Archive for February, 2021

BLACK PEOPLE O! – 13 YR OLD BLACK BOY IS CHOKED HELD BY POLICE O!

February 25, 2021

See more trending news on @Phoenix Browser https://lkphx.net/1h9n

AFRICAN MEDICINE O! – YORUBA FARMER USES IT TO SEIZE FULANI WEAPONS O!

February 25, 2021

INSIDE LIFE:. See how farmer use ‘Juju’ to collect weapons from Fulani herdsmen in Osun
SojworldnewsFeb 24, 2021Read original

A farmer in Ilesha in Osun State whom some Fulani herdsmen invaded his farm with cows confronted them with ‘African Magic’ and ordered them to surrender their weapons which they did immediately.

WATCH VIDEO>>>

https://www.facebook.com/groups/553557141992787/permalink/718043812210785/?app=fbl

EDITOR’S NOTE: JOURNEY OF A MILLION MILES

Now that political space in Nigeria is open and gaining momentum towards the Anambra State governorship election in 2021, Osun State in 2022 and the general elections in 2023, anyone who intends to be a participant in these elections need to start with a bold step now in order to finish well in victory.

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Enough is enough to herdsmen killing our people – OPC, Agbekoya warns
The Yorubas of the Southwest of Nigeria have said enough is enough to the herdsmen harassing its people on their farmlands with a warning that they can no longer bear it any longer. This warning was made by its local security outfits, Oodua Peoples Congress (OPC) and the Agbekoyas (local…

February 5, 2018In “HOME”

ULTIMATUM EXPIRES:. Sunday Igboho storms Igangan with thousands of warriors against killer herdsmen
January 22, 2021In “HOME”

Gunmen suspected to be Fulani herdsmen kill seven farmers in Edo
February 18, 2021In “HOME”

AFRICAN MEDICINE O! – YORUBA FARMER USES IT TO SEIZE FULANI WEAPONS O!

February 25, 2021

INSIDE LIFE:. See how farmer use ‘Juju’ to collect weapons from Fulani herdsmen in Osun
SojworldnewsFeb 24, 2021Read original

A farmer in Ilesha in Osun State whom some Fulani herdsmen invaded his farm with cows confronted them with ‘African Magic’ and ordered them to surrender their weapons which they did immediately.

WATCH VIDEO>>>

https://www.facebook.com/groups/553557141992787/permalink/718043812210785/?app=fbl

EDITOR’S NOTE: JOURNEY OF A MILLION MILES

Now that political space in Nigeria is open and gaining momentum towards the Anambra State governorship election in 2021, Osun State in 2022 and the general elections in 2023, anyone who intends to be a participant in these elections need to start with a bold step now in order to finish well in victory.

We are professionals, just tell us what you want, we will showcase and project you to the whole world at affordable charges.

We are Google approved!

Follow us on Twitter, @WAJU73 or SOJ WORLDWIDE ONLINE NEWS

Enough is enough to herdsmen killing our people – OPC, Agbekoya warns
The Yorubas of the Southwest of Nigeria have said enough is enough to the herdsmen harassing its people on their farmlands with a warning that they can no longer bear it any longer. This warning was made by its local security outfits, Oodua Peoples Congress (OPC) and the Agbekoyas (local…

February 5, 2018In “HOME”

ULTIMATUM EXPIRES:. Sunday Igboho storms Igangan with thousands of warriors against killer herdsmen
January 22, 2021In “HOME”

Gunmen suspected to be Fulani herdsmen kill seven farmers in Edo
February 18, 2021In “HOME”

NIGERIA LEAVES RECESSION BEHIND 0!

