Archive for the ‘AFRICAN AMERICANS’ Category

NIGERIA O! – WIZKID, TIWA SAVAGE, BURNA BOY ALL WIN U.S. GRAMMYS O!

March 18, 2021

YOU WILL BE SHOCKED! See How Wizkid Celebrated The Grammy Award Win

By Mr.RIGHT

Mar 17, 2021

Unlike Burna Boy, the likes of Wizkid and Tiwa Savage have maintained silence on social media after winning at the 2021 Grammy awards.

In what many referred to as epochal event, Wizkid, Tiwa Savage and Burna Boy won an award each at the ceremony held on Sunday, March 14, and while Burna Boy has gone over the star with several celebration posts across different social media platforms, Both Wizkid and Tiwa Savage have restricted their fans to no much Celebration.

However Wizkid, also referred to as Star Boy by his fans, earlier retweeted the announcement post from the hosts on popular microblogging platform Twitter, and aside from that he has not said another word after that.

Wizkid who won the award for Best Music Video for his collaboration with the popular American singer Beyonce on the song ‘ Brown Skin Girl’ while Burna Boy won the Best Global Music Album for his Twice As Tall album of 2020. The win marks Burna Boy’ s first Grammy Award after being nominated last year.

Nigerian female star, Tiwa Savage also got a Grammy award for contributing to Cold Play’ s 8th album ” Everyday Life ” which bagged the Album of the year ” award for the 63rd Grammy Award Show.

Tiwatope Savage popularly referred to as Tiwa Savage is a Nigerian singer, songwriter and actress. She was believed to be born in Isale Eko area of Lagos State. she relocated to London at an early age of 11 years for her secondary education. Five years later, she began her music career doing backup vocals for artists such as such as George Michael and Mary J. Blige.

On the other hand Ayodeji Ibrahim Balogun, popularly refers to as Wizkid, is a Nigerian singer and songwriter. He is regarded as One of Africa’ s biggest artistes, Wizkid is the most decorated Nigerian artiste ever, and one of the most revolutionary Afro- pop artist in the country.

#ENDSARS- NEW CAMPAIGN O!

October 25, 2020

After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Begin New Campaign on Social Media
EveryeveryOct 24, 2020Read original
Nigerian youths might not be backing down on their protest and several demands from the government anytime soon, especially after the the huge backings they gave to the #EndSARS movement.

The youths have since the unfortunate killing of several people in Lagos State continue to mourn them, but might have taken a new course after the massacre.

They have taken over the social media space with a new campaign on asking questions to know the person or persons who issued an order to the men referred to as men of the Nigerian army who shot live bullets at unarmed protesters.

Questions are being asked about how and why the men said to be Nigerian soldiers would leave their barracks and decide to shoot innocent and unarmed protesters. This, in a new twist of events has become a new course for the Nigerian youth who want to know who gave such others.

Some of the Nigerian youth wrote on Twitter;

“E L OO N A M #EndSars@Elozonam1;

Who ordered the shooting of peaceful protesters at Lekki on the 20th of October 2020???”

“David Hundeyin@DavidHundeyin;

Who ordered the shooting of peaceful protesters at Lekki on the 20th of October, 2020??? #EndSARS”

“chimdindu obiaku@DinduObiaku,

WHO ORDERED THE SHOOTING OF PEACEFUL PROTESTERS AT LEKKI ON THE 20TH OF OCTOBER, 2020???”

The Lagos State governor on the other hand had earlier stated that the order for the events leading to the shoot came from quarters beyond the state’s immediate control. Many Nigerians have however wondered who has the constitutional power to order the Nigerian army, if the men responsible for the shooting were truly men of the Nigerian army.

