Archive for the ‘BLACKS IN MEXICO’ Category

THIS BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY LEARNED TO LOVE HER GOD-GIVEN BLaCK BEAUTY!-FROM BUZZFEED.COM

March 6, 2014

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mackenziekruvant/lupita-nyongo-essence-speech-black-
beauty?s=mobile

Lupita Nyong’o Delivers Moving Speech About How She Learned To Love The Color Of Her Skin

The Oscar nominated actress spoke candidly in her Black Women in Hollywood acceptance speech about her struggle to understand her own beauty.

posted on February 28, 2014 at 12:58

Yesterday, Lupita Nyong’o won the Essence Magazine Black Women In Hollywood Breakthrough Performance Award.

And while she has fast become one of the most idolized women on the red carpet in years…Lupita told the audience that she has not always felt that comfortable with the color of her skin.

Here is the full transcript of her beautifully honest speech.

I wrote down this speech that I had no time to practice so this will be the practicing session. Thank you Alfre, for such an amazing, amazing introduction and celebration of my work. And thank you very much for inviting me to be a part of such an extraordinary community. I am surrounded by people who have inspired me, women in particular whose presence on screen made me feel a little more seen and heard and understood. That it is ESSENCE that holds this event celebrating our professional gains of the year is significant, a beauty magazine that recognizes the beauty that we not just possess but also produce.

I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty, Black beauty, dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: “Dear Lupita,” it reads, “I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.”

My heart bled a little when I read those words, I could never have guessed that my first job out of school would be so powerful in and of itself and that it would propel me to be such an image of hope in the same way that the women of The Color Purple were to me.

I remember a time when I too felt unbeautiful. I put on the TV and only saw pale skin, I got teased and taunted about my night-shaded skin. And my one prayer to God, the miracle worker, was that I would wake up lighter-skinned. The morning would come and I would be so excited about seeing my new skin that I would refuse to look down at myself until I was in front of a mirror because I wanted to see my fair face first. And every day I experienced the same disappointment of being just as dark as I was the day before. I tried to negotiate with God, I told him I would stop stealing sugar cubes at night if he gave me what I wanted, I would listen to my mother’s every word and never lose my school sweater again if he just made me a little lighter. But I guess God was unimpressed with my bargaining chips because He never listened.

And when I was a teenager my self-hate grew worse, as you can imagine happens with adolescence. My mother reminded me often that she thought that I was beautiful but that was no conservation, she’s my mother, of course she’s supposed to think I am beautiful. And then Alek Wek came on the international scene. A celebrated model, she was dark as night, she was on all of the runways and in every magazine and everyone was talking about how beautiful she was. Even Oprah called her beautiful and that made it a fact. I couldn’t believe that people were embracing a woman who looked so much like me, as beautiful. My complexion had always been an obstacle to overcome and all of a sudden Oprah was telling me it wasn’t. It was perplexing and I wanted to reject it because I had begun to enjoy the seduction of inadequacy. But a flower couldn’t help but bloom inside of me, when I saw Alek I inadvertently saw a reflection of myself that I could not deny. Now, I had a spring in my step because I felt more seen, more appreciated by the far away gatekeepers of beauty. But around me the preference for light skin prevailed, to the beholders that I thought mattered I was still unbeautiful. And my mother again would say to me you can’t eat beauty, it doesn’t feed you and these words plagued and bothered me; I didn’t really understand them until finally I realized that beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume, it was something that I just had to be.

And what my mother meant when she said you can’t eat beauty was that you can’t rely on how you look to sustain you. What is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty enflames the heart and enchants the soul. It is what got Patsey in so much trouble with her master, but it is also what has kept her story alive to this day. We remember the beauty of her spirit even after the beauty of her body has faded away.

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside, that there is no shade in that beauty.

Confirmed: Lupita could not be more beautiful.

YORUBA MALE ATTIRE! -THE BEST IN THE WORLD-THESE PROUD BLACK MEN RULE THE PLANET WHEN IT COMES TO CLOTHES!

April 6, 2011

FROM

OJOGBON AKINWUMNI ISOLA,ORLANDO JULIUS AND HIS BLACKamerikkkan WIFE ADUKE

OBAMA WITH HIS YORUBA FRIENDS IN YORUBA DRESS!

OKO IFEDOLAPO!

