Archive for February, 2020

Lynching Is a Federal Crime Finally o!

February 28, 2020

RACE
‘It’s About Time’: House Approves Historic Bill Making Lynching A Federal Crime
February 26, 20207:18 PM ET

CLAUDIA GRISALES

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the Emmett Till Antilynching Act on Wednesday on Capitol Hill. He stands beside a photo of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in the 1950s.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
With supporters calling it more than 100 years in the making, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved legislation on Wednesday that makes lynching a federal hate crime for the first time in U.S. history.

The Emmett Till Antilynching Act was approved in a vote of 410-4. Three Republicans and one independent representative voted against it.

Advocates say there have been more than 200 attempts to pass the legislation in the past, and the latest effort has been in the works for nearly two years.

“This act of American terrorism has to be repudiated,” Illinois Democrat Bobby Rush, who sponsored the legislation nearly two years ago, told NPR. And “now it’s being repudiated. It’s never too late to repudiate evil and this lynching is an American evil.”

Bobby L. Rush

@RepBobbyRush
Lynching is an American evil. Today, we
send a strong message that violence—and race-based violence, in particular—has no place in America.

Thank you to my colleagues in the House & Senate who have joined me to correct this injustice. #OutlawLynching https://rush.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/house-passes-rush-antilynching-legislation

596
9:12 PM – Feb 26, 2020
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While there are no recently recorded lynchings, sponsors say, the House bill remains critical.

The legislation was named for a 14-year-old Chicago teenager who was lynched in the 1950s during a visit to see relatives near Money, Miss. His body was recovered from the Tallahatchie River.

California Democratic Rep. Karen Bass, a co-sponsor of the House bill, says although the legislation touches on a difficult period in U.S. history, it also stands as a reminder of the hate crimes that continue today.

For example, she noted that a Mississippi memorial in Till’s honor has been vandalized several times. Last year, cameras were installed and the memorial was covered in bulletproof glass to prevent new attempts of vandalism.

NATIONAL
‘Why Don’t Y’all Let That Die?’ Telling The Emmett Till Story In Mississippi
“Even today, periodically, you hear news stories of nooses being left on college campuses, worker locker rooms, to threaten and terrorize African Americans — a vicious reminder that the past is never that far away,” Bass said.

Reps. Louie Gohmert of Texas, Thomas Massie of Kentucky and Ted Yoho of Florida and the chamber’s lone independent, Justin Amash of Michigan, voted against it.

A painful legacy

The U.S. saw more than 4,000 cases of lynching between the late 1800s and the 1960s, according to the Montgomery, Ala.,-based nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative. Many of those cases involved black men.

“We often like to only talk about only the glorious parts of our history, and it’s difficult for us to hear some of the ugly parts,” Bass, the co-sponsor, said. “But it is important that we do hear and understand our history in full.”

Rush said he first filed the legislation in June 2018 after hearing from the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who asked the lawmaker if he knew that lynching wasn’t a federal crime. Rush said he did not.

But Rush says his journey to sponsoring the legislation probably started long before that.

Emmett Till in that casket launched the civil rights movement in America.

Rep. Bobby Rush

As a child, Rush said his mother sat him and his four siblings around a table in their Chicago home to share images of Emmett Till. Jet magazine published graphic photos shared by the teen’s mother of Till’s body in a casket to illustrate the painful legacy of lynching.

“That atrocity has been really something that has been with me, that’s a part of who I am,” Rush said in a struggling, soft-spoken voice, his vocal cords previously damaged as a result of an illness. “Emmett Till in that casket launched the civil rights movement in America.”

Rush’s mother told her children that Till’s story was why they left their home state of Georgia, and moved to Chicago instead.

A path forward

The Senate passed similar anti-lynching legislation, led by California Democrat Kamala Harris, for the first time in December 2018. However, the legislation failed to gain traction in time for the end of the legislative session that year.

