Archive for the ‘BLACKS IN THE CARIBBEAN’ Category

A BLACK PRESIDENT OF DOMINICAN REPUBLIC WITH BEAUTIFUL WOOLLY HAIR?-YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT!-FROM NY TIMES 2008

December 11, 2009

THIS BLACK,WOOLLY HAIR PRESIDENTE OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC IS A MAJOR BLACK BREAKTHROUGH!

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/05/nyregion/05dominican.html?_r=1
Dominican President Wins a Third Term
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LinkedinDiggFacebookMixxMySpaceYahoo! BuzzPermalinkBy MARC LACEY
Published: May 17, 2008
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — Dominicans who went to the polls on Friday had been given chickens, poured beer, promised new homes and even handed cash during a spirited frenzy of campaigning. But President Leonel Fernández won a third term in office largely as a result of a campaign gift to the populace that dwarfed those of his six opponents: a shiny new subway system.

“It’s something for all of us,” said Francia Catalina Peña, 71, who stood outside one of the downtown stations, a glass and granite structure that juts from the ground at an odd angle. Her vote went to the man she calls simply “Leonel.”

Mr. Fernández’s campaign slogan was “Pa’lante,” Dominican slang for onward, and his giant public works project was rushed to completion to allow him to offer free rides before the polling. For a while he even drove the subway train, the first in the Caribbean outside of Puerto Rico.

Opponents said the $710 million used to build the nine-mile subway line, which happens to roll through the struggling neighborhood where Mr. Fernández was born, could have been better spent on the country’s poor.

“All that money that went for this should have gone here,” said Eddie Urenya, 55 and unemployed, rubbing his belly. “It’s nice, but is it needed?”

Perhaps not. But many Dominicans said they saw the project, which still had not opened officially, as a sign of the country’s progress. And in a country where corruption is all too common, others argued that at least the money was not pocketed.

“It’s true that it’s a lot of money, but it’s a project for the people,” said Ramona Hernández, director of the Dominican Studies Institute at the City College of New York.

Mr. Fernández grew up in the Bronx and maintains strong ties there. “Leonel grew up in New York and has a fascination with the place,” said Eduardo Gamarra, a professor at Florida International University in Miami and Mr. Fernández’s longtime friend and campaign consultant. “For him, the Metro is part of that, a way to make this city modern and boost national pride.”

Early returns Friday night showed that Mr. Fernández appeared to have garnered more than 50 percent of the vote and clearly would not need to enter a runoff election. His main opponent conceded late Friday.

Mr. Fernández has been widely credited with steadying a country that he inherited in economic crisis. He was first elected in 1996 and then returned to the presidency in 2004, as banks collapsed, inflation skyrocketed and waves of Dominicans headed to the ocean in boats to seek better lives in the United States.

Mr. Fernández’s chief competitor, Miguel Vargas, an engineer, was public works minister in the last government. The two men battled during the campaign over which of them would drag the Dominican Republic back to its troubled past.

Mr. Fernández, 54, whose Dominican Liberation Party vastly outspent all rivals, sought to link Mr. Vargas with the problem-plagued presidency from 2000 to 2004 of Hipólito Mejía, who left the country near collapse.

And Mr. Vargas, 57, representing the Dominican Revolutionary Party, raised the specter of the last president to win two consecutive terms, Joaquín Balaguer, a strongman who rigged elections, jailed opponents and stuck around for decades, leaving office in 1996.

“We have seen the harm that re-election has done,” Mr. Vargas said at a recent election rally.

Mr. Balaguer’s legacy prompted the country in 1996 to bar sitting presidents from serving again, a law that was changed again in 2002 to allow two consecutive terms.

Mr. Fernández has made no secret of his desire to amend the Constitution to lift term limits altogether, a controversial notion in a country with a history of dictatorship.

Even with his apparent victory, the Dominican Republic faces entrenched problems, despite an economic growth rate that has approached 10 percent in recent years. Global food prices are on the rise, blackouts are still a way of life for much of the capital and unemployment hovers around 15 percent. On top of that, a building boom and a steady influx of tourists have not changed the fact that a quarter of the population lives in poverty.

“Life is hard,” said one of those poor people, Sando Chere, 34, who sells flavored ice on the street and planned to vote for an opposition candidate to stir things up. “None of the politicians, not one of them, really understand that.”

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-A FASHION DESIGNER, MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN-SHE GOT HER BLACK MAN AND YOU CAN TOO!

August 22, 2009

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM HAITI. MARIE IS A POPULAR FASHION DESIGNER,MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE JEAN IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FROM HAITI. MARIE IS A POPULAR FASHION DESIGNER,MODEL AND WIFE TO BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED WYCLEF JEAN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY GETS HER MAN A BLACK BEAUTY HIMSELF WYCLEF JEAN ! YOU TOO WILL GET A WONDERFUL BLACK MAN TO MARRIED WHO WILL LOVE YOUR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN!

MARIE CLAUDINETTE,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY GETS HER MAN A BLACK BEAUTY HIMSELF WYCLEF JEAN ! YOU TOO WILL GET A WONDERFUL BLACK MAN TO MARRIED WHO WILL LOVE YOUR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN!

AT BET AWARDS

AT BET AWARDS

MARIE CALUDINETTE AND WYCLEF JEAN GET MARRIED!

MARIE CALUDINETTE AND WYCLEF JEAN GET MARRIED!

wyclef_claudinette_largerfusha83fusha1
BLACK BEAUTY MEETS BLACK BEAUTY!

BLACK BEAUTY MEETS BLACK BEAUTY!

4 BLACK LESSONS TO LEARN FROM MICHAEL JACKSON’S DEATH FOR BLACK PEOPLE EVERYWHERE!

July 1, 2009

BLACK PARENTS MUST TEACH THEIR CHILDREN TO LOVE THEIR GOD GIVEN BLACK FEATURES! MICHAEL WAS TAUGHT BY HIS FATHER TO HATE HIS NOSE,HIS SKIN COLOR,HIS BLACKNESS! BLACK PARENTS THAT ARE DOING THIS  STOP KILLING OUR CHILDREN LIKE THIS!

BLACK PARENTS MUST TEACH THEIR CHILDREN TO LOVE THEIR GOD GIVEN BLACK FEATURES! MICHAEL WAS TAUGHT BY HIS FATHER TO HATE HIS NOSE,HIS SKIN COLOR,HIS BLACKNESS! BLACK PARENTS THAT ARE DOING THIS STOP KILLING OUR CHILDREN LIKE THIS!

MICHAEL SAID THAT HIS FATHER USED TO MAKE FUN OF HIS NOSE AND CALL HIM UGLY! BLACK PARENTS TEACH YOUR CHILDREN TO LOVE THEIR GOD GIVEN BLACK FEATURES!

MICHAEL SAID THAT HIS FATHER USED TO MAKE FUN OF HIS NOSE AND CALL HIM UGLY! BLACK PARENTS TEACH YOUR CHILDREN TO LOVE THEIR GOD GIVEN BLACK FEATURES!

