Archive for November, 2020

BLACK SANTA CLAUS IN AMERIKKKA O!

November 30, 2020

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://people.com/human-interest/man-receives-racist-note-demanding-he-take-down-his-inflatable-black-santa/&ct=ga&cd=CAEYAioUMTYxMzY1MDU5ODkyNjAzNDg1MjUyGjRkYWRiOGQ5NWY4YmFmZTc6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFz02UQjy4oyl38BHRWpjpXcLssPA

Itan Naijiriya (1)… History of Nigeria (Part 1)

November 29, 2020

What America Owes Its Black People

November 24, 2020

https://www.thecut.com/2020/11/what-america-owes-its-black-people.html

CAPSOUL, A BLACK BEER O!

November 24, 2020

https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.google.com/url?rct%3Dj%26sa%3Dt%26url%3Dhttps://www.wtvr.com/eat-it-virginia/uncap-everything-with-eric-jackson%26ct%3Dga%26cd%3DCAEYASoTNDEyNDc3Njc5ODE0NTI1NzgzMzIaNGRhZGI4ZDk1ZjhiYWZlNzpjb206ZW46VVM%26usg%3DAFQjCNEvG4H3Jw2YlKWICw7guxX_MlPEhg&source=gmail&ust=1606273897508000&usg=AOvVaw06wZVUMj6Ws0suwFKaduRx

blm

November 24, 2020

Picture book gives children insight into Black Lives Matter Skip to sections navigationSkip to contentSkip to footer OPENMENU Brisbane Times CultureBooksLiterature Picture book gives children insight into Black Lives Matter By Jason Steger November 23, 2020 — 10.50pm Save Normal text sizeLarger text sizeVery large text size Maxine Beneba Clarke was on a video get-together with her extended family around the world when she began to think about how to talk to children about the Black Lives Matter movement. ‘‘Just seeing all the faces – my little cousins and nieces, and my kids – and thinking that, along with the pandemic, this movement, this idea of a civil rights movement for black people, has gone global: what does that mean for these little faces?’’ Maxine Beneba Clarke wanted to create a picture book to tell children about the movement.CREDIT:LUIS ENRIQUE ASCUI The Melbourne author wondered what they understood when they heard the words or saw the footage of George Floyd, the African American man killed earlier this year when a policeman knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. ‘‘Could there be a book that would introduce that phrase to children. I think it’s really difficult to articulate why there are people on TV who are being killed that look like you, why people are marching on the streets, why they are angry. To articulate that to a small child without generating trauma is very difficult.’’ But that’s what the author of The Hate Race, Foreign Soil and several previous children’s books has done. When We Say Black Lives Matter is a bright, economical picture book that spells out what the movement stands for as two parents explain its meaning to their child. It had to be balanced, without condescending to either children or their parents. It had to show reality, to reflect the gravity of what it means to black people and yet be OK for a child to read. And, Clarke stresses, she wanted to show that BLM ‘‘also means joy, it means we support each other, and we fight for what’s right – the positives that come out of that type of community movement’’. She worked on heavily textured paper with watercolour pencils to create the images. Her palette – browns combined with greens and reds – was a deliberate reference to the colours of the 1960s, ‘‘a nod to the fact that the black civil rights movement didn’t actually start with the BLM movement’’. Maxine Beneba Clarke says her book had to show reality but still be OK for a child to read.CREDIT: When Patrise Cullors, one of the founders of BLM in 2013, came to Australia three years ago to accept the Sydney Peace Prize for the movement, Clarke interviewed her. ‘‘The Town Hall was filled with black faces, Aboriginal people, Torres Strait Islanders, African diaspora Australians, and what struck me was the applicability of this movement across the black world.’’ Clarke said Cullors imagined a movement that could be moved anywhere in the world, allowing people in different grassroots communities to use similar tools. ‘‘That’s the approach I tried with the book. I was wanting to create a text not too grounded in one place; that could exist in the UK or Australia or in the US and would just mean different things in those spaces.’’ The book will be published in Britain in March and the US in September. Loading Clarke agreed that children’s books had changed over the past few years – one of her children read Briggs’ Our Home, Our Heartbeat for school during lockdown – but said there were still not enough protagonists of colour in picture books in general. ‘‘I don’t think 10 years ago or five even you would have the words ‘black lives matter’ on the front of a picture book. So I think it was an opportunity to be really specific about what I’m doing and to say this is a book about Black Lives Matter as opposed to have all that fluff that you often have to have around the topic.’’ A portion of the proceeds from Clarke’s book will be donated to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. Save License this article Literature Black Lives Matter Jason Steger Twitter Email Jason Steger is Books Editor at The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald MOST VIEWED IN CULTURE Loading Brisbane Times Twitter Facebook Instagram RSS OUR SITES CLASSIFIEDS BRISBANE TIMES PRODUCTS & SERVICES Copyright © 2020 Feedback SUBSCRIBE

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY O-TEACH OUR CHILDREN TO BE PROUD OF THEIR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN O!