So, in February 2019, Harris introduced and gained passage again for her anti-lynching bill for the new legislative session. But since the House bill is titled differently, now the Senate must take up Rush’s measure in order to send it to the president’s desk.

Harris lauded the news of the House passage on Wednesday.

“It’s about time that the United States Congress take this issue up,” Harris told NPR a day before the vote. “It represents the thousands of lives that were the subject of extreme violence and criminal activity in saying — finally — that it was a crime that was committed against those folks, and it should never be repeated. So it is one of the most significant pieces of legislation that we could ever address.”

Lawmakers have said they hoped the Senate could take up the House measure during the final days of Black History Month, but that remains to be seen. The Senate returns Thursday after a one-day recess for party retreats.

But lawmakers remain hopeful the Senate can pass the House measure in the near future and send it to President Trump’s desk.

“I’m very proud of that. I helped negotiate it and I’m grateful for the leadership of the House and the House members who were part of it. It’s really historic,” New Jersey Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, who co-sponsored the Senate measure with Harris, told NPR.

In terms of the timing, Booker said, “It’s Black History Month, it’s been too long, and the time to do right is always right.”

On Wednesday, a White House official told NPR that Trump is expected to sign it.

NPR’s Franco Ordoñez contributed to this report

Correction
Feb. 27, 2020
A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Money, Miss., as Monroe.

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Lynching Is a Federal Crime Finally!

February 28, 2020

RACE
‘It’s About Time’: House Approves Historic Bill Making Lynching A Federal Crime
February 26, 20207:18 PM ET

CLAUDIA GRISALES

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the Emmett Till Antilynching Act on Wednesday on Capitol Hill. He stands beside a photo of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in the 1950s.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
With supporters calling it more than 100 years in the making, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved legislation on Wednesday that makes lynching a federal hate crime for the first time in U.S. history.

The Emmett Till Antilynching Act was approved in a vote of 410-4. Three Republicans and one independent representative voted against it.

Advocates say there have been more than 200 attempts to pass the legislation in the past, and the latest effort has been in the works for nearly two years.

“This act of American terrorism has to be repudiated,” Illinois Democrat Bobby Rush, who sponsored the legislation nearly two years ago, told NPR. And “now it’s being repudiated. It’s never too late to repudiate evil and this lynching is an American evil.”

Bobby L. Rush

@RepBobbyRush
Lynching is an American evil. Today, we
send a strong message that violence—and race-based violence, in particular—has no place in America.

Thank you to my colleagues in the House & Senate who have joined me to correct this injustice. #OutlawLynching https://rush.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/house-passes-rush-antilynching-legislation

596
9:12 PM – Feb 26, 2020
Twitter Ads info and privacy
211 people are talking about this
While there are no recently recorded lynchings, sponsors say, the House bill remains critical.

The legislation was named for a 14-year-old Chicago teenager who was lynched in the 1950s during a visit to see relatives near Money, Miss. His body was recovered from the Tallahatchie River.

California Democratic Rep. Karen Bass, a co-sponsor of the House bill, says although the legislation touches on a difficult period in U.S. history, it also stands as a reminder of the hate crimes that continue today.

For example, she noted that a Mississippi memorial in Till’s honor has been vandalized several times. Last year, cameras were installed and the memorial was covered in bulletproof glass to prevent new attempts of vandalism.

NATIONAL
‘Why Don’t Y’all Let That Die?’ Telling The Emmett Till Story In Mississippi
“Even today, periodically, you hear news stories of nooses being left on college campuses, worker locker rooms, to threaten and terrorize African Americans — a vicious reminder that the past is never that far away,” Bass said.

Reps. Louie Gohmert of Texas, Thomas Massie of Kentucky and Ted Yoho of Florida and the chamber’s lone independent, Justin Amash of Michigan, voted against it.

A painful legacy

The U.S. saw more than 4,000 cases of lynching between the late 1800s and the 1960s, according to the Montgomery, Ala.,-based nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative. Many of those cases involved black men.

