Archive for the ‘BLACK CIVILIZATIONS’ Category

HAITI!-THIS BROTHER TELLS US HOW HAITI GOT IN THE HOLE DUG BY THE WHITES WITH VENGENCE!-“HAITI:THE HATE AND THE QUAKE!”

January 29, 2010

FROM nationnews.com (in Barbados)

The hate and the quake

Published on: 1/17/2010.

BY SIR HILARY BECKLES

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES is in the process of conceiving how best to deliver a major conference on the theme Rethinking And Rebuilding Haiti.

I am very keen to provide an input into this exercise because for too long there has been a popular perception that somehow the Haitian nation-building project, launched on January 1, 1804, has failed on account of mismanagement, ineptitude, corruption.

Buried beneath the rubble of imperial propaganda, out of both Western Europe and the United States, is the evidence which shows that Haiti’s independence was defeated by an aggressive North-Atlantic alliance that could not imagine their world inhabited by a free regime of Africans as representatives of the newly emerging democracy.

The evidence is striking, especially in the context of France.

The Haitians fought for their freedom and won, as did the Americans fifty years earlier. The Americans declared their independence and crafted an extraordinary constitution that set out a clear message about the value of humanity and the right to freedom, justice, and liberty.

In the midst of this brilliant discourse, they chose to retain slavery as the basis of the new nation state. The founding fathers therefore could not see beyond race, as the free state was built on a slavery foundation.

The water was poisoned in the well; the Americans went back to the battlefield a century later to resolve the fact that slavery and freedom could not comfortably co-exist in the same place.

The French, also, declared freedom, fraternity and equality as the new philosophies of their national transformation and gave the modern world a tremendous progressive boost by so doing.

They abolished slavery, but Napoleon Bonaparte could not imagine the republic without slavery and targeted the Haitians for a new, more intense regime of slavery. The British agreed, as did the Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese.

All were linked in communion over the 500 000 Blacks in Haiti, the most populous and prosperous Caribbean colony.

As the jewel of the Caribbean, they all wanted to get their hands on it. With a massive slave base, the English, French and Dutch salivated over owning it – and the people.

The people won a ten-year war, the bloodiest in modern history, and declared their independence. Every other country in the Americas was based on slavery.

Haiti was freedom, and proceeded to place in its 1805 Independence Constitution that any person of African descent who arrived on its shores would be declared free, and a citizen of the republic.

For the first time since slavery had commenced, Blacks were the subjects of mass freedom and citizenship in a nation.

The French refused to recognise Haiti’s independence and declared it an illegal pariah state. The Americans, whom the Haitians looked to in solidarity as their mentor in independence, refused to recognise them, and offered solidarity instead to the French. The British, who were negotiating with the French to obtain the ownership title to Haiti, also moved in solidarity, as did every other nation-state the Western world.

Haiti was isolated at birth – ostracised and denied access to world trade, finance, and institutional development. It was the most vicious example of national strangulation recorded in modern history.

The Cubans, at least, have had Russia, China, and Vietnam. The Haitians were alone from inception. The crumbling began.

Then came 1825; the moment of full truth. The republic is celebrating its 21st anniversary. There is national euphoria in the streets of Port-au-Prince.

The economy is bankrupt; the political leadership isolated. The cabinet took the decision that the state of affairs could not continue.

The country had to find a way to be inserted back into the world economy. The French government was invited to a summit.

Officials arrived and told the Haitian government that they were willing to recognise the country as a sovereign nation but it would have to pay compensation and reparation in exchange. The Haitians, with backs to the wall, agreed to pay the French.

The French government sent a team of accountants and actuaries into Haiti in order to place a value on all lands, all physical assets, the 500 000 citizens were who formerly enslaved, animals, and all other commercial properties and services.

The sums amounted to 150 million gold francs. Haiti was told to pay this reparation to France in return for national recognition.

The Haitian government agreed; payments began immediately. Members of the Cabinet were also valued because they had been enslaved people before independence.

Thus began the systematic destruction of the Republic of Haiti. The French government bled the nation and rendered it a failed state. It was a merciless exploitation that was designed and guaranteed to collapse the Haitian economy and society.

Haiti was forced to pay this sum until 1922 when the last instalment was made. During the long 19th century, the payment to France amounted to up to 70 per cent of the country’s foreign exchange earnings.

Jamaica today pays up to 70 per cent in order to service its international and domestic debt. Haiti was crushed by this debt payment. It descended into financial and social chaos.

The republic did not stand a chance. France was enriched and it took pleasure from the fact that having been defeated by Haitians on the battlefield, it had won on the field of finance. In the years when the coffee crops failed, or the sugar yield was down, the Haitian government borrowed on the French money market at double the going interest rate in order to repay the French government.

When the Americans invaded the country in the early 20th century, one of the reasons offered was to assist the French in collecting its reparations.

The collapse of the Haitian nation resides at the feet of France and America, especially. These two nations betrayed, failed, and destroyed the dream that was Haiti; crushed to dust in an effort to destroy the flower of freedom and the seed of justice.

Haiti did not fail. It was destroyed by two of the most powerful nations on earth, both of which continue to have a primary interest in its current condition.

The sudden quake has come in the aftermath of summers of hate. In many ways the quake has been less destructive than the hate.

Human life was snuffed out by the quake, while the hate has been a long and inhumane suffocation – a crime against humanity.

During the 2001 UN Conference on Race in Durban, South Africa, strong representation was made to the French government to repay the 150 million francs.

The value of this amount was estimated by financial actuaries as US$21 billion. This sum of capital could rebuild Haiti and place it in a position to re-engage the modern world. It was illegally extracted from the Haitian people and should be repaid.

It is stolen wealth. In so doing, France could discharge its moral obligation to the Haitian people.

For a nation that prides itself in the celebration of modern diplomacy, France, in order to exist with the moral authority of this diplomacy in this post-modern world, should do the just and legal thing.

