Archive for February, 2015

Mo’Nique Blackballed Because She Demanded Gabourey Sidibe Be Flown First Class Across The Country?

February 28, 2015

The Chicago Defender

Mo'Nique & Gabourey Sidibe Michael Tran
[ione_image_credit width=”630″ caption=”1″ align=”aligncenter” text=”Getty”][/ione_image_credit]

When Academy Award winning actress and comedienne Mo?Nique revealed director Lee Daniels told her she had been blackballed in the industry after her stellar performance in ?Precious,? we were confused. How? When? But Why? We were certain Mo?Nique was about to blow up.

However, according to Daniels, who recently appeared on CNN for an interview with Don Lemon, ?She was making unreasonable demands, and she wasn’t thinking — this was when reverse racism was happening, I think.? He added, “I told her, ‘You have to thank the producers of the film, you have to thank the studios.’ And I think she didn’t understand that, and I said, ‘People aren’t going to respond well if you don’t.”

Mo?Nique sat down with Inside Edition to clear her name. ?I?m never willing to put my integrity at risk,? she said. But what about these demands?

View original post 118 more words

BLACK DOLLS FOR BLACK CHILDREN-FROM QUEENS OF AFRICA DOLLS ON FACEBOOK!

February 17, 2015

BDOLLShttps://www.facebook.com/queensofafricablackdolls

Top 5 Video Converters Software for PC

February 11, 2015

[iVoicesoft.com] We have all had times where we couldn’t watch a video because it wasn’t in the right format. Video converter software can help you change your video from one format to another with the click of a button.

If you’re looking for a video converter software, you must first determine what video types you have that need to be converted. Each program can only convert certain file format types into another set of video formats. The best video converter software needs to support videos that are in common and obscure file formats and allow you to convert them into a similar range of video file formats. The converted versions of your favorite videos must come out in high-quality condition, even or better than what they were previously.

Video Converter for Windows

Top 5 Video Converters Software Programe for PC, they are:

BLACK POWER!-BLACK MAN OVER ALL!-FROM AUTUM ASHANTE ON FACEBOOK!

February 10, 2015

BLACK DEFEATS

BLACK LYNCHING IN 2014,NORTH CAROLINA !-BLACK BOY DATED A WHITE WOMAN AND GOT LYNCHED FOR IT!-FROM HUFFPOST’S THE BLOG ATI IACENTER.ORG

February 10, 2015

FROM YEYEOLADE.BLOGSPOT.COM

THE BLOGFeaturing fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost’s signature lineup of contributors

Michael W. Waters Headshot

The Life and Death of Lennon Lacy: Strange, Still

Posted: 02/08/2015 11:03 am EST Updated: 02/08/2015 11:59 am EST
LENNON LACY

The animus for Time Magazine’s “song of the 20th century” was a photograph of a Southern lynching. A Southern lynching would often draw an entire region of spectators together for a day of socializing. Small children were even present in the crowd, lifted high upon shoulder for an uninterrupted view of the day’s fatal proceedings. It was a strange, albeit frequent Southern spectacle, one that claimed many Black lives.

Given the frequency of this horrid practice, and the abundance of lynching photographs in circulation, many that doubled as postcards, it is unclear why one particular photograph troubled, then inspired Abel Meeropol, a New York English teacher and poet. Yet, it did. Unable to free his mind of this troubling image over several days, Meeropol sought consolation through his pen. As ink dried upon its canvas, its residuum formed words that have haunted generations, words etched into our collective memory as lyric by the incomparable Billie Holiday:

“Southern trees bear a strange fruit,
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,
Black body swinging in the Southern breeze,
Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.”

Now seventy-six years removed its initial recording, there is still cause to sing this sorrowful song.

On August 29, 2014, another Black body was added to the crowded annals of those swung by Southern breeze. In a cruel twist of irony, the body of seventeen year-old Lennon Lacy was not found swinging upon a Southern tree, but upon a Southern swing set – a fact only beginning the strangeness surrounding his death. Authorities in Bladenboro, North Carolina, abruptly ruled Lennon’s death a suicide, declaring that he was depressed, and closed the case in five days.

Still, many questions remain.