“We often like to only talk about only the glorious parts of our history, and it’s difficult for us to hear some of the ugly parts,” Bass, the co-sponsor, said. “But it is important that we do hear and understand our history in full.”

Rush said he first filed the legislation in June 2018 after hearing from the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who asked the lawmaker if he knew that lynching wasn’t a federal crime. Rush said he did not.

But Rush says his journey to sponsoring the legislation probably started long before that.

Emmett Till in that casket launched the civil rights movement in America.

Rep. Bobby Rush

As a child, Rush said his mother sat him and his four siblings around a table in their Chicago home to share images of Emmett Till. Jet magazine published graphic photos shared by the teen’s mother of Till’s body in a casket to illustrate the painful legacy of lynching.

“That atrocity has been really something that has been with me, that’s a part of who I am,” Rush said in a struggling, soft-spoken voice, his vocal cords previously damaged as a result of an illness. “Emmett Till in that casket launched the civil rights movement in America.”

Rush’s mother told her children that Till’s story was why they left their home state of Georgia, and moved to Chicago instead.

A path forward

The Senate passed similar anti-lynching legislation, led by California Democrat Kamala Harris, for the first time in December 2018. However, the legislation failed to gain traction in time for the end of the legislative session that year.

So, in February 2019, Harris introduced and gained passage again for her anti-lynching bill for the new legislative session. But since the House bill is titled differently, now the Senate must take up Rush’s measure in order to send it to the president’s desk.

Harris lauded the news of the House passage on Wednesday.

“It’s about time that the United States Congress take this issue up,” Harris told NPR a day before the vote. “It represents the thousands of lives that were the subject of extreme violence and criminal activity in saying — finally — that it was a crime that was committed against those folks, and it should never be repeated. So it is one of the most significant pieces of legislation that we could ever address.”

Lawmakers have said they hoped the Senate could take up the House measure during the final days of Black History Month, but that remains to be seen. The Senate returns Thursday after a one-day recess for party retreats.

But lawmakers remain hopeful the Senate can pass the House measure in the near future and send it to President Trump’s desk.

“I’m very proud of that. I helped negotiate it and I’m grateful for the leadership of the House and the House members who were part of it. It’s really historic,” New Jersey Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, who co-sponsored the Senate measure with Harris, told NPR.

In terms of the timing, Booker said, “It’s Black History Month, it’s been too long, and the time to do right is always right.”

On Wednesday, a White House official told NPR that Trump is expected to sign it.

NPR’s Franco Ordoñez contributed to this report

Correction
Feb. 27, 2020
A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Money, Miss., as Monroe.

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Reparations for Slavery o!-#AfricanDOS, #ADOS,the struggle continues o! We will win God’s Justice o!

February 28, 2020

Glad @TomSteyer fought to get his point about #Reparations in. Notice how they cut him off and move on. I’ll remember the Democrats constant dodging on this issue when it’s time to vote. I’m sure others will as well.

#AfricanDOS, #ADOS,the struggle continues o! We will win God’s Justice o!

https://t.co/IgMx1hhwsL

Edo Musical Instruments

February 27, 2020

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Native Law, Custom And Judicial Review

 
Talking Musical Instruments Of Edo Culture

By Ambrose Ekhosuehi (Last update 25/09/2017)
Talking Musical Instruments lie in the tonal quality of most languages, in the fact that the instrument reproduces the tones, stresses and numbers of syllables in the various utterances. Talking instruments do not use a kind of morse system and the talk has often attracted the attention of visitors and observers.
Edo talking musical instruments give performers and listeners the opportunity to express and experience a variety of emotions. Some of which are hostility, excitement, psychological relief and to increase dramatic tension at points of climax, but their blasts also express the excitement of the adversaries and hostility.

It was said that the functions of music concern the reasons for its employment and particularly the broader purpose which it serves and among the several functions are those of emotional expression, entertainment, communication, symbolic representation, enforcing conformity to social norms, validation of social institution and religious rites.

