sisters who have lived there for over 300 years.

Our problem is your problem. No matter how much independence Africans get here on the mother continent, unless you wear your national dress at all times, when you visit America, you may be mistaken for one of us and suffer the same psychological humiliation and physical mutilation that is an everyday occurrence in our lives.

Your problems will never be fully solved until and unless ours are solved. You will never be fully respected until and unless we are also respected. You will never be recognized as free human beings until and unless we are also recognized and treated as human beings.

Our problem is your problem. It is not a Negro problem, nor an American problem. This is a world problem; a problem for humanity. It is not a problem of civil rights but a problem of human rights.

If the United States Supreme Court justice, Arthur Goldberg, a few weeks ago, could find legal grounds to threaten to bring Russia before the United Nations and charge her with violating the human rights of less than three million Russian Jews, what makes our African brothers hesitate to bring the Untied States government before the United Nations and charge her with violating the human rights of 22 million African-Americans?

We pray that our African brothers have not freed themselves of European colonialism only to be overcome and held in check now by American dollarism. Don’t let American racism be “legalized” by American dollarism.

America is worse than South Africa, because not only is America racist, but she also is deceitful and hypocritical. South Africa preaches segregation and practices segregation. She, at least, practices what she preaches. American preaches integration and practices segregation. She preaches one thing while deceitfully practicing another.

South Africa is like a vicious wolf, openly hostile towards black humanity. But America is cunning like a fox, friendly and smiling, but even more vicious and deadly than the wolf.

The wolf and the fox are both enemies of humanity; both are canine; both humiliate and mutilate their victims. Both have the same objectives, but differ only in methods.

If South Africa is guilty of violating the human rights of Africans here on the mother continent, then America is guilty of worse violations of 22 million Africans on the American continent. And if South Africa racism is not a domestic issue, then American racism also is not a domestic issue.

Many of you have been led to believe that the much publicized, recently passed civil-rights bill is a sign that America is making a sincere effort to correct the injustices we have suffered there. This propaganda maneuver is part of her deceit and trickery to keep the African nations from condemning her racist practices before the United Nations, as you are now doing as regards the same practices of South Africa.

The United States Supreme Court passed a law ten years ago making America’s segregated school system illegal. But the federal government has yet to enforce this law even in the North. If the federal government cannot enforce the law of the highest court in the land when it comes to nothing but equal rights to education for African Americans, how can anyone be so naïve as to think all the additional laws brought into being by the civil-rights bill will be enforced?

These are nothing but tricks of the century’s leading neo-colonialist power. Surely, our intellectually mature African brothers will not fall for this trickery.

The Organization of Afro-American Unity, in cooperation with a coalition of other Negro leaders and organizations, has decided to elevate our freedom struggle above the domestic level of civil rights. We intend to “internationalize” it by placing it at the level of human rights. Our freedom struggle for human dignity is no longer confined to the domestic jurisdiction of the United States government.

We beseech the independent African states to help us bring our problem before the United Nations, on the grounds that the United States government is morally incapable of protecting the lives and the property of 22 million African-Americans. And on the grounds that our deteriorating plight is definitely becoming a threat to world peace.

Out of frustration and hopelessness our young people have reached the point of no return. We no longer endorse patience and turning-the-other-cheek. We assert the right of self-defense by whatever means necessary, and reserve the right of maximum retaliation against our racist oppressors, no matter what the odds against us are.

From here on in, if we must die anyway, we will die fighting back and we will not die alone. We intend to see that our racist oppressors also get a taste of death.

We are well aware that our future efforts to defend ourselves by retaliating—by meeting violence with violence, eye for eye and tooth for tooth—could create the type of racial conflict in America that could easily escalate into a violent, world-wide, bloody race war.

In the interests of world peace and security, we beseech the heads of the independent African states to recommend an immediate investigation into our problem by the United Nations Commission on Human Rights.

If this humble plea that I am voicing at this conference is not properly worded, then let our elder brothers, who know the legal language, come to our aid and word our plea in the proper language necessary for it to be heard.

One last word, my beloved brothers at this African summit:

“No one knows the master better than his servant.” We have been servants in America for over 300 years. We have a thorough, inside knowledge of this man who calls himself “Uncle Sam.” Therefore, you must heed our warning: Don’t escape from European colonialism only to become even more enslaved by deceitful, “friendly” American dollarism.

May Allah’s blessings of good health and wisdom be upon you all. Salaam Alaikum.