November 23, 2020

“AS you can see, I’m a beautiful girl because I’m dark in complexion. I like to look nice and beautiful always. My mum always encourages me every time I appear clean, that, I’m black and I’m shining. I sweep my room, lay my bed and clean our sitting room always. I learn how to be clean from my mum because she dresses well. She is my role model when it comes to looking good. “- Iremide Oyelaja, 10-year-old, Pry 4. (THIS NIGERIAN MOTHER TAUGHT HER DAUGHTER TO BE PROUD OF HER BLACK BEAUTIFUL SKIN COLOR UNLIKE MICHAEL JACKSON’S FATHER WHO TOLD HIM HIS BLACK FEATURES WERE UGLY! TEACH YOUR BLACK CHILDREN TO LOVE THEIR BLACK FEATURES-NOSE,MOUTH,BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!(IBADAN,NIGERIA)

BLACK O! – BLACKS TEAM UP WITH MORMONS O!

November 23, 2020

“There are good people in the world.” How Wyoming’s Black 14 mended fences with LDS church and brought Thanksgiving dinners to Denver

John Griffin’s long walk to redemption made a pit stop in Aurora last week. And it’s the kind of story that just might salvage 2020 yet. Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post John Griffin poses for the portrait at Salvation Army Emergency Services Center in Aurora Colorado on Tuesday. Nov. 17, 2020. The food donation is coordinated by Griffin, one of 11 surviving members of the University of Wyoming’s Black 14, a group of 14 civil rights icons who were kicked off the football team in 1969 for wanting to protest the Mormon church’s ban on allowing Black men and women from joining their priesthood. More than 50 years later, the Mormon church and the Black 14 have partnered up to distribute food to nearly a dozen under-served communities across the country. Griffin, now in his 70s, has resided in Denver for more than 20 years and coordinated the drop with Catholic Charities. By SEAN KEELER | skeeler@denverpost.com | The Denver Post November 22, 2020 at 5:45 a.m. “It is like a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and put in his own garden. It grew, and became a large tree, and the birds of the sky lodged in its branches.” — Luke 13: 18-19 *** Before last Tuesday, the bird had never heard of the Black 14. Christina Day knew the chapel on Quari Court like the back of her wing, though, having first approached the Salvation Army of Aurora ages ago in search of day care for her oldest son. “And they said, ‘Sure, you can bring him over here, free of charge,’” Day recalled. “And at the same time, they asked me if I’d needed food for Thanksgiving. I said, ‘Well, we could use help.’ So they gave me this huge box. It had everything you needed for Thanksgiving. Everything.” They could use a little help again. Day’s worn many hats at Sam’s No. 3. Server. Bartender. Host. But she can’t keep the building open for sit-down customers. She can’t make COVID-19 magically go away. “(Sam’s) is great, but with the pandemic, it did close down,” Day said. “We were closed for about three months. We did takeout, but …” Not the same. Not even close. “I mean, it cut my money in half. It cut my income in half. And even being back to work, our money’s still half. And our whole situation’s different.” As the holidays approach, we’re bracing for the worst again. For those whose livelihoods depend on large gatherings — sports, entertainment, restaurants, retail — the darkness of March and April is creeping back with a vengeance as coronavirus numbers skyrocket across the Front Range. It’s like 2020 can’t walk away without one last shot to the kidney. Day’s a single mom, with a 15-year-old and an 11-year-old at home. She’s wrestled with alcoholism in the past. When life throws a punch, Christina knows better than most how to roll with the blow and get back on her feet. “So just to see the community come together with all these gifts for those in the community who are in need,” Day said, “it really makes me feel good.” Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post AURORA, CO – NOVEMBER 17 : The food donation is coordinated by John Griffin, one of 11 surviving members of the University of Wyoming’s Black 14, a group of 14 civil rights icons who were kicked off the football team in 1969 for wanting to protest the Mormon church’s ban on allowing Black men and women from joining their priesthood, at Salvation Army Emergency Services Center in Aurora Colorado on Tuesday. November 17, 2020. More than 50 years later, the Mormon church and the Black 14 have partnered up to distribute food to nearly a dozen under-served communities across the country. Griffin, now in his 70s, has resided in Denver for more than 20 years and coordinated the drop with Catholic Charities. (Photo by Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post) Before last week, John Griffin had never heard of Christina Day. And yet he knows her story well. Too well. His favorite restaurant had to shut its doors for a time, too. The former Wyoming Cowboy flanker and longtime Denverite felt 2020, just like the rest of us. He read the news reports. He saw lines of locals in cars this past spring, picking up donated food and supplies. He watched toilet paper vanish, stores close, dreams shatter and neighbors weep. He asked himself: What can I do? He called his old Cowboys teammate Mel Hamilton and rephrased the question: What can WE do? “Every day, I’m blessed to still be here,” said Griffin, 72, a civil rights icon and one of 14 Black football players kicked off the Wyoming football team in October 1969 for suggesting a protest against the Mormon church. “It’s a blessing