February 25, 2021

OYOTUNJI VILLAGE-SOUTH CAROLINA O! #2

February 23, 2021

Oyotunji: South Carolina’s African Village

Oyotunji: South Carolina’s African Village The Oldest Authentic African Village in North America

One of the darkest chapters of American history is the destruction of African Americans heritage. When forcibly brought over to the New World African slaves were stripped of their names, culture, and language. As generations passed, any knowledge of their African roots have been diminished and forgotten in the past. During the Civil Rights Movement, also known as the revolution, there were differing opinions on as to how black Americans would live in the United States. Martin Luther King spoke of integration while Malcolm X advocated for further segregation. Other than these two methods one other revolutionary offered another path: Cultural Revival. Adefunmi was born in Detroit Michigan under the name Walter King. Throughout King’s life, he went through his own spiritual journey before founding the current order of Yoruba in North America. Adefunmi first studied Haitian Vodou at the age of 20 and later became the first documented African-American to be ordained into the Yoruban Priesthood. In Harlem, New York Adefunmi set up his first Yoruba Temple but later moved it to its current location in Beaufort, South Carolina. Early in King’s journey, he ventured to Nigeria to search for spiritual guidance for his temple in North America but was outright rejected by the Yoruba people. After the success of his order, the revival of Yoruban beliefs in the United States, and the conflicts arising with the Cuban sect of the religion Adefunmi traveled to Nigeria a second-time. King was then welcomed with open arms and coronated as the Yorubian King of all of North America. Thus, the Yoruba Kingdom was born. Ghosts of the Plantation The Yoruba Temple has been moved several times before finally being placed in Sheldon, South Carolina. Originally founded in Harlem, Adefunmi hoped to move the Temple to Savanah, Georgia but had to settle for Sheldon, South Carolina. Even after arriving in Sheldon the village was moved once again due to noise complaints by the locals. Some consider it fate that the final location of the Yoruban Kingdom was on the site of a former slave plantation. Behind the Oyotunji Village is a large expanse of swamps which was at one-time rice paddies worked by slaves. The former plantation house is even still standing, although it has seen many face-lifts over the years which makes it almost unrecognizable as being a relic from the 19th century. As the slavery era has become a page in the history books, the plantation has been reclaimed by the swamp and the alligators who now call the murky waters home. The entire region around the African village played a critical role in the underground railroad, which Harrit Tubman was actively involved in. It is only fitting that a place where so many people were enslaved and suffered would be the center of  African cultural revival in North America. Entering the Yoruba Kingdom When leaving the United States and entering the Yoruba Kingdom, visitors must wait by the gate before given permission to tour the village. Resident devotee Efunsegun has been living in the village for the last two years. He first visited Oyotunji to do a simple flooring job in one of the buildings but ended up finding his spiritual calling in the Yoruba culture. Today, he makes up one person in the 5-7 families that call Oyotunji home. At the villages peak, the African Village was home to over 20 families. The population steadily declined as the younger generation left the compound for higher education and better employment opportunities. After being cleared to enter the Kingdom, Efunsegun then leads tourists to the ceremonial drum which is played everytime visitors enter the village. In Oyotunji’s heyday, the sounding of the drum would indicate that all villagers would need to emerge from their homes to welcome the guests and open the market. 27 Acres of Orisha and Witches The Yoruba shrines are spread out throughout Oyotunji and are the focal point of village life. Each shrine is dedicated to an Orisha which is the human reincarnation of a spirit. Other than the demi-gods there are also witches who draw their power from hollow trees. Much like the shrines, these witch trees have offerings placed at their base and are adorned with various scarves and fabrics. The Yoruba pantheon consists of over 400 Orisha, 9 of which have shrines in Oyotunji. Eshu-the messenger god, Yemaya-goddess of the sea, and Shango -God of Thunder are just a few of the gods which are enshrined in the village. Like many other religions, each Orisha has its own personality as well as powers. Each devotee has two Orisha acting as their father and mother, these spirits both have direct involvement in the person’s life. In order to appease these spirits, followers of the Orisha will do anything from offering toy cars to performing animal sacrifices to win over their favor. You can read more about Yoruba witches here! The resident priestesses also perform various spiritual services for a price. The reason for charging devotees for these rites is due to the amount of time and preparation put into each ritual. These services range from a simple blessing to fortune telling, and even the more complex funeral processions or men’s rite of passage. Some locals misinterpret the meaning of these rituals, using spiritual readings to predict the lottery or be granted forgiveness for ill-doings.  Priestesses will usually advise against using these practices for such self-fish reasons. In the end, however, holy women will usually still perform these rites just to satisfy the follower’s wishes. You can read more about the spiritual services performed at Oyotunji here! Reviving African Culture Oyotunji stands as a refuge for many African-Americans who wish to find a sense of belonging and their own ancestors. One of the first things an oppressive imperialist regime will do to quell any resistance within their borders is to strip their opposition of their culture and language. The cultural genocide against Native Americans and African-Americans is one of the darkest chapters of US history which to this day has not been properly addressed. The village of Oyotunji exists as a path to give the black community a sense of their roots and ancestors. Although Walter King was able to trace back his lineage to the Yoruba people, that does not mean that every African-American is descendant of the same tribe. Regardless of where in Africa one’s forefathers may have come from, Oyotunji is a community for all black Americans in search of a connection to their ancestral motherland. Pilgrims and Revolutionaries Currently, only a handful of people call Oyotunji their home, most of which are priestesses who perform many of the spiritual services and rituals. This extraordinary group of women were on the front lines during the civil rights movement and the revolution, thus giving them a copious amount of knowledge and a unique insight on the world. During the day there is little to no activity in the village. If the locals are not holding a special event or recognizing a holiday, one may even come under the assumption that the Kingdom is abandoned. According to Efunsegun, there may be days when Oyotunji will see no visitors at all. Then out of the blue, the village will suddenly receive new guests as well as old residents numbering well over a hundred. Long Live the King The founding king, Adefunmi, passed away in 2005. His crown was then passed down to his son, Adefunmi II. The King’s wife and children all live in Oyotunji and are sometimes even available to answer questions from visitors. As long as guests enter the Yoruba village with a smile and an open mind, the locals will be extremely welcoming and hospitable. Although life in the Kingdom has slowed down since the 70s and 80s, there is still hope that this village will exist for decades to come. A fire recently burned down one of the Orisha’s temples and destroyed many artifacts in the process. The Queen mentioned that the fire served as a blessing in disguise, the King has since been inspired to double his efforts towards rebuilding the temple and helping the village. In the past, seclusion helped the Oyotunji village to thrive and develop their own sense of identity and culture in peace. As revolutionaries aged and their children left the village, the Yoruba Kingdom must find other means to survive. The best way to ensure that all the hard work the village has put into uncovering their roots is preserved for future generations is to open the gates of their kingdom and educate Americans about Yoruba culture. You can read more about Oyotunji’s festivals and events here!    