Such an act at the outset of this century would open the door for a sophisticated interface of past and present, and set the Haitian nation free at last.

l Sir Hilary Beckles is pro-vice-chancellor and Principal of the Cave Hill Campus, UWI.

POSITIVE POLYGAMY IS STILL ALIVE AND GROWING IN THE MOTHERLAND AFRICA TOO!

January 12, 2010

AFRICAN DANCE IS IN OUR BLACK BLOOD!

GETTING DOWN THE BLACK/AFRICAN WAY!

WHO SAYS POSITIVE POLYGAMY IS DEAD? A BLACK MAN WHO WILL TAKE CARE OF ALL HIS WIVES IS WHAT WE NEED FOR ALL THOSE LONELY BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES OUT THERE!

Zuma Formally Weds 3rd Wife in Zulu Ceremony
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By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: January 4, 2010
Filed at 12:00 p.m. ET

KWANXAMALALA, South Africa (AP) — South Africa’s president formalized his marriage to his third wife during a traditional ceremony Monday amid media reports he plans to take a fourth bride later this year.

Some 2,000 guests thronged a homestead in rural KwaZulu-Natal province to watch the ceremony in which 67-year-old President Jacob Zuma and 38-year-old Tobeka Madiba took part.

The couple are already married under South African law and have three children. Madiba attended Zuma’s inauguration ceremony in May. He paid a dowry to her family in 2007 as is tradition.

Meanwhile, a family member told The Associated Press on Monday that Zuma is also planning to marry again later this year. Other relatives have told South African media that the president plans to wed Durban native Gloria Bongi Ngema. The president’s office has not commented on the reports.

Monday’s ceremony included an hourlong traditional Zulu wedding dance. During the ceremony, Madiba performed a solo dance while holding a spear and a shield to symbolize her acceptance of her new husband.

Zuma, wearing a skirt made of animal fur pelts and sporting bright white tennis shoes, then joined the dance. The bride wore matching sneakers.

Guests dined on traditional Zulu foods, and attendees were told that more than a dozen sheep, goats and cows had been slaughtered for the feast.

Wedding guest Sipho Msomi, a cattle herder, said the wedding made him proud to be Zulu, the nation’s largest ethnic group.

”We love him because he is one of us and does not look down upon us,” he said. ”Zuma can marry as many women as he wants. It is our culture.”

Another guest, 28-year-old Prudence Khumalo, said she also supported the polygamous tradition.

”In the West is frowned upon,” she said. ”Here we celebrate it. It is our culture and we stand by it.”

Zuma, 67, a Zulu traditionalist and an unabashed polygamist, has now married at least five women over the years and has 19 children. He currently has three wives including Madiba: Sizakele Khumalo, whom he married in 1973, and Nompumelelo Ntuli, whom he wed in 2008.

He also was married to other women: Kate Mantsho Zuma, committed suicide in 2000. He divorced the other, Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, in 1998, although she remains a trusted aide and is now the country’s home affairs minister.

When he took office earlier this year, all three wives were at the inauguration ceremony, but only Khumalo, his first wife, accompanied him to the main stage set up outside the presidency building in Pretoria. Since then, none of his wives has had a particularly prominent role, in keeping with the practice of South African first ladies before them.

Zuma’s embrace of Zulu tradition — including polygamy — has endeared him to many South Africans. Still, some consider polygamy old-fashioned and expensive, and question how it can endure in a modern country.

And experts say having multiple, concurrent partners heightens the risk of AIDS, leaving some to question what model a polygamous president presents. South Africa, a nation of about 50 million, has an estimated 5.7 million people infected with HIV, more than any other country.

Zuma is not alone among world leaders when it comes to polygamy. In the Gulf, the number of a ruler’s wives and who among them is paramount are a constant source of rumors.

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FROM bbc.com

South Africa President Jacob Zuma marries third wife
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Jacob Zuma performs a traditional Zulu dance at the ceremony

South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma has married his third wife, in a Zulu ceremony attended by his other wives.

Some 2,000 guests saw the 67-year-old marry Thobeka Mabhija, 36. The ceremony had been postponed from last year because of his political commitments.

Reports in South Africa suggest he already has another fiancee and his fourth wife may not be far off.

Correspondents say Mr Zuma’s belief in the traditional practice of polygamy has divided South Africans.

Some support him but many younger people believe it should have no place in a modern society.

Under Zulu tradition, Mr Zuma’s two current wives had to approve the wedding and attend the ceremony.

His new fiancee, Gloria Bongi Ngema, took umbondo (wedding gifts) to the Zuma family last week, reports say.

This ceremony is the last traditional event before a wedding and is done after ilobolo (dowry) has been paid to the bride’s family.

Hive of activity

Monday’s ceremony is Mr Zuma’s fifth wedding – he married his first wife Sizakele Khumalo-Zuma in 1973 and Nompumelelo Ntuli-Zuma two years ago.

MRS JACOB ZUMA

Thobeka Mabhija – married, January 2010 (above)
Nompumelelo Ntuli – married, January 2008
Sizakele Khumalo – married, 1973
Home Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma – divorced, 1998
Kate Mantsho Zuma – died, 2000
He is also divorced from Home Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma.

South African media reported that Mr Zuma’s home in Nkandla, in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, was a hive of activity in the run-up to the ceremony.

Large tents were erected to accommodate guests, some of whom arrived in a number of buses on Monday.

Several cows, sheep and goats were slaughtered for the wedding feast.

Locals including Mr Zuma were dressed in traditional Zulu attire – mostly made from animal skin.

When Mr Zuma was inaugurated as president in May, speculation was rife about who would be the first lady.

He has attended some high-profile events with all his wives, including Ms Mabhija.

Mr Zuma, who has 19 children – three with Ms Mabhija – paid ilobolo to the Mabhija family two years ago.