1. RAISE YOUR BLACK CHILD WITH PLENTY OF BLACK LOVE,TEACH THEM TO LOVE THEIR BLACK SKIN,FEATURES,SELF AND THEIR UNIQUE BLACK BEAUTY!

2.DON'T BLEACH! BLEACHING LEADS TO OTHER SKIN DISEASES AND EVENTUALLY SKIN CANCER AND DEATH,ALONG WITH SKIN SCARRING IN THE PROCESS!

3.DON'T TAKE EXCESSIVE DRUGS,PRESCRIPTION OR OTHER WISE! ANY DAILY DRUG TAKING LEDS TO ADDICTION AND ALL THESE ARE UN-NATURAL CHEMICALS ENTERING YOUR BODY AND THERE WILL BE HORRIBLE SIDE EFFECTS,ALONG WITH ADDICTION! DRUG ADDICTION KILLED MICHAEL JACKSON BEFORE SKIN CANCER DID(WHICH HE GOT BY BLEACHING!)

4.FACE GOD LIKE AFRICAN CULTURE TEACHES US TO DO HISTORICALLY! IF MICHAEL JACKSON HAD TAKEN ALL HIS PROBLEMS OF BAD FAMILY UPBRINGING AND FEELINGS OF INFERIORITY TAUGHT FIRST TO HIM BY HIS FATHER,AND LACK OF PARENTAL LOVE TO GOD THEN HE WOULD HAVE OVERCAME THEM! AS IT WAS THESE FEELINGS THAT WERE THE BASIS OF HIS SELF-DESTRUCTION!

WELL IT HAS HAPPENED!-MICHAEL JACKSON HAS DIED!-WHETHER IT WAS OVERDOSE FROM HIS DRUG ADDICTION OR HIS BLEACHING THAT WOULD HAVE KILLED HIM EVENTUALLY WITH SKIN CANCER THE LESSON IS,BLACK PEOPLE DON’T BLEACH! BLEACH AND DIE!

June 29, 2009

DON'T BLEACH AND BECOME A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON DID!

DON'T BLEACH AND BECOME A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON DID!

MICHAEL JACKSON BLEACHED UNTIL HE GOT A SKIN DISEASE! IT WAS REPORTED BEFORE HE DIED THAT HE HAD SKIN CANCER FINALLY AND THAT IS DEATH TOO! DON'T BLEACH BLACK PEOPLE,DON'T BLEACH! BLEACH AND DIE!

MICHAEL JACKSON BLEACHED UNTIL HE GOT A SKIN DISEASE! IT WAS REPORTED BEFORE HE DIED THAT HE HAD SKIN CANCER FINALLY AND THAT IS DEATH TOO! DON'T BLEACH BLACK PEOPLE,DON'T BLEACH! BLEACH AND DIE!

FROM drbenkim.com

Potential Dangers Of Using Skin-Lightening Creams
By Dr. Ben Kim on August 31, 2006 Health Warnings
Michael Jackson and I both have a skin condition called vitiligo, a condition that results in loss of skin color in patches throughout one’s face and body.

For years, I have heard people snicker about Michael Jackson’s feeble attempts to “be more white.” The truth is, Michael Jackson’s skin is white because more than a decade ago, he used powerful skin-lightening medication to blend his naturally brown skin color with his white, depigmented patches.

Skin-lightening creams are heavily promoted by many dermatologists and skin care experts to even out cosmetic conditions like vitiligo, liver spots, and other superficial blemishes.

The problem with these creams is that many of them contain a substance called hydroquinone, which a variety of studies have linked to:

Increased risk of cancer
Increased risk of adrenal gland problems
Increased risk of all health conditions associated with mercury poisoning
Increased risk of developing a rare metabolic disorder called ochronosis, which can cause physical changes to the skin and tissues surrounding the eyes, ears, and joints
Citing these and other potential dangers of using creams that contain hydroquinone, this past Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S. put forth a proposal to ban over-the-counter sales of skin-lightening products.

Don’t expect dermatologists and the many companies who sell hundreds of different skin-lightening products that contain hydroquinone to remain silent about the FDA’s proposal.

According to the L.A. Times, in the United States, approximately two-thirds of all skin-lightening products are available over-the-counter without a prescription. Who knows how many millions of dollars this translates to each month for companies that produce these products?

If you’re not convinced that skin-lightening products that contain hydroquinone are best avoided, consider that hydroquinone has already been banned for sale in the European Union, Australia, and Japan.

Perhaps the real issue here is the lack of encouragement that our society offers to people who feel badly about their physical appearances. There never seems to be a shortage of plastic surgeons, dermatologists, and other sales people who encourage people to change or hide what they don’t like about their looks.

BLEACHING!-TYRA BANKS DID A WHOLE SHOW ON BLACKamerikkkans BLEACHING FROM CHILDHOOD AND THEIR HEALTH PROBLEMS NOW!-FROM TYRASHOW.WARNERBROS.COM

June 13, 2009

BLEACH,THE CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOU AND YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN!

BLEACH,THE CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOU AND YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN!

THIS BROTHER AND SISTER IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE NOW REGRETTING BLEACHING!

THIS BROTHER AND SISTER IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE NOW REGRETTING BLEACHING!

IT IS CHEMICALS SO THE LONGER YOU USE THEM THE MORE THEY DAMAGE YOUR SKIN AND IN THE END GIVE YOU SKIN CANCER!

IT IS CHEMICALS SO THE LONGER YOU USE THEM THE MORE THEY DAMAGE YOUR SKIN AND IN THE END GIVE YOU SKIN CANCER!

SEE HOW IT CAN AFFECT YOU AFTER TIME!

SEE HOW IT CAN AFFECT YOU AFTER TIME!

BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON IF YOU BLEACH!

BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON IF YOU BLEACH!

From tyrashow.warnerbros.com

Dangers of Skin Bleaching
Shocking info on how bleaching can endanger your health.

Tyra has met women willing to do almost anything to lighten the color of their skin … including the use of bleach, despite the negative or harmful side effects. What’s really scary is that you can buy bleaching creams in stores across the country. While these creams are intended to be used on small spots to reduce scarring, as we saw on the show, some women slather creams over their entire bodies. But is the result worth the risk — even if the risk is cancer? Read on for the scary side effects of these controversial creams.

Mercury
Even small doses of Mercury can cause neurological damage. This concern is so great, Minnesota has outlawed cosmetics like skin lighteners that intentionally feature it. But some “mom and pop” shops carry creams with that contain extreme levels of such ingredients.

Hydroquinone
This component of many skin-bleaching techniques is also found in film developing products. (Note: Your body is a work of art, but should you treat it like a chemically processed photo in a darkroom? We think not!) The idea of using this ingredient didn’t sound good to the French, who banned it for fear of cancer risks.

Alpha Hydroxy Acids
These are most commonly found in facial chemical peels, which are better known as procedures reserved for serious and infrequent skin overhauls administered by professionals. These should not be in anything you use at home regularly.

Arsenic
Most people hear this word and immediately think “poison,” which is exactly what arsenic is. Not something you want to find on the list of ingredients in your face cream, but that might be the case with some skin lighteners.