OYOTUNJI VILLAGE-SOUTH CAROLINA O!

February 23, 2021

https://www.orphanednation.com/oyotunji-south-carolinas-african-village/

BLACK PEOPLE O-OMAHA ROOTS OF MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!

February 22, 2021

Omaha’s roots in Black activism trace through Malcolm X’s parents to Marcus Garvey

OMAHA O- BLACK HISTORY TRACED TO MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!
https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://omaha.com/news/local/history/omahas-roots-in-black-activism-trace-through-malcolm-xs-parents-to-marcus-garvey/article_c2ca35fe-70ae-11eb-9cf0-6fe818776a4d.html&ct=ga&cd=CAEYBSoUMTQ4MzQ2MjA3NjUzODQ2MTg5MTEyGjRkYWRiOGQ5NWY4YmFmZTc6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNE9EGTUGwF25KOZS4X62XeUIO4mmw

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YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

The day after beating the New York Yankees in Game 7 of the World Series in 1964, Bob Gibson rode through the neighborhood where he grew up in a Buick convertible, receiving a hero’s welcome.

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Bryant Center, an outdoor basketball facility with five black-top courts, lights, bleachers and an electric scoreboard, was coronated in September 1966 on an empty lot at 24th and Burdette Streets.

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Children were among the throngs lining the streets on Oct. 16, 1964 during a parade for “Bob Gibson Day.”

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Ronnie Wright, 18, and little brother Ricky Wright, 13, play basketball in the snow on the courts at Kountze Park in January 1969.

RUDY SMITH/THE WORLD-HERALD

Long School, on the northeast corner of 26th and Franklin Streets, in April 1971.