FEMI KUTI,LIKE HIS BABA IS A BLACK TRUTH TALKER AND BLEW THIS BBC REPORTER AWAY!-FROM TELL MAGAZINE

July 11, 2020

The BBC Shooting Itself in the Foot

By BEN LAWRENCE

Musician Femi Ransome-Kuti avoided being trapped by Bretton Wood’s agents in his recent conversation with Zeinab Badawi on BBC’s “Hard Talk” slot. He acquitted himself creditably and did not collapse to singing the tune of those zombies – IMF’s professors – who parade the corridors of power in Nigeria, as he dealt with misleading questions by the BBC’s interviewer. Badawi asserted that President Goodluck Jonathan was improving the people’s lot as certified by the IMF and that the removal of subsidy from petrol was for the general good. How uninformed those foreign-based African journalists, welfare cases, who serve the interests of their principals unreasonably! Should she have made such a categorical statement without facts about growth in Nigeria? Well, Elizabeth Ohene who got into favour with the British by deriding Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah at every turn in Ghana, rose to be BBC’s deputy editor of Network Africa which has been steadily deteriorating in the last 10 years that Robin White quit the stage. It now presents the worst types of news of readers and of presenters. One could pardon errors of possible inflexion in reading news in English but not that of phonetics and phonology. The grammar of presenters, like Akwasi Sarpong’s is awful. Peter Okwoche is not better.

The issue is the subtle support BBC’s staff give to capitalism a la Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, which has plunged the world into economic chaos, except for some eight years that Bill Clinton reversed it until a worse apostle, George W. Bush, came on the scene to take the world deep into depression. It is now worse than the one suffered under his father’s watch.

Femi Ransome-Kuti gave pride to the memory of his grandfather, Israel Oludotun Ransome-Kuti, as he demolished all attempts by Badawi to justify that things were now rosy in Nigeria. How gratuitously can one sell one’s ignorance as Badawi displayed on the subject!

Femi said that in the 1970s, to be deprived of electricity in Nigeria for two hours was treasonable. Now, Nigerians, even in their new capital, Abuja, do without electric power for days.

Up till the late 1980s, Nigeria was an industrial power in Africa, serving the region’s needs in producing secondary goods. That has collapsed. Until the mid-1990s, Nigeria produced all the petroleum products for local use and for neighbours. It now imports petrol and other products from Benin, Togo and Ivory Coast. What has Jonathan done to alleviate this scourge of scarcity though Nigeria has four mighty refineries that now produce nothing?

Has he repaired the refineries to meet our needs? Must we import petrol? Who are these beneficiaries of the subsidy regime? Were they not the supporters of his campaign? Aliko Dangote opened one mighty cement factory manned mainly by Chinese workers. What has happened to Nkalagu, Ukpilla, Gboko and others that have been rendered moribund by bad government policy of the wholesale privatisation that the likes of Badawi are made to canvass for their principals?

Millions of Nigerian young men and women are estimated to be jobless. What has Jonathan done to scratch the surface on the subject of full and gainful employment with all the industries in Nigeria lying fallow, also from bad government policy? Visit Ikeja, Iganmu, Ogba, and Otta in the South-west kand see the damage the IMF and World Bank’s agents have done to Africa. Madam Badawi does not know that the names of the World Bank and IMF stink in Nigeria. Justifiably, Nigerians regard them as enemies as Dennis Healey, Britain’s Chancellor of Exchequer under Harold Wilson, once described them. Mrs Ngozi Okonjo-Iwealla, Jonathan’s economic miracle worker, is treated as a national youth service corps intern by those who planned the fortune Nigeria enjoyed in the 1960s, 1970s and part of the 1980s, that period of old that was egalitarian paradise. No policy can work without the mobilisation of the people. Nigerians do not know what Jonathan stands for, except that he still pursues the rot left behind by Olusegun Obasanjo and Atiku Abubakar, two agents of the IMF’s privatisation project that set Nigeria back. It is gratifying that the court has just reversed the swindle of the sale of the Aluminum Smelting Company that the government spent billions of dollars to establish. It was one grievous bodily harm done to Nigeria to have sold a company worth $2 billion for $245 million! It was Ibrahim Babangida, earning $8 per barrel of oil, who established that company. How many were built under Obasanjo’s laisez faire regime? He sold it when Nigeria earned $100 per barrel from crude. It will be repeating oneself to speak of the illegalities of the sales of corporations established by acts of parliament and decrees for a song.

The National Assembly should take further steps to return the Nigeria Airways and other affected corporations to their old status. How can there be growth when Nigeria’s industrial life is comatose? The only thing Nigeria sells today is crude oil. She does not even enjoy the benefit of its derivatives. If we must ask, what is the octane rating of imported petrol from Ivory Coast and Benin? The Dana airline’s crash was said to have been caused by corrosion of its engine by impure fuel. Vehicles, machines and other plants that use imported fuel, have suffered from government incompetence. BBC has shot itself in the leg.