Traditional Attire of Nigerian and African Men
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By Philipo
Click thumbnail to view full-size
See all 14 photos

Surprisingly, most men in Nigeria especially Lagos State wear the traditional Yoruba cloths. This comes in various styles and designs. They have different names depending on the type of design like:

Agbada – this is a 4-piece Nigerian Agbada apparel that is made up of hat, buba, flowing Agbada and pants with embroidery.

Babariga – This is men’s 4-piece African Babariga clothing apparel comprising a Hat, long-sleeved shirt, flowing Buba and pants with embroidery.

3-piece Gbarie outfit. Hand-loomed Aso Oke material with matching embroidery.

They are suitable for special occasions and events. Have you seen what the Nigerian women wear? See this http://hubpages.com/_1rfosdrnucsn9/hub/Glamorous-and-Gorgeous-Yoruba-Nigerian-Women-Dress

“ BEAUTIFUL TO BE BLACK”-A POEM BY SISTER CHARA NYASHIA SANJO AND HER PROFILE!

June 11, 2010

Author Chara NyAshia Sanjo

from yeyeolade.wordpress.com

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!
DEDICATED TO SAVING BLACKNESS WORLDWIDE!

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« BROTHER PEACEMAKER INTRODUCES THE TOPIC OF POLYANDRY:MANY HUSBANDS FOR 1 WOMAN?

ITALIANO # 2 »

“BEAUTIFUL TO BE BLACK” A POEM BY SISTER CHARA NYASHIA SANJO,SUBMITTED BY KYA TO “BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL”
By Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

“BEAUTIFUL TO BE BLACK”

“It’s beautiful to be black.”

It is the color of strength and pride.

I will say it out loud. I don’t have to hide.

I love me, and the color that I represent.

Look at me, there is nothing like it.

What you see is not an illusion.

It’s a gift from GOD, don’t ever confuse it.

“It’s beautiful to be black.”

It is the color of fame and envy.

If I wasn’t black, I wouldn’t be me.

Black is the color of power and authority.

It is so outstanding, thank you LORD for blessing me.

I’ll shout it to the world, I’m proud of what I am.

Those who are in vain will never understand.

“It’s beautiful to be black”

It is the color of confidence and style.

I have been blessed, by my ancestor from the Nile.

I am scenic from the inside out.

These verses are true, I don’t have any doubt.

There is no one who can change my mind.

Black has been beautiful since the begging of time.

“It’s beautiful to be black.”

It is the color of honor and grace.

This is one thing that cannot be taken away.

By Chara NyAshia Sanjo

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Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)

Black and Beautiful by Hilesha S. Humphreys
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This entry was posted on August 12, 2007 at 3:06 pm and is filed under AFRICA, BLACK CHILDREN, BLACK CULTURE, BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!, BLACK MEN, BLACK NATIONALISM, BLACK PEOPLE, BLACK WOMEN, THE BLACK RACE. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. Edit this entry.

4 Responses to ““BEAUTIFUL TO BE BLACK” A POEM BY SISTER CHARA NYASHIA SANJO,SUBMITTED BY KYA TO “BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL””
The face of Afrika Says:
May 4, 2008 at 2:54 am | Reply edit It is beautiful to be black indeed! I hope you don’t mind if I use your poem on my blog, dedicated to celebrate the beauty of African people and of the African continent. Please check the Website http://www.thefaceofafrika.com and contact us at thefaceofafrika@googlemail.com

jameka little Says:
March 2, 2009 at 5:52 pm | Reply edit love the poem it describes me and the way that i feel, it’s very intresting to me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

khadijah Says:
May 19, 2009 at 12:27 am | Reply edit i love the poem i hope it will inspire many
can i use your poem for my group “black is beautiful?”

daijahenry Says:
January 15, 2010 at 6:22 pm | Reply edit i love the poem and i hope other people do to and i hope they love to be black
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from mirrors of expression.com
XHARA NYASHIA SANJO-
Poet, Song Writer and Screenplay/Stage Play Writer

Chara NyAshia Sanjo (born August 27, 1965) is an African American author, poet, song writer and screenplay/stage play writer. She is best know for her novel Reclamation of Africa’s Royalty 323 BC and her inspiring poem “It’s Beautiful to be Black.” She began writing at the age of eleven.