One of his earlier wives, Kate Mantsho-Zuma, died in 2000.

PRESERVING THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF THE YORUBA-FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,AUG.2009

October 19, 2009

from ngrguardiannews.com

Friday, August 28, 2009

Yoruba Academy… preserving cultural heritage of the Yoruba
By Anote Ajeluorou

IT will be an under-estimation to say that most cultures in Africa are dying. In nowhere else is this truer than in Nigeria. Most young people do not know the traditions that define their existence. Even the language, the first purveyor of a people’s culture, is fast becoming alien to such young people.

How can such negative trend be reversed to keep the soul of most ethnic groups alive? What does each ethnic group contribute to the commonwealth, and how can this be highlighted? How can the traditions of the tribe be passed on to the young ones in the face of assimilating Western pop cultures? Indeed, how can the cultural excellence of an ethnic group like Yoruba be celebrated in a wholesome way?

These are some of the questions a new intellectual think-tank known as the Yoruba Academy is attempting to answer. Set up two years ago, the academy is making its first major public outing with an art exhibition focusing on core Yoruba motifs and celebrating the traditions invested therein. With the title ‘Yoruba’, the exhibition is expository in nature as it explores pertinent issues that form the core values in Yoruba worldview.

It is the view of the organisers that African countries are adrift because they have lost touch with their past, and the values that constituted that past. And, having learnt nothing or having failed to take anything from that past that is generally agreed to be good, it is no surprise the continent is beset with crisis of confidence and identity and in the area of value orientation.

To rediscover themselves in these core areas within the Yoruba way of seeing the world, Yoruba Academy is envisaged to play a prominent role. According to Mr. Kunle Famoriyo, a member of the committee of the academy, an intellectual outpost was needed to properly articulate the rich cultural past of the Yoruba. Like every group willing to move beyond the current degradable level in every facet of society, they aim to integrate the past with the present for the continuing survival of the group and its rich heritage for coming generations.

He explained that one of the works that most exemplify what the academy stands for is Yomi Leon Ashaye’s expository piece of work ‘Ayandiran’ on display at the academy’s 25 Dejo Oyelese Street at Bodija GRA office, Ibadan. ‘Ayandiran’ depicts an old man, who represents the passing tradition, teaching a boy how to play the gungun (talking drum). The old man is cast in gray colours while bright colours suffuse the boy, whose bouyant mood is typified by his laughter with a bright future laid out before him.

“Nobody wants his tradition to die,” Famoriyo insisted. “In every ethnic group, there is a reason for its existence. God is the God of variety. Why must we allow our cultures to die? We should be able to keep them. In ‘Ayandiran’ the father or old man is passing the culture or tradition, of drumming, down the line. Is it in our time that the tradition will stop or die? Yoruba Academy is an intellectual outpost for teaching the science, culture, technology and the Yoruba ways of life to the young ones.”

He counseled that the academy shouldn’t be seen in tribal slants as it was not out to propagate ethic bigotry but that it was out to celebrate the beauty and excellence of Yoruba culture. He urged every ethnic group in the country to strive to save their respective cultures from dying as modern civilization was threatening to do. For Famoriyo, Nigeria’s lack of unity does not derive from the diversity of her cultures or ethnic groups as some ignorantly claim or believe. Rather, he said, it stemmed from the wrong political values that seek to entrench needless ethnic divisions.

“The unity we are looking for in Nigeria must not cut us off from our respective cultures and languages,” he noted. “We are too concentrated on politics we have forgotten who we are. We can’t be talking about politics all the time without serious planning on the way forward. We need to develop our people not to see politics as a place to fight; our different religions never fought among themselves. We should inculcate this into our politics.”

Famoriyo further argued that what ordinarily united the diverse peoples of the country most was not politics but the cultural heritage, which he said were sadly neglected. He stated that the respective languages and cultures of the Nigerian people held the key to the nation’s unity as cultural affinity among the different tribes was to be found in these areas.

“We are not aware that our languages are dying,” he said lamentably, “but it is so; we must keep them alive. We should not allow our languages to die. What unites us most isn’t politics but the languages and cultures that have unifying ties.”

He gave the similarities that exist in the Yoruba and Igbo lexicons in certain words. He said words like ear, nose and forest and several others bear similarity in their phonological and semantic appropriation in the two languages. He then wondered why people failed to see such areas of oneness but rather liked to emphasise the so-called difference and exploited same for political advantage that had done nothing to advance the unity of the country. “We need to recognise these things and amplify them so we can see ourselves as one.” He stressed.

Members in the committee of Yoruba Academy include Ayo Afolabi, Kayode Samuel, Dr. Charles Akinola, Dipo Famakinwa, Dr. Tunde Adegbola and Prince Oye Oyewumi. Others are Mrs. Sade Taiwo, Jimi Agbaje, Dr. Kayode Fayemi, Tola Mobolurin, Mrs. Funmi Olayinka, Mrs. Jumoke Ajasin and Prince Tokunbo Ajasin.

The promoters, Famoriyo noted, would employ Yoruba Academy as a rallying point for “intellectual awareness, artistic expression, cultural reorientation and anything that will bring about the development of Yoruba people and serve as a resource centre for Yoruba civilization. We are trying to preserve our identity as a people”.

Dr. Iyabo Bassir, programme advisor to the academy also said the academy was “about being proud of who we are, what we have, about unearthing the knowledge we have that can liberate us so we can shed superstition and not be easily manipulated. It’s about doing not about talking. We need to celebrate what we are. The art show is to celebrate the expressiveness of the Yoruba in the area of culture.

“We shall also be celebrating 50 years of broadcasting in Nigeria by producing a video on broadcasting, which started here in Ibadan”.

