Archive for the ‘BLACK VIRGINITY’ Category

MODERN AFRICAN WOMEN PREPARE FOR MARRIAGE IN ThE TRADITiONAL CALABAR FATTENING ROOM On AFRICAN REALITY TV! -FROM THE PUNCH NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

April 20, 2013

Modern babes in fattening room

2013-04-17 00:15:03

In a fresh and ambitious re-enactment of the Efik pre-marriage tradition, Fattening Room, six ladies drawn from different parts of Africa land in seclusion, writes AKEEM LASISI

 At a time many people fear that the country’s many cultural practices are on the extinction plane, Fattening Room, a major bridal practice of the Efik People of Cross River, appears to have got a new lease of life. It will soon become a spectacle to be watched on the screen, through the acts of six modern ladies who have just experienced it.

The producer, EbonyLife, which has come up with some powerful reality shows in recent times, describes  Fattening Room as an authentic experience set in the historically significant city of Calabar, also home to the famous Calabar Cultural Festival.

“The Fattening Room is unique to the Efik culture of Nigeria and is practised when young women enter a house of seclusion to learn everything a woman needs to know about running an honourable home, raising children that are as good as gold and managing to keep her husband happy and at home,” the company’s Director of Reality Programmes, Pamela Ofoegbu, notes.

The organisation believes that the time has come to discover the inner chambers of tradition that have always been reserved for women only, when six young ladies from across Africa enter the Fattening Room for the very first time.

She adds, “The ladies start the series in the strict Efik tradition and journey towards modern invention while always honouring their African roots.  It has been an incredible journey back to time as we celebrate our rich African heritage on a beautiful trado-modern backdrop. Our ladies from Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya emerged from the Fattening Room with a better appreciation of the Efik culture and tradition and also of themselves as strong African women full of value and worth.”

Just ‘escaping’ from the room are Roselyn Ashkar, a fashion model and journalist from Ghana; Sally Berold, an adventurer and freelance experiential marketing specialist from South Africa; Stephanie Unachukwu, a Nigerian designer and Patricia Kihoto, a singer, actress and radio personality from Kenya.

Others are Thsepo Maphanyanye,  a publicity and public relations executive from Botswana,  and Limpo Funjika, a business development manager and aspiring TV presenter from Zambia.

While the Series Producer at EbonyLife, founded by Mo Abudu,  Priscilia Nzimiro, says producing the Fattening Room has been a wonderful and enlightening experience,  with Content Director, Kenneth Gyang, lauding the treat as being engaging, the cast generally say the experience has been revealing.

Says Tshepo, “Participating in the fattening room has certainly been a surge of all kinds of emotions but best of all it has been without a doubt an incredible journey of discovery and a once in a lifetime opportunity of exposure to such a rich culture experienced alongside an amazing circle of young women from nations across Africa.Certainly one of my best experiences.”

For Limpo, it has provided her an opportunity to learn; and for Patricia, it has been a lot of fun although she concedes she has learnt a lot, even about herself.

Also says Stephanie, “I have had the opportunity to learn new skills in the short amount of time I’ve been here and look forward to the rest of the show and what it holds.”

Abudu congratulates all the participants and salutes the crew for the feat at producing Fattening Room. She notes, “It is a true testimony of ‘If you can think it, you can do it.’ As a team, during one of our strategy sessions about a year ago inTinapa, we wanted to develop and produce a reality show that showcased the rich culture of Calabar that is now home to EbonyLife TV and we thought what better way to do that, than the Efik tradition of The Fattening Room! And with the genius minds of the EbonyLifeTV team at work, we gave it a treatment that will simply wow everyone when it airs! We simply took an old Efik culture and gave it a modern twist. “

>BLACK RITES OF PASSAGE FOR BLACK GIRLS!-SAVE OUR GIRLS FROM HEARTACHE! -FROM ASSATASHAKUR.COM

May 27, 2011

>

from assatashakur.org

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

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#1 (permalink) 08-29-2004

IfasehunReincarnated

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

——————————————————————————–

Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

Synade Jackson, a divorced mother of two, was filled with anxiety as her 14-year-old daughter, Kemikaa, moved toward womanhood. So to reinforce the lessons she had been teaching her at home about being a strong Black woman, Jackson enrolled Kemikaa in the Sojourner Truth Adolescent Rites Society (STARS) in New York City.

“I had wondered whether my daughter would choose education over adolescent pregnancy,” Jackson says. “I wanted her to learn African history and spirituality. I wanted these values to be ingrained in her.”

Jackson seems to have gotten her wish. As Kemikaa and 13 other girls finished the ten-month program (which included classes on spirituality, sexuality, cooking-and even quilting), Jackson says she watched her daughter become a more confident, responsible young lady. And Kemikaa, too, was happy with the results. “I got a lot out of the group,” she says, “especially the self-love and self-esteem class, where we talked about our ,body temple, and how we feel about ourselves.”

Jackson is not alone in her desire to play a greater role in the socialization process of her child. According to Audrey “Ayo” Hunter, founder and executive director of the Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, Inc., in Detroit, African-American rites-of-passage programs like hers have been going on since the 1960’s. Meanwhile, the Afrikan National Rites of Passage United Kollective, a St. Louis, Missouri-based umbrella organization that has been conducting these programs for ten years, has annual meetings to develop and hone African-American passage programs around the country.

“Historically our people have always used certain requirements or tasks to move on to the next level,” says Darryl “Kofi” Kennon, executive director of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective. “African people have been doing rites for thousands of years.”

Bruce “Olamina Osatunde” Stevenson, assistant director of operations programming of the Baltimore rites group, adds “As a direct result of the enslavement of African people, our rites of initiation were stolen. Every culture has a process where children must become adults. We use these rituals to let children know that it’s time to take on roles and responsibilities.”

There are other benefits as well. Because negative images of the Black community abound, says Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock, a Washington, D.C., psychologist who has written several books on African-American rites of passage, these programs help ensure that our children have healthy self-images. “Society does not provide a mirror for our kids to see themselves positively,” says Warfield-Coppock, whose three children have all participated in these rituals.

“With these programs,” sums up Dr. Wade W. Nobles, executive director of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture in Oakland, “our children belong to something greater than themselves. And that’s important.”

ESSENTIALS OF A RITES PROGRAM

While there is no “correct” way to do it, Stevenson of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective recommends the following components for a successful passage program:

* Let African traditions or influences be at the core. At the African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program in Washington, D.C., for example, boys learn about the history and culture of Africans in the diaspora through lectures, films and visits to museums. * Involve parents, relatives and guardians in the process. For instance, the West Dallas Community Centers have bonding sessions between the children and parents or guardians to emphasize the importance of extended family and mentors. * Make the rites program an ongoing one. “Rites of passage are lifelong,” says Warfield-Coppock. Consequently, the process is continuous, spanning birth and adolescence to marriage, eldership and finally death. Although programs typically revolve around young adolescents, they can be performed with toddlers, 7-year-olds and late teens too. * Give the participants tasks to master. Use emotional, spiritual and physical tests to prepare children for adulthood. At Detroit’s Kabaz Center, children go to the woods to become more attuned with nature and also participate in precision drills that instill discipline. * Let the community witness the ceremony. At the STARS program, Kemikaa and her friends dressed in African attire for their final ceremony in New York City’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, where they shared speeches with their families and other witnesses. * Include rituals and ceremonial activities. Children at the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective, for instance, form a unity circle to give thanks to the Creator and offer libations to remember their ancestors.

