Archive for the ‘EDE YORUBA’ Category

YORUBA RONU ! -THIS white girl is FIGHTING TO SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE/CULTURE-WHAT ARE YOU OMO YORUBA DOING TO SAVE IT? -she also IS SMART ENOUGH to KNOW That ORISA ARE NOT gods but Messengers from GOD JUST LIKE Jesu ati Muhammad!

April 28, 2013

FROM thenationonline.com
Nigeria is a better place than its image outside

Posted by: GBENGA ADERANTI

on April 27, 2013

in Saturday Magazine

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Dr. Paula Gomes is the only white face in the palace of the Alaafin of Oyo, Oba Lamidi Adeyemi 111. Fast-pacing, quick-talking Gomes first visited Oyo 20 years ago; and ever since, she has been going and coming to the ancient town. Recently, the Alaafin of Oyo noticed her interest in the culture of Yoruba people and the monarch honoured her by making her his Cultural Ambassador. In this interview with GBENGA ADERANTI, this Portuguese shares her experience in Oyo in the last 20 years and why she has embarked on a crusade to preserve Yoruba culture. Excerpts:

 

What do you really do for Alaafin?

I’m the Culture Ambassador for Alaafin.

How did you meet Alaafin?

My first contact with Alaafin actually was the beginning of last year, but I have been in Oyo already for a while, coming and going.

What were you doing in Oyo before now?

I came to Oyo because of the culture. I used to come to Nigeria while I was a student of History about 20 years ago. I know Yoruba land though I cannot say very well but quite well; 20 years ago was the first time I came to Oyo and I thought there was no more culture in Oyo. When you talk about culture, culture is in everything, food, literature, the way you dress. All this time while I was a student, I always shuttled between Osogbo and Oyo. With time and mixing together with people, I saw that a lot of cultures came from the ancient town of Oyo Ile. That is why I actually came to Oyo to make more research on it.

Does that mean you are leaving Oyo after the completion of your research?

No, I’m not going to leave, I’m just telling you that while I was a student, I used to come to do research and after that I came to Oyo not on my private interest to know more but because Oyo had nothing to offer more about their own culture. If you go back to the history, you will know that Oyo Empire dominated all the kingdoms in Yorubaland and you as well know that it was when Alaafin Sango was a very strong king ruling, actually during the 7th or 8th century, that the influence of Oyo Empire in Yorubaland was massive. And much of the culture in our day not only in Yorubaland but also in the Diaspora, everything was connected to Sango. That was why I came here to know more about him and like I said, I have been around for four years. There is a lot here to be preserved because that is the history of a ethnic group that has survived outside and is really appreciated.

In Europe nowadays, we are looking for the ancient culture that has something to give to the humanity because what we are expecting from life is to live long and to live long with quality, you can have a good car, you can have lots of money but if your body is not in the equilibrium, if you die young, what is the essence of life? Life is long life with quality and quality means first of all, your body has to be strong, has to be healthy and the philosophy and the knowledge of the Yoruba is like the philosophy and culture from India and China.

Acupuncture from India is based on lots of ancient culture, they are very similar to Yoruba culture. What we are looking for is that deep knowledge of Yoruba which they have about the nature, that you can find the equilibrium between the body and the spirit, because Yoruba believe that there is one God who is called Olodumare. Then this Creator has created, and when He created the earth, He sent the energies to the earth which are divided into four elements and these are known all over the world: water, you cannot live without water; air, you cannot live without air, that is oxygen; fire and earth.

These are the four elements that the Yoruba people believe and if you go to other ancient cultures, all of them are the same. They are all talking the same language. So the Yoruba people like to personify those energies like other ancient cultures and they believe that if the body, which is the aye; the material life which is also aye and the spiritual life, which is orisa. Orisa is not God; orisa is what you cannot see, it is invisible. You have the visible world which is aye and the invisible world which is orisa, people used to think that orisa is another God, it is not. It is not the correct translation because when you say orisa sango, orisa osun, all the 401 orisa are the invisible power of the nature. They are everywhere in the world. You cannot live without water, you cannot live without air, so people should be very careful when they translate.

We don’t say Olodumare Sango, Olodumare Osun . When you have the equilibrium of the invisible world, aye and not visible world, orisa, you have what you need to live, you have ase, you have power; it is very simple. These people have philosophy, these people have a very strong knowledge which is given through Ifa. It is an oral history coming from very ancient times like all the other ancient cultures, and these need to be preserved. That is why I’m here, to try in my own capacity to show the Yoruba people that they are very valuable.

How vast are you in Yoruba language?

Mo ti gbo die die, sugbon Yoruba ko rorun (I understand smattering Yoruba, but it is not easy).

How old are you now?

Normally you should not ask a lady how old she is.

You should be…..

(Cuts in) I will not tell you.

What about your family?

I have my family, like I said, I go and come back but I have been here for two years without going home.

I’m talking about your husband and children?

Well, I will not like to go to my private life; you know that is very private. I will just like to talk generally; I will not like to say anything about my private life.

Some people spell your name Gomez why is yours Gomes?

My name is a Portuguese name, it ends with an ‘s’ it is Portuguese but if it is ‘z’, it is Spanish.

Have you read anything about Suzanne Wenger?