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Lothrop School as it appeared in 1966.

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The Ritz Theater at 2041 N. 24th St in April 1945.

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Omaha Mayor A.V. Sorensen, foreground, talks at the official opening of a playground at 28th and Grant Streets in August 1966.

Omah Tech grad and All-American Kansas State basketball player Bob Boozer, right, returned to his old neighborhood to help with the Near North YMCA basketball clinic in July 1966.

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Federal Market at 1414 N. 24th St., shown here around 1946, was one of several businesses filling North Omaha. 

NEBRASKA JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The intersection of 24th and Erskine Streets looking north in 1943.

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The northwest corner of 24th and Lake Streets in January 1963.

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The intersection of 24th and Ohio Streets looking south toward Lake Street in 1977.

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A youngster runs ahead of the Bryant Center drill team during the Malcom X parade in May 1973 at 24th and Paul Streets. 

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The Jewell building on N. 24th St. in 1946.

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The intersection of 24th and Lake Streets looking south in 1947.

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24th Street looking south from Lake in 1981. 

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Central High’s “Rhythm Boys” with coach Warren Marquiss, standing, preparing for the 1968 basketball tournament.

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Omaha Central basketball standout William “Willie” Frazier, left, receives the Claude V. Spencer Memorial Sportsmanship trophy at the Bryant Center in August 1967.

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Students at Franklin School line up to get their swings in a ball game in November 1969. Notable are the portable classrooms in the outfield. At the time, the Omaha Public Schools District were considering expansion while also dealing with changing demographics of the student body.

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Jazz musician Preston Love in front of the Jewel Building in 1972.

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Near North YMCA at 22nd and Grant Streets circa 1960s.

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DePorres Club members protest in front of Reeds Ice Cream in 1953 for not hiring blacks.

GREAT PLAINS BLACK HISTORY MUSEUM

Members of the Logan Fontenelle Lawn Patrol promote spring clean-up in April 1957.

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A Kellom pool scene from July 1952.

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In February 1954, Lake School fifth-graders reenact a scene from 65 years earlier when their school was the first in Nebraska to fly the American flag.

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Lake Street west of 24th in 1967 included the Legal Aid Society inside the Carver Savings and Loan building and The Off Beat Supper Club.

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BLACK PEOPLE O!-POLICE KILLER OF BREONNA TAYLOR 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY IS STILL FREE O!

February 22, 2021

BREONNA TAYLOR’s mothet tells Biden to prosecute the police killer o!

