Archive for the ‘BEAUTY’ Category

BLACK PEOPLE! -SKIN BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!-FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

July 5, 2020

FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week
20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By Lauren R.D. Fox

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

 

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better; they are only using what they know. So why is this practice still being used in the Millennial generation? Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?
– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpufmodelsmodels

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

ASO OKE OOO!–THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CLOTH IN THE WORLD !!!!

July 31, 2018

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY POSTED BY ZEBELEAN HILL ON FACEBOOK!!!!

February 24, 2017
ZEBELEAN HILL POSTED THIS ON FACEBOOK!!!!
Image may contain: one or more people, text and closeup

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM FACEBOOK

May 19, 2016

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D1042250525860892%26id%3D592683670817582&width=500

BLACK WOMEN!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MISS FIYAH-FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

March 2, 2016
WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-MISS FIYAH!–FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

BLACK PEOPLE !-TUPAC SAYS-“The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHE Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac

April 13, 2015

BSB9

The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHE Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac

The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHEBSB10BSB11BSB8BSB7BSB6BSB5BSB4BSB3BSB1BSB Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac

BLACK HAIR!—BLACK WOOLLY HAIR FEATURED ON WHITE TV VIDEO ON HOW WE ARE GOING BACK TO OUR WOOLY ROOTS WORLDWIDE-FROM ADEGBOYEGA THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK

December 8, 2014

from ADEGBEYEGA THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK

ATI RECOPIED FROM YEYEOLADE.BLOGSPOT.COM

WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Monday, December 08, 2014

BLACK PEOPLE!!!!!—BLACK WOOLLY HAIR IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HAIR IN THE WORLD!-SEE THIS VIDEO THAT WHITE TV DID ON BLACK PEOPLE GOIN’ BACK TO THEIR WOOLLY ROOTS!-FROM ADEGBOYEGA S. THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK!

from ADEGBOYEGA  S, THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK

My 200% support for all my Sistas that wear and carry proudly their natural hair…
— with Lori Danley and 7 others.
Going back to our “roots”
05:35
How Black women all over the world are going natural..
  • You and 7 others like this.
  • Mary T. Jefferies When I was in lower level School, the Caucasion students would tease me about my hair. I told my Mother when I came home from School.My beautiful Mother sat down with me laughing and said”Baby, your hair states who you are. It’s part of your heritage. Your hair strong and kinky because your Ancestors are from Africa a Continent with many country’s full of your people with original hair just like yours because we are from the original people with strong hair. That straight limp weak hair you see on their heads is not the original hair. They are an extension on of us. Remember that we come from original people. You remember what I’m telling you are teach this to your children so that they can teach to their children. The Library is our information center we should go often and take our children because what we need to know will not be taught in the schools .
  • Princess Oyeyinka Oluwa @Mary T. Jefferies…you nailed it. Pple of my culture even question why I have locks on my hair? I tell them it’s the style I chose to wear my hair natural. My children know the reason is becos I need to maintain my Africaness. And my 9 year old daughter with curly and kinky hair cannot understand why I dress her hair with real sheer butter and unrefined coconut oil to enhance her curls. Teach your children how to be proud of their hair. And they will never go astray.
  • Princess Oyeyinka Oluwa Yep. I am nappy haired and proud.
  • Ta’Seti Efuntola-Osunlade We are the Mothers and Fathers of Humanity! Whites, Asians, Native Americans … all have Black African Ancestors! Their ancestors too had wooly hair!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY! -ELOMBE BRATH PROMOTED BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY LONG BEFORE OTHERS WITH HIS GRANDESSA MODELS-FROM AMSTERDAM NEWS ATI ELIHUGHES.COM

May 23, 2014

FROM AMSTERDAM NEWS ATI ELIHUGHES.COM

 

Friday, May 23, 2014

ELOMBE BRATH PROMOTED BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY LONG BEFORE OTHERS WITH HIS GRANDESSA MODELS…-AMSTERDAY NEWS ATI ELIHUGHES.COM

 

Tribute to Elombe Brath

By HERB BOYD Special to the AmNews

TrFibute to Elombe Brath

Friday, May 23, 2014

ELOMBE BRATH PROMOTED BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY LONG BEFORE OTHERS WITH HIS GRANDESSA MODELS…-AMSTERDAY NEWS ATI ELIHUGHES.COM

 

Tribute to Elombe Brath

By HERB BOYD Special to the AmNews

Elombe Brath

BEAUTY! –BLACK BEAUTY!-BLACK ALBINO BEAUTY! -FROM THANK GOD I’M NATURAL ON FACEBOOK

May 18, 2014

black aLbinoBLACK BEAUTY IN MANY ASPECTS! AND THAT BEAUTIFUL BLACK WOOLLY HAIR SHINES!

GABOUREY SIDIBE-OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-WAS REDUCED TO TEARS! -FROM entertainthisusatoday.com

May 3, 2014

GabbyFROM entertainthisusatoday.com

Gabourey Sidibe’s speech might make you cry, too

By Ann Oldenburg May 2, 2014 5:06 pm⁠

Gabourey Sidibe

Gabourey Sidibe’s not shy about speaking her mind. And in a speech the actress gave at Thursday’s Ms. Foundation gala, she brought herself to tears recalling her childhood and what shaped her, reports Vulture.

It wasn’t so much about being fat. It was something else.

The Oscar-nominated actress recalled a fifth-grade party that meant a lot to her. She baked cookies for it and hoped to share them with the class. But none of the kids would eat any.

Why didn’t they like me? I was fat, yes. I had darker skin and weird hair, yes. But the truth is, this isn’t a story about … color, or weight. They hated me because… I was an a–hole!

And a “bossy” one at that.

Those kids couldn’t get a word in edgewise without me cutting them off to remind them that I was smarter, funnier, and all around wittier than them.

As she struggled to make friends, she recalled, she would pass every day by a photo in her home of her aunt, Dorothy Pitman Hughes, a feminist and activist, standing side-by-side with her lifelong friend, Gloria Steinem, their fists held high in the air.

And every day as I would leave the house … I would give that photo a fist right back. And I’d march off into battle.

The lesson she learned:

I live my life, because I dare. I dare to show up when everyone else might hide their faces and hide their bodies in shame. … If I hadn’t been told I was garbage, I wouldn’t have learned how to show people I’m talented. And if everyone had always laughed at my jokes, I wouldn’t have figured out how to be so funny. If they hadn’t told me I was ugly, I never would have searched for my beauty. And if they hadn’t tried to break me down, I wouldn’t know that I’m unbreakable.


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