to me every day, because three of my (teammates) aren’t here anymore and haven’t been here for quite some time. Everybody’s dying around this country. Some people won’t be here tomorrow.” Why not make the most of today? Hamilton, Griffin and seven of their teammates did their best to salvage this calendar year late last month when they announced a partnership with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — the same organization that had once been the root of their silent protest — to conduct a food drive in nine under-served communities. In one of life’s sweeter ironies, Hamilton, a former Wyoming lineman, has become good friends over the years with folks within LDS leadership, including former BYU quarterback Gifford Nielsen. Hamilton’s son even converted to Mormonism, marrying into a family of the LDS faith. “You have these seeds of bitterness that were sown (in 1969),” LDS Elder Michael Jones said, noting the Cowboys’ opposition to the church’s ban on Blacks in the priesthood, a stance reversed in 1978. “And you have these great fruits that are being harvested today.” This past week, that harvest was nine truckloads worth of non-perishable food, each truck containing 40,000 pounds worth of goods provided by the LDS, to aid charities across eight states — locales as far north as Pittsfield, Mass., and as far south as Charleston, S.C. The nine members of the Black 14’s philanthropic arm got to pick the communities served. “There are going to be people Monday who had no idea what they were going to be able to eat,” Griffin said. “And come Tuesday and Wednesday, when stuff gets issued, they’ll know that they will be able to have Thanksgiving dinner. Wow, man. I’m happy to be able to have done that. The Mormons are happy to have been able to have done that with us.” The 18-wheeler with the Denver donation, designated by Griffin for Catholic Charities, the Salvation Army and other food banks, arrived last Tuesday. As Catholic Charities didn’t have a dock big enough to store the entire donation, the drop was made at the Salvation Army’s Emergency Services Center in north Aurora. Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post AURORA, CO – NOVEMBER 17 : The food donation is coordinated by John Griffin, one of 11 surviving members of the University of Wyoming’s Black 14, a group of 14 civil rights icons who were kicked off the football team in 1969 for wanting to protest the Mormon church’s ban on allowing Black men and women from joining their priesthood, at Salvation Army Emergency Services Center in Aurora Colorado on Tuesday. November 17, 2020. More than 50 years later, the Mormon church and the Black 14 have partnered up to distribute food to nearly a dozen under-served communities across the country. Griffin, now in his 70s, has resided in Denver for more than 20 years and coordinated the drop with Catholic Charities. (Photo by Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post) A small ceremony got underway as pallets of boxes were unloaded, each adorned with a white sticker that read: University of Wyoming / BLACK 14 / Mind, Body and Soul Initiative / Donation in partnership with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints “To me, this is one of those snapshots in history,” Griffin said. “Fifty-one years ago, this wouldn’t have happened.” Griffin’s a hugger by nature. He fought back tears more than a few times, pumping fists and touching elbows, as he thanked the multitudes who made the donation possible. But the moment that knocked the ex-Cowboy for the biggest loop was when the truck driver who’d delivered the goods made a point to come over and tell Griffin how the journey had motivated him to research the legend of the Black 14, all those years ago. The black arm bands. Lloyd Eaton, the coach who’d turned his back. The shunning. The long walk to redemption. “He told me that right at the border between Utah and Wyoming, at the truck stop, they have to check the trucks coming across the state lines,” Griffin said. “I presume the person was highway patrol or state patrol. He’d told (the driver), ‘We’re getting more trucks coming through with these same white stickers on the road, what is this?’ And he went on to explain it to this person. And the person goes, ‘Oh my goodness.’ “This truck driver, he gets paid to take loads across the country. I don’t know if he does this for every load. But he knew everything about the Black 14.” *** Before Thanksgiving, Christina Day knew next to nothing about the Black 14. Until she discovered the boxes of food going home with her this fall had a story, too. A journey of brotherhood that goes back decades. “It made me think of this year, with all the racial tensions and rioting,” Day said with a sigh. “I drove downtown just the other day and saw all the windows still boarded up. But to hear that the same thing, somewhat, happened 50-odd years ago, for (Griffin) to think of the community 50 years later, it really, really does touch my heart. To know that we’re not forgotten.” Not this week. Not ever. “It’s really nice to know that there are good people in the world.” Day said. She paused, then let out a gentle laugh of blessed relief. is an award-winning writer who joined The Denver Post in 2018 after stints with Cox Media Group (2016-18), FOX Sports and FOX Sports Midwest (2012-2015), The Des Moines Register (2002-2011) and The Cincinnati Post (1998-2001). skeeler@denverpost.com Follow Sean Keeler smkeeler Follow Sean Keeler @seankeeler

BLACK DON’T CRACK-BUT RACISM DOES!