Bleaching seems like a crazy idea, and I think it is, but before we look at the mothers and judge we should look at ourselves. white wemon get fake tans, that can cause cancer, they bleach their teeth, that kills the enammal. these bleaching girls are a reflection of our own society. bleaching is wrong, but so can the other beauty routiens. these mothers are emotinaly and physacally damaging their dark skined chindren, butthe bigger problom is why they are doing it. it is the parents job to teach their kids that they are beautiful, and that what makes a beautiful person is their heart and their head. we should take that episode as a sign that our society doesnt understand true beauty, and evey girl on this planet should see that and change. Posted by kiwu 01/19/09 11:22 AM
ok i understand why somebody would want to bleach, they don’t think they are pretty enough or beautiful. im a white teenage girl and i HATE the way i look!!! i will do anyting just to lose a little weight. and if i don’t lose any weight i feel like i’ve faild so i end up cutting my arms. but there is one thing that has helped me is know that everybody is beautiful in their own way!!!! Posted by Ashlee 01/19/09 10:59 AM
Oh my God…i am black from africa. i have light brown shade. my favourate colour is the dark black that shines …like the colour of the lady that was complaining. also some white people want to look darker by tanning. what is wrong with people…i do not think it is about colour it is about self esteem issue. and abhoring once’s colour is a symptom of it. god has given you health and beauty and we complain about the blessings of God… Posted by kifaah 01/19/09 10:01 AM
HEy. Does Bleaching the skin even work ???????? Like I think thats crazy…. If i get any bleach on my fingers it stings.. let alone on a childs whole body, thats outragous. awful. I thought black people stuck up for there race and really belived in it. This is crazy crazy crazy. Posted by Dont Understand 01/19/09 7:35 AM
I would have to agree with Stephanie about showing both sides of the spectrum as it is all harmful whether it be UV lights or chemicals from bleaching chemicals. You have people like me that think black is beauty from one shade to the next. Posted by Kara 01/19/09 7:15 AM
Hi Tyra! I saw the show on black women who bleach their skin. I have to tell you that I was shocked! I am a dark skin puertorican woman and I am overweight. I will tell you that when I look in the mirror I see the most beautiful woman I have ever seen. I’m proud of everything about me, including my skin color. These women are telling the world ‘I’m black, I’m minority, and I’m not worth much. What they dont understand is that we have to be proud of who we are no matter what size, color, shape and weight. If you dont deem yourself beautiful, nobody else will. One thing that i dont understand is the following’ black women are trying to be white (getting together with white men, straightening their hair, light colored contacts, and white women are trying to be black (curling the hair with perms, darkening the skin in tanning salons under the sun in the summertime and at tanning salons in the winter. Why cant we just love who we are and be the best we can be? I’m so sick of people not being happy with how god made them! Ramona Posted by Ramona 01/19/09 12:33 AM
I knew of skin bleaching before watching the show from having lived in the Arab world. I would like you all to visit AVRF.org to see the faces of children who have **involuntarily** gone from black to white. This skin disease is called Vitiligo, and it needs to be recognized. I think the women on the show should be happy that they are one color. God makes us the way we are for a reason. Please visit AVRF.org and educate yourselves!! 🙂 Posted by Jessica 01/18/09 8:37 PM
Well, I am a brown skin young lady and proud of it. I wouldn’t change my skin color for the world and this is the attitude the women who are trying to bleach their skin should have because they are all beautiful. Dark skinned women are beautiful african americans as well. I do agree that they should be represented more in the media and videos. Posted by Quinita 01/18/09 8:02 PM
Hi’ Tyra I watch your show every day and i saw the show about the black girl that was bleaching they body but they shouldn’t do it ,because black is beautiful and what count is the beauty of they heart so tell them that we love them very much the color don’t have anything to do with they color ok. and that does people out their they don’t have heart or feel to hurt black humam ok Thank you Diana Alicea Posted by Diana Alicea 01/18/09 5:50 PM
Tyra, I DVR’d your show on skin bleaching and as a white woman I was a little offended when your undercover reporter was shocked to find out the creams were only marketed in “black” areas. As a white woman I wanted to let you know that tanning booths, which have harmful UV rays, are only marketed in “white” areas and that the tanning creams that they promote are named things such as “caramel delight” and “sensual chocolate”. It would have made more sense to me if you had shown both spectrums of caucasions tanning and african americans bleaching. It’s all the same, we just want to be something we’re not, sad as that is. Posted by Stephanie 01/18/09 5:24 PM
TYRA I WATCHED THE SHOW AND WAS A LITTLE OFFENDED BECAUSE I AM A BEAUTIFUL DARK SKINNED WOMAN WITH SELF ESTEEM. ITS TRULY UNFORTUNATE THESE YOUNG LADIES TRULY LACK IN THIS AREA AND THAT’S TRULY WHAT THE BOTTOM LINE IS. ALSO I BELIEVE IF THESE YOUNG WOMEN RECEIVED POSITIVE AFFIRMATIONS AT HOME OF HOW BEAUTIFUL THEY ARE AND THAT TRUE BEAUTY IS FROM THE INSIDE OUT THIS WOULD NOT BE AN ISSUE FOR THEM. MY PRAYER FOR THEM IS THAT THEY GROW IN ENOUGH SELF LOVE AND ACCEPT THEMSELVES FOR WHO THEY ARE AND HOW GOD MADE THEM. Posted by WANDA 01/18/09 4:09 PM
PS- I think my saving grace is my personality . If i were’nt the way I am, Lord knows what I would’ve done to myself by now. Posted by MusiqJunkie16 01/18/09 4:05 PM
I understand where the women on the show were coming from . I am a 16 year old dark-skinned female, insecure about my looks . I have had numerous thoughts about wanting to bleach my skin, etc. in order to make my complexion lighter. I have had guys that look right past me and on to my light-skin, modelesque friends ; “Friends” that have secluded me because I didn’t look like the rest of the light-skin girls. Not to add to the fact that they are all tall, beautiful, and built to perfection. I on the other hand am about 5’3, dark, and over-developed. [ I hate the stares from older gentlemen. ] You can see the difference in treatment between us all and it a serious problem that must be handled . I have no one to talk to because I highly doubt anyone would know how to react or help me. The only reason why i have not went through with these things to lighten my complexion is health reasons. Of course I have my days where I am the Fiercest Feline in the Jungle, but most of the time I’d rather live my life dark-skinned and average rather than light-skin and on an early ride to death. Just thought I’d share my experiences =], ~MusiqJunkie Posted by MusiqJunkie16 01/18/09 4:03 PM
tyra your right this article just described my mom. she is willing to do anything to make her skin lighter. i have tried to convince her that its bad for her skin. i also tried telling her that she should be happy with the shade she is. i think its beautiful. but my mom doesnt seem to believe me and what i have to say what wouold you tell her? Posted by nisha patel 01/18/09 2:25 PM
I agree with Tyra when she said on the show that the darker skin women who want to bleach are the victims of our color struck racist society that never celebrates dark skin especially in the media. I notice that black sitcoms and movies from years ago used dark skin women as love interest paired with the black man – you rarely see that today. Its almost like a dark skin black man cannot be in love with a dark skin woman in the media, he is always paired with a light skin or white woman. This sends a clear message to our african american men and women that having a light or white skin is more pretigious. If we dark skin women speak out – then you’re labeled jealous or player hating. It really hurts when your own brothers reject you and that’s when the bleaching extreme happens. Personally, I am brown skin and love my complexion, but I find dark skin stunning. They are show stoppers on the runway etc. Hurray for Barrack & Michelle Obama who is dark skin. I don’t know but somehow black women as a whole must find a way to protest this injustice in movies, and in hip hop without us being labeled as jealous. Posted by Jeannestar101 01/18/09 1:03 PM