  Justice for the Black community is the main goal, whether we agree on ways to get it or not
Last night’s episode “REVOLT BLACK NEWS” addressed the historic fatal snowstorm impacting millions of Texas residents and the approaching one-year anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s tragic death. By D’Shonda Brown  Feb 19, 2021, 5:14pm EST Share this story Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Inspired by Sean “Diddy” Combs’ successful “State Of Emergency: The State of Black America & Coronavirus” town hall, “REVOLT BLACK NEWS” is a platform that is designed to report news from the perspective of Black people for Black people. Last night’s (Feb. 18) episode of “REVOLT BLACK NEWS” titled “Love Freedom” discussed the historic snowstorm hitting Texas that is impacting millions of lives, and leaving residents without power or heat; as well as the understanding of the Black agenda. Host and executive producer Eboni K. Williams was joined by Roland Martin, Willow Smith, Angelo Pinto, Tamika Mallory, Kenny Walker, Tamika Palmer, Rapsody, Bun B, Erica Ford, Lee Merritt, Keturah Herron and Linda Sarsour. “Combating racial injustice isn’t a job and it certainly ain’t no damn hobby. No, it’s a way of life,” Williams said in her opening remarks. “We must all endure in this fight because people like Breonna Taylor no longer have a way of life at all.” Until Freedom clarifies Breonna Taylor’s family was involved in planning BreonnaCon Pinto, co-founder of Until Freedom, kicked off the episode by introducing Martin, who moderated a panel about democracy, Black power and policy featuring Ford, Merritt, Sarsour and Herron. “You can march, you can protest, but if you do not change policy, it’ll all go for not,” Martin said. Then, Ford told Martin about co-producing public safety as a prioritization and implementing policies of the Black agenda. “What brings police into our communities is violence, crime,” Ford explained the benefits of creating resources for Black communities to minimize interaction with law enforcement. “We are able to reduce the things that give life to the ‘I can’t breathe’ and able to reduce the interaction we have with police that cause them to infect their disease of anger and racism on innocent young men and women.” Herron, from an abolitionist perspective, touched on the balance between protesting for issues such as the injustice of Taylor’s death and implementing lasting policy changes. “We have to change the practices and the tools that our law enforcement is using or the system as a whole are using.” Herron continued to explain changing law enforcement practices after the tragedy surrounding Taylor in a 16-day span from the beginning of the protests. “When you’re talking about the movement, you have so many different pieces, but there has to be someone that is willing and able to take the voices of the community, and communicate that and talk to the elected officials, the people who have the power to make those changes. That’s what we did.” Sarsour chimed in to demystify “the misconception that Black and brown people are in the streets without an agenda.” She added that protesters are doing more than “aimlessly walking around in the streets” and are “in fact leading agendas across this country,” particularly Black women. “To the folks who are not Black, follow the leadership of Black people and Black women,” she enforced “because when you ban No Knock Warrants, when you divest from police departments and invest back in communities and when you ensure that all students get high quality public education…we all get it.” Breonna Taylor’s mom wants Biden to “hold true” on police accountability promises Rapsody came on to the screen during the commercial break to recite “Diary of a Mad Black Man,” which was followed by a conversation with Williams and Bun B about the fatal snowstorm in Texas. Bun revealed that he lost power for five to six hours during the storm and had been in contact with people who’ve been without power since it began. While Texans knew that the storm was coming, the rapper believed that the impact of the storm was undersold. “We don’t get snow here very often, so people were just excited about the idea of having snow in Texas. That’s all we were prepared for in terms of going outside and venturing out into the show,” he added. After diving further into the impacts of pipe breakage, lack of natural gas, food and water resources and the rising death tolls, Bun expressed the importance of getting the word out to help Texas, especially Black its communities. “I don’t really trust a lot of these organizations. I trust the people that I see on the ground,” he admitted as he employed viewers with the task to support grassroots organizations such as Relief Gang and his church, where people can visit online at BethelsHeavenlyHands.org. Mallory headed the “highly anticipated conversation” about justice for Taylor nearly a year after her killing. While going live in Louisville, KY with the family of the slain woman’s mother, Palmer; former boyfriend, Walker, Mallory was also joined by Pinto and Mysonne. When asked how she was feeling a year to date of her daughter’s death, Palmer responded, “Mad still. She was murdered almost a year ago and there’s no justice.” Walker agreed about the feelings of anger because of the lack of justice, but is optimistic in that “we’ve made a lot of progress.” Officer who fatally shot Breonna Taylor is raising money to retire  Though Palmer cited justice and holding people accountable as a solution to feeling better, she acknowledged that it would not make the pain go away. “It’s half and half,” Walker said about the firing of the three LMPD officers from their positions. “That’s admitting that you all have done something wrong. From that point on, how could nobody go to jail? If I went to jail and there was no proof that I did anything wrong, I didn’t do anything wrong. That doesn’t make sense to me.” Pinto turned to Palmer to ask about the Biden Administration’s efforts to get justice for Taylor, and the mother revealed that they have not reached out as of yet. “We understand that they just got in office,” Mysonne explained “but that still has to happen. Breonna Taylor is a landmark situation for our generation…and she is the face of injustice for Black people in America. We’re definitely gonna make sure that we push them to have conversations about what justice looks like for Breonna Taylor.” Martin reappeared for the second half of his conversation with the Black agenda panel to discuss the reconciliation of multiple interest groups. Merritt touched on his role as a lawyer and the understanding of different groups working towards a common goal of social justice. “Conferencing, working together and unity is so important to our community,” Merritt said. “If the streets don’t understand how qualifying immunity works and how it serves as a protector for law enforcement behavior…then there is a disconnect in terms of what the demands are from the streets.” Black people are getting killed by police in your own cities and communities too He continued, “We all need to speak from one voice and as we continue to speak from one voice and one agenda, I think that’s how we achieve actual and meaningful change.” “No one group works together. We have to all work together in targeted areas where high risk numbers based on data are proven and let it go to work,” Ford added. Merritt jumped back into the conversation to acknowledge that disagreements will happen along the way, but you must keep pushing. “In this work, you have no choice but to work with everyone,” Herron said. “The thing is getting people to understand their role in the movement and getting them to do that.” Sarsour said we don’t always have to agree on everything to have the same common ground. “We have to understand that the opposition, they don’t like each other either but somehow they figure out how to band together, how to work together and how to strategize together around the things that they want to keep our people oppressed,” she added. Pinto returned to moderate a conversation about the future of activism and social justice with Tory Russell and Tiffany Dena Loftin. “2021 is probably gonna be a 1960s freedom summon. My hopes are that everyone goes to the one-year commemoration in Louisville to stand up for this sister and shut it down,” Russell shared. Breonna Taylor grand jurors file petition to impeach Daniel Cameron Loftin touched on the need to shut down private prisons in the midst of COVID-19 outbreaks, while addressing schools and vaccinations. “We have to have those conversations on the local level. It’s not gonna be some national figurehead talking about it in D.C. at the White House,” she said. “That model needs to be replicated. We have to bring the folks from last year in.” Willow Smith encouraged viewers to follow the featured social justice leaders from last night’s episode across social media platforms. Williams returned to close, “When we look at each other as family, then we are truly aligned in the fight. But, when we stay focused, we don’t get distracted by that bullshit and we stay energized like we are in this moment, that’s when shit really changes.”