PASSAGE PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE

While we can’t list all rites-of-passage programs around the country, here are a few: * Baltimore Rites of Passage, Kollective, Harambee Kollective Services, Inc., 3645 Cottage Ave., Baltimore MD 21215; (410) 462-1494. With “positive, preventive and proactive” curricula, the Kollective trains boys and girls (ages 7 to 18) to become strong, responsible adults. The program, which lasts at least 20 weeks, is broken down into five major phases: family orientation, rites of separation, curriculum, retreat and naming ceremony, and the transformation ceremony. * HAWK Federation, 175 Filbert St., Ste. 202, Oakland CA 94607; (510) 836-3245. HAWK–High Achievement, Wisdom and Knowledge–was designed initially as an African-based manhood training program, but today, HAWK’s female counterpart, the Aset Society, offers a parallel operation for girls. Based on a series of tests that each child must master to build courage, character and consciousness, Hawk targets 12-to-14-year-old boys. Both programs, however, are open to children between the ages of.5 and 18. * West Dallas Community Centers, Inc., 8200 Brookriver Dr., Ste. N704, Dallas TX 75247; (214) 634-7691. After receiving a $1.4 million grant in 1989, the West Dallas Community Centers developed a rites-of-passage program that focuses on youths who have been involved with the correctional system or in family intervention. The curriculum incorporates the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles celebrated during Kwanzaa), counseling, and language, karate and history classes. This coed program generally lasts two years and targets children between ages 9 and 17. * Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, 3619 Mount Elliott, Detroit MI 48207; (313) 924-1140. Kabaz, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary last year, claims to teach “the art of manhood and womanhood by connecting to our past.” The coed program, lasting from three months to a year, trains children starting at age 5, using a 12-formula Dlan to in still Afrocentric values and norms. * Concerned Black Men, Inc. (D.C. Chapter), 1511 K St., N.W., Ste. 1100, Washington DC 20005; (202) 783-5414. The five-year-old African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program is a year-round operation in which 8-to-13-year-old boys meet two Saturdays a month. It’s based on five principles: economic intuition, leadership, health and physical fitness, cultural awareness and academic competence. * African American Women on Tour, 3914 Murphy Canyon Rd., Ste. 216-B, San Diego CA 92123-4423; (800) 560-AAWT. At five conferences around the country, AAWT holds rites-of-passage programs for 12-to-19-year-old girls. The three-day workshop focuses on self-empowerment, teen sexuality and African culture and history.

For information on how to set up a passage program in your community, contact one of the organizations listed above. If you want to read up on the topic, check out Transformation: A Rites of Passage Manual for African American Girls by Mafori Moore, Gwen Akua Gilyard, Karen King and Nsenga Warfield-Coppock (STARS Press, $15) and Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage by Nathan Hare and Julie Hare (Black Think Tank, $6). Warfield-Coppock can also provide a wealth of information; she can be reached at Baobab Associates, Inc., 7614 16th St., N.W., Washington DC 20012.

COPYRIGHT 1996 Essence Communications, Inc.S

__________________

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#2 (permalink) 08-08-2005

STUDENT

Premium Member Join Date: Jul 2005

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HELP: Searching For Rites-of-Passage in LA

——————————————————————————–

Hello everyone. I am just coming out of the “Matrix”. I have a 10yr old son

that I want to help stay clear of it. I am looking for a rite-of-passage group

in LA to put him in. If anyone can help, please write back or phone me @

858-414-3434. Thank you so much for any and all assistance given.

Oh, I am also looking for an African based church, thanks again.

#3 (permalink) 08-08-2005

Im The Truth

Organizer Join Date: Jan 2004

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I worry the same about Atlanta, GA I heard about a rites-of-passage a while back but I’m not sure of the details or if it still exsist. If anyone knows let a brotha know.

Uhuru Sasa!!!

__________________

“If the enemy is not doing anything against you, you are not doing anything”

-Ahmed Sékou Touré

“speak truth, do justice, be kind and do not do evil.”

-Baba Orunmila

“Cowardice asks the question: is it safe? Expediency asks the question: is it political? Vanity asks the question: is it popular? But conscience asks the question: is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor political, nor popular – but one must take it simply because it is right.”

–Dr. Martin L. King

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

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#1 (permalink) 08-29-2004

IfasehunReincarnated

Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors Join Date: Jan 2004

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Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

——————————————————————————–

Rites of passage: ceremonies can help our kids cope with today’s turbulent times

Synade Jackson, a divorced mother of two, was filled with anxiety as her 14-year-old daughter, Kemikaa, moved toward womanhood. So to reinforce the lessons she had been teaching her at home about being a strong Black woman, Jackson enrolled Kemikaa in the Sojourner Truth Adolescent Rites Society (STARS) in New York City.

“I had wondered whether my daughter would choose education over adolescent pregnancy,” Jackson says. “I wanted her to learn African history and spirituality. I wanted these values to be ingrained in her.”

Jackson seems to have gotten her wish. As Kemikaa and 13 other girls finished the ten-month program (which included classes on spirituality, sexuality, cooking-and even quilting), Jackson says she watched her daughter become a more confident, responsible young lady. And Kemikaa, too, was happy with the results. “I got a lot out of the group,” she says, “especially the self-love and self-esteem class, where we talked about our ,body temple, and how we feel about ourselves.”

Jackson is not alone in her desire to play a greater role in the socialization process of her child. According to Audrey “Ayo” Hunter, founder and executive director of the Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, Inc., in Detroit, African-American rites-of-passage programs like hers have been going on since the 1960’s. Meanwhile, the Afrikan National Rites of Passage United Kollective, a St. Louis, Missouri-based umbrella organization that has been conducting these programs for ten years, has annual meetings to develop and hone African-American passage programs around the country.

“Historically our people have always used certain requirements or tasks to move on to the next level,” says Darryl “Kofi” Kennon, executive director of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective. “African people have been doing rites for thousands of years.”

Bruce “Olamina Osatunde” Stevenson, assistant director of operations programming of the Baltimore rites group, adds “As a direct result of the enslavement of African people, our rites of initiation were stolen. Every culture has a process where children must become adults. We use these rituals to let children know that it’s time to take on roles and responsibilities.”

There are other benefits as well. Because negative images of the Black community abound, says Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock, a Washington, D.C., psychologist who has written several books on African-American rites of passage, these programs help ensure that our children have healthy self-images. “Society does not provide a mirror for our kids to see themselves positively,” says Warfield-Coppock, whose three children have all participated in these rituals.

“With these programs,” sums up Dr. Wade W. Nobles, executive director of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture in Oakland, “our children belong to something greater than themselves. And that’s important.”