BLEACHING IN UGANDA!-“HOW SKIN LIGHTENING TAKES ITS TOLL ON YOUR HEALTH”,AND CAN EVEN EFFECT THE BIRTH OF NORMAL CHILDREN IN FUTURE!-FROM UGANDA’S THE MONITOR.CO.UG

June 13, 2009

BLEACH AND GET SKIN CANCER ON THE LONG RUN! YOU WON'T SEE YOUR CHILDREN GROW UP AND IT CAN EVEN AFFECT YOUR CHILDREN AT BIRTH!

BLEACH AND GET SKIN CANCER ON THE LONG RUN! YOU WON'T SEE YOUR CHILDREN GROW UP AND IT CAN EVEN AFFECT YOUR CHILDREN AT BIRTH!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER!

From monitor.co.ug

How skin lightening takes its toll on your health
EDGAR R. BATTE

Walking around town will reveal just how low some women think of their natural black skin complexion. They strive to achieve a lighter skin complexion because they think that the lighter their skin complexions are, the better and probably more appealing they will look.

As such, skin bleaching continues to manifest itself in many black communities where even the supposedly lighter-looking women will go an extra mile to make themselves lighter.
Several women in Uganda use soaps and creams containing mercury to obtain a lighter complexion. NET PHOTO

Skin whitening, as answers.com offers, is a term covering a variety of cosmetic methods used to whiten the skin, in parts of East Asia, the Americas, the Middle East and Africa.

The site adds that skin lightening or whitening is a controversial topic as it is closely intertwined with the detrimental effects on health, identity, self image and racial supremacy.

According to Dr Pius Okong, a health consultant with St Francis Hospital Nsambya, this remains a big problem he attributes to inferiority complex where women are not satisfied with the colour of their skins and therefore go out to try and achieve a light complexion which comes with a price to pay. In most cases, the products have found their way to shops unchecked yet the effects of the chemicals used in making (such) products like soaps and creams, as Dr. Vincent Karuhanga explains, have been found to have adverse effects on unborn children, women and men.

“Many of these bleaching agents contain steroids, hydroquinone and mercury which can affect the body as drugs do, given the fact that they interfere with the production of melanin- group of naturally occurring dark pigments, especially the pigment found in skin,” Dr Karuhanga elaborates.

In communities, the problem has not gone unattended to and last year, The International Anti-Corruption Theatre Movement (IATM), a pressure group against bleaching, indicated that thousands of women in Uganda use soaps containing mercury to obtain a lighter complexion without knowing the health hazards of using such soaps.

Mercury according to findings through Nordic Chemicals Group, the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland and Ms Uganda, causes a number of health problems such as skin cancer and nervous disorder.

Steroids, on the other hand, could cause diabetes given that they increase the amount of sugar metabolism in the body thus worsening the infection, Dr Karuhanga adds. He points out creams like Pimplex usually used to treat pimples, contain mercury which is reportedly poisonous.

According to mercuryexposure.org, mercury-based bleaching creams contain ammoniated mercury or mercrous chloride as a bleaching agent. Some of these creams may contain up to more than 2-5 per cent mercury that will be harmful to health, therefore resulting in mercury poisoning, especially chronic mercury poisoning.

“In the Minimata epidemic in Japan, there were 42 brain-damaged children in 400 live births. Only one of the mothers had no sign of having mercury poisoning.

Majority of the mothers had used mercury-based bleaching creams during their childbearing years,” mercuryexposure.org explains.

“The biggest problem is that by the time someone realises signs of the effects, the damage is already done.

The inferiority complex has also caught up with men and they have started bleaching their skins too,” Dr Karuhanga further explains, adding that the worst side effect victims could suffer would be worsened infections.

Mercury, he adds, can affect the kidney and nervous system while hydroquinone can damage the body nerves as well as the blood cells. Steroids have a pushing syndrome and can thus precipitate high blood pressure, diabetes and could cause acne.

However, that is not to say all bleaching agents have bad side effects. And as Dr Karuhanga and David Ssali, a dermatologist at Dama Medical Clinic agree, some herbal creams and soaps have been found to be good, given the fact that most are natural.

According to Ssali, for most people, the intention is not to bleach. They are looking for a good skin but with the continuous trials with different products, end up bleaching their skins unknowingly.

“People should be made aware of alternatives to achieving this (good skin). They could eat fruits like carrots, simsim and a variety of coloured fruits and vegetables,” Ssali who did not rule out skin cancer for continued use of skin products, adds.

“By using some of these products, you remove the natural pigment which makes the skin vulnerable to ultraviolet rays, opening the skin pores further which puts you at many health risks,” he warns.

According to the AAR Health services Kenya website, dermatologists caution that the treatment of skin conditions must be done strictly with the advice of the gynaecologists or dermatologists. In pregnant women, the unborn child is susceptible to medications, even those applied to the skin and great care must be taken.

In neighbouring Kenya, there has been a ban on bleaching creams with stringent laws and public campaigns have been launched to address the harmful effects of these products on the skin.

Much as effort has been taken to ban the importation of skin lightening creams, they are still in plenty and sold across the counter in most shops and on the roadside in Uganda.

Ideally, skin whitening could be advised to treat pigmentation (coloration of tissues by pigment) disorders like spotted skin tone, age spots, freckles- small, usually yellow or brown spots on the skin, often seen on the face and pregnancy marks.

BLEACHING!-“SKIN CANCER IS A MAJOR CAUSE OF DEATH AMONGST JAMAICANS” BECAUSE THEY ARE BLEACHING!-FROM JAMAICANRESEARCHER.WORDPRESS.COM

June 13, 2009
BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

from jamaicanresearcher.wordpress.com
http://jamaicanresearcher.wordpress.com/2008/11/02/skin-cancer/

Skin cancer is a Major cause of death amongst Jamaicans!
November 2, 2008

Skin lightening/ bleaching is a big deal in the Jamaican society. It is such a big deal that the Ministry of Health (MOH) saw it important to embrace a campaign geared at its discouragement in February 2007.

The practice is very serious because it addresses common concerns about our yearning for beauty. During the period of the MOH’s campaign which denounced skin bleaching, then Minister, Hon. Horace Dally articulated the seriousness of the situation in the following way, “Skin bleaching has become a fast and risky way for young men and women to become beautiful.”

With the association with beauty, skin bleaching has become extremely popular. We all have a desire to feel and be perceived as beautiful, and as such my concerns about how to discourage people from it. We saw in another article that health concerns weren’t enough to discourage bleachers. After all, doesn’t it make us feel better about ourselves and the way the world sees us? It seems like an uphill battle to me–trying to convince our citizenry to stop destroying their beautiful black skin when the color cards are staked up against them.