The general principle which underlies the ‘talk’ of the various instrument are in the tonal quality of most of the languages and in the fact that the instruments reproduces tones, stresses, and numbers of syllables. What the instruments transmit, therefore, is not usually a code or a cipher but rather an abstraction from a total speech, a tendency towards standardized messages and towards fairly long utterances, since short, non-standard transmissions may be ambiguous, unless the social context supplies the necessary limitations to possible interpretation.

Many Edo talking instruments can be used to reproduce the essential features of the tonal system but some types are more used than others.

Horns-Urhu, Ekpere are very good at talking. They are often used in sounding its note at the proper time. The same is true of clapperless bells. They are used to announce important visitors and to summon meetings.

Edo Talking instruments are used for signaling important events, such as outbreak of war, meetings and in some communities people are often called together to the sound of a large drum, and in some places an Ekpere horn is used.

Musical bows are used by all Edo groups for entertainment and as talking instrument. They consists of a bow made of branch of wood. Musical bows of this kind are called Egion by the Benin and known to the Ivbiosakon, who used the name aidion. Egion is a one-stringed native musical instrument in the form of a bow put to the mouth and played with two sticks.

The bow string passes across the open mouth which serves as a resonator. The lips do not touch the string at any time and to get several pitches of the talk, the string is divided by touching it with a foot long stick which is held in the right hand. By varying the size of the buccal (mouth) cavity, the player can isolate and intensify a number of partials and by alternating these; the player can produce a melody or distinct talk simultaneously with the fundamental tone of the string.

Egion talking instrument is one of the oldest types of talking instruments still in use played by men; and also the most widespread.

Asologun is a lamella-phones played solo or together with other lamellaphones to accompany story telling. It was safer to play this talking instrument during day time, because certain spiritual beings the ‘Eninwanren Ason’ the elders of the night are supposed to be attracted to the talk or the telling melody of this instrument.

The story teller and the people of the night are both in a state of constant liminality; both are transitory figures, alien to and part of the social system at one and at the same time.

The Asologun was also associated with two deviant persons within the Benin culture; the giant Arhuanran and Oba Ewuakpe who played the Asologun to transmit the event for Divine interventions. Arhuanran played the talking Asologun to Lament the fierce battle and entered into the Odighi lake for ever. Oba Ewuakpe played the Asologun to invoke the Ancestral spirit and a diviner visited him, and the performance of a sacrifice was a turning point in Oba Ewuakpe relationship with his subjects who returned to pay him royal respect; and to relieve his grief during the time of misery, the Oba used to play the Asologun talking instrument and sang through the melody.

A professional narrator usually brings with him his own choir, the members of which are called ‘Igbesa’ or supporters while playing the talking instruments. The degree of ornamentation and the degree of metrical complexity vary from narrator to narrator and from narrative to narrative.

In telling the tales, the narrator opens the recitation with a string of proverbial phrases of the talking instrument, which includes praise for the host, greetings to the audience and wishes of blessing to everyone present.

The Asologun player would strike the string of the talking instrument and introduced the opening verse “Ikpinhin — obo re a ya bu ose omwa ude o —e e” that is “Finger is used to reprove a friend”. Such an introduction continues for a while, until the narrator starts the actual narrative by introducing” “ya ghe egbe ghe O; ne a ya bu ohien n’ Edo Asologun a re okhae” simply means “Do to thyself as you would do to others so says the Asologun”

Most Edo talking instruments are likely to have existed for many centuries ago together with the talking drums of Edo culture, one of the few exception is the large lamellaphone, the agidigbo, but the Edo physicians — called native doctors use the Oko as talking instrument in divining and curing

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Yoruba Drums in Ekiti o!