Why did authorities fail to place bags over Lennon’s hands to prevent contamination and preserve DNA from a possible struggle?

Why didn’t authorities take any pictures at the scene of Lennon’s death?

Why were the shoes found on Lennon’s feet not the same shoes that he departed from home wearing?

Why were the shoes found on Lennon’s feet a size and a half smaller than his foot size?

Why were those same shoes removed from the body bag between the time his corpse was placed in the body bag and the time the body arrived at the medical examiner’s office?

Strange.

Very strange.

Strange, still, is an independent examiner’s conclusion that declaring Lennon’s death a suicide is virtually impossible given Lennon’s height, weight, and the items found at the scene.

The circumstances surrounding Lennon’s death, however, begin to lose some of its strangeness when the fact that he was in an interracial relationship with a white woman in an area still ripe with racial tension, and where the Ku Klux Klan has an active presence, is brought to the fore. History has taught us time and time again that when authorities move too quickly to close a case, a cover-up is afoot. With so many questions surrounding Lennon’s death, the move to close his case remains startlingly strange, and it is cause for great concern. Thankfully, the FBI is now investigating the case.

Strange, still, is how justice for so many Black lives remains so fleeting.

Strange, still, is how swiftly certain tragedies that befall Black lives are swept under the rug.

Strange, still, is the spectacle of a Southern lynching upon a swing set, a symbol of youthful euphoria now rendered the site of a Black youth’s strangulation. Of Meeropol and Holiday’s “Strange Fruit,” the late jazz writer Leonard Feather penned that it was “the first significant protest in words and music, the first unmuted cry against racism.” The very nature of a lynching is to render the victim forever mute — asphyxiating in suspended space — the violent snapping of the neck. While Lennon Lacy is forever muted, we who love justice must become for him as Meeropol and Holiday: an unmuted cry.

We must continue to pen Lennon’s story.

We must continue to sing Lennon’s song.

We must continue to seek answers to strange circumstances.

We must continue to seek justice for another Black life, a life, strangely, still, gone too soon.

This post is part of the “28 Black Lives That Matter” series produced by The Huffington Post for Black History Month. Each day in February, this series will shine a spotlight on one African-American individual who made headlines in 2014 — mostly in circumstances we all wished had not taken place. This series will pay tribute to these individuals and address the underlying circumstances that led to their unfortunate outcomes. To follow the conversation on Twitter, view #28BlackLives — and to see all the posts as part of our Black History Month coverage, read here.

“WE WILL SHOOT BACK!”-BLACK PEOPLE!- WAKE UP!-SELF-DEFENCE IS THE ANSWER!-FROM “WE WILL SHOOT BACK:ARMED RESISTANCE IN THE MISSISSIPPI FREEDOM MOVEMENT” ON FACEBOOK!

February 10, 2015

WE WILL SHOOT BACK!

What happened to Kerry Washington?

February 10, 2015

KERRY -SISTER you are a disgrace to the Black Race with this bleaching! YOUR SELF-HATRED IS SHOWING! BLEACHING IS RACIAL SUICIDE AS WELL-ARE YOU TELLING GOD THAT HE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS DOING WHEN HE MADE YOU BEAUTIFUL BLACK? SHAME ON YOU-DAPADA!(RESTORE YOUR GOD GIVEN BLACK SKIN!-DAPADA! BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!

politics from the eyes of an ebony mom

light skin kerry
Kerry Washington posted this picture on Instagram. She loved it but her fans are wondering what happened to their black gladiator. Read the article and share your thoughts.

http://www.theroot.com/blogs/the_grapevine/2015/02/twitter_side_eyes_instyle_s_kerry_washington_pic.html

View original post

Steve Harvey says “I don’t care about slavery”…funny or just stupid?

February 10, 2015

politics from the eyes of an ebony mom


Watch the clip and share your thoughts.

View original post

IN REMEMBRANCE: 2-8-2015

February 10, 2015

BEAUTIFUL, ALSO, ARE THE SOULS OF MY BLACK SISTERS

CHARLIE SIFFORD, WHO SHATTERED A BARRIER OF RACE IN GOLF

Sifford at the Los Angeles Open in 1969.Credit Associated Press

The son of a factory worker, he had caddied as a youngster at his whites-only hometown country club in Charlotte, N.C. — earning 60 cents a day and giving 50 to his mother — and at age 13 he sometimes broke par when caddies were allowed to play the course on Mondays. By his mid-20s he was a top-flight player.