The root cause of contemporary skin bleaching practices–stigma and discrimination against Jamaicans of African decent–must be addressed if we are to ward off a skin cancer epidemic in our country. Skin cancer is reported as one of the major causes of death amongst Jamaican citizens and therefore it is just a matter of time before we have a full blown epidemic on our hands. We must therefore strive to change behavior by addressing physical, mental, and symbolic remnants of light-skinned superiority and dark-skinned inferiority which contributes to low self-esteem and confidence.

Our solution to the problem lies in our need to examine what is being done nationally to increase and inspire confidence about the beauty of the black skin and denounce the age old belief/ saying, “Nutten Black nuh Good !”

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African women risking health by bleaching skin
Categories: Skin Lightening in Jamaica
Tagged: Elora Consulting, Horace Dalley, Jamaica, Jamaican, Jamaican Researcher, Ministry of Health, MOH, skin bleaching, skin lightening, St. Rachel, St. Rachel Ustanny

3 responses so far ↓
The Legal Mind // November 11, 2008 at 8:48 pm

It is very unfortunate that after almost 500 years, we as a people are still psychologically damaged from the ideology, philosophy and methodology of white supremacy. I was in Jamaica recently and I was in shock to see how these young people were bleaching their lovely black skin to look white. It makes me sick to my stomach.
http://caribbeantravelexpert@wordpress.com
The Legal Mind // November 11, 2008 at 8:54 pm

Is there any evidence that the Jamaican Government ban those bleaching creams? We all should lobby a bill or legislation that will outlaw any such product in Jamaica. Mental slavery, it still exists in the minds of many of our people.
http://caribbeantravelexpert.wordpress.com/
A Historical Review of Perceptions of Beauty and Colour in the Jamaican Society « Jamaican Researcher // November 23, 2008 at 3:15 am

[…] I decided to write this post as a follow-up to my articles: From Skin Lightening… and Skin Cancer… so as to demonstrate the impact of socialization on perceptions of beauty and colour, and […]
Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade // June 13, 2009 at 1:08 pm

IN GABON THE PRESIDENT HAS BANNED SKIN BLEACHING-IF YOU BLEACH YOU GO TO JAIL! THAT IS ONE OF THE STEPS BLACK COUNTRIES MUST TAKE IN ADDITION TO JAILING PEOPLE WHO ARE SMUGGLING AND SELLING THESE PRODUCTS! WE ARE ASKING ALL BLOGS TO CAMPAIGN AGAINST IT SHOWING THE SIDE EFFECTS AND DEADLY SIDE OF BLEACHING!

THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTBELO(COLON,PANAMA)-ANOTHER SIGN OF THE ORIGINAL BLACK IMAGES OF CHRIST AND THE BLACK MADONNAS!-FROM PHOTOGRAPHY BY UNIXRULZ 37 AT FLICKR.COM

June 12, 2009

THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTOBELO IS CELEBRATED EVERY YEAR ON 21 OCTOBER IN COLON

THE BLACK JESUS OF PORTOBELO IS CELEBRATED EVERY YEAR ON 21 OCTOBER IN COLON

FROM flickr.com
unixrulz32

BACK TO AFRICA-“CAN BLACKS IN AMERIKKKA WORK WITH BLACKS IN AFRICA?”

June 6, 2009

BROTHER HUDSON LIBERTY,A BLACK AMERIKKKAN

BROTHER HUDSON LIBERTY,A BLACK AMERIKKKAN

FROM village.africanpath.com

Connecting African Culture

Can Blacks in America Work With Blacks in Africa?

Posted by hudsonliberty on September 19, 2008 at 7:47pm in Friends
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The answer is Yes. The Black Business Builders Club is demonstrating the cooperation is not only possible but necessary. For many years, there has been an artificial rift between Blacks in the Homeland and those in the Diaspora.

As Dr. John Henrick Clarke would say, “It didn’t matter where the slave ship stopped to drop you off, we all came from Africa.” The Black Business Builders Club is making a concerted effort to build the economic bridge between Blacks Globally.

The fee structure for membership made it affordable to people even in some of the most economic stressed areas. It is another wonderful step in building bridges between the East Side of the Ocean and the West Side of the Ocean.

For more information on the club the resource site for the club. To join one goes to the club entrance
Tags: africa, at, based, blacks, business, cooperation, home, job, joint, training

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Permalink Reply by yaw on September 23, 2008 at 1:42am
I am glad the “answer in yes.” Having visited the continent on several times, and i’ve been captured, immershed and captivated with the people, their culure and their humanity; from the way that i see it, with the meetings of the minds of the far streched distance among the people of the diaspora and those on the continent, would be a Godly chosen circumstance. I think with the mindset of both coming togather for a common goal is achievable.

But, let me back up. even though all things are possible, it sometimes seems that what is destined to be, seem’s a bit far fectched, “like getting it together.” we often talk about ethic and tribal turmoil, etc. Well, perhaps to some degree, it does exist. I feel that anything i hear concerning this matter was intentionally conceived and planned for much of such causes. Even so, i’ve visited 13 or14
“countries”, (only because some of the countries are so small, it would seem if we could form and have a feradated union among various states) and classed as a visitor, i’ve enjoyed my connections, and indeed, feel that i have established some good links with many people every place i’ve gone. no, not every encounter is your ideal friendship. you’ll have to weed those not so hospitable out, just as anyother place, but the culture and the people seem to me, so full of humanity you can easily let your guard. It occurs to me that many of us here in the diaspora and on the continent desire to make these links, but lack the formality to do so, that is, the united front or effort to do; to pool our resources, both human and with monetary resources. The problem seem’s to stem from the word good GOVERNANCE by the leadership in too many of the Afrikan countries. Corruption. Why not we do nor pool these resources and work for the common good of bringing ourselves in unity for the betterment of our political and enconomic situation? to achieve meaniful economic and unity for this goal will require what many of us are not ready to do; give the necessary sacrfice to achieve what we say we want. And within the diaspora, are groups not pooling themselves for the interest of the cause. I see a lack of organization.

I conclude, that what is going on is the results of colonialism and slavery, of which has been vested into the hearts and minds of Afrikan people. Even so, it would appear that we would have learned to overcome such obstacles.

i feel there is much life left, i think, that is if global warming won’t extinguish us before someone get sense and stop the human madness, which i feel we all must partake in. I imagine we will have to take the lead roll in that as well.