November 23, 2020

Black Don’t Crack, Unless Racism Is Involved: Study Finds Racial Discrimination Quickens Aging Stress

from racism, particularly experienced early in life, can affect the mental and physical health disparities seen among Black Americans. Written By Sierra Carter Posted November 20, 2020 The big idea I’m part of a research team that has been following more than 800 Black American families for almost 25 years. We found that people who had reported experiencing high levels of racial discrimination when they were young teenagers had significantly higher levels of depression in their 20s than those who hadn’t. This elevated depression, in turn, showed up in their blood samples, which revealed accelerated aging on a cellular level. Our research is not the first to show Black Americans live sicker lives and die younger than other racial or ethnic groups. The experience of constant and accumulating stress due to racism throughout an individual’s lifetime can wear and tear down the body – literally “getting under the skin” to affect health. These findings highlight how stress from racism, particularly experienced early in life, can affect the mental and physical health disparities seen among Black Americans. Why it matters As news stories of Black American women, men and children being killed due to racial injustice persist, our research on the effects of racism continues to have significant implications. COVID-19 has been labeled a “stress pandemic” for Black populations that are disproportionately affected due to factors like poverty, unemployment and lack of access to health care. In 2019, the American Academy of Pediatrics identified racism as having a profound impact on the health of children, adolescents, emerging adults and their families. Our findings support this conclusion – and show the need for society to truly reflect on the lifelong impact racism can have on a Black child’s ability to prosper in the U.S. How we do the work The Family and Community Health Study, established in 1996 at Iowa State University and the University of Georgia, is looking at how stress, neighborhood characteristics and other factors affect Black American parents and their children over a lifetime. Participants were recruited from rural, suburban and metropolitan communities. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, this research is the largest study of African American families in the U.S., with 800 families participating. Researchers collected data – including self-reported questionnaires on experiences of racial discrimination and depressive symptoms – every two to three years. In 2015, the team started taking blood samples, too, to assess participants’ risks for heart disease and diabetes, as well as test for biomarkers that predict the early onset of these diseases. We utilized a technique that examines how old a person is at a cellular level compared with their chronological age. We found that some young people were older at a cellular level than would have been expected based on their chronological age. Racial discrimination accounted for much of this variation, suggesting that such experiences were accelerating aging. Our study shows how vital it is to think about how mental and physical health difficulties are interconnected. What’s next Some of the next steps for our work include focusing more closely on the accelerated aging process. We also will look at resiliency and early life interventions that could possibly offset and prevent health decline among Black Americans. Due to COVID-19, the next scheduled blood sample collection has been delayed until at least spring 2021. The original children from this study will be in their mid- to late 30s and might possibly be experiencing chronic illnesses at this age due, in part, to accelerated aging. With continued research, my colleagues and I hope to identify ways to interrupt the harmful effects of racism so that Black lives matter and are able to thrive. Sierra Carter, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgia State University This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. SEE ALSO: Chris Rock Says White People Are ‘Mentally Handicapped’ Abusers Who Don’t Understand Racism Michelle Obama Explains How White People ‘Didn’t Even See’ Her Despite Being First Lady Black Lives Matter: Powerful Photos Of The World Protesting Racism 15 PHOTOS BLACK AMERICANS , BLACK PEOPLE , NEWSLETTER , RACIAL DISCRIMINATION , RACISM MORE FROM NEWSONE Close menu Nation Politicker Good News #TheBlackBallot Biz/Media Live Well Arts & Entertainment Working Together PRIVACY POLICY TERMS OF SERVICE COOKIE SETTINGS AD CHOICE CAREERS ABOUT US SUBSCRIBE Facebook Twitter Instagram An Urban One Brand Copyright © 2020 Interactive One, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Powered by WordPress.com VIP PRIVACY POLICY TERMS OF SERVICE COOKIE SETTINGS AD CHOICE CAREERS ABOUT US SUBSCRIBE Facebook Twitter Instagram An Urban One Brand Copyright © 2020 Interactive One, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Powered by WordPress.com VIP

FIRST BLACK MODEL TO BE ON COVER OF VOGUE!

November 22, 2020

https://www.essence.com/feature/zendaya-on-winning-her-emmy-activism-through-art-and-honoring-black-style-icons/

THE BLACKEST SKIN IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL O!

November 22, 2020

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