ESSENTIALS OF A RITES PROGRAM

While there is no “correct” way to do it, Stevenson of the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective recommends the following components for a successful passage program:

* Let African traditions or influences be at the core. At the African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program in Washington, D.C., for example, boys learn about the history and culture of Africans in the diaspora through lectures, films and visits to museums. * Involve parents, relatives and guardians in the process. For instance, the West Dallas Community Centers have bonding sessions between the children and parents or guardians to emphasize the importance of extended family and mentors. * Make the rites program an ongoing one. “Rites of passage are lifelong,” says Warfield-Coppock. Consequently, the process is continuous, spanning birth and adolescence to marriage, eldership and finally death. Although programs typically revolve around young adolescents, they can be performed with toddlers, 7-year-olds and late teens too. * Give the participants tasks to master. Use emotional, spiritual and physical tests to prepare children for adulthood. At Detroit’s Kabaz Center, children go to the woods to become more attuned with nature and also participate in precision drills that instill discipline. * Let the community witness the ceremony. At the STARS program, Kemikaa and her friends dressed in African attire for their final ceremony in New York City’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, where they shared speeches with their families and other witnesses. * Include rituals and ceremonial activities. Children at the Baltimore Rites of Passage Kollective, for instance, form a unity circle to give thanks to the Creator and offer libations to remember their ancestors.

PASSAGE PROGRAMS NATIONWIDE

While we can’t list all rites-of-passage programs around the country, here are a few: * Baltimore Rites of Passage, Kollective, Harambee Kollective Services, Inc., 3645 Cottage Ave., Baltimore MD 21215; (410) 462-1494. With “positive, preventive and proactive” curricula, the Kollective trains boys and girls (ages 7 to 18) to become strong, responsible adults. The program, which lasts at least 20 weeks, is broken down into five major phases: family orientation, rites of separation, curriculum, retreat and naming ceremony, and the transformation ceremony. * HAWK Federation, 175 Filbert St., Ste. 202, Oakland CA 94607; (510) 836-3245. HAWK–High Achievement, Wisdom and Knowledge–was designed initially as an African-based manhood training program, but today, HAWK’s female counterpart, the Aset Society, offers a parallel operation for girls. Based on a series of tests that each child must master to build courage, character and consciousness, Hawk targets 12-to-14-year-old boys. Both programs, however, are open to children between the ages of.5 and 18. * West Dallas Community Centers, Inc., 8200 Brookriver Dr., Ste. N704, Dallas TX 75247; (214) 634-7691. After receiving a $1.4 million grant in 1989, the West Dallas Community Centers developed a rites-of-passage program that focuses on youths who have been involved with the correctional system or in family intervention. The curriculum incorporates the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles celebrated during Kwanzaa), counseling, and language, karate and history classes. This coed program generally lasts two years and targets children between ages 9 and 17. * Kabaz (Black Jewels) Cultural Center, 3619 Mount Elliott, Detroit MI 48207; (313) 924-1140. Kabaz, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary last year, claims to teach “the art of manhood and womanhood by connecting to our past.” The coed program, lasting from three months to a year, trains children starting at age 5, using a 12-formula Dlan to in still Afrocentric values and norms. * Concerned Black Men, Inc. (D.C. Chapter), 1511 K St., N.W., Ste. 1100, Washington DC 20005; (202) 783-5414. The five-year-old African Son-Rise Rites of Passage Manhood Training Program is a year-round operation in which 8-to-13-year-old boys meet two Saturdays a month. It’s based on five principles: economic intuition, leadership, health and physical fitness, cultural awareness and academic competence. * African American Women on Tour, 3914 Murphy Canyon Rd., Ste. 216-B, San Diego CA 92123-4423; (800) 560-AAWT. At five conferences around the country, AAWT holds rites-of-passage programs for 12-to-19-year-old girls. The three-day workshop focuses on self-empowerment, teen sexuality and African culture and history.

For information on how to set up a passage program in your community, contact one of the organizations listed above. If you want to read up on the topic, check out Transformation: A Rites of Passage Manual for African American Girls by Mafori Moore, Gwen Akua Gilyard, Karen King and Nsenga Warfield-Coppock (STARS Press, $15) and Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage by Nathan Hare and Julie Hare (Black Think Tank, $6). Warfield-Coppock can also provide a wealth of information; she can be reached at Baobab Associates, Inc., 7614 16th St., N.W., Washington DC 20012.

COPYRIGHT 1996 Essence Communications, Inc.S

__________________

All is Well. Workin’ Hard – Tryin’ to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

Photos of members wearing Hands Off Assata Shirts 6/3/06

Buy: Afrikan Spirituality Books & Videos (300+ in stock)

Meaningless Blog #1
Blog # 2

#2 (permalink) 08-08-2005

STUDENT

Premium Member Join Date: Jul 2005

Location: Los Angeles

Posts: 2

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Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

Gender: Sister

Rep Power: 0

HELP: Searching For Rites-of-Passage in LA

——————————————————————————–

Hello everyone. I am just coming out of the “Matrix”. I have a 10yr old son

that I want to help stay clear of it. I am looking for a rite-of-passage group

in LA to put him in. If anyone can help, please write back or phone me @

858-414-3434. Thank you so much for any and all assistance given.

Oh, I am also looking for an African based church, thanks again.

#3 (permalink) 08-08-2005

Im The Truth

Organizer Join Date: Jan 2004

Location: Atlanta, GA by way of Afrika

Posts: 5,910

Blog Entries: 11

Thanks: 2,684

Thanked 1,843 Times in 1,052 Posts

Gender: Brother

Rep Power: 591

Member’s Picture Albums

I worry the same about Atlanta, GA I heard about a rites-of-passage a while back but I’m not sure of the details or if it still exsist. If anyone knows let a brotha know.

Uhuru Sasa!!!

__________________

“If the enemy is not doing anything against you, you are not doing anything”

-Ahmed Sékou Touré

“speak truth, do justice, be kind and do not do evil.”

-Baba Orunmila

“Cowardice asks the question: is it safe? Expediency asks the question: is it political? Vanity asks the question: is it popular? But conscience asks the question: is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor political, nor popular – but one must take it simply because it is right.”

–Dr. Martin L. King

Get Involved!



Add caption



>BLACK VIRGINITY TESTS IN ZULULAND,SOUTH AFRICA-FROM EASYCOMESEASYGOES.BLOGSPOT.COM

May 5, 2011

>

from easycomeseasygoes,blogspot.com



Monday, March 9, 2009


Physical Virginity Tests in Africa!!!!!!

To all Ladies out there – anyone of you dare to take this tests ??????????

Thousands of girls in South Africa are queuing up each month to prove that they are virgins, reviving an African tradition seen by many as the answer to the scourge of AIDS.

Bare-breasted teenagers wearing nothing but strings of beads and colourful loincloths regularly submit to the ordeal of having a stranger check if their hymens are intact, leaping for joy when the test confirms that they are still virgins.


(After the tests are done – these girls who passed are given certificates!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

Advocates say the revival of the rite, which had died out in all but a few rural areas late in the 20th century, is the most effective way to stop the spread of teenage pregnancies and the deadly HIV virus, believed to affect one in 10 South Africans.

Opponents argue that the practice is unconstitutional, unhygienic and violates the human rights of those being tested.

“Those who are behind the comeback…say that if we test young girls to see if they are virgins they will be fearful and will not engage in sexual activity,” said Phumelele Ntombela-Nzinande, former deputy head of the Commission for Gender Equality.

“We are arguing that this practice undermines the principles of equality, freedom and human dignity. It is difficult to tell whether or not a girl has had intercourse and after touching about 600 girls you can easily transfer infections.”

Girls between the age of seven and 26 lie on a mat in front of the woman doing the test, which only takes a few seconds. It is often carried out with bare hands and the tester seldom washes them.