Some of the artists said the exhibition initiative by Yoruba Academy enabled them dig deep into their roots as Yoruba to come up with the pieces. Ashaye with his expository ‘Ayandiran’ stated that he liked documenting passing civilizations for posterity and also challenging the status quo in his paintings. Fela Bolaji’s ‘Tewe Tegbo’ explores the place of traditional medicine and herbs in Yoruba socio-cultural life. “I’m trying to bring back our traditional things and the natural resources of our different herbs, fruits, and barks both for the curative and economic gains they offer,” he explained.

Ade Oluwaji’s ‘Aso Ebi’ examines the social implication of the Aso Ebi practice of wearing a similar clothing item for social events in his resin engraving, which is largely experimental. He explained that the practice was both coercive and economical depending on how one perceives the practice. His second piece ‘Ejanbakan’ has its root in the social lore of identification: Is it a fish or a crab? It could also be used to ascertain the sex of a child at birth: Is it a boy or a girl? But the social aesthetics of the question has been extended to embrace other areas of societal concern. So, is it good or bad news, positive or negative?

If the affirmation is that it is good news or a boy that is given birth to, the celebratory drums are rolled out, people are gathered and animals are slaughtered for feasting to begin. All this Oluwaji carefully represents in his colourful work to exemplify an aspect of a typical Yoruba social setting. Exploring Yoruba environment and motifs, he said, gives him joy and the exhibition is one way to showcase his talent.

Continuing on that Yoruba traditional vein is Kola Akintola’s work that explores religious mythology that is only unique to the Yoruba but also believed to be lost to a majority of people, especially the young ones. Titled ‘Ela’, another name for Ifa, the intermediary between the divine, Olodumare, and man, Akintola explained that Ela plays the mediatory role of Christ in Yoruba religious setting. He executed the abstract work on a relief on metal foil to throw up the images for clarity.

Akintola stated that he regretted that such ancient Yoruba knowledge was fast passing away and that it was being lost to this generation. Yoruba Academy, he said, was on a mission to rescue such vital local, cultural knowledge and “to bridge the gap between the past and the present, and for this generation to know and be informed”.

Another critical area for examination is the where about of some of the nation’s rich cultural objects or artifacts. Emmanuel I.M. Silva, an artist and curator of the exhibition, who has a passion for the documentation of Nigeria’s cultural history, boldly takes on this enquiry in his work, “Arugbo Ojo’.

With four representatives of the heads of Onis of Ife, Silva maintains that Nigeria might have lost more artifacts than originally claimed. That even the ones claimed to be in some museums in the country might actually be copies while the original ones had long been carted away. It is a telling piece and an indictment of the nation’s shoddy attitude to things sacred or antique. Silva advocates a change in attitude as Nigerians pay heavily to see such works outside the country not to mention the loss to the historical process.

“I’m examining many issues about the past with my work,” he explained. “Where are the artifacts? Are the correct tradition being followed by current Onis? There were sixteen minor deities that came from Olodumare. One was Oduduwa. Who are the others? We need to know. I’m passionate about documentation so we can study the history, culture and our value systems. If we don’t study them, research into them, we can’t get far in our quest for development as a nation.

Mr. A.A. Ayandepo’s sculptural set is a pantheon of the deities and their allies consisting of Ibeji, Osun, Yemoja, Oduduwa, Ogun, Sango Oya, Esu, Ipon – essential Yoruba religious motifs – and a central figure believed to be Olodumare in its mythic and grand standing. The entire piece is an installation ranged round the central figure as in a shrine.

As curator, Silva said the exhibition shows the ideals for which the Yoruba Academy stands for as a bridge between the past and the present. His words: “We need to connect the past with the present. If you don’t make the past meet the present, interact with contemporary things, it’s going to be difficult. We looked at certain defining areas of the life of a typical Yoruba community, which the artists explored in their works: music, clothing, value system, traditional medicine and reconciliation to cover the different themes that Yoruba Academy represents. It is designed to raise awareness, to help the contemporary get connected with the traditional”.

It is also the hope of the curator that the otherwise dormant cultural life of the ancient city of Ibadan ‘scattered amidst seven hills/like a broken china in the sun’ will receive a revival of sorts with Yoruba Academy art exhibition.

© 2003 – 2009 @ Guardian Newspapers Limited (All Rights Reserved).
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“ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND GIANT STONE-AGE AXES IN AFRICA…”-FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA,SEPT.17,2009

September 18, 2009

from ngrguardiannews.com

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Archaeologists find giant Stone-Age axes in African lake basin

A GIANT African lake basin is providing information about possible migration routes and hunting practices of early humans in the middle and late Stone Age periods between 150,000 and 10,000 years ago.

Oxford University researchers have unearthed new evidence from the lake basin in Botswana that suggests that the region was once much drier at certain times and wetter at other times than it is today.

They have documented thousands of stone tools on the lake bed, which sheds new light on how humans in Africa adapted to several substantial climate change events during the period that coincided with the last Ice Age in Europe.

Researchers from the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford are surveying the now-dry basin of Lake Makgadikgadi in the Kalahari Desert, which at 66,000 square kilometres is about the same size of present day Lake Victoria.

Their research was prompted by the discovery of the first of what are believed to be the world’s largest stone tools on the bed of the lake. Although the first find was made in the 1990s, the discovery of four giant axes has not been scientifically reported until now. Four giant stone hand axes, measuring over 30 cm long and of uncertain age, were recovered from the lake basin.

Equally remarkable is that the dry lake floor where they were found is also littered with tens of thousands of other smaller stone-age tools and flakes, the researchers report.

Professor David Thomas, Head of the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford, said: ‘Many of the tools were found on the dry lake floor, not around its edge, which challenges the view that big lakes were only attractive to humans when they were full of water.

‘As water levels in the lake went down, or during times when they fluctuated seasonally, wild animals would have congregated round the resulting watering holes on the lake bed. It’s likely that early human populations would have seen this area as a prolific hunting ground when food resources in the region were more concentrated than at times when the regional climate was wetter and food was more plentiful and the lake was full of water.’