Femi really made his grandfather proud in his face-off with with Badawi, – a grandfather, who disagreed with the British in 1934 and caused the Yaba Higher College to be founded and in 1948 forced the University of Ibadan to be established. Nigeria must terminate this one-line chorus of “no government in business’’ because China, a command economy, has disproved that crazy talk. Germany is not laisez faire and it leads Europe.

Published in Opinion
Ben Lawrence

Latest from Ben Lawrence

BLACK PEOPLE! -SKIN BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!-FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

July 5, 2020

FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week
20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By Lauren R.D. Fox

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

 

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better; they are only using what they know. So why is this practice still being used in the Millennial generation? Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?
– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpufmodelsmodels

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

“BLACK MAN -YOU ARE CHOSEN”..Tweet from MINISTER FARRAKHAN (@LouisFarrakhan)

November 3, 2018

https://youtu.be/nZPxhx0ItWc

AFRICA IS THE BIG STORY OOOO!

October 6, 2018

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6447879941290885120

NIGERIAN BOY MAKES HIS OWN CAR OOOO!

September 14, 2018

https://www-informationng-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/www.informationng.com/2018/09/student-arrives-school-in-his-locally-made-sports-vehicle-in-enugu-photos.html/amp

ASO OKE OOO!–THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CLOTH IN THE WORLD !!!!

July 31, 2018

BABA OYIN OOOO!AFRICAN HERITAGE RESEARCH LIBRARY AND CULTURAL CENTRE CELEBRATES HIS FIFTH “OJO IBI O!”

July 20, 2018

Lllll0l0 ,s

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SERENA WILLIAMS OOOOO!SERENA OOO!—A STRONG BLACK MAN LOVES YOU OOO!-ANDRE L..HOLMES OOO!-Don’t Marry that white boy OOO!-WE ARE PRAYING FOR YOU AND VENUS!!-GOD WILL GIVE GREAT BLACK MEN WHO APPRECIATE YOUR BLACKEST BEAUTY OOOOO!-From Facebook

March 31, 2017

http://bleacherreport.com/…/1333270-serena-williams-rumored…

YOU DUMB UGLY BLACK SELf HATING NIGGERS!!!!! YOU BETTER NOT LET SERENA GET AWAY! look YALL THEY HAVE PUSHED SERENA TO THE OTHER SIDE!! Sad she has to go to a european guy because THE NIGGER Wants to chase MEN Or the so called white gurls,the so called latinas everything except his own pride of woman.Serena is too strong physically & Mentally for the NIGGER! THE NIGGER SAYS SERENA LOOKS UGLY BECAUSE OF HER AFRICAN GENETICS! I SWEAR ON MY LIFE IF SERENA MARRYS ANY DUDE WHO IS NOT SOME KINDA OF BROTHER I WILL HATE MY OWN AFRICAN BLACK BROTHERS FOR THE REST OF MY DAYS! THIS IS JUST ABSURD!!!! On just 1 hand how many times have u seen a black man show Serena Williams This Kinda of affection? THIS IS A DISGRACE!!!! Makes My african bros look PATHETIC!!! ALWAYS PUSHING THE BLACK WOMAN AWAY BECAUSE SHE IS TO BLACK LOOKING! Always chasing the mixed breeds or others.I tell ya,i look forward to the day i move out of the usa because everyday the media news makes me wanna vomit when i see what little i can stomach of it.Damm shame because i better hurry and become a pro boxer so I can marry her! what a damm sad shame! other races can have any other black woman but not SERENA!!! A STRONG MIGHTY POWER NZINGA SPIRITED BLACK WOMAN NEEDS HER A BLACK MAN!!! BUT THE BLACK MAN HAS BECOME THE NIGGER!!!!

Serena Williams and her coach Patrick Mouratouglou may just have better chemistry than most professional tandems. Rumors abound the two are actually an item. The Detroit Free Press reports on rumblings from French website PKTennis …

bleacherreport.com


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