Sanjo was born in Cleveland, OH, as Carla Benita Burton, but decided to reclaim her African name Chara NyAshia Sanjo once she was inspired by the true beauty of African History. Her name translates to (Beautiful African princess of purpose who appreciates her past) Chara, the daughter of Anita Cozzette Moore, a hair dresser and elementary school janitor and Albert Carl Burton whose career is unknown seeing that Chara never established a relationship with her father. Her mother died in 2005 of Lung Cancer.

Chara attended John Adams High School and later transferred and graduated from West Technical High School in Cleveland OH. After high school, she attended and graduated from Cuyahoga Community College with an Associates of Art Degree (liberal arts-music & theater). She later attended and graduated from Myers University with a Bachelors of Science Degree in Information Processing Systems.

Chara had every intention on finishing what she started in the arts but had allowed other to discourage her dreams when she became a statistic as a single parent. From this, she took on various jobs working as a secretary, customer service, fitness instructor and she has also worked in various administrative positions in the Medical Industry to support her son.

Before her mother’s death in 2005, she encouraged Chara to get back into the arts and to write the stories that she so loved. Chara took her mother’s advice and decided that she didn’t want to look back on her life and be a victim of Should of would of could of so she pulled an old novel that she started in 1998 off her book shelf and felt compelled to finish it. Chara dedicated that book to her mother.

In 2007 Chara made many attempts to get her book published, but all she heard was no or not interested. After being turned down, Chara decided to self publish her story because she was determined for the world to hear it. Today we know this novel/stage play as Reclamation of Africa’s Royalty 323 BC.

Chara was determined not to let anyone discourage her from making her dreams a reality. In 2008 she launched her own production company called Chara NyAshia Sanjo’s Entertainment Empire. She completed her first poetry book titled Verses of a Black Voice in 2009.

Website Designed by Mirrors of Expression Publishing (A Finham Enterprise Company) Logo by Tyson Brazille © 2009 at Homestead™ Make a Website for Your Business

EBONY MAGAZINE DOES NOT PUT BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES ON ITS COVER-SAYS WHITE BRAINWASHED BLACKS SINCE SLAVERY ONLY GO FOR CREOLE-CRAZY-MULATTO-MENTALITY-IMITATION-WHITE-GIRL-BEAUTY BUT IN THE 60’S WE WOOLLY HAIR BEAUTIES FORCED EBONY TO PUT ITS FIRST BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY,WITH WOOLLY HAIR AND AFRICAN FEATURES ON IT’S COVER AND NOW GABOUREY SIDIBE HAS BROKEN AGAIN THE IMITATION WHITE GIRL CEILING OF EBONY-BLACK ON BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

March 29, 2010

THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO- CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROP0LITAN CATHEDRAL,MEXICO CITY!-PHOTOGRAPHED BY BIALY

June 12, 2009
CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL MEXICO CITY-THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO!

CRUCIFIXION OF BLACK JESUS,METROPOLITAN CATHDRAL MEXICO CITY-THE FAMOUS BLACK CHRIST OF MEXICO!

THE BLACK OLMECS:”THE BIRTH OF OLMEC CULTURE MESOAMERICA’S MOTHER CULTURE”-FROM CARNAVAL.COM

May 19, 2009

olmec9book:"THE HISTORY OF THE AFRICAN OLMECS" BY PAUL ALFRED BARTONv81twoheadsfrom carnaval.com

COUNTDOWN to 2012
The year 2012 will be 520 years after Columbus
delivered the message of the promised land in 1492

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The Birth of Olmec Culture Mesoamerica’s mother culture

The Olmecs were the first Mesoamerican people to fathom the concept of zero, maintain a calendar, and use a hieroglyphic writing system based on the Manding system of West Africa. These intellectual achievements, as well as Olmec myths and rituals, were influential in the subsequent Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec cultures.
Once we move beyond recognizing the African roots of Mesoamerica’s mother culture we come to the more fascinating theories regarding the source of their culture and the cause of the trigger for an immigration representing so much knowledge and talent.
The Toltecs were never conquered and kept good records. Prof. Herman L. Hoeh in his exhaustive Compendium of World History explains the birth of the Olmec civilization by comparing dates with history before Christ.
The first seeds of Olmec culture began in the Americas as the result of Spain expelling the North Africans who had enslaved them in 1892 BC or 3 millenniums prior to 1492. The date has been kept by adding 520 years to the great flood and corresponds with the date of GIANTS arriving in Mesoamerica as recorded by the Toltec historian Ixtlilxochitl.