This work is part of an ongoing project investigating the complex history of major changes in climate in Africa. Co-researcher Dr Sallie Burrough has dated the sediment and shorelines of the lake basin, which has shown that the mega lake was filled with water on multiple occasions in the last 250,000 years. The research team has also investigated islands on the floor of the lake – remnants of former sand dunes – which suggest the region’s climate has also been both windier and markedly drier than it is today.

Thomas said: ‘The interior of southern Africa has usually been seen as being devoid of significant archaeology. Surprisingly, we have found and logged incredibly extensive Middle Stone Age artefacts spread over a vast area of the lake basin.

‘The record the basin is revealing is one of marked human adaptation in the past. Early humans saw the opportunity to use the lake basin when it was not full of water, but at least seasonally dry. It shows that humans have adapted to climate change and variability in a sustained way.’

Many archaeologists believe that equivalent lakes in the North African Sahara desert played an important part in the ‘Out of Africa’ human expansion theory, as the ancestors of all modern humans would have chosen a wet route out of Africa. The new research is the first time that this giant Botswanan lake basin in southern Africa has been the focus of scientific research, and these findings could provide new evidence to support the theory about a hominid migration through and expansion from Africa.

Thomas and Burrough are planning further research into how the lake was formed and how it came and went. They say that the most likely explanation is that sustained periods of greater rainfall in the Angolan Highlands resulted in much greater flow in the Zambezi River, with the water being diverted into the lake basin due to a quirk of geology.

New research, beginning in 2010 and funded by the Leverhulme Trust, will investigate possible links between the lake basin and the Zambezi River, while initial discussions are in hand for setting up a major international geo-archaeologist programme to further unravel the complexities of human-climate-environment interactions in this important and under-researched region.

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THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTBELO(COLON,PANAMA)-ANOTHER SIGN OF THE ORIGINAL BLACK IMAGES OF CHRIST AND THE BLACK MADONNAS!-FROM PHOTOGRAPHY BY UNIXRULZ 37 AT FLICKR.COM

June 12, 2009

THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTOBELO IS CELEBRATED EVERY YEAR ON 21 OCTOBER IN COLON

THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTOBELO IS CELEBRATED EVERY YEAR ON 21 OCTOBER IN COLON

FROM flickr.com
unixrulz32

BLACKamerikkkans ARE THE MOST RELIGIOUS PEOPLE IN amerikkka!-REUTERS POLL

June 12, 2009

OBAMA BEFORE HE WAS PRESIDENT AT A NEW ORLEANS CHURCH,AUG.26,2007

OBAMA BEFORE HE WAS PRESIDENT AT A NEW ORLEANS CHURCH,AUG.26,2007

from Reuters Blogs

January 30th, 2009
African Americans top U.S. religious measures-Pew

Posted by: Ed Stoddard

An analysis by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life suggests that Blacks are considerably more religious than the overall U.S. population. You can see the whole report here.

“While the U.S. is generally considered a highly religious nation, African-Americans are markedly more religious on a variety of measures than the U.S. population as a whole, including level of affiliation with a religion, attendance at religious services, frequency of prayer and religion’s importance in life,” the report says.

Its highlights include:

– Nearly eight in 10 blacks (79 percent) say religion is very important in their lives, compared with 56 percent among all U.S. adults.

– Blacks attend religious services and pray more frequently than the general population. While 39 percent of all Americans report attending religious services at least once a week, 53 percent of blacks report the same.

– Similarly, while 58 percent of all Americans report praying at least once a day, 76 percent of blacks report praying daily.

– The vast majority of blacks are Protestant (78 percent), compared with 51 percent of the U.S. adult population as a whole.

The findings, drawn mostly from data within Pew’s Religious Landscape Survey conducted in 2007, have political as well as cultural implications.

President Barack Obama and his Democratic Party made a strong bid in last November’s presidential election to woo voters of faith — a strategy that dovetailed neatly with Obama’s strong appeal to the party’s black base.

The survey also highlights the cultural and social conservatism of U.S. blacks on issues such as gay rights.

According to Pew Research Center surveys conducted in the summer of 2008, nearly two-thirds of blacks said they opposed gay marriage compared to 51 percent among whites.

Some leading groups in the religious right such as the Family Research Council have been tapping this vein by forming alliances with leading black Christian conservatives.

Democrat and Republican strategists will no doubt read this report carefully.

(Photo: Barack Obama at a New Orleans church, Aug. 26, 2007. REUTERS/Lee Celano, USA)

February 13th, 2009
4:42 am GMT sorry ken, i was a none believer now i am a believer,have been for twenty years.my faith sustains me,it makes everything worthwhile ,not only have i only heard about the lord ,he lives within me.he is more tangible to me than any thing you could say.he is with me on this journey that i make through this life ,and some day i will stand before him,WELL DONE GOOD- AND FAITHFUL SERVANT.

– Posted by BRIAN LEE

February 3rd, 2009
7:36 pm GMT oh lonesome me what are hanging about the religious sites for?are you hoping someone will befriend you.the disciples said “Why do you speak to the multitudes in parables and not to us”?he said” because you have been GIVEN the knowledge to understand the mysteries of god “.sorry buddy this is a hand out you missed out on up till now.god bless.

– Posted by brian lee

February 3rd, 2009
5:55 pm GMT It is a shame that so many black people are closed minded. God doesn’t exist, and praying does absolutely nothing more than wishful thinking does.

~black atheist~

– Posted by Oh! Lonesome Me

February 2nd, 2009
8:30 am GMT […] “African Americans top U.S. religious measures-Pew”. […]

– Posted by » “African Americans top U.S. religious m … Talk Islam

February 2nd, 2009
12:26 am GMT being a racist is nothing to do with the color of your skin,it is whats in your heart.i attended a school in northern england, the number of students about 500.there was only one black kid in the school,but he was something else.he the schools prefect(head boy],he was the best scholar,he captained the football team.,and led the counties athletic team as well.every one in the school loved him,teachers as well.he was every one,s friend,and guess what he was an orphan,he was bused in every day from’” dr barnado,s home” an orphanage.many years later, he is still my hero and always will be, and i thank him for the racial balance that i have in my life.