Yes, I know her very well. Like I said, I’ve been coming for 20 years, I used to be in Osogbo, so I knew Suzan Wenger very well. Actually I can say that she was and she is an inspiration for me because she really tried for Osogbo and Osun State, especially Osogbo. Today, what is there, people should be very grateful because if not for her who fought for it, it would have gone long time ago. She really preserved what people who said were the bush, the history of Osun Osogbo. Every people has its own history. People are crazy to travel abroad to go and see our culture, let me tell you, you have to appreciate your culture as well because we preserve our culture, so you have to preserve your culture as well. That is what I’m trying to do. I know Suzanne very well.

Don’t you sometimes feel you are going Suzanne Wenger’s line?

Look, I’m not Suzanne, I don’t want to follow Suzanne’s line, I want to follow my inside. I want to follow what my inside says. Suzanne did what her inside said; me, I’m doing what my inside tells me. So I can never be Suzanne because each individual is unique and special, so I don’t want to imitate Suzanne and I don’t want to be Suzanne. Do you understand me? Suzanne is Suzanne. She was a great person that I have in my heart; I only follow what my inside tells me, so I can never be Suzanne because if I try to be Suzanne, I’m not myself. I’m just doing what I feel is correct to do. I’m not an artist, Suzanne was an artist so I can never try to be an artist but I have passion for this culture because I believe it can give a lot to humanity; the way India people and Chinese people are, they are already giving to the humanity.

I believe that Yoruba people can give as well but for that to happen, Yoruba must be proud of themselves and they are not, they are losing their own identity, the Indian people are not like that, they preserve their culture and they are proud of it. Chinese people, they are proud of their culture. They teach their own children to continue and today, if you go to Europe, if you’re a VIP, instead of you to go to hospital, you go for alternative medicine. Because we got to a point that we realised that all the chemical medicine you take will cure one part and destroy the other part.

Actually what you want in life is to live long, it is through the natural thing that your body can stay longer, do you understand? People want to go to Europe, people want to go to America, what kind of life do we live? A lot of people are dying too young through heart attack; the life we live is to go to work and come back home. You know we are an old continent but now we are turning the thing around. We want to go back to what we don’t have anymore; we want to eat bio-ecological, we are tired of plastic food because of cancer.

If you put a Yoruba child who has nothing inside one compound and you put a white child, which one is stronger? Why do you think Europeans live longer? It is because we have access to medicine for free because the society is organised, but if we don’t have access to medicine and the hospital to maintain us alive, we cannot live the way you people live because you are too close to nature.

I know you are not in the Niger Delta area, but foreigners are constantly being warned to be wary of Nigeria, do you sometimes get scared that you could be kidnapped too?

Look, let me talk about myself, I do go to Delta State, I’m not afraid to go. I think that the image which is given to the outside world about Nigeria is different from actually what is happening in Nigeria. I’m not saying that it is not dangerous but Nigerian people are very nice. I think the government should rebrand. For example, when you think about Brazil, you think about football and carnival, but there are people who are still eating from the garbage. There are people when you go outside they will steal your things.

But when you talk about Brazil, people think about football and carnival, people don’t talk about those who eat in the garbage or people robbing people. I’m in Oyo, nobody robs me, I travel, I don’t have any trouble with anybody. But when you talk about Nigeria, you think about 419; they tell you it is a bad place, why don’t you rebrand it? Nigeria has many things to offer the people outside. People love your culture, people really appreciate your culture but they are afraid because of the image that have been created. If government rebrands the country, I believe that bit by bit, people will start coming because of culture. So there is need to rebrand.

People go to America; me I don’t have anything to do in America. I studied in America, I went back to Europe because if you go to America, you have to be careful, if you are not careful, somebody may follow his gang and they will shoot you. You train your children to shoot because they can just come and kill you. Do you understand? Everything has to have an equilibrium, Nigeria needs to be rebranded because it has a lot to give to people. I cannot talk about Hausa and Ibo, I can only talk about Yoruba, that is what I know. Yoruba people are beautiful, the culture is beautiful, people are friendly and they should not lose their identity because if they lose their identity, they will never find it. They can never be white, I cannot be black. I have to accept who I’m and people should be free and be proud of what they have.

The introduction of foreign religion has eroded the belief system of the Yoruba people, what do you think will happen in the nearest future?

I don’t like to talk about religion because for me it is a private thing, religion is like politics, you are a Christian or Muslim, you are ACN or PDP or whatever. Religion is something that is private, but you know if you go back to the history, it was always a problem with religion, religion tries always to dominate and control and when you talk about Africa, especially West Africa, it has suffered a lot, through the slavery, families were destroyed, alot of blood in the name of money was shed. Religion for me, I respect everybody, I don’t look at people from their religion, I respect people because everybody is special and everybody is a creation of God. So, that is why I don’t want to go deep into religion.

Religion is a personal belief it is not only going to be today, it is yesterday and going to be tomorrow and the process that is going on now in Nigeria was in Europe before. Life is a mystery and because it is a mystery, people try to control people through religion. Me, I don’t believe in anything, I believe in what I feel because I’m a creation of God but I respect everybody and every belief, if you tell me now that this is what you believe, this chair, I will respect you.

You were talking about your support for nature and local herbs (agbo), Yoruba herbs are from nature, do you drink agbo?

