BLACK PEOPLE O-OMAHA ROOTS OF MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!

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Omaha’s roots in Black activism trace through Malcolm X’s parents to Marcus Garvey

OMAHA O- BLACK HISTORY TRACED TO MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!
https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://omaha.com/news/local/history/omahas-roots-in-black-activism-trace-through-malcolm-xs-parents-to-marcus-garvey/article_c2ca35fe-70ae-11eb-9cf0-6fe818776a4d.html&ct=ga&cd=CAEYBSoUMTQ4MzQ2MjA3NjUzODQ2MTg5MTEyGjRkYWRiOGQ5NWY4YmFmZTc6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNE9EGTUGwF25KOZS4X62XeUIO4mmw

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YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

The day after beating the New York Yankees in Game 7 of the World Series in 1964, Bob Gibson rode through the neighborhood where he grew up in a Buick convertible, receiving a hero’s welcome.

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Bryant Center, an outdoor basketball facility with five black-top courts, lights, bleachers and an electric scoreboard, was coronated in September 1966 on an empty lot at 24th and Burdette Streets.

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Children were among the throngs lining the streets on Oct. 16, 1964 during a parade for “Bob Gibson Day.”

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Ronnie Wright, 18, and little brother Ricky Wright, 13, play basketball in the snow on the courts at Kountze Park in January 1969.

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Long School, on the northeast corner of 26th and Franklin Streets, in April 1971.

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Lothrop School as it appeared in 1966.

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The Ritz Theater at 2041 N. 24th St in April 1945.

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Omaha Mayor A.V. Sorensen, foreground, talks at the official opening of a playground at 28th and Grant Streets in August 1966.

Omah Tech grad and All-American Kansas State basketball player Bob Boozer, right, returned to his old neighborhood to help with the Near North YMCA basketball clinic in July 1966.

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Federal Market at 1414 N. 24th St., shown here around 1946, was one of several businesses filling North Omaha. 

NEBRASKA JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The intersection of 24th and Erskine Streets looking north in 1943.

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The northwest corner of 24th and Lake Streets in January 1963.

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The intersection of 24th and Ohio Streets looking south toward Lake Street in 1977.

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A youngster runs ahead of the Bryant Center drill team during the Malcom X parade in May 1973 at 24th and Paul Streets. 

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The Jewell building on N. 24th St. in 1946.

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The intersection of 24th and Lake Streets looking south in 1947.

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24th Street looking south from Lake in 1981. 

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Central High’s “Rhythm Boys” with coach Warren Marquiss, standing, preparing for the 1968 basketball tournament.

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Omaha Central basketball standout William “Willie” Frazier, left, receives the Claude V. Spencer Memorial Sportsmanship trophy at the Bryant Center in August 1967.

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Students at Franklin School line up to get their swings in a ball game in November 1969. Notable are the portable classrooms in the outfield. At the time, the Omaha Public Schools District were considering expansion while also dealing with changing demographics of the student body.

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Jazz musician Preston Love in front of the Jewel Building in 1972.

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Near North YMCA at 22nd and Grant Streets circa 1960s.

YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

DePorres Club members protest in front of Reeds Ice Cream in 1953 for not hiring blacks.

GREAT PLAINS BLACK HISTORY MUSEUM

Members of the Logan Fontenelle Lawn Patrol promote spring clean-up in April 1957.

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A Kellom pool scene from July 1952.

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In February 1954, Lake School fifth-graders reenact a scene from 65 years earlier when their school was the first in Nebraska to fly the American flag.

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Lake Street west of 24th in 1967 included the Legal Aid Society inside the Carver Savings and Loan building and The Off Beat Supper Club.

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2 Responses to “BLACK PEOPLE O-OMAHA ROOTS OF MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!”

  1. Rubber Kneader Says:

    It’s very emotional to hear that. Thanks for sharing that!

  2. James Tyler Says:

    Such an emotional thing to read.

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