– Posted by brian lee

February 1st, 2009
8:18 pm GMT SO IN ALL BLACKS ARE PREYING TO THE WRONG GOD AND IT TELLS THEM THIS IN THE BIBLE,CAUSE IT WAS WRITTEN ON THE WALLS OF EGYPT BUT BLACKS HAVE BEEN PROGRAMMED TO THINK THE REAL GOD IS THIS WHITE JESUS.VERY DEEP.THE BIBLE HAS BASIC LAWS IN THEIR THAT ARE CORRECT TO FOLLOW BUT AS FAR AS THE STORIES AND OTHER PARTS COMPLETELY TWISTED OR JUST FALSE ALTOGETHER.FOR SOME REASON BLACKS WANT TO THINK EUROPEANS WHO TOOK STOLE BEAT OUR CULTURE OOUT OF US LIKE THEY WILL ACTUALLY GIVE US A BOOK TOREAD THAT WAS GONNA BE REAL. THIS IS THE BIGGEST SCREWUP IN LIFE,BUT IT WILL COME BACK HAUNT THE PERPERTRAITORS FOR A LONG TIME,THE BIBLE IS A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF THE SPIRITUALITY OF AFRIKAN PEOPLE IN THE US HAD, IN OTHER WORDS BLACKS HAVE BEEN NOT ONLY DUMMIED TO TO EUROPEAN STANDARDS,BUT LOST ALL OUT REAL SPRITUALITY BECAUSE OF THIS IMAGE OF GOD AND THE FALSE BIBLE.A BIBLE LIKE A PIECE OF A THOUSAND WORD PUZZLE A SMALL SECTION OF THE PUZZLE,BUT WE WALK AROUND WITH ONLY THAT BOOK LIKE ONCE YOU HAVE THAT BOOK THATS IT,THIS WAS APART OF THE SLAVERY PROGRAM

posted by Jay

THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO- CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROP0LITAN CATHEDRAL,MEXICO CITY!-PHOTOGRAPHED BY BIALY

June 12, 2009
CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL MEXICO CITY-THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO!

CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROPOLITAN CATHDRAL MEXICO CITY-THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO!

BLACKS IN THE BIBLE ACCORDING TO CONSERVATIVE EBONY MAGAZINE IN 1994!

June 12, 2009

87c9c7d28c89ab24

BLACK JESUS IN THE CATEDRAL PLAZA DES ARMAS

BLACK JESUS IN THE CATEDRAL PLAZA DES ARMAS

BLACK JESUS

BLACK JESUS

"THE QUESTIONS IS NOT WHERE ARE THE BLACKS IN THE BIBLE BUT WERE ARE THE WHITES!"from findarticles.com

Blacks in the Bible
Ebony , Feb, 1994 by Lisa C. Jones

Although some film, books and art depict most biblical characters as blond and blue-eyed Europeans, a growing body of research indicates that Blacks or people who would be considered as Blacks today were among the major actors in the Bible, which is generally called “the greatest book of all time.”

“Over the years, African-Americans have been introduced to a form of Christianity that was largely recast through the European culture,” says Dr. Cain Hope Felder, a New Testament language and literature professor at the Howard University School of Divinity and the author of several books on the subject. “We are not creating something new. We are going back and recovering what was always there.”

What was always there, Dr. Felder and other religious experts say, is incontrovertible evidence that noted biblical figures, such as the Queen of Sheba, Moses’ Cushite wife Zipporah, Prophet Jeremiah’s right-hand man Ebedmelech, and Sarah’s Egyptian handmaiden Hagar, are among the many royal Black personalities mentioned in the Bible.

Although evidence on the presence of Blacks in the Bible dates back to the 18th century, only in the past 25 years have Black scholars and ministers made major breakthroughs on a subject that has been practically ignored or suppressed by White religious authorities. Modern research, however, is based on the findings of Black historians like William Leo Hansberry and W.E.B. DuBois, who identified major Black biblical characters more than 50 years ago.

Moreover, some scholars say, it has taken them just as much time to convince Black Americans of their findings.

“Black people have been duped into running from the Bible, thinking it was the White man’s book,” says the Rev. Walter A. McCray, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Chicago and author of two volumes titled The Black Presence in the Bible. But in fact, Rev. McCray says, “Many notable biblical personalities were Black.”

Scholars base their characterizations of biblical figures on a few basic hypotheses set forth, in part, by Dr. Charles B. Copher, professor-emeritus of Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta and a leading authority the historical analysis of Blacks in the Bible. These assumptions are that 1) race was not the social and political issue that it is today, 2) most Bible activity took place in areas historically populated by people of color, such as the near Middle East and Northeast Africa; 3) “blackness” can be determined by scriptural references to skin color, Black ancestry and features characteristic of Black peoples.

Based on this criteria alone, “You’d have to say that the vast majority of peoples referred to in the Bible would have to be classified as Black,” Dr. Copher says. Another school of thought holds to the view that only those people belonging to ancient Africa can be identified as Black.

In any case, Black preachers, scholars and historians are determined to establish the presence of Black kings, queens, war leaders and women of the Bible as part of missing links in Black history. “The question isn’t where are the Blacks in the Bible,” Dr. Felder said during a telephone interview, “but where are the Whites?”

“The information has been there for the reader all along,” adds Dr. Renita J. Weems, an Old Testament assistant professor at Vanderbilt University who specializes in biblical hermeneutics. “To the extent that African-American people identify with their African heritage, I think that they can take pride in [the fact] that African people were very much embedded in the founding of the Judeo-Christian traditions.”