Girls who pass get white stars pasted on their foreheads and a certificate confirming their virginity.

“We have come here to celebrate and keep our culture going,” 16- year-old Brenda Mkhize told Reuters television after her test.

“It’s better to be a virgin than to have AIDS and have a baby at the age of 16…we don’t see any reason to sleep with a guy, and I think I will stay like this until I get married.”

Mkhize was one of hundreds of girls attending a virginity celebration at a sports stadium near Durban in December.

Afterwards, the girls sang and danced in traditional Zulu fashion.

“We are here because we are proud of ourselves, because we are virgins,” another girl said.

Any volunteers from Asia for this tests??????

Well physical virginity tests were also reported in India as shown in the video above dated August 3rd, 2009. That so called tests received widespread condemnations by leaders and elders.


22 comments:

bereges said…

Checking it out, this news seems to back from 2000 or 2001.But the thing that amazes me most is: why is the testing done in full glare of the general public??

bebek said…

i dont know…… and it was done in south africa……. a well developed country…. and not in guinea buisseau or new caledonia or papua new guinea or congo!!!!!

LanaBulu said…

Very funny test system..Canno be ..like thisWhy they din’t use any room or clinic. Too privacy.

bebek said…

Yes LanaBulu.. it’s really funny indeed!!!

shame said…

some low class family in iran do the test too. they do it before marriage and it is done by a gynacologist.there are many doctors who has made a futune out of fix the virginty!!!

Anonymous said…

to mr or mrs. shameDon’t bring your country down.cause it seems you should be iranian.it is never have been like that in iran.just if any future husband asks for the test!and it’s just 1 in 10.000 .wich may happen in any other asian or middle eastern country.any ways i agree with the fact that this test is very ugly and against women rights.

Anonymous said…

Damn. Damn. Damn this horrible culture. As well as the cruel nature that inflicted all these injustice to women. Why don’t these ignorant women stand up to all this crap? Why?

sara said…

such a shameful test, not because it is taken in public, but, because it is a real violation of women rights.To mr or mrs Anonymous 1! : I haven’t heard of such a test in iran either. But, you know it is still of high importance among many iranian families, causing a lot of women not to have sex before marriage.

bebek said…

Thanks for the comment Sara, Anonymous and others… will appreciate if you all can tell me wether this practise is still being done in other parts of the world… Thanks very much

Anonymous said…

آخه سی ساله که تخم اسراييل رو نتونستن بخورن. همه اش شعار مفته . فقط ملت ايران رو غارت کردن. کس اول آخر محمد و موسي.oder

Anonymous said…

Shamewhat kind of test you are talking about I had been in Iran for 34 years and I have never ever eared something about what you said. I agree that somebody are reluctant to marry with the girls who had sex before but never such a test have been conducted

me said…

So at the end they have certificate,shows that they are VIRGIN, how great! i’m 100% agree with shame, it is the bitter fact in iran. please notice before respond comment; he/she said :some low class family in iran… and unfortunately it is a hot business for some doctors.

Anonymous said…

I am Iranian Lady and i never heared about a similar test in iran. i will be thank full if shame let us now where he/she live. in which city of iran you live? and why you try to change the reality?

Anonymous said…

I don’t know why some guy deny this fact in Iran? I am not from Iran but I have live in Iran,Isfahan city,for 5 years as Afghanistani illegal refugee. When I was in Iran,I saw many similarity between my country and Iranian culture. one of this similarity was virginity test that are done by groom’s mother in zafaf(first night of marriage ) and if bride was not virgin,as a result, marriage is canceled and this act is considered ignominy and dishonor for that girl and her family and even familiars.this tradition stay alive in Afghanistan and Iran and many of neighbor countries.even in urban areas like capital city Tehran, Recreating virginity with surgery is widespread.now I question from those guys who deny this fact why you deny?in addition to this tradition there is another shameful and horrible tradition that only carry out between Kurds in middle east. I haven’t seen that in another place even my country and that practice is Female Circumcision. in the Kurdish areas of Iran and Iraq, supporters of the practice say it controls women’s sexual desires and makes them “clean.” Food prepared by uncircumcised women, for example, can be considered unacceptable.I think we shouldn’t deny this fact and we should seek how solve this problems.

Community Member said…

This shameful act has no place in Iran. Iranian society is developed and civilized enough not to let anyone to carry such barbaric act on its girls.

Anonymous said…

It’s biggest lie that I heard…it’s impossible to get this test in Iran, because its so rude for Iranian people to do this, whether in their religion or in their culture.nobody cant stand this test in Iran…

Anonymous said…

Excuse me last Anon, in the English language two negatives do not make a negative, but rather a positive. So saying that “nobody can’t stand” means “everybody can stand”. This is not the case in the Persian language though.

Anonymous said…

This such tests have never taken a place in Iran! Of course some families are still concerned about virginity but they never have this kind of test! The guy or girl from Afghanistan: Please never ever compare your culture with Persians! Everyone knows what’s going on in Afghanistan in terms of women’s right! You might have been a construction worker there and probably the people you used to socialize with, were at the level of those families who are concerned about virginity but I bet non of them have that kind of virginity test! If you want to talk a bout history and hundreds years ago, then we can bring up all the world including Europe that virginy was one of the most important issues among high class families! (i.e. Victorian era in England)while now its matter of low class familes. Iran already has passed its “Victorian” era but Afghanistan for sure has a long way to go!!Na

Anonymous said…

Shame and Me: It’s a bitter fact that some people still care about virginity as so many families in Canada or Australia! But here we’re talking about “virginity test” not the importance of virginity! I am not Iranian but have lived in Iran for several years and never heard of such tests! Besides (no offense to Iranian girls) never seen a virgin as well :)) Which is a great proof that they (Iraninans) do not care about virginity at all!!

bebek said…

Thank you very much to all of you who dropped by and took your time to read this blog.. I really appreciate it. But seriously, i dont think this virginity tests are being done in any part of Iran or other Asian countries. The photographic proof showed that this obnly happens n Africa – not all parts of Africa but certain parts.. Happy reading everybody.. Women, Men, Boys and Girls…

Anonymous said…

yes. it is true 3o years ago, when i was in Iran, every girl before marriage ( aghd } accompanied with girl’s mom and one member of the groom family would go to a doctor to be exam for virginity. i don’t know about now these days. All respectable family did this. whoever disagree with this custom either they are very young or don’t know what they are taking about, even shah’s wife Farah have gone Thur this. this was done to stop any false TOHMAT accusation. but what is happening in Africa it is unbelievable, they didn’t do this way in Iran, always girl was exam by a doctor I am a Iranian girl, and I am from very educated and well off family.

bebek said…

Thanks for the comment Anonymous… i am sure the Iranian government will do its best to protect the well beings, sanity & honour of all Iranian women.. Thanks for reading..

>BLACK VIRGINITY! – BEHOLD,NIGERIAN VIRGINS!- FROM THE NATIONONLINENG.NET

March 24, 2011

>

BLACK VIRGINS ALL-AND PROUD TO BE!  


VIRGINITY!-AN AFRICAN VALUE THAT STILLS LIVES!-LET’S BRING IT BACK AGAIN COMPLETELY!

By Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

FROM thenationonlineng.net
!
Behold Nigerian virgin!
* By Taiwo Abiodun
Virgins during the testing programme
Girls proud to be virgins confidently offered themselves for tests at Ekemode Memorial Hospital and Women’s Infirmary, Surulere, Lagos as the Nigeria virgins celebration organised by Princess Adunni Adediran marked its third anniversary. The virginity tests were done by Dr Ade Ekemode, an experienced gynaecologist and involved 45 young women from across the country.
Three years ago, Adediran launched her campaign to help Nigerian girls keep their virginity and avoid unwanted pregnancies, diseases such as HIV/AIDS, syphilis, barrenness and broken homes. Above all, she wanted them to be chaste, protect their virginity for their husbands, to honour and give them respect.”
According to her: “Women and innocent girls are always on the receiving end.The girls are lured into prostitution, put in the family way and made barren as a result of infection or induced dangerous abortion that could affect their future; while during the burial of the men or the so called husband the wife would be surprised when the children her husband had out of wedlock come to attend the burial service. We have seen many.”
Giving reasons why young girls should keep their virginity, the princess said “charity begins at home, my daughter who is now a practising lawyer is still a virgin. I have to practise what I preach and I am proud that our girls are beginning to understand what we are saying ‘’.
Dr Ekemode praised the girls for keeping their virginity, and advised them to keep it till their wedding day. “In Nigeria now we are proud to still have some of our young girls who believe in chastity. Pre spent 41years in the profession and I am proud that we still have some of our children that are decent.”
Love David (22), from Okokomaiko, Lagos, said she came to do the test to prove to the world that she is clean and would not have sex until her wedding day. “I will keep my virginity until I meet the man who is ready to pay my bride price,’’ she asserted.
Augusta Aishen from Delta state said she is a student of River State University where she is studying computer science. She heard the news of the virginity test over the radio. “My mother is a cosmetologist and my father is an engineer, they trained me not to destroy or spoil my life because of any boy or man. I am happy that my parents trust me and they even paid my fare to come to Lagos for the test,” she told The Nation.
Akada Ikada (22), a mass communication student, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State, described the medical test as the best way to prove virginity “I will keep my virginity until I am ripe enough to marry,” she said, adding that she wasn’t ashamed of being a virgin.
Awawu Ismail, a devout Muslim who was dressed in a hijab, said, Islam respects chastity. “Islam respects virginity and we have to keep ourselves until the day we are going to get married. I am proud to say that I am a virgin.
Others who came for the test include; Olawumi Opelola from Oyo state,Ajayi Oluwabukola, Oluwatoyin Vincent, Suliat Suberu, Islamyat Yisa,Mukoro Juliet, Ibirogba Ololade, Blessing Paul, , Mariam Bello.
Hajiya Basirat Yusuf said the virginity test was not painful. “They will only ask you to remove your undies and the doctor would check to confirm one’s virginity and that is all’’ she said.
Some mothers who came to witness the occasion were happy to see their daughters participating in the programme. Madam Muyidat Bello, (mother of Mariam) said it was a great programme the government at the local, and state levels should contribute to. Madam Bello said when she heard over the radio that there would be a virginity test, her daughter, Muyidat beat her chest that she is a virgin and she came with her to ascertain the truth. “When the doctor confirmed her virginity, I was happy and I love my daughter the more. She is brilliant and it is because there is no money for her university education that she has not gone to school; yet she did not go into prostitution because of our poverty level.”
Adediran who started the programme said, “They called me many names, some said I wanted to use the girls’ virginity for ritual to make money while some said I wanted to be a trafficker. I received nasty, abusive text messages but in the end most of the parents appreciated what I am doing.”
Now that her programme is gaining credibility, she wants support from government. “I want the state and local government to be involved and assist my programme for it is the first time such thing would be organised,” she said. “I am using my own money to finance the programme as many of the girls who wanted to participate had no money and I paid their transportation fare this year. I want private organizations to support us. I have been ejected from the office I was using before and I need an office’’ the woman stated.
Virgins during the testing programme
BLACK GIRLS KEEP YOUR VIRGINITY-IT IS YOUR TREASURE FOR YOUR HUSBAND AND BRINGS YOU VIRTUE!

>BLACK VIRGINITY! -COMMENTS FROM DAWNALI.COM

February 25, 2011

>

FROM dawnali.com

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Chocolatesmoothie
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« on: February 04, 2011, 05:57:53 PM »

BLACK VIRGINITY! -LET’S GO BACK TO IT AND SAVE BLACK GIRLS FROM SHAME AND UNHAPPINESS!
FROM true-love-relationship-advice.com

Virgin Girl – Keep Your Virginity, Gain Self Esteem
A virgin girl may not appreciate what she has. Some girls actually loose their virginity because of peer pressure. They give away their virginity just to fit in, just to belong.

Here’s some great news.

Contrary to what your friends say, being a virgin girl is perfectly normal. You’re perfectly normal as a virgin. You won’t fall ill because you didn’t have sex before twenty one. You won’t even get sick if you don’t have sex before thirty five.

Another thing. You don’t have to play along with your friends to do evil in other to feel great about yourself. You don’t have to belong to a certain circle of friends to be important.

You can achieve what you want to achieve and be anything you want to be without having to follow the wrong crowd. Self-esteem is a thing of the mind. If you feel good about yourself no one can put you down.

This is important because many young girls have veered into sexual misconduct simply to please their friends or to be rated as mature by friends.

Some other college girls have been lured to sexual misbehavior because they fear they may get sick if they do not have sex before they are twenty.

This may all sound silly and irrational to you. But ignorance breeds fear.

To compound matters, many parents do not feel comfortable discussing sexual matters with their children. When children ask questions relating to sexuality, many parents skim over the subject or dodge it outright.

That doesn’t help your children.

Since parents often fail to carry out their responsibility to their children, these innocent children turn to their peers for answers. And the answers they get are often distorted and far from the truth.

The result?

Pregnant teens, troubled teens, and reckless teens that become depressed adults. These depressed adults eventually become a nuisance to society.

You young woman reading this, I have this simple advice for you.

Do not join your friends to experiment with sex. It is like walking on red hot coal. Your legs will get burnt.

If you are a virgin girl, maintain your virginity. Your virginity is a source of pride to your parents. And when you get married as a virgin girl, your husband will be extremely proud of you.

Remaining a virgin girl until you marry establishes your marriage on sound footing of trust. Your husband knows he can trust you because you have self-discipline and love of righteousness.

It takes self-discipline, self-control, and love of God to stay morally upright in this decadent generation. When you are able to do that and maintain your virginity straight to marriage you gain self-esteem as a woman of substance.

Besides, you save yourself the trauma your wayward schoolmates experience. You save yourself the pain of teen pregnancy and fatherless baby. And you save yourself the pain of a wasted life.

Your friends are wrong when they say virginity is archaic and dark age morality.

Remaining a virgin girl is a thing of pride. As a virgin you can hold your head high anywhere you go. You have no need of shame.

You have self-confidence, self-esteem, poise and a feeling of fulfillment.

Wouldn’t you rather remain an innocent virgin girl and enjoy such honor than be tossed about because your stomach is bulging with pregnancy for a baby who has no father?

Yeah. I know you will do the right thing.

However, there are certain mistakes that young people your age make that undermine their decision to remain a virgin girl.

Young girls tend to be avid readers of romance stories.

Romance stories tend to create sexual passion and often cause their readers especially women to fantasize about life with Mr. Perfect.