February 26, 2020

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1519801201372876&id=500383719981301&sfnsn=scwspmo&extid=m2kd1DrACYf1TC2F

TRADITIONAL DRUMS IN IJERO EKITI

Drums are a wonderful instrument, and they are beautiful. In Yoruba land drums are very important in people’s daily life. We use drums in many different ways. We have drums which are used for sending messages to the people in towns or sometimes to send a message to the next village. There are also drums for ceremonies like wedding or naming ceremonies. Furthermore, there are drums for healing people who are sick.
When you hear the sound of a drum, you feel something inside of you, because drums have this supernatural power, which goes into the body and touches our soul and wakes our spirit. A drum-beat, is the same as a heartbeat beacause they both have pulse. So, when we hear the spirit of the drum-sound, we respond immediately and we respond in different ways.
Drum is a special instrument and is very significant. In Africa we have different types of drums and they are used for different meanings. Also in Africa, we have drums from other countries like Akan drum, Goema drum, Dunum drum, Bara drum, Karyenda drum, to mention but a few. In Nigeria, most expecially in Yorubaland we do have different types of drums. These drums are for different reasons or purposes. As a land that cherishes culture and traditions, some of these drums are used for cultural festivals. Among the drums we have in Yoruba land are Bata drum, Gangan drum, and many others. Apart from the popular drum that has been mentioned above, every town and village has its own unique and special drum. In Ekiti State, the most common drum is Ikoko drum (pot drum). This drum is mainly used by the local musicians who play local songs. In Ijero, we have Apiiri Music. This music is not complete at all without this Ikoko drum. Other drums are for different purposes, most especially for traditional festivals. In Ijero, a particular drum is called Gbedu drum. It is beaten by Chief Alugbedu of Oke-Oro. This drum is so important that a chief is incharge of it and he beats this drum annually. This Gbedu drum is used for festivals of Obalogbo and Eyebokoaye, during their festivals respectively. They both dance Esekan Ikori dance. Chief Ejewi also has a drum called Asikereje drum used during his Idiyo Festival. The tune from this drum is what people dance to during the festival.
Olodooye also do have a drum used during his Igoke Olodooye festival, but this drum has not been used in recent years. At Idi Agba at Oke-Agba Street where Osirigbongbo entered the ground, there is a particular drum which is being drummed during Ogun Festival. Ikarakara drum is also among these drums used for many cultural festivals. For example, the Omo Owas carry the drum to Itepe Obalogbo to beat it for Obalogbo, during Itepe Obalogbo. Obalogbo dances to two traditional drums which are Gbedu drum beaten by Alugbedu and Ikarakara drum beaten by the Omo Owas. Ikarakara drum is used during Ogbonlu Festival at Odi. Oroo Masquerade and the people at Odi courtyard dance to the tunes. Ikarakara drum is also used during Isagun, Irogbala, Oro-wa etc.

Source: Ijero kingdom Cultural Festivals by Olabode Abayomi with forward by HRM Oba Joseph Adebayo Adewole JP OFR
The Owa Ajero of Ijero Kingdom
Book Year published: 2014

how-black-pastors-resisted-jim-crow-and-white-pastors-incited-racial-violence

February 25, 2020

https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.google.com.ng/alerts/share?hl%3Den%26gl%3DNG%26ru%3Dhttp://theconversation.com/lynching-preachers-how-black-pastors-resisted-jim-crow-and-white-pastors-incited-racial-violence-129963%26ss%3Dtw%26rt%3DLynching%2Bpreachers:%2BHow%2Bblack%2Bpastors%2Bresisted%2BJim%2BCrow%2Band%2Bwhite%2Bpastors%2Bincited%2Bracial%2Bviolence%26cd%3DKhMxNTM4MTc3MTIxMzk2NDA5MTMzMh0xMzM0YzNkYjA0NzA5NjJkOmNvbS5uZzplbjpORw%26ssp%3DAMJHsmWdZj5YIBHOMFPzh9Fd-KnNEhUyyQ&source=gmail&ust=1581446171420000&usg=AFQjCNGeZWvv-DFl53GIG-_fNv51BLAh_Q

Muhammad Ali oooo!- Great Wisdom from Him!

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Shaharzard Ali hits it with Black Truth for Black Women

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Our Black Skinned Beauty Comes to Nigeria ooo!

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Yoruba Dressing-So Fine

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