Although there are differences of emphasis, Black scholars and an increasing of White biblical scholars agree on the eight most widely accepted Black personalities in the Bible:

* The Queen of Sheba. The queen, who visited King Solomon and marveled at his wisdom, was queen of Ethiopia and Egypt. In scripture, she is called “the queen of the South.” Scriptures: I Kings 10:1; II Chronicles 9:1; St. Matthew 12:42.

* Zipporah. She was Moses’ Cushite wife. It is said that Moses’ siblings, Aaron and Miriam, did not like her. Some say it was because of a family spat. Others claim it’s because Zipporah, daughter of Jethro, was Black. Scripture: Numbers 12:1.

* Ebed-melech. This Ethiopian eunuch saved the life of Jeremiah, the prophet. Scriptures: Jeremiah 38:7-13; 39:16.

* Ethiopian Eunuch. This unnamed eunuch received a spiritual conversion and a better understanding of the Scriptures after speaking with Philip. Scriptures: Acts 8:26-40.

* Hagar. She was Sarah’s Egyptian handmaiden, and she eventually had Abraham’s first son, Ishmael. Scriptures: Gen. 16:1,3; 21:9.

* Pharaoh Tirharkah. He was an Ethiopian king. II Kings 19:9.

* Asenath. She was the Egyptian wife of Joseph, given to him by the Pharaoh. Asenath and Joseph had two sons, Manessah and Ephraim. Scriptures: Gen. 41:45.

* Simon of Cyrene. He helped Jesus carry the cross. Cyrene was an ancient city in Libya, Africa. Scriptures: St. Mark 15:21.

In determining the race of biblical characters, religious scholars consider legends, languages, Bible translations and other historical manuscripts. But there is some disagreement.

Although few, if any, believe in the “curse of Ham,” which was used as a justification for slavery, some experts, like Dr. McCray of Chicago, maintain that Blacks are indeed descendants of Ham, the youngest of Noah’s three sons. Ham — translated from Hebrew to mean “hot, heated or Black” — was called the father of Canaan in the Bible.

Canaan, along with Cush (or ancient Ethiopia), Mizraim (early Egypt) and Phut are considered to be Ham’s direct offspring.

If this is true, according to Dr. Copher, Dr. Felder and other scholars, at least one book of the Bible was written by a Black man, namely Zephaniah. Called the “son of Cushi,” Zephaniah was counted among the minor prophets of the Bible.

In addition to agreeing that Zephaniah was Black, some read King Solomon’s lyrical prose in The Songs of Solomon and conclude that he, too, was a Black man and that this song-like book was devoted to his relationship with the Queen of Sheba. In the book’s first chapter Solomon’s female companion proclaims, “I am black, black, but comely… look not upon me because I am black, because the sun has looked down upon me.”

If Solomon, King David’s son, was Black, some scholars reason that Jesus Christ himself — according to the genealogy outlined in the first chapter of St. Matthew — was Black. Other observers, not as convinced by this logic, just conclude that he was not White.

“Jesus was definitely a person of color. He was not Anglo or White, but that doesn’t mean that he was Black either,” adds Dr. Weems, who sees the benefit of dialogue on Blacks in the Bible as long as it does not lead to ethnic chauvinism.

And what about the Three Wise Men who carried gifts to Jesus? In fact, the Bible makes no reference to the number of wise men who greeted Jesus and his parents that day. It only states that the wise men were from the east — east of Bethlehem, that is. And many scholars believe that these “wise men,” magicians or the Magi as they are best known, were all from Egypt.

These arguments have whetted the interests of a growing number of Blacks and have prompted the production of several books, and even Bibles, that address the subject.

Black churches are also recognizing the power of physical religious images. Some assemblies, like the historic Abyssinian Baptist Church of Harlem, are discussing the idea of replacing their stained-glass windows and wall paintings, which depict biblical character’s as Whites, with multicultural images. Other churches, like Saint Sabina Catholic Church in Chicago and Moore’s Chapel A.M.E. Church in St. Petersburg, Fla., have already executed such plans. “It’s the height of paradox for Black people to experience as much racism that we do during the week and then to go to our most holy place and see all of these White images of the so-called holy families,” Dr. Felder adds. “We want to see more multicultural images and more Black images that are more correct.”

Although there is evidence that Blacks were major contributors in ancient, biblical times, religious scholars say the major point is that the Bible depicted a multicultural world. “Whites are in the Bible as Greeks and Romans. Asia is mentioned and so is Hispana,” says Howard University’s Dr. Felder. “I think it’s this rich mosaic of diverse people in the Bible that makes it very compelling.”

BLACK JESUS CHRIST BEING BAPTIZED BY BLACK JOHN THE BAPTIST!-RE-ESTABLISHING THE BLACK IMAGES OF TRUE CHRISTIANITY WHICH HAVE ALL BEEN REPLACED WITH FALSE WHITE IMAGES!-FROM THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SENTINEL,SEPT 26,2005

June 8, 2009
from THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SENTINEL,SEPT.262005,PAGE22-BLACK JOHN THE BAPTIST BAPTIZES HIS BLACK COUSIN JESUS CHRIST!

from THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SENTINEL,SEPT.262005,PAGE22-BLACK JOHN THE BAPTIST BAPTIZES HIS BLACK COUSIN JESUS CHRIST!

OBAMA-OUR BLACK PRESIDENT AMIDST THE BLACK PYRAMIDS!-OFCOURSE OBAMA LOOKS LIKE THIS BLACK ANCIENT EGYPTIAN WITH BIG EARS!-THESE ARE YOUR BLACK ANCESTORS!-FROM AC360.BLOGS.CNN.COM

June 8, 2009

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT IN FRONT OF THE BLACK SPHINX!

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT IN FRONT OF THE BLACK SPHINX!