Next Up In REVOLT BLACK NEWS Bun B on Texas’ fatal snowstorm, power outages, plus Willow Smith & more Can we really hold Former President Donald Trump accountable for the Capitol riots? Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial, ‘Judas And The Black Messiah’ and more Colorism in the Black community and entertainment: Don’t be tone deaf Cicely Tyson and the importance of celebrating Black stories in Hollywood Money talks: The Black community and the value of the dollar Sign up for the newsletterJoin the revolution. Get REVOLT updates weekly so you don’t miss a thing. Email (required) By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice and European users agree to the data transfer policy. SUBSCRIBE Terms of Use Privacy Notice Cookie Policy Do not sell my info Accessibility Platform Status Adjust cookie preferences Contact Send Us a Tip Masthead Interactives Providers Careers

BLACK PEOPLE O!-WILLING TO BE VACCINATED BY BLACK PEOPLE O!-COVID-19 VACCINE4,000 Philadelphians vaccinated at Black Doctors COVID Consortium’s 24-hour clinicBy Beccah HendricksonSunday, February 21, 2021 PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — The Black Doctor’s COVID-19 Consortium vaccinated more than 4,000 Philadelphians with a marathon 24-hour clinic this weekend.Lydia Mcaliley found joy in the hours-long line. She says the wait was worth every second to get her COVID-19 vaccination.”It was a wonderful day. I feel blessed,” she said.She joined thousands of people in Philadelphia to get their first shot from the consortium, which opened the Liacouras Center at Temple University from Friday 12 p.m. to Saturday at 12 p.m.”It feels good to know all of these people are building their immunity because of our efforts. So maybe a little tired physically, but not weary,” said Dr. Ala Stanford, who founded the consortium.She says the crowd never relented. Overnight, they brought patients into the arena in waves of 30 and out of the cold. The consortium had 2,500 doses to give and realized that wouldn’t be enough. The city delivered another 2,000 doses around 1 a.m.”We couldn’t anticipate that there were going to be hundreds, literally hundreds of people here, between the hours of midnight and six, and there was no downtime at all in this 24 hour period,” she said.Members of the Philadelphia Eagles staff along with mascot Swoop surprised the hundreds waiting in line early Saturday with Dunkin’ coffee and hot chocolate.The consortium opened the clinic to the city’s most vulnerable; those in Phase 1b who also live in 20 Philadelphia zip codes with high COVID positivity rates.”It was much easier to take than the flu shot or the pneumonia shot. I didn’t even feel it. I was like, ‘Oh, you put it in there already!'” said Bryan Jeffrey Daniels from South Philadelphia.He and his sister initially came to the line Friday, but with the snow and rain, decided to leave and come back.”Knowing that I got the shot, I’m happy,” said Diann Jones from West Philadelphia. She waited four hours Saturday morning. She had two family members die because of the virus, and she’s been waiting for the day she could get protected.”This is something I’ve been praying for, at least to get a vaccine so we can go back to some sense of normalcy,” she said.Dr. Stanford says everyone vaccinated in this clinic will have their second shot scheduled for the week of March 22.The consortium will work with the city and the Liacouras Center to decide whether there will be another marathon clinic.Report a correction or typoRELATED TOPICS:community & eventsphiladelphiasocietycoronaviruscovid 19 vaccinecommunitytemple university