The Mysterious Olmecs
1849 BC

Who was this mysterious people that have so baffled the modern-day historians and anthropologists? To find the answer to this riddle we must go back, once again, to the OLD World!
“In the year 1883 B.C. an invasion of Spain took place from the confines of North Africa. Having become a civilized land and wealthy due to changes in climate and the presence of many producing gold mines, Spain aroused the greed of Egypt and other North African nations.
A king by the name of GERION or DEABUS, with a large army and many ships, conquered Spain and forced the inhabitants to dig gold for their new African overlords. Many Spanish slaves died from overwork under this tyranny”
Osyris slew Gerion in 1849, upon which part of his tribe took to ship and sailed to the New World. A tradition found among the Toltecs of Mexico and preserved by Ixtlilxochitl declares there once were giants in their land. Even the date of the arrival of these giants has been preserved by the Toltec historian. It was 520 years after the flood. (Bancroft “Native Races of the Pacific States”, vol. V, p. 209. )
The year of the flood was 2370-2369. And 520 years AFTER the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and many of the giants were expelled.
Herman L Hoeh
Compedium of World History (google)
or Compendium of World History
1963 1966, 1969 Edition pf PhD Dissertation

The Book of Mormon
The Book of Mormon is about a small group of Jews who fled Jerusalem in 600 B.C. and sailed to America. However, there is an older book within The Book of Mormon called The Book of Ether. It tells about a group of people who fled the Tower of Babel at least 3000 years before Christ called the “Jaredites”. Because they were a righteous people the LORD did not confound their language, and a Prophet led them called “The Brother of Jared” (his actual name was Mahonri Moriancumr). All of the Jaredite names are Hamitic, and the descendants of Ham were black. Most Mormon scholars believe that the Jaredites were the ancient Olmecs; the first civilization on the American continent.
“The existence of the OLMEC culture in Mexico and Central America, along with terraced pyramids (similar to SUMERIAN ZIGGURATS), calendrical systems, mathematics and sculptured figures WITH BEARDS or Negroid features implies, to many observers, “a CONNECTION with such peoples as the…PHOENICIANS, HITTITES… or CARTHAGINIANS” — all of whom were CANAANITES
hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
“While official Mormon promotional literature and activities continue to make claims of scientific support from the fields of archaeology and anthropology, there are NO non-Mormon specialists in these fields who support the premise of an ancient Hebrew civilization in the pre-Columbian Americas. ”
John Keyser AMERICAN INDIANS AND THE BOOK OF MORMON hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
Olmecs by John Keyser on the web by google
Mormons & Olmecs by google

” It was 520 years after the flood….
The year of the flood was 2370-2369 BC. And 520 years after the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849 BC, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and MANY OF THE GIANTS EXPELLED.
(Bancroft, Native Races of the Pacific States, vol. v, p.209).
OLMEC CONSPIRACY
The widespread Academic Repression of overwhelming evidence of diffusion to the Americas by a profession based upon the discovery of truth would seem to support the many claims of Eurocentrism by Afrocentric web authors. We’d rather add it to our list under the title the Curse of Columbus. Here is a sample from the web
“A great deal has been made of the “Negroid” features of the Olmec colossal heads. Various dubious theories have been advanced.”
mesoweb.com/olmec
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“without proper evidence” & “academically irresponsible” to suggest African origin is racist
Billie Follensbee

“Olmec Heads” by google

African Empires of Ancient America
by Clyde A. Winters PhD
biography
“The view that Africans originated writing in America is not new. Scholars early recognized the affinity between Amerindian scripts and the Mande script(s).” Beginning with Rafinesque in 1832, Leo Wiener (1922) Harold Lawrence (1962)

LINKS
Makubwa Homepage
Links showing Afrocentric origins of Olmec civilization
Photo of Olmec and African Heads
Professor Alexander Von Wuthenau compared the Olmec heads to the Head of King Taharka, a Nubian-Kushite ruler of ancient Egypt.
A History of the African-Olmecs
by Paul Alfred Barton published Sept 2001 at amazon
Manding in West Africa Today
by CIA — The World Factbook — Mali || Senegal ||Gambia || Guinea-Bissau || Guinea

Home || Discovery of Diffusion is Past Due || Strange but True || The 4 Voyages || Columbus or Indigenous People’s Day || Hispaniola’s Colon Memorial Lighthouse || Olmecs & Mother Africa || Countdown to 2012 || Dawning of Age of Aquarius || aForum || Link Lists & Resources
Carnaval Main Page ( reset your frame set for full menu options)

Last Link Check 26MAY2006

The Headwear of Beautiful Black Yoruban/ Nigerian Women!!