I hope i have not gone to far from the point of issue, but i think it is all relevant. I just hope the continent of Afrika will still have enough of its resources left to sustain the future children to come. You know like the minerals and other natural resources: the cobalt, uraniaum, iron, copper, zinc, manganese, etc. hopefully the rich soil will be left to sustain us. So please!!! someone halt self extinction of selling all the minerals and keep hope alive.

yaw
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Permalink Reply by tekono on September 24, 2008 at 3:32am
Here is an example of a successful African American Businessman in Nigeria. He arrived with no capital in NIgeria in 1988 at the invitation of his University friends and he has been representing Apple Computers in Nigeria since 15 years now.You can read more on John Cashin;s journey on one of my blog posts:

More info about Cashin’s business in Nigeria:

MetroLAN Plans State-of-the-Art Apple Systems
By Okechukwu Kanu

——————————————————————————–

MetroLAN Ventures, a company which believes strongly in the radical revolutionary research & development programme of Apple Computers has set itself the target of using Apple products to provide the right basic tools to change lives. John Cashin, CEO MetroLAN Ventures made this known recently in a statement to THISDAY on the trends within MetroLAN and the computer industry.

He said MetroLAN could deliver the latest up-to-date range of Apple technology at short notice anywhere in the country. According to Cashin, “At any given time MetroLAN has several equipment in stock that are usually on the way out for delivery. The demand is such that many systems go straight from clearing to delivery. MetroLAN also offers a demonstration on its system for interested customers, on notification of their wish for this.

Cashin had more to say on the Apple range of products: “Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh. Apple is committed to bringing the best personal computing experience to students, educators, creative professionals and consumers around the world through its innovative hardware, software and Internet offerings.”

MetroLAN also offers a complete line of high quality, high performance Internet, Intranet and Extranet solutions enabling customers to increase productivity and profitability through Internet technology. Through its comprehensive service offerings, MetroLAN meets the requirements of businesses, governments & parastatals, online service providers and telecommunications firms. Customers can choose from in-house deployment to end-to-end, fully managed Internet services, all backed by technical support. MetroLAN’s Systems & Hardware Services Group provides Information Technology services, such as systems integration and networking that allow organizations to match their IT strategy with their business objectives.

MetroLAN offers remote access options such as, ISDN and VPN, Wireless Technology. With MetroLAN Wireless Internet, customers will have access to a complete spectrum of remote connectivity options to satisfy their telecommuters, traveling road warriors and other e-workforce needs. MetroLAN is working to further enhance and extend its IP networking offerings beyond Nigeria and into the West African Regions. This will improve availability of expanded bandwidth and redundancy options and inter-operability between legacy data connections and IP VPN solutions.

MetroLan Ventures is an Apple Authorized Dealer for Nigeria which and advises, sells, supports and provides warranty for the Apple range of products.

The company has a daring list of companies for which it has done all sorts of jobs. They include: THISDAY Newspaper, National Maritime Authority HQ; Christ Embassy Ikeja, Lagos and ABG Communications, Kaduna. Others are Nigeria Minting Security & Printing Company, Victoria Island, Lagos; Continental Transfer Technique Limited, Victoria Island, Lagos; Daily Times Of Nigeria Ikeja, Lagos; Equity & Research Associates (Banking & Financial Consultants) Ikoyi, Lagos and several others.
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Permalink Reply by tekono on September 24, 2008 at 3:57am
I am just using few examples of successful African American businessmen currently operating in Africa to show that yes, Blacks in America and Blacks in Africa can work together:

Sweet success in South Africa: a wine merchant finds opportunity in Johannesburg
Black Enterprise, June, 2008 by Kelly E. Carter
E-mail Print Link [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

ALL EYES WILL BE ON SOUTH AFRICA WHEN THE COUNTRY hosts soccer’s World Cup in 2010. But aside from the sports fanfare, fare, the capital city, Johannesburg, which will host the opening ceremony and final match, is getting significant attention because of its growth in the business sector.

Mining no longer drives the economic growth in this city of 3.9 million. Today, finance and manufacturing, which contribute 34% to the national economy and approximately 9% to the gross domestic product fuel the province of Gauteng (which includes Johansesburg) more than any other district. Information and communications technology and construction also represent growth sectors.

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Son Gault, 67, has witnessed this dramatic change. The Chicago native moved to Johannesburg in December 1996 from New York where he served as a managing director of JPMorgan, heading an infrastructure group in the public finance department. After anti-apartheid sanctions were lifted, the firm opened a South Africa office and installed Gault as managing director. The four-employee office grew to 70 before the 2000 merger with Chase Manhattan Corp. “It was a wonderful opportunity,” says Gault, who appeared on BLACK ENTERPRISE’S 2002 list of Top 50 African Americans ON Wall Street. “Several of the global banking institutions have opened offices here.” He cites Citibank, HSBC, and Merril Lynch South African. Bank of China, Barcklays, Deutsche, and State Bank of India have also set up shop there.

Moreover, 80% of approximately 600 American companies have a presence in South Africa. A little more than half of those, including Microsoft, Coca-Cola Co., Ford, DuPont, UPS, Intel, and Colgate-Palmolive, are among America’s largest companies.

Gault transitioned–a word he prefers to retired–from JPMorgan Chase in early 2006. but he and his wife, noted journalist and author Charlayne Hunter-Gault, remain permanent residents of South Africa. (They own a place in New York City and spend summers at their Martha’s Vineyard home.) Gault is now a chairman of a private investment company, an adviser for an international management consulting firm, and a producer-exporter of South African wine. His RTG Trading Co. portfolio consisted of Passages, a wine venture he started with his wife; Epicurean, which Gault launched with three South African business partners; and wines from the othe vineyards. “The thing about South Africa that is so attractive is that the vista is full of opportunities,” Gault says. “If you have an idea, pick one. If you have enough energy, enthusiasm, and financial wherewithal, pursue it.”

He points out that Johannesburg, like many large cities, has social and economic problems. “Power outages, inadequate public education facilities, a need to curb crime, unemployment, inadequate public health facilities, the full menu of problems that cities have, you’ll find them here.” Gault says. Despite those difficulties, he manages to enjoy long, leisurely lunches with friends on weekends and plays golf and tennis in his spare time.

City: JOHANNESBURG

ACCOMMODATIONS

If you’ve got a few nickels to spend, Gault recommends the Saxon Boutique Hotel and Spa (36 Saxon Road, +27-11-292-6000, http://www.saxon.co.za). He appreciates the ambience and spaciousness at this serene, 24-suite sanctuary. “It’s not a well-traveled venue, so you can go there and do pretty much what you like without a lot of interruptions.” A suite is named in honor of the nation’s favorite son, Nelson Mandela, who stayed at the hotel when he edited his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom (Back Bay Books; $17.99).

For convenience, Gault recommends that business travelers stay at the Hyatt Regency (191 Oxford Road, Rosebank, +27-11-280-1234, http://www.johannesburg.regency.hyatt.com), in the cosmopolitan suburb of Rosebank. The 259-room hotel, centrally located in the business and social district, features the Phumula Spa and Peak Health Club.

DINING

French-born chef Frederic Leloup dazzles diners with his native country’s cuisine at the chic Auberge Michel (122 Pretoria Ave. Sandown, +27-11-885-7013, http://www.aubergemichel.co.za), which boasts an extensive wine cellar. Gault suggests the escargot as a starter and duck for the main course, noting that the fish dishes are particularly tasty as well.