February 22, 2021

COVID-19 VACCINE

4,000 Philadelphians vaccinated at Black Doctors COVID Consortium’s 24-hour clinic

By Beccah HendricksonSunday, February 21, 2021 3:13AM

EMBED <>MORE VIDEOS 

The Black Doctor’s COVID-19 Consortium vaccinated more than 4,000 Philadelphians with a marathon 24-hour clinic.PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — The Black Doctor’s COVID-19 Consortium vaccinated more than 4,000 Philadelphians with a marathon 24-hour clinic this weekend.

Lydia Mcaliley found joy in the hours-long line. She says the wait was worth every second to get her COVID-19 vaccination.

“It was a wonderful day. I feel blessed,” she said.

She joined thousands of people in Philadelphia to get their first shot from the consortium, which opened the Liacouras Center at Temple University from Friday 12 p.m. to Saturday at 12 p.m.

“It feels good to know all of these people are building their immunity because of our efforts. So maybe a little tired physically, but not weary,” said Dr. Ala Stanford, who founded the consortium.

She says the crowd never relented. Overnight, they brought patients into the arena in waves of 30 and out of the cold. The consortium had 2,500 doses to give and realized that wouldn’t be enough. The city delivered another 2,000 doses around 1 a.m.

“We couldn’t anticipate that there were going to be hundreds, literally hundreds of people here, between the hours of midnight and six, and there was no downtime at all in this 24 hour period,” she said.

Members of the Philadelphia Eagles staff along with mascot Swoop surprised the hundreds waiting in line early Saturday with Dunkin’ coffee and hot chocolate.

The consortium opened the clinic to the city’s most vulnerable; those in Phase 1b who also live in 20 Philadelphia zip codes with high COVID positivity rates.

“It was much easier to take than the flu shot or the pneumonia shot. I didn’t even feel it. I was like, ‘Oh, you put it in there already!'” said Bryan Jeffrey Daniels from South Philadelphia.

He and his sister initially came to the line Friday, but with the snow and rain, decided to leave and come back.

“Knowing that I got the shot, I’m happy,” said Diann Jones from West Philadelphia. She waited four hours Saturday morning. She had two family members die because of the virus, and she’s been waiting for the day she could get protected.

“This is something I’ve been praying for, at least to get a vaccine so we can go back to some sense of normalcy,” she said.

Dr. Stanford says everyone vaccinated in this clinic will have their second shot scheduled for the week of March 22.

The consortium will work with the city and the Liacouras Center to decide whether there will be another marathon clinic.Report a correction or typoRELATED TOPICS:
community & eventsphiladelphiasocietycoronaviruscovid 19 vaccinecommunitytemple university

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OMAHA O! -BLACK HISTORY TRACED TO MALCOLM X ATI MARCUS GARVEY O!

February 22, 2021

https://omaha.com/news/local/history/omahas-roots-in-black-activism-trace-through-malcolm-xs-parents-to-marcus-garvey/article_c2ca35fe-70ae-11eb-9cf0-6fe818776a4d.html


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