These girls feel the passion in the stories and wish for a life just like that in the stories. The romance in the romance novels results in a buildup of sexual fantasy in many girls. A regular dose of sexual fantasy eventually results in a desire for the real thing.

Then what?

Your guess is as good as mine.

Yes, romance novels make interesting reading. But many teach values that derail youths by creating desires that lead them astray.

Do you really want to remain a virgin girl?

Then stay clear of material that arouse your sexual desires. If you don’t, you will have trouble maintaining your virginity and self-esteem.

Make the right choice. It’s your life.

read more: https://yeyeolade.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/black-virginity-lets-go-back-to-this-african-cultural-standard-and-save-our-black-girls-from-hearbreak-and-shame/

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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2011, 01:28:09 AM »

Bravo!
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 05:27:19 AM »

Smiley
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 07:18:53 AM »

 Grin Cool Cool Cool Kiss
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2011, 07:25:02 AM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2011, 07:38:40 AM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.

The way movies and romantic novels play out sex scenes and romantic ‘love making’ makes me wonder like shittt i hope the guy’s expectations of getting it on with me aren’t a refelction of what we being shown on tv etc.. Undecided cos he’ll be sadly mistaken lol.  Tongue

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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2011, 07:46:30 AM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.

The way movies and romantic novels play out sex scenes and romantic ‘love making’ makes me wonder like shittt i hope the guy’s expectations of getting it on with me aren’t a refelction of what we being shown on tv etc.. Undecided cos he’ll be sadly mistaken lol.  Tongue

i always think the same thing!  i be thinking “people are waaaayyyy to FREAKY when it comes to sex…i ain’t doing all that sh*t.” Embarrassed  i refuse to hang upside down, handcuff to a chandelier trying to have sex! Tongue

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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2011, 07:50:20 AM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.

The way movies and romantic novels play out sex scenes and romantic ‘love making’ makes me wonder like shittt i hope the guy’s expectations of getting it on with me aren’t a refelction of what we being shown on tv etc.. Undecided cos he’ll be sadly mistaken lol.  Tongue

i always think the same thing!  i be thinking “people are waaaayyyy to FREAKY when it comes to sex…i ain’t doing all that sh*t.” Embarrassed  i refuse to hang upside down, handcuff to a chandelier trying to have sex! Tongue

Hahaha Dawn ur crazy, but your right just because i did gymnastics as a child doesnt mean am all bendy and can do some crazy sex positions or something lol  Tongue

« Last Edit: February 05, 2011, 08:36:29 AM by Dawn » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2011, 09:41:22 AM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.

The way movies and romantic novels play out sex scenes and romantic ‘love making’ makes me wonder like shittt i hope the guy’s expectations of getting it on with me aren’t a refelction of what we being shown on tv etc.. Undecided cos he’ll be sadly mistaken lol.  Tongue

i always think the same thing!  i be thinking “people are waaaayyyy to FREAKY when it comes to sex…i ain’t doing all that sh*t.” Embarrassed  i refuse to hang upside down, handcuff to a chandelier trying to have sex! Tongue

I would willingly do some of that stuff for my HUSBAND.

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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2011, 10:10:43 AM »

Get your FREAK on Saturn    Tongue Tongue Tongue
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2011, 11:00:41 AM »

lol @ Saturn…

yes people can be crazy with sex these days…i noticed in the late 90s that love scenes in movies started becoming more rough and aggressive. back in the day, loves scenes used to slow, sweet and sexy, now a days its just wham bam, slam the woman against the wall, get in between her legs and go to town…i mean it’s ridiculous. Where is the romance, where is the love?

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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2011, 12:58:55 PM »

response to the original post – it talks about staying away from fantasy and romantic novels.  i also  want to add that this country is set up to feed sex to you all of the time.  all of the tv show and movies, even commercials and cartoons are filled with sexual suggestive behavior and language.  all of those things make being a virgin more difficult…especially for boys and men.  they then get all of these desires built up inside of them, and they know the only way they can get the girls to have sex with them (without marriage) is to lie to them so they can get what they want.

I agree, especially when there is a lack of parental moral guidance. Gratuitous sex is like gratuitous foul language in entertainment…both are usually unnecessary if you have a good story to tell. I am no angel. I sometimes have a foul mouth when I get angry, but it is not something that we should aspire to when making “cultural contributions.”

BLACK VIRGINITY!-LET’S GO BACK TO THIS AFRICAN CULTURAL STANDARD AND SAVE OUR BLACK GIRLS FROM HEARBREAK AND SHAME!

October 4, 2010

FROM yeyeolade.blogspot.com

Monday, October 04, 2010
BLACK VIRGINITY! -LET’S GO BACK TO IT AND SAVE BLACK GIRLS FROM SHAME AND UNHAPPINESS!
FROM true-love-relationship-advice.com

Virgin Girl – Keep Your Virginity, Gain Self Esteem

A virgin girl may not appreciate what she has. Some girls actually loose their virginity because of peer pressure. They give away their virginity just to fit in, just to belong.

Here’s some great news.

Contrary to what your friends say, being a virgin girl is perfectly normal. You’re perfectly normal as a virgin. You won’t fall ill because you didn’t have sex before twenty one. You won’t even get sick if you don’t have sex before thirty five.

Another thing. You don’t have to play along with your friends to do evil in other to feel great about yourself. You don’t have to belong to a certain circle of friends to be important.

You can achieve what you want to achieve and be anything you want to be without having to follow the wrong crowd. Self-esteem is a thing of the mind. If you feel good about yourself no one can put you down.

This is important because many young girls have veered into sexual misconduct simply to please their friends or to be rated as mature by friends.

Some other college girls have been lured to sexual misbehavior because they fear they may get sick if they do not have sex before they are twenty.

This may all sound silly and irrational to you. But ignorance breeds fear.

To compound matters, many parents do not feel comfortable discussing sexual matters with their children. When children ask questions relating to sexuality, many parents skim over the subject or dodge it outright.

That doesn’t help your children.

Since parents often fail to carry out their responsibility to their children, these innocent children turn to their peers for answers. And the answers they get are often distorted and far from the truth.

The result?

Pregnant teens, troubled teens, and reckless teens that become depressed adults. These depressed adults eventually become a nuisance to society.

You young woman reading this, I have this simple advice for you.

Do not join your friends to experiment with sex. It is like walking on red hot coal. Your legs will get burnt.

If you are a virgin girl, maintain your virginity. Your virginity is a source of pride to your parents. And when you get married as a virgin girl, your husband will be extremely proud of you.

Remaining a virgin girl until you marry establishes your marriage on sound footing of trust. Your husband knows he can trust you because you have self-discipline and love of righteousness.

It takes self-discipline, self-control, and love of God to stay morally upright in this decadent generation. When you are able to do that and maintain your virginity straight to marriage you gain self-esteem as a woman of substance.

Besides, you save yourself the trauma your wayward schoolmates experience. You save yourself the pain of teen pregnancy and fatherless baby. And you save yourself the pain of a wasted life.

Your friends are wrong when they say virginity is archaic and dark age morality.

Remaining a virgin girl is a thing of pride. As a virgin you can hold your head high anywhere you go. You have no need of shame.

You have self-confidence, self-esteem, poise and a feeling of fulfillment.