* * * * *

Malcolm X Speaks • George Breitman, editor • © Copyright 1965 by Merit Publishers and Betty Shabazz • Grove Press • New York, NY 10003 Remembering Malcolm Malcolm X Videos

posted 21 February 2006

* * * * *

Feb. 21, 2006–41 years ago

Malcolm X was gunned down at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem

* * * * *

Spectres of 1919: Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro

By Barbara Foley

A carefully argued, nuanced presentation of the genesis of the Harlem Renaissance. Foley’s breadth of knowledge in American radical history is impressive.—American Literature

Foley’s book is a lucid and useful one… A heavyweight intervention, it prompts significant rethinking of the ideological and representational strategies structuring the era.—Journal of American Studies

Foley does a masterful job of analyzing the racial and political theories of a wide range of black and white figures, from the radical Left to the racist Right… Students of African American political and cultural history in the early twentieth century cannot ignore this book. Essential.—Choice

In our current time of crisis, when ruling classes busily promote nationalism and racism to conceal the class nature of their inter-imperialist rivalries, one can only hope that readers will not be daunted by Foley’s dedication to analyzing the ideological milieu of the 1920s that contributed to the eclipse of New Negro radicalism by New Negro nationalism.—Science & Society

With the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the 1920s was a landmark decade in African American political and cultural history, characterized by an upsurge in racial awareness and artistic creativity. In Spectres of 1919 Barbara Foley traces the origins of this revolutionary era to the turbulent year 1919, identifying the events and trends in American society that spurred the black community to action and examining the forms that action took as it evolved.

Unlike prior studies of the Harlem Renaissance, which see 1919 as significant mostly because of the geographic migrations of blacks to the North, Spectres of 1919 looks at that year as the political crucible from which the radicalism of the 1920s emerged. Foley draws from a wealth of primary sources, taking a bold new approach to the origins of African American radicalism and adding nuance and complexity to the understanding of a fascinating and vibrant era.—amazon.com

* * * * *

Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues

1950 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 ____ 2005

Enjoy!

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan / The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll / Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

* * * * *

The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804 / January 1, 1804 — The Founding of Haiti

* * * * *

BLACK CLASSIC BOOKS

BCP Digital Printing

* * * * *

updated 19 October 2007

MALCOLM X ON”GOING BACK TO AFRICA”-FROM MALCOLM X SPEAKS-WE CAN EITHER GO BACK TO AFRICA OR BECOME CULTURALLY AFRICAN WHILE IN AMERIKKKA BUT BE TOTALLY LIBERATED FROM BEING 21ST CENTURY SLAVES AS WE ARE NOW IN AMERIKKKA!

May 6, 2011

FROM yeyeolade.blogspot.com

Friday, May 06, 2011
MALCOLM X ON “GOING BACK TO AFRICA”-FROM MALCOLM X SPEAKS-WE CAN EITHER GO BACK TO AFRICA OR BECOME AFRICANS CULTURALLY IN AMERIKKKA AND DEVELOP STRONG LINKS WITH THE MOTHERLAND IN THE PROCESS!

ON GOING BACK TO AFRICA- MALCOLM X’S COMMENTS TO A QUESTION AT A HARYOU-ACT FORUM FOR DOMESTIC PEACE CORPS MEMBERS,HARLEM,DEC. 12,1964

MALCOLM WAS ASKED HOW HE THOUGHT AFRO AMERICANS WOULD BE RECEIVED BY THE AFRICANS IF THEY SHOULD GO BACK TO AFRICA.

Malcolm : After lengthy discussions with many Africans at all levels, I would say some would be welcome and some wouldn’t be welcome. Those that have a contribution to make would be welcome,but those that have no contribution to make would not be welcome\;I don’t think any of us, if we look at it objectively could find fault with that.
And I believe this, that if we migrated back to Africa culturally, philosopically and psychologically, while remaining here physically, the spiritual bond that would develop between us and Africa through this cultural, philosophical and psychological migration, so-called migration would enhance our position here, because we would have our contacts with them acting as roots or foundations behind us. You never will have a foundation in America.You’re out of your mind if you think that this government is ever going to back you and me up in the same way they back others up. They’ll never do it,It’s not in them.

AS an example take the Chinese. You asked me about Red China. The Chinese used to be disrespected.They used to use that expression in this country:”You don’t have a chinaman’s chance”. You remember that? You don’t hear it lately. Because a Chinaman’s got more chances now. Why? Because China is strong. Since China became strong and independent, she’s respected, and she’s recognized. So that wherever a Chinese person goes, he is respected and recognized because of what he as an individual has done;he is respected and recognized because he has a country behind him,a continent behind him. He has some power behind him. They don’t respect him but respect what’s behind him.

By the same token, when the African continent in its independence is able to create the unity that’s necessary to increase its strength and its position on this earth, so that Africa too becomes respected as other huge continents are respected,then wherever people of African origin ,African heritage or African blood go,they will be respected-but only when and because they have something larger that looks like them behind them. With that behind you,you will get some respect. Without it behind you you can do almost anything under the sun in this society-pass any kind of law that Washington can think of-and you and I will still be trying to get them to enforce that law. We’ll be like that Chinaman (about whom they used to say “He doesn’t have a Chinaman’s chance”.Now you don’t have a Negro’s chance. But with African getting its independence, you and I will have more of a chance.I believe in that 100 per cent.

And this is what I mean by a migration or going back to Africa -going back in the sense that we reach out to them and they reach out to us. Our mutual understanding and our mutual effort toward a mutual objective will bring mutual benefit to the African as well as to the Afro-American. But you will never get it just relaying on uncle sam alone. You are looking to the wrong direction. Because the wrong people are in Washington D.C. and I mean from the White House right on down. I hope I don’t step on anybody’s toes by saying that I didn”t vote for him so I can say it.


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