May 15, 2009

These ladies do style, they are about class. They are ready to flaunt.
They’ve come prepared to show their
hats off. Brace yourself for the most
beautiful and vibrant, bright set of
colors. Oh, and the styles of the headwraps will make you want to
go purchase scarves for them.

It’s like a festival. It will make you want to dance, just maybe.
It’s a parade of glorious scarf hats.
The hats are so beautiful it will make
you lose gravity, just kidding, but they
are really really gorgeous.

OBAMA BRINGS A NEW ERA TO DIALOGUE WITH THE AMERICAS-FROM SEFERMPOST.COM

April 21, 2009

BLACK POWER SHAKE!

BLACK POWER SHAKE!

2 DESCENDANTS OF BLACK MOTHER AFRICA MEET!

2 DESCENDANTS OF BLACK MOTHER AFRICA MEET!

from sefermpost.com

Monday, April 20, 2009
Stephen Harper Hails Obama For New Era In The Americas
Stephen Harper credited Barack Obama with opening a “new era of dialogue” in the Americas as a hemispheric summit that the Prime Minister had feared would collapse in confrontation ended with surprising chords of harmony.

Instead of the barrage of attacks that former U.S. president George W. Bush faced at the last Summit of the Americas four years ago in Argentina, Mr. Obama engineered a warming of relations with offers of a new “equal partnership” that seemed to turn famously anti-American firebrands like Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez into pussycats asking to be his friends.

It was a weekend in which Mr. Obama proposed a “new beginning” with Cuba – still suspended from such summits.

He also promised to combat poverty and inequality in Latin America and pledged to not only emphasize international law-enforcement in fighting drug crime, but also to aim for reducing U.S. demand for drugs and trafficking of guns.

On Cuba, Mr. Obama said Raul Castro should release political prisoners, embrace democratic freedoms and cut fees on the money that Cuban-Americans send back to their families. Mr. Obama has lifted some restrictions on Cuba and Mr. Castro responded with a broad, conciliatory overture.

“The fact that you had Raul Castro say he’s willing to have his government discuss with ours – not just issues of lifting the embargo, but issues of human rights, political prisoners – that’s a sign of progress,” Mr. Obama said at a news conference yesterday.

Venezuela’s Mr. Chavez, who once called Mr. Bush “the devil,” said he wanted to exchange ambassadors with Washington again – both countries had expelled each other’s last year – and the summit was set abuzz by the repeated handshakes and smiles the limelight-loving leader exchanged with Mr. Obama.

Some of Mr. Chavez’s allies in the leftist Bolivarian Alternative international organization, like Bolivia’s President Evo Morales, said they were still waiting for concrete signs of change. However, Mr. Obama insisted he had held warm talks with many other Latin American leaders.

“I think it’s just that President Chavez is better at positioning the cameras,” he joked.

“The subject of many of these meetings and conversations has been launching a new era of partnership between our nations. Over the past few days, we’ve seen potential positive signs in the nature of our relationship between the United States, Cuba and Venezuela,” Mr. Obama said at a press conference yesterday.

“But as I’ve said before, the test for all of us is not simply words, but also deeds.”

Mr. Harper said he wasn’t sure before the summit began if he’d want to see another one take place, because they tended to get bogged down in ideological diatribes. Now, he said, there is a new opportunity for dialogue that can make progress on economic and social issues.

“I was very worried about the atmosphere of confrontation that exists in our region. But we saw a remarkable change during this summit. And that means that the era of confrontation was replaced by the era of dialogue,” Mr. Harper said at the close of this summit.

“In the difficult economic times in which we’re living, I think this is a tremendously promising development.”