Wouldn’t you rather remain an innocent virgin girl and enjoy such honor than be tossed about because your stomach is bulging with pregnancy for a baby who has no father?

Yeah. I know you will do the right thing.

However, there are certain mistakes that young people your age make that undermine their decision to remain a virgin girl.

Young girls tend to be avid readers of romance stories.

Romance stories tend to create sexual passion and often cause their readers especially women to fantasize about life with Mr. Perfect.

These girls feel the passion in the stories and wish for a life just like that in the stories. The romance in the romance novels results in a buildup of sexual fantasy in many girls. A regular dose of sexual fantasy eventually results in a desire for the real thing.

Then what?

Your guess is as good as mine.

Yes, romance novels make interesting reading. But many teach values that derail youths by creating desires that lead them astray.

Do you really want to remain a virgin girl?

Then stay clear of material that arouse your sexual desires. If you don’t, you will have trouble maintaining your virginity and self-esteem.

Make the right choice. It’s your life.

Posted by YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE at 3:48 AM
Labels: AFRICAN AMERICANS, BLACK GIRLS, BLACK MEN, BLACK PEOPLE, BLACK VIRGINITY, BLACK WOMAN, BLACK WOMEN, VIRGINITY

VIRGINITY!-AN AFRICAN VALUE THAT STILLS LIVES!-LET’S BRING IT BACK AGAIN COMPLETELY!

February 1, 2010

FROM thenationonlineng.net

!

Behold Nigerian virgin!

* By Taiwo Abiodun

Virgins during the testing programme

Girls proud to be virgins confidently offered themselves for tests at Ekemode Memorial Hospital and Women’s Infirmary, Surulere, Lagos as the Nigeria virgins celebration organised by Princess Adunni Adediran marked its third anniversary. The virginity tests were done by Dr Ade Ekemode, an experienced gynaecologist and involved 45 young women from across the country.

Three years ago, Adediran launched her campaign to help Nigerian girls keep their virginity and avoid unwanted pregnancies, diseases such as HIV/AIDS, syphilis, barrenness and broken homes. Above all, she wanted them to be chaste, protect their virginity for their husbands, to honour and give them respect.”

According to her: “Women and innocent girls are always on the receiving end.The girls are lured into prostitution, put in the family way and made barren as a result of infection or induced dangerous abortion that could affect their future; while during the burial of the men or the so called husband the wife would be surprised when the children her husband had out of wedlock come to attend the burial service. We have seen many.”

Giving reasons why young girls should keep their virginity, the princess said “charity begins at home, my daughter who is now a practising lawyer is still a virgin. I have to practise what I preach and I am proud that our girls are beginning to understand what we are saying ‘’.

Dr Ekemode praised the girls for keeping their virginity, and advised them to keep it till their wedding day. “In Nigeria now we are proud to still have some of our young girls who believe in chastity. Pre spent 41years in the profession and I am proud that we still have some of our children that are decent.”

Love David (22), from Okokomaiko, Lagos, said she came to do the test to prove to the world that she is clean and would not have sex until her wedding day. “I will keep my virginity until I meet the man who is ready to pay my bride price,’’ she asserted.

Augusta Aishen from Delta state said she is a student of River State University where she is studying computer science. She heard the news of the virginity test over the radio. “My mother is a cosmetologist and my father is an engineer, they trained me not to destroy or spoil my life because of any boy or man. I am happy that my parents trust me and they even paid my fare to come to Lagos for the test,” she told The Nation.

Akada Ikada (22), a mass communication student, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State, described the medical test as the best way to prove virginity “I will keep my virginity until I am ripe enough to marry,” she said, adding that she wasn’t ashamed of being a virgin.

Awawu Ismail, a devout Muslim who was dressed in a hijab, said, Islam respects chastity. “Islam respects virginity and we have to keep ourselves until the day we are going to get married. I am proud to say that I am a virgin.

Others who came for the test include; Olawumi Opelola from Oyo state,Ajayi Oluwabukola, Oluwatoyin Vincent, Suliat Suberu, Islamyat Yisa,Mukoro Juliet, Ibirogba Ololade, Blessing Paul, , Mariam Bello.

Hajiya Basirat Yusuf said the virginity test was not painful. “They will only ask you to remove your undies and the doctor would check to confirm one’s virginity and that is all’’ she said.

Some mothers who came to witness the occasion were happy to see their daughters participating in the programme. Madam Muyidat Bello, (mother of Mariam) said it was a great programme the government at the local, and state levels should contribute to. Madam Bello said when she heard over the radio that there would be a virginity test, her daughter, Muyidat beat her chest that she is a virgin and she came with her to ascertain the truth. “When the doctor confirmed her virginity, I was happy and I love my daughter the more. She is brilliant and it is because there is no money for her university education that she has not gone to school; yet she did not go into prostitution because of our poverty level.”

Adediran who started the programme said, “They called me many names, some said I wanted to use the girls’ virginity for ritual to make money while some said I wanted to be a trafficker. I received nasty, abusive text messages but in the end most of the parents appreciated what I am doing.”

Now that her programme is gaining credibility, she wants support from government. “I want the state and local government to be involved and assist my programme for it is the first time such thing would be organised,” she said. “I am using my own money to finance the programme as many of the girls who wanted to participate had no money and I paid their transportation fare this year. I want private organizations to support us. I have been ejected from the office I was using before and I need an office’’ the woman stated.

Virgins during the testing programme

BLACK GIRLS KEEP YOUR VIRGINITY-IT IS YOUR TREASURE FOR YOUR HUSBAND AND BRINGS YOU VIRTUE!

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January 27, 2010

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via THE VIRGIN AND THE NARROW PATH MOVIE NIGERIAN FORUM, FORUMS, SOCIAL NETWORK, NIGERIA JOB FORUM, BLOG, WEBSITE, SITE, NOLLYWOOD, ONLINE MESSAGE BOARD.

YORUBA GIRLS/WOMEN WEAR WAIST BEADS AND THIS IS WHAT IT CULTURALLY MEANS!-FROM GUARDIAN NEWSPAPERS,NIGERIA

April 28, 2009

4846b8_2yoruba_chapter_3_03

MODERN USE OF YORUBA WAIST BEADS

MODERN USE OF YORUBA WAIST BEADS

c_95-7FROM ngrguardiannews.com

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Waist bead among the Yoruba
By Alloysius Nduka Duru

THE usage of beads especially waist bead in Nigeria is wide spread across the various nationalities that make up the nation. There are similarities and peculiarities in their usage.
However, the Yorubas developed the most varying and peculiar uses for the waist beads. The Yorubas have developed a culture of bead usage that cuts across both material and spiritual aspects of the life of the people. In addition, they have also the capacity to produce the beads for varying purposes ranging from royalty, body adornment, deification and decoration.

The Yorubas are found in the South Western geo-political delineation of present day Nigeria. They are a vibrant and social people that accentuate their ways of life in their day-to-day activities.

Beads are usually small round piece of glass, wood, metal or nut, pierced for stringing. They are either used for adornment such as the waist, neck or ankle beads or as decorative ornament in art works or even for royalty purposes.

The art of beading is serial in process and serrated in composition. It has a step by step or one by one approach in stringing when traded together, beads stands for unity, togetherness and solidarity.

Beads of the waist is said to posses the power to attract and evoke deep emotional responses, they are a sign of success and affluence as well as spiritual well being.