When he met Jackie Robinson in 1947, soon after Robinson broke the modern Major League Baseball color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Sifford told him of his dream. Robinson replied that he could not be a…

View original post 3,051 more words

BLACK KINGS ATI ONE BLACK QUEEN!-“THE MANY MODERN-DAY KINGS AND QUEENS OF NIGERIA”-FROM SLATE.COM

February 3, 2015

FROM SLATE.COM ATI YEYEOLADE.BLOGSPOT.COM

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

KINGS-NIGERIAN KINGS ATI ONE QUEEN!-“THE MANY MODERN-DAY KINGS AND QUEENS OF NIGERIA”-FROM SLATE.COM

from slate.com

The Many Modern-Day Kings and Queens of Nigeria

Behold
The Photo Blog
Jan. 27 2015 10:23 AM
The Many Modern-Day Kings and Queens of Nigeria
4
HRM Oba Jimoh Oyetunji Olanipekun Larooye II, Ataoja of Osogboland, 2012.
George Osodi
Up until the 1960s, kings and queens controlled hundreds of ethnic groups in Nigeria. Today, the descendents of those rulers still play important roles as intermediaries between politicians and the people in their communities and as custodians of the cultural heritage.
An upcoming exhibit at the Newark Museum, “Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs,” collects photos from George Osodi’s ongoing project, which has taken him into the palaces of more than 20 kings and queens all over the country. The project is intended to show off Nigeria’s history and cultural complexity, and to promote harmony in a country often torn apart by ethnic and religious conflict. Osodi is excited to show this work for the first time in the United States because he thinks the project has special relevance for Nigerians who’ve emigrated abroad and their children, who have never been to their homeland.
“I feel that it’s high time we as a country see this diversity as a point of unity in Nigeria rather than something that divides us,” he said.
9
HRM Lucky Ochuko Ararile, The Ovie of Umiaghwa Abraka Kingdom, 2012.
George Osodi
7
HRH Emir of Zauzau (Zaria) Alhaji, Dr. Shehu Idris, 2006.
George Osodi
5
The Emir of Kano’s Rolls Royce, 2012.
George Osodi
In his photos, Osodi places special attention to the fashions of the rulers—the red garments popular in the south, and the robes popular in the north—as well as the various architectural styles of their palaces, which have been influenced by Christianity and Islam, the country’s two dominant religions.
“We are living in a much more modern society today, and a lot of people have misplaced their cultural identity, especially because of technology and globalization,” he said. “I think it’s good to remind Nigerians who left the country and had the next generation born in foreign lands that you have a home, a place where you come from, and this is what it looks like.”
8
HRH Queen Hajiya Hadizatu Ahmedu, Magajiya of Kubwada, 2012.
George Osodi
10
HRM Oba Okunade Sijuwade, Olubuse II, Ooni of Ife, 2012.
George Osodi
In order to photograph the rulers, Osodi wrote official letters to introduce himself and his project, but he didn’t always have the best results. For those he was finally able to photograph—including his mother’s king, His Royal Majesty Agbogidi Obi James Ikechukwu Anyasi II, Obi of Idumuje Unor—his aim was to portray them in a stately and dignified manner, the same way in which they were likely to see themselves.
“These kings, some of them have had ancestors who were kings in the early days of slavery. Some were kings in the early days of the Europeans capturing various kingdoms. Some were heavily humiliated, and they were photographed in ways that were dehumanizing by some of these captors in the early days of colonialism,” Osodi said. “I wanted to now show them in the modern day as true kings of the 21st century.”
The exhibition, “Royals and Regalia,” is on display at the Newark Museum from Feb. 25 through Aug. 9.
2
HRM Agbogidi Obi James Ikechukwu Anyasi II, Obi of Idumuje Unor, 2012.
George Osodi
6
HRM The Emir of Kano Alhaji Ado Bayero Reception, 2012.
George Osodi

Jordan G. Teicher writes about photography for Slates Behold blog. Follow him on Twitter.


%d bloggers like this: