Archive for the ‘BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES:QUEEN MOTHERS OF ALL BEAUTY’ Category

BLACK PEOPLE! -SKIN BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!-FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

July 5, 2020

FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week
20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By Lauren R.D. Fox

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

 

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better; they are only using what they know. So why is this practice still being used in the Millennial generation? Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?
– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpufmodelsmodels

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY MUST BECOME REAL NOW!-LEXINGTON M. WILLIAMS POSTED THIS ON FACEBOOK!!!

May 8, 2017

S2JOOO fight /CRUSH THIS white standard of beauty for us and all this bleaching/whitening of the race and HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACKEST SKINNED BEAUTY AND by Celebrating the Blackest beauty like the white boy celebrates the ugly white/girl/no/lips/no/hips/no/nose/no/ass/no/color as beautiful! Everywhere you go salute these Blackest Beauties and let them know that they are the most beautiful ! Put them back on top of the Beauty Pyramid like God did in the beginning!

https://yeyeolade.wordpress.com/2007/01/06/black-beauty-is-the-mother-of-all-beauty/

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SERENA WILLIAMS OOOOO!SERENA OOO!—A STRONG BLACK MAN LOVES YOU OOO!-ANDRE L..HOLMES OOO!-Don’t Marry that white boy OOO!-WE ARE PRAYING FOR YOU AND VENUS!!-GOD WILL GIVE GREAT BLACK MEN WHO APPRECIATE YOUR BLACKEST BEAUTY OOOOO!-From FacebookS2bsbbsbBSBBSW

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY POSTED BY ZEBELEAN HILL ON FACEBOOK!!!!

February 24, 2017
ZEBELEAN HILL POSTED THIS ON FACEBOOK!!!!
Image may contain: one or more people, text and closeup

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY BY 4 THE LOVE OF BLACK WOMEN ON FACEBOOK!!!

February 24, 2017

THE BLACKEST BEAUTY MUST BE CELEBRATED!!

February 4, 2017

JOOO fight all this bleaching by Celebrating the Blackest beauty like the white boy celebrates the ugly white/girl/no/lips/no/hips/no/nose/no/ass/no/color as beautiful! Everywhere you go salute these Blackest Beauties and let them know that they are the most beautiful ! Put them back on top of the Beauty Pyramid like God did in the beginning!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM FACEBOOK

May 19, 2016

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D1042250525860892%26id%3D592683670817582&width=500

BLACK BEAUTY WEDS BLACK BEAUTY!!!!!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOOO!–WHAT BEAUTIFUL BLACK CHILDREN THEY WILL MAKE!–FROM DARKSKINNEDWOMEN<3 ON FACEBOOK-THE COUPLE ARE BRELYNN AND TIM BOWMAN!!!

March 11, 2016

FROM

 

Comments

Akia Hardnett's photo.

Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade BLACK BEAUTY WEDS BLACK BEAUTY! WHAT BEAUTIFUL BLACK CHILDREN THEY WILL MAKE OOOO!
DarkSkinned Women <3
DarkSkinned Women ❤ Deanna Dillworth
I don’t think the words are meant to take a shot at you and your significant other. It’s people proud to see black love in a world where regardless of if you don’t see it that way , race is very important. And black people were taught that white is right and pretty babies come from being mixed. See More
Iyoba Kaya
Iyoba Kaya Eric, shut up! This is rare and it must be celebrated! Why does BLACK LOVE offend people? Why does it make people feel some type of way when black people openly show love to each other? Why is it wrong to highlight beautiful BLACK couples? Europeans ain’t gonna do it for us. Racist? You clearly don’t know what racism really is or how it really works….. Smh.
Akia Hardnett
Akia Hardnett They are gorgeous couple…Brelynn and Tim Bowman

8 Replies
Tedrian Carlton
Tedrian Carlton They gone have some chocolate beauty babies… Real men love chocolate!!!
7 Replies
Toni Foxx
Toni Foxx People get on my NERVES everytime BLACK DARK SKIN PEOPLE try to rep themselves. DAMN! DO YALL NOT UNDERSTAND WHAT WE GO THROUGH BEING DARK? WE ARE THE MOST FROWN UPON RACE AND COMPLEXION. EVERYTIME WE REPRESENT POSITIVELY HERE YALL GO TALKING ABOUT “THSee More
6 Replies · 10 hrs
Joseph Archibong
Joseph Archibong They look perfect for each other I love it , she looks amazing , and he’s a match for her , the babies are gonna be looking good
Joseph Archibong
Joseph Archibong Hillary Ann Wright oh God it’s a Saturday , I’m not planning anyone’s life 1 and how on earth do you know they’re one of those couples 2 ?? Exactly , and 3 I was complimenting them but of course .
Dorthy Sanders-Talbert
Dorthy Sanders-Talbert Glad to see a dark skin man and a dark skin woman together. It was like it was an unwritten law that the two should not be together. Love it.
Dorthy Sanders-Talbert
Dorthy Sanders-Talbert My husband and I are both dark and my own black people acted like we had committed a crime for being together. Any combination except dark and dark was ok though. We have to stop this color caste system among ourselves.

BLACK WOMEN!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MISS FIYAH-FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

March 2, 2016
WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-MISS FIYAH!–FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

BLACK, BEAUTIFUL BLACK!–“BLUE-BLACK”–A POEM BY MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK

January 21, 2016

from menelik charles on facebook

‘Blue-Black’ has typically been…

A phrase which suggested one was ‘ugly’ in Black America. But I have a much better interpretation of the phrase: ‘beautiful’.

Can I get a witness?

(c) Menelik Charles.

Menelik Charles's photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Comments
Charles Reaves
Charles Reaves Very lovely.
Like · Reply · 1 · 2 hrs
Menelik Charles replied · 1 Reply
Sandra Golding
Sandra Golding Beautiful..
Like · Reply · 1 · 57 mins
Menelik Charles replied · 1 Reply
Sharon Cooper-Walker
Sharon Cooper-Walker Beautiful! Sudan perhaps?
Nathan Hare

Nathan Hare Witness. Witness.

 

BLACK PEOPLE !-TUPAC SAYS-“The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHE Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac

April 13, 2015

BSB9

The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHE Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac

The Blacker The Berry The SweeterTHEBSB10BSB11BSB8BSB7BSB6BSB5BSB4BSB3BSB1BSB Juice/ I Say The Darker The Flesh, Then The Deeper The Roots ~ Tupac


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