Archive for February, 2012

BLACK MEN ARE BEING KILLED, LYNCHED,AND JAILED-BLACK MEN COME BACK TO AFRICA AND BE FREE OF THIS MADNESS!

February 8, 2012

NYPD Officers Shoot and Kill Three Black Men in One Week
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Colorlines, News Report, Posted: Feb 06, 2012
Ramyaccount.nytimes.com/auth/loginmarley Graham, 18, was shot and killed by a NYPD officer in the Bronx on Thursday afternoon after running into his home as undercover officers pursued him. He’s the third person the NYPD have killed in a week. According to the police spokesperson, he was unarmed.

Paul J. Browne, the New York Police Department’s chief spokesman, said there was “no evidence that he was armed” when the officer, a member of a narcotics unit, shot him once in the upper left chest, the New York Times reports.

The Graham shooting is the third time in a week that a member of the NYPD had killed a suspect. On Jan. 26, an off-duty police lieutenant shot a 22-year-old carjacking suspect in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn. And on Sunday, an off-duty detective shot a 17-year-old in Bushwick, Brooklyn, during a mugging, authorities said.

In Graham’s case, police found a small bag of marijuana in the toilet at the home he entered after the pursuit, the NY Times reports. “It’s likely the story will thicken and the NYPD will argue the cop acted in self defense, but right now it looks like the cops killed a kid trying to get rid of a little pot,” said Seth Freed Wessler, Colorlines.com’s investigation reporter.

“Despite directives from the NYPD Commissioner to stop arresting people for simple possession of marijuana, the NYPD actually conducted more marijuana arrests in 2011 than in the previous year,” Wessler said.

In New York City, marijuana arrests strike people of color the hardest. Last year the NYPD made a near-record number of low-level marijuana arrests, making 2011 the second-most prolific period for marijuana arrests in NYC history. Close to 87 percent of those arrested for marijuana were black or Latino, while only 10 percent were white.

“The daily practice of harassing black and Latino kids with stop and frisk policing and then arresting them for simple possession of pot would be bad enough even if it did not lead to shootings. In this case in the Bronx, it looks like the day-to-day drug war left this 18-year-old kid dead,” Wessler said.

Comments

Anonymous

Posted 16 hours ago

I believe the NYPD should criminalize the excessive force used by “undercover” police officers and also set the standard that cops NOT HAVE firearms unless there is a known shooting situation…they are obviously not trained to reduce or contain questionable situations, especially wher they are presented with the opportunity to murder young people of color!

DON CORNELIUS -GREAT BLACK PRODUCER HAS GONE TO MEET HIS AFRICAN ANCESTORS ! -From VOICE OF AMERICA

February 4, 2012

African American TV Pioneer Exposed Audiences to Black Culture

Many Americans are recalling an icon in the entertainment industry following the death of longtime African American TV producer and music show host Don Cornelius. The 75-year-old Cornelius, who had been in declining heath for years, died Wednesday, February 1 from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. The television pioneer had an amazing career and incredible impact on the music world.

“I had a burning desire to see black people presented on television in a positive light,” said Cornelius.

Cornelius created Soul Train in 1970, with just $400. He hosted the hugely popular music and dance show for more than two decades. It was must-see TV for the latest fashion trends, innovative dance moves and black music hits.

Ralph Herndon is a pianist with the Choral Arts Society of Washington. He has fond memories of the show.

“Soul Train was like having a party at your house every Saturday. Something that our black youth had to look forward to, something they could identify with,” said Herndon.

Soul Train helped to propel the musical careers of giants such as Michael Jackson, James Brown, Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye. The weekly show was the first TV program specifically geared towards African Americans.

By the time it went off the air in 2003 Soul Train had become one of the longest-running syndicated shows in U.S. television history. Cornelius hosted the show until 1993. Herndon said the TV icon helped so many recording artists.

“We probably would not have come this far had it not been for Don Cornelius and Soul Train being a catapult for a lot of black artists,” said Herndon.

Other Soul Train fans agree and say Cornelius introduced the music of black Americans to the world, and to their fellow Americans.

“I’m Don Cornelius and as always in parting, we wish you love, peace and soul.”

LYNCHING FILM ON MODERN DAY LYNCHING -EXPOSE THE WHITE Coverup!