Mr. Harper also met with several Caribbean and Latin American leaders – the latter mostly his closest allies, like the presidents of Chile, Colombia and Mexico – and continued to curry warm ties with Mr. Obama during two 15-minute private chats.

On Saturday, after a 15-minute talk in a hotel kitchen’s service corridor, they strolled past waiting cameras, and when Mr. Obama was asked if he would take Canada’s tips on Cuba, Mr. Obama said: “I take tips from Canada on a lot of things.”

Although the forum’s future had been in doubt, Brazilian President Ignacio Lula da Silva, the leader of the hemisphere’s second-largest country, said he believes there’s a reason to have another Summit of the Americas in three years time, with Cuba attending.

WANT TO SET UP AN INDEPENDENT BLACK SCHOOL WHERE EVER YOU ARE IN WHITELAND? CHECK OUR THE COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT BLACK INSTITUTIONS(CIBI.COM)-THEY WILL SHOW YOU HOW!

April 9, 2009

from cibi.com

BLACK CHILDREN EVERYWHERE NEED BLACK SCHOOLS TO TEACH THEM THE TRUE BLACK HISTORY AND TEACH THEM THAT THEY ARE THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CHILDREN IN THE WORLD!

BLACK CHILDREN EVERYWHERE NEED BLACK SCHOOLS TO TEACH THEM THE TRUE BLACK HISTORY AND TEACH THEM THAT THEY ARE THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CHILDREN IN THE WORLD!


About the Council of Independent Black Institutions (CIBI)
Founded in 1972, the Council of Independent Black Institutions (CIBI) is an umbrella organization for independent Afrikan-centered schools and individuals who are advocates for Afrikan-centered education. CIBI members are found primarily throughout the United States. Most of our institutional members are full-time Afrikan-centered independent schools. Our institutional membership also includes a number of part-time and supplementary schools. These schools enroll students at all levels from pre-kindergarten through secondary. The heaviest concentration, however, is at the elementary level.

CIBI activities include:

• Bi-annual conferences (in odd numbered years) designed to educate members of the Afrikan community about issues and prospects in Afrikan-centered education in general and specifically in CIBI. Unlike the convention, the conference is open to the public;

• Bi-annual conventions (in even numbered years) provide educators from CIBI schools and elsewhere opportunities to share information on curricula and other Afrikan centered education related matters. CIBI also installs its incoming Ndundu (leadership council) members during its convention;

• The Walimu Development Institute (WDI) attracts teachers in CIBI schools as well as CIBI home schools. CIBI also organizes intensive, on-site workshops for African-centered educators;

• Semi-annual publication of a newsletter, FUNDISHA! TEACH!, provides a forum for curriculum innovations, book reviews, news about member schools and other features pertaining to people of Afrikan ancestry.

• Annual Science Expositions held each year in April. During each Science Expo, children from the various member schools have an opportunity to display their science projects in a uniquely non-competitive environment in which they are evaluated according to criteria based upon the Nguzo Saba.

• A speakers’ bureau;

• An alumni association for graduates of CIBI institutions;

• Consultation and technical assistance to those operating or wishing to open independent Afrikan-centered schools. Services are also available to public and private schools or to any institution or group that serves children of Afrikan descent.

CIBI member contributions help make it possible to publish some of the outstanding Afrikan-centered curriculum materials that have been developed and used effectively over the years by teachers in institutions affiliated with CIBI as well as in other schools. CIBI’s social studies curriculum guide, Positive Afrikan Images for Children, published in 1990, is an example.

CIBI Mission Statement (Approved January 14, 1995)
Definition, Standards and Interpretations

• To define Afrikan-Centered Education
• To establish appropriate terminology, conditions, interpretations and standards consistent with the definition

Advocacy

• To vigorously promote the philosophy of Afrikan-centered education as defined by the organization
• To serve as the primary regional, national, and international spokesperson for the Afrikan- centered education movement and the institutions associated with that movement

Certification

• To establish Afrikan-centered standards and procedures for the certification of educational institutions, program, initiatives, organizations, etc.
• To establish Afrikan-centered standards and procedures for the certification of instructional and administrative personnel associated with educational institutions or programs