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT SHOWING HIS STAFF THE RESEMBLENCE TO THIS BLACK ANCIENT EGYPTIAN!

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT SHOWING HIS STAFF THE RESEMBLENCE TO THIS BLACK ANCIENT EGYPTIAN!

BLACK LIKE THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS! OBAMA YOU ARE DESCENDENT FROM BLACK EGYPT LIKE THE REST OF BLACK US!

BLACK LIKE THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS! OBAMA YOU ARE DESCENDENT FROM BLACK EGYPT LIKE THE REST OF BLACK US!

FROM ac360.blogs.cnn.com

June 4, 2009

Look like an Egyptian – Obama sees his ancient twin

Posted: 02:52 PM ET

Joe Von Kanel
CNN Writer and Editor

President Obama got an “up close and personal” —VERY personal as it turns out— look at the pyramids before leaving Egypt today. One of the tombs contains a 4,600-year-old relief portrait of a man named Kar, who was a priest, scholar and judge. He also looked exactly like Mr. Obama – big ears and all. Take a look!

President Obama’s Egyptian look-alike.
Now, check out the President’s reaction.

Guide: This is a tomb dated four thousand 600 years ago. And the person who is back here, his name is Kar. His name is written in hyroglypic and it looks like Kar.

Obama: That looks like me! Look at those ears.

He even brought Press Secretary Robert Gibbs and Senior Counselor David Axelrod over to show them the resemblance.

President Obama showing his aides the resemblance.
Obama to Gibbs and Axelrod: I want to show you something.

Guide: Mister President, you look like King Tut. It’s true. I said this the whole time – two years ago. You were a king in ancient Egypt.

33 Comments
More about: 360° Radar • President Barack Obama

33 Comments

Joanne Pacicca, Solvay, NY June 4th, 2009 3:11 pm ET

So great! Thanks for this!~

Sharon Kitchen June 4th, 2009 3:46 pm ET

This is a great story.

Esma June 4th, 2009 3:51 pm ET

See, even the Almost-Ancient Egyptians predicted the coming of Obama!

Mari June 4th, 2009 3:51 pm ET

Funny! I am glad our president has a sense of humor!

Scott June 4th, 2009 3:51 pm ET

The man has a sense of humor. Good for him!

Patrice Wullschleger June 4th, 2009 3:51 pm ET

So it is written So it will be done!

Susan Williamson June 4th, 2009 3:53 pm ET

This is so neat, yet very strange. It is hard to believe, but all of us are always told we have a twin out there somewhere. We are never told if the twin is alive or dead. Thank you so much for sharing these photos and information!!

Alyzabeth June 4th, 2009 3:55 pm ET

How funny!

Michele June 4th, 2009 3:55 pm ET

That’s hilarious. Love the sense of humor. It does look like him though.

andreanicole June 4th, 2009 3:57 pm ET

that is pretty funny!!! it does look like him!

Sandy June 4th, 2009 3:58 pm ET

So nice to see that he has such a great sense of humor.

Robyn June 4th, 2009 3:59 pm ET

LOL!!!!!

It’s good to know that our new president as a sense of humor about himself!

PJ Granieri, San Diego, CA June 4th, 2009 4:01 pm ET

That’s great, l am glad you are doing all this for the world an our country to come together. Yes King Tut looks like you alot. Enjoy your trip and thanks for sharing…

kendle71 June 4th, 2009 4:05 pm ET

This is funny. Love the Presidents humor

Mondesir! June 4th, 2009 4:05 pm ET

Hilarious! Love it.

Chinemenma June 4th, 2009 4:15 pm ET

hahah!
indeed….

Carol, Evanston, IL June 4th, 2009 4:17 pm ET

Fantastic! And eerie!

Joe- San Mateo, California June 4th, 2009 4:23 pm ET

Wow….who knows maybe Obama 1 was into chariot racing, before Obama 2 took up hoops!

james June 4th, 2009 4:23 pm ET

Twin… or alien bretheren?!

MaryEllen Benvenuto-Rendine June 4th, 2009 4:40 pm ET

…could be but not because the drawing has big ears! I seriously doubt we would return for another shot at the game and choose to reincarnate looking the same

Boo Boo Romero June 4th, 2009 4:57 pm ET

Holy cow! It does look like Obama! That’s great! Luv it…LOL LOL LOL

Kenn Taber June 4th, 2009 5:07 pm ET

Kar is the Alfred E. Newman of the ancient Egyptian world

JRQ June 4th, 2009 5:25 pm ET

I haven’t laughed this hard in years!

Meredith June 4th, 2009 5:34 pm ET

“hyroglyphic,” really?

Cadum June 4th, 2009 5:46 pm ET

This so funny!

Girl. June 4th, 2009 5:47 pm ET

I cannot believe it! Thats sooo cool.

susan June 4th, 2009 5:56 pm ET

But did Kar have that great Duchenne smile?

Annie Kate June 4th, 2009 7:12 pm ET

Oh man that is funny? Does this make Michelle Cleopatra? And do we call Obama Mr. President or Mr. Pharaoh now?? I love it!

Tarek Nassr June 4th, 2009 7:27 pm ET

“Amazing”

He must of been a king in ancient Egypt times….

Janiece June 4th, 2009 7:42 pm ET

All I can say is that I Love That Man. He and his family are awesome.

de’ June 4th, 2009 7:57 pm ET

WOW! Very interesting, and eerie!

Chris June 4th, 2009 8:34 pm ET

I’m not sure who’s dumber – Brian Williams or Anderson Cooper.

His “tour guide” was Dr. Zahi Hawass! I’m sure Dr. Hawass will be happy to know that he has been demoted from Secretary General of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities to “tour guide”.

How embarassing is that?

Martha June 5th, 2009 9:35 am ET

tour guide indeed; but Dr. Hawass is a very generous fellow, he so loves his job. And our President – priceless


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