February 4, 2012

Filmmaker Keith Beauchamp Investigates Cases of Possible Modern-day Lynchings in Investigation Discovery’s THE INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE

Two-Hour Special Probes Hanging Deaths Ruled Suicide by Authorities But Suspected To Be Vigilante Lynchings –

SILVER SPRING, Md., Feb. 2, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — History relegates lynchings to the Deep South’s bygone era of Civil Rights injustices, when racial intolerance spawned crimes so hateful and politically charged that they divided a nation. In Investigation Discovery’s new special, THE INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE, investigative filmmaker Keith Beauchamp probes the shocking claim that lynchings may still be a reality in modern-day America. The special considers four mysterious hanging deaths, which authorities ruled suicides but families of the deceased believe were murders, echoing fears of an underground resurgence of vigilante hate crimes. THE INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE premieres on Tuesday, February 21 from 8-10 PM ET on Investigation Discovery.

“In this second rendition of THE INJUSTICE FILES, Keith Beauchamp examines whether these tragedies are the result of men taking their own lives or unthinkable acts of terror,” said Henry Schleiff, president and general manager of Investigation Discovery. “Beauchamp does what he does best by searching for answers in the murky waters where injustice, racial tension and rash judgments can distort the truth.”

“I am truly thankful that Investigation Discovery continues to provide me with a platform to share these stories of families stricken by agony as they question if their loved one’s death was an unthinkable hate crime, not simply suicide,” said Keith Beauchamp, investigative filmmaker. “The next installment of THE INJUSTICE FILES ensures a huge awakening for many who will have to confront the unsettling thought that lynchings still may occur in this country, proving how far we have to go to obtain true justice for all.”

In THE INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE, Beauchamp examines the four hangings and evidence that led investigators to rule them suicides with the assistance of a criminologist, a psychologist and a forensic pathologist. He then tempers law enforcement’s take with the impassioned claims of loved ones and experts who believe that these are cases of modern-day lynchings. For years, these families have been on a merry-go-round searching for answers to confirm their deep-rooted beliefs that foul play is at hand. But for investigators, the cases have been closed as suicides and the evidence speaks for itself to support these conclusions.

INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE investigates the circumstances surrounding each of these four hangings, including analysis of the available evidence, interviews with officials who led the original investigations, and testimony from families on the inconsistencies they believe shroud these cases in mystery:

Raynard Johnson, age 17, Kokomo, Miss. Found hanging from a pecan tree in front of his parents’ home in June 2000, Johnson’s death was ruled a suicide. His family believes he was murdered because of his personal relationships with white females in the community, which echoes the circumstances of the murder of Emmett Till in nearby Money, Miss., more than 45 years earlier. Calls by the Rainbow Push Organization and the NAACP were heard all the way in Washington, D.C., urging authorities to take a closer look at this controversial case.

Nick Naylor, age 23, Porterville, Miss. In the winter of 2003, Naylor walked his dogs on the property of a local deer hunt club and never returned. The following day, his family found him tethered to a tree with one of his dogs’ leashes. Beauchamp talks to former investigators of this case with wide ranging theories including the death being the result of a gang initiation. With the incident that inspired Mississippi Burning in neighboring Neshoba County, Miss., the region has a history stained by lynchings.

Keith Warren, age 19, Silver Spring, Md. Warren’s body was found hanging from a tree in a suburban neighborhood in July 1986. Questions were raised about his ability to orchestrate his own death due to the elaborate rope configuration from which he was hanged, but authorities ruled Warren’s death a suicide, outraging his family and friends. The search for answers surrounding Warren’s death has been championed by his mother and sister, who brought the story to ID’s attention at a Capitol Hill event showcasing the original INJUSTICE FILES in February 2011.

Izell Parrott, age 61, Glen Falls, N.Y. A popular BBQ chef, Parrott’s sudden disappearance in February 2005 puzzled the community. More than a year later, his badly decomposed body was found hanging 35 feet high from a tree. Parrott’s family doubted his ability, as an overweight man, to climb and hang himself so high up, but authorities ruled his death a suicide in the end. Parrott’s daughter is on a quest to find answers and to bring closure to the loss of her father.

INJUSTICE FILES: AT THE END OF A ROPE is produced by CBS EYE Productions with Keith Beauchamp and Brett Alexander as executive producers, and Emily M. Bernstein as producer. For Investigation Discovery, Diana Sperrazza is executive producer, Sara Kozak is senior vice president of production and Henry Schleiff is president and general manager.

About Investigation Discovery

Investigation Discovery (ID) is America’s leading investigation network and the fastest-growing network in television. As the source for fact-based analytical content and compelling human stories, ID probes factors that challenge our everyday understanding of culture, society and the human condition. ID delivers the highest-quality programming to more than 77.8 million U.S. households with viewer favorites that include On the Case with Paula Zahn, Disappeared, Unusual Suspects and Stolen Voices, Buried Secrets. For more information, please visit InvestigationDiscovery.com, facebook.com/InvestigationDiscovery, or twitter.com/DiscoveryID. Investigation Discovery is part of Discovery Communications (DISCA) (DISCB) (DISCK) , the world’s #1 nonfiction media company reaching more than 1.5 billion cumulative subscribers in 210 countries and territories.

Please visit the Press Website at for additional press materials, online screeners and photography.

SOURCE Investigation Discovery

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OUR BLACK Skinned BEAUTY Gabourey Sidibe IS BLOWING the skinny/white/girl/no color/no shape/image/away!

February 3, 2012

The Big C’: Gabourey Sidibe becomes series regular

Published Friday, Feb 3 2012, 17:16 GMT | By Catriona Wightman | .

Sidibe has appeared in the show since the first season as Andrea, who strikes up a friendship with her teacher Cathy (Laura Linney).

She will now become a main cast member in the third season, TV Line reports.

Sidibe was previously nominated for an Oscar for her role in the movie Precious and also recently appeared in the film Tower Heist.

News of her promotion comes shortly after Showtime announced that Susan Sarandon has landed a major role in the show. Victor Garber has already signed up for a guest spot.

The third season of The Big C will return to Showtime on April 8. The second season is currently airing in the UK on Thursdays at 10pm on More4.

More: Gabourey Sidibe, Laura Linney, Susan Sarandon, Victor Garber, US TV

Back To Woolly NATURAL BLACK PEOPLE’S HAIR -THE MOST Beautiful Hair on the PLANET! -This. Sister cuts it all off and gets BACK To Wearing her hair NATURAL!

February 1, 2012

Stylist advocates for return to natural black hair styles, with a big chop first

By Lolly Bowean

Updated: February 01, 2012 – 3:01 am

Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — On the cold, winter night that Sharon Coleman shaved off all her hair, she sat surrounded by other African-American women who were grinning and applauding as the clippers hummed.

And when every strand of her shoulder-length, straight hair was on the floor, Coleman stood from her seat, and fell into the arms of the women circled around her. The room was filled with strangers who had come to witness the new hair ritual, show support and find courage to do the same, Coleman said.

“All the women just embraced me and were very encouraging,� she said as she recalled the event. “Everyone was complimenting me: ‘I like the way you look. I love your hair.’�

For African-American women, hair is often a battle ground for how beauty is defined. For one group of black women, shaving their hair to a close-cropped, boyish style has become a way of empowering themselves, rejecting mainstream standards of beauty and shedding their obsession with extensive, daily hair rituals.

Earlier this month, Emon Fowler launched her Chicago-based “Harriet Experiment,� in which she is asking black women to abandon weaves, wigs and chemical relaxers and spend a new year with new hair. She wants the women to start with the “big chop,� in which they shave off their processed hair completely and start anew.

Fowler, 30, has organized gatherings to take place throughout the year for women to cut their hair while surrounded by cheerleaders who have done the same. She has been recruiting women on Facebook, stopping them in grocery stores and making appearances at fairs and festivals to promote her cause.

“This is all about breaking free from that hair bondage,� said Fowler, a hair stylist. She says her project isn’t about building a clientele, but changing mind-sets. “When a woman decides to cut all her hair, she discovers something underneath that is liberating. It can be therapeutic because you have to let go of the idea that you need these superficial extras to feel beautiful. It says, ‘I’ve accepted me.’�

Fowler said she was inspired to start her movement after reflecting on the life of Harriet Tubman, the iconic hero who risked her life to free hundreds of slaves. She sees her mission as helping to free African-American women from the emotional and psychological baggage associated with their hair.

There are varying opinions in the black community about the meaning of straight hair, but some think it’s an attempt to imitate the white standard of beauty. Fowler said she wants to reinforce to African-American women that they don’t have to change their hair to feel pretty or accepted.

For African-American women, shaving off all their hair is nothing new. In the 1970s, thousands of black women wore their hair short and close-cropped as a symbol of racial pride and consciousness, said Lanita Jacobs, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Southern California.

But in Fowler’s project, the women who decide to undergo the big chop do it publicly, and with a built-in support system of cheerleaders, Jacobs said.

That support can help ease what can be a shock to black women’s psyche, one expert said.

“Black women have been conditioned to believe that our hair, in its natural state, is not beautiful, not professional and not manageable,� said Chris-Tia Donaldson, a Chicago-based author who wrote a book about the topic. “When you go to hair that is short, it can take a toll on your self-esteem. You have to learn how to work it and own it.�

There is a growing trend toward wearing hair more naturally, which some believe means a change in the definition of what beauty is for the next generation of African-Americans, Jacobs said.

“There has been a radical shift in black people’s minds on what can be beautiful,� she said. “Increasingly, black men are making room for non-straightened and non-long hair as a qualifier for beauty. More African-American celebrities are experimenting with natural hair.

“What black women do with their hair has always created questions: Who are you? Who are you trying to be? What does this mean?�

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When any woman shaves her hair close to the scalp, it can unearth feelings of vulnerability, said Jacobs. For those African-American women who have straightened their hair for much of their lives, it can be particularly stirring.

“You are in some cases stepping away from something that you know and into new, unknown territory,� Jacobs said. “When you do the big chop, people come up and ask questions. It can complicate your appeal to the opposite sex, it can complicate your job searching endeavors, it can complicate your family relationships. Your family may ask, who are you?�

Because her hero, Harriet Tubman freed an estimated 700 slaves, Fowler has an ambitious mission to find 700 black women willing to undergo the big chop this year, she said. So far, she’s only gotten a couple dozen to join her on the journey. But her project isn’t just about numbers, she said. It’s about making a statement.

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The project actually comes at a time when more African-American women are abandoning the mainstream weaves and relaxers and making peace with their natural textures, statistics show.

The number of black women who said they do not use chemicals to straighten their hair jumped to 36 percent in 2011 from 25 percent in 2010, according to a report by Mintel, a consumer spending and market research firm. Sales of hair relaxer boxed kits dropped 17 percent between 2006 and 2011, Mintel’s report showed.

In addition, there has been a recent flood of blogs, websites, meet-up groups and YouTube video postings devoted to demonstrating to women how to transition to natural textures and how to style their new hair, Donaldson said.

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Antinique Bearden-Nunes said she’d been thinking about leaving her straight hair behind for a year, but she was afraid of how she would look. When she saw other women at Fowler’s launch celebrating the cut, she stepped up to do the same.

“I feel like I can do anything now,� said Bearden-Nunes, 24, who was still giddy about her haircut days after it was done. “I finally can care less about what others think. I have three young children, and I can’t let them see any shadow of low self-esteem.�

Bearden-Nunes said she’s been so pleased with her decision that she’s been oblivious to the reaction of her friends and strangers on the street. Her fiance wasn’t at all thrilled when she came home with less than an inch of hair.

“I told him, ‘I’m still me, I’m still beautiful,’� she said.

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After years of contemplating the bold step, Coleman, 55, decided that she would cut all of her processed hair off. For Coleman, it was a break away from what she called an unhealthy obsession and lifestyle.

“I’ve had chemicals in my hair since I was 14 or 15 years old,� she said. “It was like a vicious cycle. I was using chemicals monthly to get a touch up or a perm. I had to blow my hair out, use the curling iron. I’ve gone through so much over the last three years with hair pieces and wigs and such. I’m done with it.�

The day she arrived at work with her short cropped cut, Coleman said she noticed some of her colleagues paused and looked at her. Her manager, in particular, smiled and celebrated her new look.

But some of her friends have been less enthused when they see her hair, Coleman said. Some shake their heads and say they would have never done it.

“When you make a drastic change of this nature, you have to own it and thatâ™m doing. I walk with confidence, she saidThis is the new me!


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