Another one of Gault’s favorites is The Orient (4 The High St. Melrose Arch, +27-11-684-1616), which serves contemporary Asian cuisine in a sexy, indoor setting and alfresco. Feast on Japanese sushi Vietnamese steamed fish, and Chinese dim sum

SHOPPING

Find it all at Sandton City Shopping Centre (+27-11-217 6000. http://www.sandtoncity.com), where 300 stores are spread over three levels and offer international brands such as Hugo Boss, Diesel, Lacoste, Hiss Sixty, Dunhill, Versace Collection, and Guess. South African designers Jenni Button and Hilton Weiner can also be found there.

CULTURAL

Gault’s must-do list includes a visit to the Apartheid Museum (Northern Parkway and Gold Reef Road, +27-11-309-4700, http://www.apartheidmuseum.org), a guided tour of Soweto, and outings to art galleries. He particularly suggests the Everard Read Gallery (6 Jellicoe Ave., Rosebank. +27-11-788-4805, http://www.everardread.co.za), South Africa’s largest and most well-known commercial gallery, which exhibits a range of national and international artists. Newtown Music Centre, +27-11-838-9145, http://www.bassline.co.za) features live South African jazz, kwaito, and hip-hop artists.
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Permalink Reply by tekono on September 24, 2008 at 4:12am
The Historical Relationship Between African Americans and South Africa

Culled from: http://www.howard.edu/library/reference/bob_edgar_site/maintext.html

The relationships between African Americans and Africans in South Africa are especially intriguing because most African Americans trace their ancestry to societies in West and Central Africa, not southern Africa, and because there has not been a large migration of blacks from South Africa to the United States. From the late eighteenth century, the exchanges began to flower as African Americans made their way to South Africa under different guises. The earliest visitors were sailors who crewed American whalers that docked in ports such as Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Durban. Some of these sailors, along with West Indians, settled permanently or for extended periods. They became key intermediaries for spreading ideas from the black diaspora back to Africa.

Other African Americans moved into the South African interior, setting up small businesses or seeking work and adventure as the diamond and gold fields opened up in the late nineteenth century. A notable case was Yankee Wood, a ship steward who turned up in Port Elizabeth during the American Civil War. After building up a nest egg on the diamond fields, he opened up hotels in Kokstad and Johannesburg, and he staked out gold claims.

Yankee Wood, a former ship steward, settled in South Africa after the American Civil War. He participated in the gold rush on the Witwatersrand in the 1880s and owned hotels in Johannesburg and Kokstad.
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In the arts African Americans made notable contributions to South African African music. Between 1890 and 1898, Orpheus McAdoo’s Jubilee Singers spent five years on three separate trips touring South Africa. These troupe’s performances of spirituals, folk songs, minstrel shows and dances left an indelible impression on African choirs, social clubs, and music styles as well as independent church leaders. The absorption of American jazz and ragtime, dance and recording styles in South Africa in this century has resulted in distinctive urban African music styles such as marabi, a mix of traditional and borrowed forms. In the last decade, marabi and its variants have made their way to the United States and influenced popular music.

Herbert Payne, a Baptist missionary, was stationed at Middledrift in the eastern Cape from 1917 to 1922.
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The Jubilee Singers were circulating through South Africa at about the same time as African American missionaries began to arrive. The National Baptist Convention founded a mission station in 1894 in Cape Town and the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church and a lesser known body, the Church of God and Saints of Christ, followed. Motivated by a desire to redeem and uplift Africa, they attracted many African Christians into their folds who were disenchanted with European mission Christianity. They influenced black education thought through their schools and religious philanthropies. As a result of these ties, possibly as many as several hundred Africans from South Africa journeyed to the United States for higher education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and forged close ties with African Americans. Many were sponsored by the AME, and most found places at black colleges such as Wilberforce, Tuskegee, Fisk, Hampton, and Lincoln. Alarmed at the prospect of African students being influenced by radical political ideas at black colleges in the United States, in 1916, the South African government founded Fort Hare College exclusively for black students.

Livingstone Mzimba (left) and Harry Mantenga (right), students from the eastern Cape, were ends on the Lincoln College football team in 1907 when this photograph was taken. After graduating, both returned to South Africa and became Presbyterian ministers. (Lincoln University Archive)
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Booker T. Washington’s self-help and industrial education ideas also had a major impact on black (and white) educational circles in South Africa. His ideas were copied in schools such as John Dube’s Ohlange Institute at Inanda and the AME Wilberforce Institute in Evaton. Washington’s Tuskegee model of self-reliance in agriculture had special significance for African farmers who were attempting to survive on the bits of land left after European conquest in the nineteenth century.
For most of this century, the South African government tightly controlled the number of African Americans allowed into South Africa. Most were either teachers, such as Janet Jackson in Cape Town, or missionaries. On rare occasions African-American scholars secured visas and traveled around South Africa for short periods. The most notable were Eslanda Robeson, who stopped over in South Africa for three weeks in mid-1936, and Ralph Bunche, who journeyed around South Africa for three months in late 1937. In addition, black sailors in the U.S. Navy stopped off for shore leaves in port cities like Cape Town and Durban.

The journeys of Bunche and Robeson were mirrored by the ventures of Africans who traveled around the United States. Most of these travelers came to study American education, but some, such as Solomon Plaatje, had explicit political agendas. All of them sent back letters or wrote essays about the differences and similarities they observed between race relations and segregation in South Africa and the United States.

Although person-to-person ties were important, it was in the realm of ideas and images that African Americans had an effect on Africans in South Africa that far outweighed their numbers. African Americans became a potent political symbol for Africans. For instance, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois had their own circles of educated followers in South Africa who applied the African-American experience of struggle to their own predicament.

The figure who most captured the imagination of a mass audience in South Africa was Marcus Garvey with his message of race pride, unity, and self-determination for Africa. After the First World War Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association set up branches around South Africa and the Garvey message took on a life of its own as African politicians shaped it to serve their parochial needs. For example, in the 1920s, Wellington Buthelezi, leader of a Garvey offshoot in the Transkei and a Zulu who claimed to be an African American, tapped into a wellspring of millennial fervor and recast African Americans as liberators who were coming to free South Africa from white oppression. This image of an African-American savior lingered on long after Buthelezi’s eclipse.

African Americans became a metaphor for progress and success. Africans saw them as survivors of slavery who were now advancing themselves in an industrialized and westernized society similar to their own. Though the achievements of African American professionals, politicians, and businessmen were sometimes exaggerated, Africans closely followed African American male musicians such as Paul Robeson, Fats Waller, and Duke Ellington and sports figures such as Jesse Owens, Joe Louis, and Henry Armstrong. On the other hand, male Africans regarded professional African-American women who engaged themselves in public activities with suspicion because they symbolized female autonomy and challenged male control of the household.

Finally African Americans were involved as advocates of political change in South Africa. The Council on African Affairs was founded in New York in the late 1930s to educate the American public about first segregation and then apartheid in South Africa and to influence American foreign policy. Its most prominent spokesman was Paul Robeson, who was already well known in South Africa. Max Yergan was another key figure. In 1921 the YMCA had dispatched him to Alice, the home of Fort Hare College in the Eastern Cape. During his 14-year sojourn as a missionary, Yergan became increasingly radicalized by his experiences with conditions in South Africa and he influenced Fort Hare students such as Govan Mbeki to move to the left politically. When he returned to the United States, he helped establish the Council. But his later shift to the right provoked a dramatic break and he ended up as an apologist for the South African regime.