The Origin of the Nigerian beads is still speculative due to its fragility portability and popularity.

Beads have been traded and used since time immemorial. However, the earliest known African beads is traced to Libya and Sudan. In Nigeria the Nok terracottes and Igbo Ukwu arts display some element of the usage of beads in those societies as early as 500BC, however there is no concrete statement of origin to the beads.

A common usage of the item is for adornment especially on the waist. There is however varying purpose for which people adorn the waist beads.

The common users of the waist beads are mostly the women folk, only in exceptional theatrical perform as will a man adorn a waist bead to symbolize feminism. The waist bead is synonymous with feminism.

The Yorubas have esteemed usage attached to the waist beads. They refer to the waist bead as Ileke, “Lagidigba” the term lagidigba means something big, thick or massive. The Lagidigba is made of palm nut shells string together, while the bebe is made of glass.

The Yorubas have a belief that the waist beads posses some erotic appeal, they have the power to provoke desire or deep emotional response on the opposite sex.

Waist beads in Yoruba are also used for birth control, the beads are laced with charms and worn by the women to prevent conception.

Beads are a precious ornaments to the Yorubas, hence when adorned by a women, accentuates her feminism or beauty. Beads also helps to portray the chastity of a maiden or women sensuality. Parent show their love for their girl child through gifts of waist beads that are colourful and expensive.

The lagidigba or palm nut shell beads is used for fecundity purposes. The nuts signify multiple births as they are in clusters, thus one can infer the high incidence of multiple births in Yoruba land to the usage of the lagidigba bead.

Brides seduce their spouses with the beads they adorn, some women are said to lace their beads with charm to make them irresistible to the male folks. The Yoruba’s can easily comment on a women’s moral standing in those days by interpretation of the movement of the waist bead adorned by a women. The way she moves her buttocks can depict her morals either seductive or reserve.

The Yorubas have a popular saying that “it is the beads that makes the buttocks to shake”.

Other users of the waist beads in Yoruba land are the Orisas or devotes of water deities and other priestesses, they adorn the waist beads for protection against spiritual attacks as well as part of their dress regalia.

The waist bead is also used to adorn the Ere-Ibeji figurine on the death of a twin, there is the belief that when treated well the spirit of the spirit of the dead twin will not harm the living twin and will return to the family to stay.

Waist beads are also adorned and laced with charms to ward away the Abiku spirit (mermaid Spirit) from a woman.

Because of the regard on the waist beads, some erotic songs have been composed and sang by the Yorubas based on its usages.

A Song Says

“She goes up

She goes down

Like buttocks beads.

Another song says;

Don’t flirt with me

Don’t flirt with me as you do with your husband.

Don’t wriggle your waist beads at me

Don’t lock the door on me and throw

Away the key.

Apart from the Yorubas, other groups in Nigeria also have similar usages of the waist beads in their culture the Ogonis in Rivers State refer to beads as Loo, its uses range from covering the private parts of a women to adornment as a sign of affluence. The beads is a measure of value to the Ogonis and are also worn by bride as part of her bridal rites. The Igbos called it Mgbaji, also for adornment and a sign of social status.

The Hausas refer to it as Jigida. To the Kalabaris, the waist bead has the potency of transforming an ugly woman into a beautiful maiden once it is worn. The Ibibios see it as Nkwa-Isin, they adorn it on a female baby to help give her a good waist line, as she grows, beads of her size are adorned on her.

Priestesses of deities also wear the beads that are always colourful as part of their regalia. They also use the waist beads laced with charm s for birth control. The maiden dances (Aban) also wear the beads doing dance to give a graceful hip movement when they dance.

Waist bead in today’s fashion is relegated, ladies have a preference for western costumes such as belts, chains, g-strings to the waist beads. The culture of waist bead is going down rapidly to extinction. Religion and other spiritual reasons have been adduced for the neglect, however it must be pointed out that waist bead usage as practiced in the past is an essential element of African body adornment that is harmless and meaningful a pride and precious item which should be encourage to day.

Nduka Duru discussed this topic with National Museum Study Group, Port Harcourt recently

© 2003 – 2009 @ Guardian Newspapers Limited (All Rights Reserved).
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FROM wazobaa.info

GIRLS GO NAKED TO SHOWCASE BEADS
She is a pretty young girl with a slim graceful figure. Her elegant movement attracted the attention of passersby as she jiggled across to the other side of the road. Her waist beads were well revealed between her skimpy top and skirt. Mindful of the attention she had generated in the ever-busy Ketu Bus-Stop, Lagos State, Nigeria, she quickly climbed a commercial bike popularly called okada, trying in the process to pull her top and miniskirt together as they went further apart between the beads. A male petty trader beside her shouted, “Wetin you dey hide? Why you no go naked make we see your ‘thing’ well well?” Vividly embarrassed she tapped the bike rider and said, “Please get me out of this place.”

The above ‘drama’ and similar ones are common scenes today in Nigerian cities as well as towns particularly where higher institutions are located, particularly in southern parts of the country. This re-emergence of beads has added a new dimension into the craze for Western oriented fashion among our ladies particularly young ones. This trend is more pronounced among female students, particularly those in higher institutions. In addition to waist adornment, ladies also use beads as necklace, for hair tie, and handbag decoration. Some also wear beads on their wrists as hand bangles, as well as using them as earrings. The popularity of beads today is enhanced by the cost of acquiring them. A survey conducted by this reporter shows that beads averagely cost between one hundred and fifty naira to two thousand naira, depending on the quality, size, length and quality of string used in making them.

Madam Grace Benson, the proprietor of a fashion shop with inscription “MAMA ONOME BEAUTY PALACE” at Balogun Stret, Lagos Island, Lagos, was busy attending to her clients when this reporter visited her shop. When she was asked how ladies patronize her beads she simply said, “Fine, as you can see beads are in vogue now, so we are selling well well.” When asked to comment on why young ladies go for beads, she said, “Beads make ladies look fine, beads bring out the natural beauty in women. It is good, not just because of beauty, but a way of introducing our culture into the modern fashion.” On the moral implications of the manner in which some ladies expose the sensitive parts of their bodies to show-off beads, she refused to comment, saying, “I am busy, you can see my customers are waiting for me, I have to attend to them.”

However, 62-year-old community leader and retired civil servant, Mr. Idowu Bakare, described the trend as unfortunate, “This shows the level of moral decadence in our society. I can’t imagine seeing these small girls going about almost naked in the name of displaying beads worn around exclusive areas of their bodies. I blame the parents because I can tolerate such in my house,” he said. “It is a curse for any one to link our culture to this madness. Various cultures in Nigeria used beads to dignify womanhood. No time did our culture led women naked in the name of displaying beads,” he added.

“When I put on beads I look more beautiful”, a student of Lagos State University, Funke Ekerin, said. When asked the fun she drives from the beads on her waist she simply replied, “It is in vogue now, ladies fancy waist beads much, and even men who want to be truthful will tell you that they admire ladies with beads on their waists.”

A teenage girl who simply identified herself as Cynthia, said, “A correct Chic cannot wear beads without wearing it on her waist; that is the one that makes us more beautiful.” On the moral implications, she said, “Well, if any man feels that it is seductive he should remove his eyes from it; after all, it is my body, nobody will tell me what I should do with it.”

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