Curriculum Development and Standardization

• To develop and promote an Afrikan-centered curriculum philosophy
• To establish appropriate definitions and terminology associated with that philosophy
• To establish an Afrikan-centered curriculum design and methods for its implementation and evaluation
• To establish Afrikan-centered curricula for all ages (infancy through post-graduate levels) and in all subject areas
• To sponsor and/or facilitate the development of curriculum materials consistent with the design and content of Afrikan-centered curricula

Academic Performance Standards and Evaluation

• To establish academic performance standards consistent with the philosophy and design of the Afrikan-centered Curriculum
• To sponsor and/or facilitate the design of appropriate performance and diagnostic instruments, and procedures for the measurement of academic performance
• To establish standards and appropriate instruments for the evaluation of curriculum design and operations, instruction, and administration within Afrikan-centered educational institutions

National and International System Development and Coordination

• To facilitate the development and linkage of Afrikan-centered institutions world-wide through staff and student development programs, exchange programs, expositions, conventions, computer networking, bulk purchasing, joint investments and fundraising, etc.
• To establish designs, criteria, procedures, models, and necessary training\orientation programs that facilitate the development of viable institutions of Afrikan-centered education and culture.
• To serve as that administrative vehicle that coordinates the affairs of a national and international system of Afrikan-centered education.

CIBI’s Definition of Afrikan Centered Education: A Position Statement (Adopted November 11, 1994)
CIBI defines Afrikan-centered education as the means by which Afrikan culture — including the knowledge, attitudes, values and skills needed to maintain and perpetuate it throughout the nation building process — is developed and advanced through practice. Its aim, therefore, is to build commitment and competency within present and future generations to support the struggle for liberation and nationhood. We define nation building as the conscious and focused application of our people’s collective resources, energies, and knowledge to the task of liberating and developing the psychic and physical space that we identify as ours. Nation building encompasses both the reconstruction of Afrikan culture and the development of a progressive and sovereign state structure consistent with that culture.

We, in CIBI, further believe, that in practice, Afrikan-centered education:
1) acknowledges Afrikan spirituality as an essential aspect of our uniqueness as a people and makes it an instrument of our liberation (Richards, 1989; Clarke, 1991; Anwisye, 1993; Ani, 1994);
2) facilitates participation in the affairs of nations and defining (or redefining) reality on our own terms, in our own time and in our own interests (Karenga, 1980);
3) prepares Afrikans “for self-reliance, nation maintenance, and nation management in every regard” (Clarke, 1991, p. 62);
4) emphasizes the fundamental relationship between the strength of our families and the strength of our nation;
5) ensures that the historic role and function of the customs, traditions, rituals and ceremonies — that have protected and preserved our culture; facilitated our spiritual expression; ensured harmony in our social relations; prepared our people to meet their responsibilities as adult members of our culture; and sustained the continuity of Afrikan life over successive generations — are understood and made relevant to the challenges that confront us in our time;
6) emphasizes that Afrikan identity is embedded in the continuity of Afrikan cultural history and that Afrikan cultural history represents a distinct reality continually evolving from the experiences of all Afrikan people wherever they are and have been on the planet across time and generations;
7) focuses on the “knowledge and discovery of historical truths; through comparison; hypothesizing and testing through debate, trial, and application; through analysis and synthesis; through creative and critical thinking; through problem resolution processes; and through final evaluation and decision making”
(Akoto, 1992, p. 116);
8) can only be systematically facilitated by people who themselves are consciously engaged in the process of Afrikan-centered personal transformation;
9) is a process dependent upon human perception and interpretation [Thus, it follows that a curriculum can not be Afrikan-centered independent of our capacity to perceive and interpret it in an Afrikan-centered manner (Shujaa, 1992)];
10) embraces the traditional wisdom that “children are the reward of life” and it is, therefore, an expression of our unconditional love for them. In order to best serve Afrikan children our methods must reflect the best understandings that we have of how they develop and learn biologically, spiritually and culturally.

References

Akoto, K. A. (1992) Nation building: Theory and practice in Afrikan-centered education. Washington, DC: Pan- Afrikan World Institute.

Ani, M. (1994). Yurugu: An African-centered critique of European cultural thought and behavior. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press.

Anwisye, S. (1993). Education is more than the three “R”s. Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, 2, 97-101.

Clarke, J. H. (1991). African world revolution: Africans at the crossroads. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press.

Karenga, M. (1980). Kawaida theory: An introductory outline. Inglewood, CA: Kawaida Publications.