The Council was the forerunner of the American anti-apartheid movement. As the Council on African Affairs was declining and under attack from the US government, the American Committee on Africa was founded to support the ANC’s Defiance Campaign in 1952. Other organizations such as the American Negro Leadership Council and the Organization of Afro-American Unity were also established in the same period and maintained communications with South Africa.

In the 1940s, South African political groups such as the ANC and the South African Indian Congress sent delegations to lobby at the United Nations. During the 1950s ANC leaders corresponded with African-American civil rights leaders about their respective struggles. Through the exchanges a friendship was forged between Martin Luther King, Jr. and Albert Lutuli. These two prominent advocates of non-violent tactics were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
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Permalink Reply by tekono on September 24, 2008 at 4:14am
After 27 years in prison, it took Nelson Mandela only four months after his release in February 1990 to pay a visit to the United States, He came to acknowledge those Americans, particularly members of the African American community, who had supported his battle for freedom in South Africa. For decades many tireless and patient North Americans had kept an anti-apartheid movements alive — in the churches, on campuses, in corporate boardrooms and trade union halls. When three African Americans stated a sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C. on Thanksgiving eve 1984, their arrest provoked one of the longest-running and most effective political demonstrations in recent U.S. history. Daily marches at the Embassy took place without interruption for several years, drawing national and international attention. Pressure built up to change American foreign policy towards South Africa; and Congress responded by passing the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act in 1986. The Act was one reason why South Africa’s main opposition groups were legalized in February 1990 and Mandela released a week later.

In Mandela’s autobiography Long Walk to Freedom he recounts some of his impressions of African Americans during his first stay in New York City. “I went up to Harlem, an area that had assumed legendary proportions in my mind since the 1950s when I watched young men in Soweto emulate the fashions of Harlem dandies. Harlem, as my wife said, was the Soweto of America. I spoke to a great crowd at Yankee Stadium, telling them that an unbreakable umbilical cord connected black South Africans and black Americans, for we were together children of Africa. There was a kinship between the two, I said, that had been inspired by such great Americans as W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Martin Luther King, Jr….In prison, I followed the struggle of black Americans against racism, discrimination, and economic inequality.”

Emotional as it was, Mandela’s trip was by no means the first exchange between blacks of these two large, urbanized, industrialized, multiracial nations. As we enter the twenty-first century, connections between the two countries are bound to become more dynamic and productive. Therefore now is an appropriate moment to retrieve and evaluate the rich but little known history of African American involvement with South Africa. This relationship stretches back several centuries, and the diverse and surprising linkages that have developed between African Americans and Africans go beyond political and economic matters to include a wide range of social and cultural issues, such as education, religion and ethics, sports, music, literature, theater and art.

The project’s co-directors, Dr. David Anthony, a historian at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and Dr. Robert Edgar, a historian at Howard University, propose to chronicle this relationship through an edition of primary documents that illustrates the exchanges that have taken place between African Americans and black South Africans from the late eighteenth century when African American sailors began venturing to South Africa to 1965. We have made 1965 a cut-off date because of shifts in the American civil rights movement and the progression of freedom movements in South Africa from legal, above-ground protest to underground, armed resistance.

The project commenced in September 1999 and will continue for a three-year period. The project is centered on a collection of several thousand documents that the project’s co-directors have collected over the past several decades from a variety of sources — diaries, private papers, travelers’ accounts, autobiographies, speeches, songs and hymns, government documents, missionary journals, magazines, newspapers, books and interviews — in the United States, Europe, and South Africa. When taken as a whole, these documents provide eloquent testimony to a relationship that has largely been relegated to the margins in historical studies.

This project will illuminate questions raised by recent scholarship on the African diaspora and the ties that have existed for many centuries between Africans on the African continent and people of African descent around the globe. African diaspora studies have challenged scholars to move outside traditional disciplinary and geographical boundaries to examine how black communities in different parts of the world engage, interact and influence each other. For instance, Paul Gilroy has coined the term “Black Atlantic” to describe the complex of ideas and culture flowing between blacks in North America and Europe.

We believe that a “Black Atlantic” also developed between black communities in the United States and South Africa because of their shared experiences with white domination and segregation in industrializing societies and their efforts to overcome discrimination and devise strategies of mobilizing and advancing themselves. Despite their common ground, individuals and groups within these communities had different views and perspectives on a range of issues and these made the exchanges all the more fascinating. The collection’s documents include discussions between both communities over appropriate political and economic strategies for responding to and challenging segregation and white domination; their attempts to pressure the American government and the international community to oppose the apartheid system; how they assessed the similarities and differences in racism, race relations and racial identities in each other’s societies; how they created perceptions and images of each other and how these shaped their own identities; and how and for what purposes popular culture and ideas were transmitted from one society to another.
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Permalink Reply by AnNu on January 23, 2009 at 1:19am

IMHOTEP NATURAL WELLNESS
An ancient art of obtaining wholeness utilizing Life Force Energy.
Benefits of a session:
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Alleviates pain and accelerates healing
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A session using 100% natural energy enhances a whole person physically, mentally and spiritually.

Contact: Andre D. Lakes, “AnNu” Certified Reiki Practitioner and Wholistic Healthcare Consultant
Phone: 678-344-5897 Email: annu_ra777@yahoo.com
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Permalink Reply by Eric Eyutchae on February 17, 2009 at 12:54pm
That will be the best thing the African Americans can do for themselves.Yes they can! and Yes they should! African Americans should be coming to Africa more frequently,that is where the power lies.
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Permalink Reply by Benin Mwangi on February 17, 2009 at 1:27pm
It is one of the best things that one can do in their lifetime, to make a trip to Africa. And if one can find a way to settle their permanently, then all the better.
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Permalink Reply by Eric Eyutchae on February 17, 2009 at 2:53pm
Thank you Benin,I don’t know how to get this message to African Americans,that our best bet is for them to move focus unto Africa,the closer they come to the heart of this world they will definitely see that,the power is in Africa,not in europe,nor America,or Asia.If you remember I mentioned earlier about what moves Economy – THE WILL.Without the will forget about persistence nor all the other virtues.The power is there incubating.African Americans should start waking up,enough of their slumber and whining over trivial issues,where is man without his roots?remember the whites saw this and used the opportunity to rape Africa.Look at picasso,where did all his genius come from? Africa,from the African sculptures and today no picasso painting is less than $2million.That is just one example,not to talk of the physical energy that makes construction possible.
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The Headwear of Beautiful Black Yoruban/ Nigerian Women!!

May 15, 2009

These ladies do style, they are about class. They are ready to flaunt.
They’ve come prepared to show their
hats off. Brace yourself for the most
beautiful and vibrant, bright set of
colors. Oh, and the styles of the headwraps will make you want to
go purchase scarves for them.

It’s like a festival. It will make you want to dance, just maybe.
It’s a parade of glorious scarf hats.
The hats are so beautiful it will make
you lose gravity, just kidding, but they
are really really gorgeous.


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