Richards, D. M. (1989). Let the circle be unbroken: African spirituality in the diaspora. Trenton, NJ: The Red Sea Press. (originally published in 1980)

Shujaa, M. J. (1992). Afrocentric transformation and parental choice in African American independent schools. The Journal of Negro Education, (61)2, 148-159.

How CIBI Defines “Independent” As it Relates to the Fiscal Affairs of Independent Afrikan Centered Educational Institutions
An Afrikan-Centered educational institution is considered by CIBI to be “independent” in the context of its fiscal affairs, if:

a. The programmatic emphasis of the institution is directed toward nation building and the security of liberated space.

b. Pan-Afrikan nationalist interests determine institutional decisions about soliciting, accepting and investing funds.
c. The operational budget (i.e., that which includes the rent/lease/mortgage, payroll, utilities, kwk (etc.)) is funded primarily from sources within and controlled by the Pan-Afrikan community in order to ensure that the ability of the institution to maintain itself is contingent upon Afrikan people.

AT LAST!-THE PHOTO I HAVE BEEN PRAYING FOR-MICHELLE OBAMA WITH AN AFRO-SHE IS INDEED A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!-FROM THEPOLITICALCARNIVAL.BLOGSPOT.COM

March 7, 2009

FINALLY THE PICTURE I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR -MICHELLE WITH AN AFRO!WHAT NATURAL BLACK BEAUTY! MICHELLE IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

FINALLY THE PICTURE I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR -MICHELLE WITH AN AFRO!WHAT NATURAL BLACK BEAUTY! MICHELLE IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

FROM thepoliticalcarnival.blogspot.com

Friday, March 6, 2009
PhotObama: Michelle Obama’s high school prom date was no Barack

By GottaLaff

Prom Night! 18-year-old beauty named Michelle Robinson: Check. Flirty low-cut dress slashed to the thigh: Check. Handsome prom date: Check. David Upchurch instead of Barack Obama: Ruh-roh!

Back then, [Upchurch] recalls Michelle exhibited the drive that would take her from a rough Chicago neighbourhood to Harvard University and on to a law career where she would later meet her husband, Barack Obama.

David said: ‘I grew up with Michelle and her brother Craig. We were neighbours, and our families were close.

‘When Michelle was in the middle of her junior year, we began dating and continued to date for a year-and-a-half.

‘Michelle knew what she wanted and after graduation she was off to Princeton University. I couldn’t stand in her way.’

Perhaps mindful that her husband is the President, David refuses to ‘kiss and tell’ about their time together.

He says he can’t even remember if he received a goodnight kiss after the prom.
The romance ended when Michelle went off to Princeton to study sociology. […]

‘I wished the best for Michelle because she has always been a wonderful person,’ he said.

‘I always knew Michelle was special and would make a difference in the world.’ […]

David, a divorced father-of-three from Colorado Springs, Colorado, says he finds it hard to believe his prom date ended up in the White House.

‘I cannot tell you how proud I am of her and her husband. I have never met Barack, but I have to say, he is a very lucky man,’ he said.

David Upchurch: The Pete Best of dating.

Posted by GottaLaff at 12:31 PM
Labels: david upchurch, first lady michelle obama, high school, prom
7 comments:
GottaLaff said…
He came THIS close… ; )

He sounds like a sweet man.

March 6, 2009 12:45 PM
Anonymous said…
LOL! I didn’t look close enough at first and just saw the mustache and thought, God Barack looks like crap with a mustache!

March 6, 2009 1:09 PM
Clancy said…
Oh, that dress! Let me tell you, prom pictures should be destroyed within five years of their taking. Every once in a while, mom likes to pull out my junior prom pics, in which I’m dressed in a 18th century period clothes (because I really loved my girlfriend).

March 6, 2009 1:15 PM
Dr. President said…
look at those long ass legs, go girl!

March 6, 2009 2:20 PM
Dr. President said…
look at those long ass legs, go girl!

March 6, 2009 2:20 PM
Anonymous said…
She looks as though she did not age a day. What is ya secret GF?

March 6, 2009 5:34 PM
Belinda said…
I wonder if President Obama is the jealous type. I bet he would pimp slap someone over his woman. I Already know Michelle would snatch a woman bald.

March 6, 2009 9:35 PM


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