Yes of course, it is not only Yoruba, we Europeans we use herbs, we have different herbs, different teas. Why do you eat efo (vegetables), why do you eat all these vegetables? Why? Because you need vitamins and minerals, so the herbs are here to help us but the new sicknesses that are in the world, they are killing people. They are sicknesses that you can cure or maintain but you destroy other parts of your body. This is not a belief, this is science, that is natural science not a belief, a belief is something you cannot prove, but 1+1=2, that is science. Yoruba herbs are science; they are natural science, not a belief. If you are feeling something, you take the herbs, like a natural tea, if you feel better, your body has eliminated what is not good.

It is not only the Yoruba people that use herbs, if you go to my country, we have alternative medicine which we are preserving, we use alternative medicine. We are no more going to doctors and Yoruba have big knowledge in this science and they are putting it as a belief because culture is part of everything, what you eat is part of your culture.

At times I wonder why people like you will leave your comfort zone for a place like this where you have to struggle to get things done. What was on your mind when you were coming here?

It depends on what you call comfort. What is comfort for you?

Light, good roads etc.

In life, we cannot have everything, if you have light 24 hours, if you have good roads, we have everything, we stay in AC office, and you leave for AC cars. Lots of people are getting sick because AC is provoking problems in the lungs. A lot of people in Europe are now putting the AC off and now open their windows. I do say we’ve given the experience to them and we want to go back to olden days. In the office we have the AC, we have the car, we don’t have to walk too much. We take the car, we go to the supermarket. We have everything we need from the supermarket, we go home, we have the TV, we get the quality of life. We human beings are meant to live up to 120 years, but at times we don’t live more than 50 and 60 because we need comfort of life, we have no exercise and we eat junk food. Lots of children are born already with diabetes and cancer because they want comfort of life.

In life, there are positive and negative sides. The individual is responsible for his own life . So we have to look the other way. Most people in our own generation in Europe, we want freedom, they want to live long. We are tired of all this imposing life style, we want freedom, we want relief, we want long life. Most people in Europe are isolated, they live alone, is it not better to live in community? We should live together. Are we meant to live alone inside houses?

A lot of people in Europe have problem with depression, they have neurotic problem because of the life they live. They are not living the life creature gave us. We are living a plastic life, we are staying alone isolating ourselves, in front of television 24 hours. No exercise, is that a good life? Can our bodies live long? It is not possible. Good life is fresh air, to breathe, to exercise. Good life depends on the concept of each individual. I love privacy, but I want to live long.

The last time I saw you, you were not wearing Yoruba attire, today, you are not still wearing Yoruba attire, why?

You know I have to be what I’m, I can never be a Yoruba. I don’t mind, sometimes I dress in batik an indigo or adire. I’m not Yoruba, the same way you are not from my culture. I have to be who I’m and I have to dress the way I feel comfortable. That is why I’m not putting on Yoruba dressing. You people are putting on Yoruba dress because it is beautiful in you, when you put on Yoruba dress, you look elegant. I used to say that and I’m not the only person, that you people have natural beauty; even if you don’t have anything when you dress, even if you go to the market, even if you go to clean something, the way your people dress, you look elegant and it looks magical. So I have to dress the way I feel comfortable with.

Do you sometimes feel home sick?

To tell you the truth, no, I don’t feel home sick. Nobody sent me here, I’m here because I want. I feel good, I feel healthy, I feel strong and I feel I’m doing what I like. I’m not the kind of person that wants to stay in the office; I don’t want to live that kind of life people call comfort, I don’t .

Do you know anything about Ifa (Oracle)?

I know what I can feel, what I can see; I can never know it well as the native people. Number one, language; for you to really know it very well, you have to start from small because it is a knowledge which is given orally, it is not a written knowledge. And there is something that is very powerful, people from generation to generation transfer this knowledge orally. See how powerful, look, we have to write them. We have to go back to religion which I don’t want to talk about, Christians and Muslims carry the Bible and Koran respectively, and do you see Yoruba carrying anything? Their brain is powerful, you know the level of capacity assimilation you are exercising with your brain but we if we don’t write it down, we forget. The question is why are you destroying all these?

How have you been coping with the food?

I don’t have any problem. I eat everything. But I don’t like snake or this kind of frog, I don’t know what they call it, I don’t like it and I don’t like bush meat but I like okete (bush rat) if it is well cooked but all the remaining, I eat everything, eba, amala, fufu, semo. I don’t like so much, but I eat eko (corn paste), moimoi , ekuru (beans paste), ewa (beans).

What do you really do for Alaafin?

I’m trying to preserve the Yoruba culture and trying to reeducate the people that they are very important, they are very valuable, that they have a lot of value and they should preserve the culture. I’m trying to promote what is ancient, what is history because without history, how can you tell your children that you are Yoruba? People without history don’t have direction. I’m trying to promote what is in existence because if Yoruba don’t want it, the international people will appreciate it. There is no problem because tomorrow, we are ready to teach your children Yoruba and we are ready to teach your children about your own culture.

How did you meet Alaafin?

As I said, I had been in Oyo already and I asked Bashorun (one of the Oyo high chiefs) to bring me to Alaafin because I wanted to meet him. For me, everybody is important, I’m not saying this king is important, this king is not important but relating to history, he (Alaafin) is the strongest king in Yorubaland. I wanted to see him and tell him that he has to preserve his culture and if he fails to preserve his culture, tomorrow, nothing will be there to show to the world. So these were the reasons I wanted to see him.

How much of support have you gotten on your crusade so far?

What kind of support?

Financial support

Nobody is helping me financially. I’m doing it by myself and now I have a foundation people can support because there is need to preserve the temple, preserve the palace. These monuments, these are culture heritage, there is need for preservation. Why do you want to go to England to see the queen and the palace? For what? Because it is history. So that is why people want to come to Nigeria and see the history of Alaafin, the history of Yoruba. This palace is the biggest and oldest palace in Yoruba land, it is falling apart. I’m trying to raise fund to repair this palace in its old originality so that Oyo children tomorrow will come and ‘say that my grandfather, my ancestors were living like this’ because I can take you to my country and tell you that my ancestors are like this.

Quite funny, why is it that it is foreigners or Yoruba people abroad that are interested in this project like this?

Go back to the history, we white people have colonised and have destroyed your culture. We brought our culture, we forced people to change inside and outside. You have lost your identity, you want to be what we are. That is why now people from outside come to support what still exists for you to appreciate.

If you go to the slavery time, look, all the slaves that went to America, if they did not practise Christianity, they would be killed. What is happening again? I believe what is happening today is that everything that our people destroyed, let’s rebuild it again, we should not be ashamed. The Europeans go to Kenya to see African culture, Africa is beautiful, African people are beautiful, why not Nigeria?

>AWON EDE NAIJIRIA

April 29, 2010

>
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Ìpè láti kópa nínu Wikimania 2010 ti jáde. O gbódò fi oun tí o bá fé fi hàn ránsé saaju ojó ‘Karunla(20) osù Kerin(May). [Bòmọ́lẹ̀]
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Ọjọ́ tí a ṣe àtunṣe ojúewé yi gbẹ̀yìn ni 16:29, 28 December 2009.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.Ètò àbòNípa WikipediaIkìlọ̀Expedition to the Mount of Thought: The third saga : being a free translation of the full text of D.O. Fagunwa’s Yoruba novel Irinkerindo ninu Igbo elegbejeThe development of the Yoruba novel, 1930-1975The modern Yoruba novel: An analysis of the writer’s art
Aspects of Yoruba cosmology in Tutuola’s novels ([Collection U du C.R.P.])

April 29, 2010

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Yemi D. Ogunyemi
Ijeoma Ogwuegbu
Francis Ohanyido[2] (1970– )
Tanure Ojaide
Steve Nezianya
Bamiji Ojo
Akinloye Ojo
Olatubosun Oladapo
Gabriel Okara (1921– )
Oladejo Okedeji
Wale Okediran
Chika Okeke
Remi Okere
Niran Okewole
Christopher Okigbo (1932–1967)
Onookome Okome
Ike Okonta
Nnedi Okorafor
Dike Okoro
Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo
Wole Oguntokun
Osita Okoroafor
Ben Okri (1959– )
Afolabi Olabimtan
Simbo Olorunfemi
Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju
Esho Oluborode
Alade E. Oluwadamilola
Kole Omotosho (1943– )
Nduka Onwuegbute (1969– )
Osonye Tess Onwueme (1955– )
Dillibe Onyeama
Frank Onyebu
Nwando Onyeabo
Alexander Orok
Nnaemeka Oruh
Dennis Osadebay
Femi Osofisan
Chinye Phiona Osai
Sanya Osha
Sola Osofisan
E.C. Osondu
Niyi Osundare (1947– )
Tony Nduka Otiono
Helen Ovbiagele (1944– )
Jamin Owhovoriole
Stella Dia Oyedepo
Bunmi Oyinsan
Dupe Olorunjo
Naan Pocen
Seni Ogunkola
Tolulope Popoola
[àtúnṣe] R-T
Remi Raji
Aderemi Raji-Oyelade
Ken Saro-Wiwa (1941–95)
Lola Shoneyin
Mudi Sipikin
Ladipo Soetan
Zulu Sofola (1935–95)
Bode Sowande (1948–)
J. Sobowole Sowande
Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye
Wole Soyinka (1934– ), awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Literature
Emmanuel Sule
Mohammed Sule
Muritala Sule
Kola Tubosun
Adebisi Thompson
Amos Tutuola (1920-97)
Morenike Taire
Odijie Ehis Michael
[àtúnṣe] U-Z
Uche Nworah
Ebele Uche-Nwakile
Françoise Ugochukwu
Clarius Ugwuoha
Odili Ujubuonu
Gracy Ukala (formerly Osifo)
Adaora Lily Ulasi (1932– )
Sumaila Isah Umaisha
Karo Umukoro
Chika Unigwe
Emman Usman Shehu
Ronnie Uzoigwe
Jumoke Verissimo
Ugonna Wachuku (1971– )
Segun Williams
Ken Wiwa (1968– )
Molara Wood
Oladipo Yemitan
Sa’adu Zungur
Ubong Alfred

Àyọkà yí le fẹ̀ jù báyìí lọ. Ẹ ran Wikipedia lọ́wọ́ láti fẹ̀ẹ́ jù báyìí lọ![àtúnṣe] Itokasi
1.↑ Philip Effiong, Jr.
2.↑ [http://www.africanwriter.com/authors/102/Francis-Ohanyido
Jẹ́ kíkójáde láti “http://yo.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%80k%C3%B3j%E1%BB%8D_%C3%A0w%E1%BB%8Dn_ol%C3%B9k%E1%BB%8D%CC%80w%C3%A9_ar%C3%A1_N%C3%A0%C3%ACj%C3%ADr%C3%AD%C3%A0”
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Ọjọ́ tí a ṣe àtunṣe ojúewé yi gbẹ̀yìn ni 23:05, 5 November 2009.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of

IREKE ONIBUDO BY D.O. FAGUNWA HITS THE STAGE BOTH IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH THANKS TO CHAMS,NIGERIA!-FROM NIGERIAN COMPASS NEWSPAPER

December 2, 2009

IREKE ONIBUDO-A NOVEL FOR THE GREATEST YORUBA NOVELIST D.O. FAGUNWA,PERFORMED AS A PLAY IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH BY CHAMS PLC NIGERIA,NOV. 2009IREKE ONIBUDO-A NOVEL FOR THE GREATEST YORUBA NOVELIST D.O. FAGUNWA,PERFORMED AS A PLAY IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH BY CHAMS PLC NIGERIA,NOV. 2009

IREKE ONIBUDO-FAGUNWA'S GREAT YORUBA NOVEL ON STAGE,COMPLIMENTS OF CHAMS NIGERIA!

IREKE ONIBUDO-FAGUNWA'S GREAT YORUBA NOVEL ON STAGE TO CHAMS,NIGERIA!

FROM compassnews.net

Wednesday, Dec 02nd
Last update:11:29:27 PM GMT

‘Fabulous Adventures…’ of Nigeria’s theatre Monday, 23 November 2009 00:00 Nigerian Compass
Veteran art critic, PITA OKUTE who watched the recent presentation of The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man, Femi Osofisan’s English language stage adaptation of D. O. Fagunwa’s Yoruba novel

Ireke Onibudo, at the National Arts Theatre appraises the production against the background of the development of the stage performing art in Nigeria.

AT the end, a critic complained that the play was too long. I agreed. Three hours or so of dance and drama may be quite hard on the backsides. But having observed that “nowadays all the money goes to musical jamborees and comedy shows rather than serious or cerebral activities,” one suspects that the translator-playwright, Femi Osofisan, sought to compensate: To enlighten and entertain at once. Ergo – the song and dance routines that trailed the tale at every turn. Perhaps, there was just a chorus or two too many, but the overall effect was somewhat cheery.

Clearly, the greater challenge of his spirited dramatic interpretation lay in deconstructing the epic narrative of Ireke Onibudo from the infinite canvas of the novel to the less extensive stage of the National Art Theater’s Cinema Hall II. Such spatial limitations do not matter to Osofisan, whose enduring style is to extend the stage far beyond its allotted boundary into the audience. Complain, if you will, about the relevance of all that ‘movement.’ The artistic director, Tunde Awosanmi has bought into this peculiar trademark and in The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man, he and the playwright create resonating chords for a moral tale birthed on mental, physical, moral and spiritual trials. In this regard, the wanderings of Oba Ireke (Kunle Agboola) and the reporter Beyioku (Olugbemi Adekambi) amidst the audience denote the hero’s strange but enthralling odyssey from pauper to oba – the king.

By will power, moral restraint and sheer good fortune, Ireke triumphs over adversity to become a celebrated warlord and noble man. His story runs alongside a fable told by his dead mother: the heinous murder of the Tiger’s children by the sly, wicked Fox. With an animal cast to embellish the narrative, the stage is set for spectacles of engaging folk theatre. Colourful and confusing in turns, the performance is overdone sometimes by tedious dialogue and spurious acting. The narrators, a blend of characters and voices add to the overall dullness. Osofisan’s commendable effort is overshadowed by pervading myopia. One is hard put to understand why his gargantuan translation of Fagunwa’s novel stopped merely at this leaving the entire song and dance sketches of the play to be rendered in vernacular. Thus, the strong and unpalatable suggestion that there is a river of interpretation he was too scared or ill equipped to cross. In the end, non-Yoruba speaking audiences may either feel greatly enriched by word plays they hardly understand or grossly cheated of their deserved enjoyment.
Nonetheless, the varying abilities of Tunde Oshinaike (Young Ireke), Charles Ihumiodu (Oba Alupayida), Kunle Agboola and Omotara Soretire (Ifepade) combine to pull the play through. Oshinaike exhibits great presence of mind throughout and is the live-wire of this engaging theatrical package.

Still, The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man mirrors at large the curious trajectory of Nigerian theatre in the last four decades: From the eventful era of Hubert Ogunde, Moses Olaiya Adejumo, Duro Ladipo and many others to those far off days when theatre groups from the universities toured the country with incisive productions for the masses and corporate interventions such as Ajo Productions held up the flag of Nigerian drama in the turbulent socio-political winds.

Thereafter, the sly, wicked fox of ill-conceived government policies like Structural Adjustment Programme devoured the growing spirit of a blossoming Nigerian theatre. The craft endured a wilderness of dwindled public support, severe competition from local and foreign television and the local home video industry among other alternative media.

It would be stretching the parallels a bit to suggest that the monster has finally been slain and that theatre has finally come into its own as a result. Yet, one can not fail to observe a growing love affair between Corporate Nigeria and the Nigerian stage. The Chams Theatre Series a yearly “feast of theatre” hosted by Chams Plc, a computer hardware and maintenance services company, exemplifies this happy trend. The series kicked off in 2008 with the production of D. O. Fagunwa’s Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo and theatre lovers around the country are mightily thrilled that Chams is helping to keep their beloved craft alive and well.

The Series has lived up to a promise of enlivening the pleasure of the people and enlarging the pockets of practitioners. To paraphrase Osofisan, Chams employs over a hundred theatre artistes for about three months every year and offers free, to live audiences, a vivid experience of theatre that the people yearn for but which is so hard to come by these days. Here, one might add, is corporate social responsibility at its eclectic best.

The event at the National Theatre ended with a dance drill which was topped by a significant question from the cast. Chams ye da? (Where is your Chams?), they chanted and the management of the visionary Nigerian company went on stage to take a deserved bow with the happy cast and production crew.

It is easy to imagine that they might also be asking the same important question in Enugu, Port Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Kaduna and other such places, where the people are also yearning for ‘vivid’ theatrical experience. It is even easier to believe that the Chams Theatre Series might also berth in those places soon, if only to prove that the theatre tradition in Nigeria does not begin in Ibadan and end in Abuja after rolling through Lagos, Akure and Ondo.
Kudos still to Chams Plc.
===========================================================================================FROM CHAMS.COM

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kicksofftonational acclaimtheatre series The Chams TheatreSeries kicked offto great public and criticalacclaim acrossNigeria in September 2008 withperformances across four citiesand two adaptations of D.O.Fagunwa’s classic Ogboju OdeNinu Igbo Irunmale.——————————————————————————–

Audiences trooped out in largenumbers for the English and Yorubatheatrical performances of OgbojuOde or The Forest of a ThousandDaemons in Lagos, Ibadan, Abuja andIfe.The enthusiasm, interest andsubsequent appreciation of theperformances underscored the fact ofthe Chams Theatre Series helping to filla gap in the cultural life of Nigeria.According to Mr. DemolaAladekomo, Group Managing Director,“The Chams Theatre Series is a strategicintervention and contribution ofChams plc to the rejuvenation of theArts and stage culture in Nigeria. It isalso a means of promoting our cultureand re-orienting Nigerians to the valuesthat we hold dear. We believe thosevalues should prompt action in oursociety.”The Ogboju Ode performances are“the beginning of what we envisageas a long journey of discovery andsharing”, Aladekomo informed guests.It was a great beginning indeed.Extensive reportage and reviews in themedia confirmed the strong interestpresentation of the plays elicited withlocal and international stakeholders ofthe company.Culture and Tourism ministerMr. Olatokunbo Kayode wrote into offer official Federal Governmentrecognition and support of the effortby Chams plc to provide corporatesupport for the revival of theatreculture in Nigeria.Chams plc sponsored productionof the plays after acquiring the rightsto the works of D.O. Fagunwa

the family of the late author and theD.O. Fagunwa Foundation. Fagunwa’sdaughter was a star guest at the Lagosperformance of the Yoruba adaptationon Sunday, September 14 at theMuson Centre. Other guests includedChief Segun Olusola, Chief Mrs. DerinOsoba, Rev Olu Odejimi, doyen ofthe Nigerian Stock Exchange, Rev OlaMakinde, Prelate of the MethodistChurch Nigeria. There were also Mr.Tayo Aderinokun, MD of GuarantyTrust Bank, Ahmed Yerima, Tani Obaro,MD, SystemSpec, as well as othermajor players in the banking, financialservices and oil and gas sectors.Town met gown in Ibadan as thecivil society joined the academia towatch presentation of the play. Theaudience spilled over and activelyparticipated in the presentation.Diplomats and members of theNational Assembly joined a largenumber of stakeholders in theinformation and communication“The Chams Theatre Seriesis a strategic interventionof Chams Plc to therejuvenation of the arts andstage culture in Nigeria.”cOver stOrycover story6 | futureteNse6 | futureteNseThe presentation of Ogboju Ode Ninu IgboIrunmale is the first in a journey of atleast seven years in the first instance forthe Chams Theatre Series. Chams plc has acquired he rights tothe five works of D.O. Fagunwa. The company plansto present a theatrical adaptation of one work eachyear. Add this to other works by other Nigerianauthors and it is easy to understand what the chiefexecutive Mr. Demola Aladekomo described as “thebeginning of what we envisage as a long journey ofdiscovery and sharing”.Next in line for 2009 is the work Ireke Onibudo.Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa was born in 1932 inOkeigbo in present day Ondo State. He was a teacherand writer. He died in 1963 at a relatively young agebut with many accomplishments under his name.According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, OgbojuOde Ninu Igbo Irunmale (Night of a Thousand Daemons,was the first full-length novel published in the Yorubalanguage. His secondnovel, Igbo Olodumare (“The Forest of God”), waspublished in 1949. He also wrote Ireke Onibudo (1949;“The Sugarcane of the Guardian”), Irinkerindo NinuIgbo Elegbeje (1954; “Wanderings in the Forest ofElegbeje”), and Adiitu Olodumare (1961; “The Secretof the Almighty”); a number of short stories; and twotravel books.Fagunwa’s works characteristically take the form ofloosely constructed picaresque fairy tales containingmany folklore elements: spirits, monsters, gods,magic, and witchcraft. His language is vivid: a sadman “hangs his face like a banana leaf,” a liar “hasblood in his belly but spits white saliva.” Every eventpoints to a moral, and he reinforces this moral toneby his use of Christian concepts and of traditionaland invented proverbs.Fagunwa’s imagery, humour, wordplay, and rhetoricreveal an extensive knowledge of classical Yoruba. Hewas also influenced by such Western works as JohnBunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, which were translatedinto Yoruba by missionaries.Some Yorubaintellectuals dislikedFagunwa’s lack of concernwith contemporary socialissues. Other criticspointed to his knowledgeof the Yoruba mind, hiscareful observation of themanners and mannerismsof his characters, and hisskill as a storyteller.Long Journey of Discovery and Sharing

technology world to watch theperformance at the Congress Hall ofthe Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja.By the time, it got to the Ile Ife onSeptember 24, enthusiasm and interestwas at fever pitch. Not surprisingly, theeager audience crashed through somedoors to ensure space in the OdoduwaHall of the Obafemi AwolowoUniversity. There was standing roomonly as the hall was brimful.The Chams Theatre Series has therights to the five works of Fagunwaand would sponsor one play eachyear. Aladekomo said the firm hasalso acquired the rights to works bywriters from other parts of Nigeriain order to broaden the appeal aswell as showcase the universality ofpositive values shared by Nigeriancommunities.Professor Femi Osofisan of theUniversity of Ibadan, wrote the“The Chams Theatre Serieshas the rights to five worksof Fagunwa and wouldsponsor one play eachyear.”futureteNse | 7futureteNse | 7D. O. Fagunwa’s Ogboju Ode tells an inter-esting adventure story of the journey ofthe intrepid hunter Akaraogun into thestrange land of Langbodo. His journeytakes him through many weird experi-ences and encounters with spirits, elves, mermaids,witches, monsters and the multifarious dwellers of theforest. He returns to a heroic welcome and takes timeto enthral his fellow citizens with hair-raising ac-counts of his escapades.Akaraogun grows in influence as news of his incred-ible journey spreads. He elicits the envy of the titularhead of the community.The monarch then comes up with a creative schemeto send this potential rival out of sight. He dreams upan assignment to fetch a missing treasure from Lang-bodo. Who better to lead the expedition but the manof valour and courage Akaraogun? Akaraogun enlistssix other brave hunters and then go on an excitingjourney of discovery suffused with dangers and thrills.Play wrights Prof Femi Osofisan and Prof Akinwun-mi Isola present interesting dimensions to the OgbojuOde story that deepened audience appreciation of thestory. Watching each play was like watching a differentbut similar account.Osofisan’s The Forest of a Thousand Daemons is akinto a dance drama with plenty of dances, chants andoriginal songs. He puts an interesting twist to thetale as the hunters accomplish the last of many teststhe good king of the nearest town to Langbodo givesthem. Now reduced to four men after the death oftheir colleagues, the adventurers learn to their surpriseyet relief that Langbodo is not a physical space but astate of being where humans come to a fuller realisa-tion of their essence and learn to live in love and har-mony with other beings.Osofisan’s Akaraogun, the protagonist, is a youngman, full of energy and verve, as are his fellow war-riors.Osofisan and artistic director Dr. Tunde Awosanmi say they sourced the rich repertoire of songs in theplay mainly from Yoruba oral tradition including therepertory of the hunter’s guild. Femi Osofisan, TundeAwosanmi and Tunde Adeyemo provided additionalcompositions.Akaraogun in Prof Isola’s Ogboju Ode is a greyingand bent old man who recounts to a scribe the inter-esting narrative of his travels through the forests ofdemons. Isola uses the flashback technique as the nowaged Akaraogun looks back at the adventures he andhis fellow hunters undertook. They arrive at the physi-cal location Langbodo and bring back to their home-land many goodies from the far away land.Proverbs, oratory and dance are alsostrong in the Yoruba presentation. Rendering in theoriginal language enriches the texture, depth of mean-ing and eloquence.Dif erent Takes on An Interesting TaleProfs Femi Osofisan and Akinwunmi Ishola

English adaptation while ProfessorAkinwumi Isola of the ObafemiAwolowo University wrote the Yorubaadaptation.Speaking on the significanceof the performances, Prof FemiOsofisan, a former General Managerof the National Theatre, asserted, “Byselecting this work, Chams is renderingan immeasurable service to thepreservation of our culture, at a timewhen our country like others in the so-called Third World are faced with themenace of globalisation. Certainly, suchprojects as this will help the processof our cultural rebirth. Fagunwa hasshown us that we have our ownfolklore and fables, our stories and sagacOver stOrycover story8 | futureteNse8 | futureteNseand heroes as authentically rich, andenriching, as any other in the worldrepertory. With him, we can also standup and announce that we are also partof the ancient heritage that first gavemeaning to humanity.”Presentation of the Ogboju Ode plays byChams plc provided direct employmentto 82 theatre practitioners and indirectemployment to many more, thusfulfilling its mission as a corporatesocial investment.This is the testimony of the technicalconsultant to the Chams Theatre Series, Prof FemiOsofisan.Speaking at a press briefing before theformal presentation of the plays, Osofisan,an experienced hand in theatre management,administration and teaching, said the involvementof Chams plc has helped revive morale amongstthespians.Theatre often involves many other aspects ofthe arts, from music through choreography andinto fields such as costuming. Osofisan said thatby sponsoring these major productions, Chams hadprovided employment for the cast and crew overmany months.A 48-person cast and crew featured inThe Forest of a Thousand Daemons while thecast of Ogboju Ode had 36 persons.CSR Mission AccomplishedGuests at the Lobby of the ConGress haLL attransCorp hiLton, venue of the abuja showMr aLadekoMo with aLhaji GboyeGa aruLoGun at the ibadan showMr & Mrs aLadekoMo weLCoMinG the priMate of the MethodistChurCh of niGeria, his eMinenCe, dr sunday oLa Makindethe ChairMan, prof. a.d. akinde with Miss diwura aGunwa,dauGhter of the Late pLaywriGht

==========================================================================================FROM

HomeSunday MagazineScreenWhen the stage depicts our loss
When the stage depicts our loss
By VICTOR AKANDEPublished 8/11/2009ScreenRating: Unrated
For as long as we can remember, we have allowed those basic values of art and culture to die; stage play being one of them. Have you ever wondered why as a parent you are struck by nostalgia each time you visit your country home? Have you paused to ask why some of our brothers abroad prefer to speak with us in our native tongue rather than in English? The answer is not farfetched; we value ourselves at a distance. My brother in-law was on yahoo chat with my wife a few days ago and in all the three-paged dialogue, hardly did I see a full sentence in English language. Beyond that, it was obvious he found relish in Yoruba proverbs and idiomatic expressions. Gbenga has lived in South Africa for five years now.

My wife’s boss is another example. Dele, while in Nigeria spoke through his nose; it amazes than amuses my wife that her oga desires so much the feel of being a Nigerian with the spontaneity at which he infused Yoruba language in their phone conversations. You may not understand how far away you are from your culture until you take out time to see a stage play. I did, and it was mind blowing.

Have you heard about the young lady called Nneka Egbuna? She won the MOBO award in the African singers’ category last month. But that is not the story. Nneka, half Nigerian-half German, used to think she was white skin until she left the shores of Nigeria. Today her music is for the emancipation of the black man, not only from colour bar, but of the glorious abundance of life, wisdom, and riches deposited by God on the soil and airspace of the black continent. That young girl is nothing short of a black activist as a victim of colour bar.
But here we are neglecting our heritage out of ignorance, and our leaders out of insensitivity have refused to promote those values that stand us out. We fall at the feet of what is called western civilisation, forgetting that the Elizabethan theatre tradition isn’t dead in Britain, just as the Shakespearean experience is still a classic.
Amidst the oddity, one corporate organisation has identified with the vision of rebranding Nigeria in the real sense by choosing not only to encourage the impoverished stage actors by engaging them for half a year but also enlivening the theatre tradition as a new leisure for children of school age.

This Information and Communication Technology firm, Chams Plc, began what it called The Chams Theatre Series in 2008 with theatrical adaptations of the D.O. Fagunwa book, Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale. This year, perhaps like never before, it is the story of this extraordinary adventure of the Sugarcane Man called Ireke Onibudo by the same author. It gladdens my heart to know that Chams is sponsoring this unique experience as a strategic intervention and contribution to the rejuvenation of the Arts and stage culture in Nigeria. It is thoughtful that it sees Corporate Social Responsibility initiative as also a means of promoting our culture and re-orientating Nigerians to the values that we hold dear.

The taste of the pudding is in the eating. As I savour the expertise of Prof Femi Osofisan in bringing this complex plot to stage and the exquisite delivery of the cast, I glance across my shoulder to acknowledge if my Igbo friend was in the same reverie with me. He looked more excited. I told him what he was missing in the area of the music lyrics. But he said to me that the rhythm was complimentary enough to the story. Only then did I know that even I had undermined the power of drama as a universal language. Ben, that’s his name, said that stage play is to him the best form of entertainment; he praised the Yoruba culture to high heavens.

The beauty of the road show for Ireke Onibudo which started yesterday is that although it will be presented in Yoruba and English languages, there will be two different stories entirely from a single theme, as Prof Femi Osofisan and Prof. Akinwunmi Isola, playwright the English and Yoruba languages adaptation respectively; it is only imaginable that interpretation, style, comic relief, suspense, folk song, costume, choreography, and other dramatic elements will make for separate savouring.

The company is extending the number of shows from seven, which it had last year, to eleven this year in response to popular demand. Perhaps this is one of the reasons that the sponsors will also be taking the Chams Theatre Series to schools,s allowing for students from selected schools in four cities to join adults to experience the thrill of live theatre from the D.O. Fagunwa’s collection.

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from 234next.com
Large turnout for Fagunwa play

By Akintayo Abodunrin

November 14, 2009 08:43PMT
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‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ and ‘Agbara Ife’, being the English and Yoruba adaptations of D.O. Fagunwa’s ‘Ireke Onibudo’ by Femi Osofisan and Akinwumi Isola respectively, premiered last weekend in Lagos.

The plays opened to a packed house at Cinema Hall I, National Theatre, Iganmu, on Saturday, November 7 and Sunday, November 8. Eminent Nigerians including former governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, Joseph Sanusi and his wife, Doyin Ogunbiyi of Tanus Communication, poet Odia Ofeimun, chair of the Fagunwa Foundation, Diwura Fagunwa, artistic director of the National Troupe, Ahmed Yerima, chairman, board of directors, Chams plc, Reverend Bayo Akinde, Lagos State commissioner for tourism, Tokunbo Afikuyomi and other lovers of stage drama were among those who saw the play. Children drawn from schools across Lagos also saw the English adaptation on Monday, November 9 at the same venue.

The Reverend Olu Odejimi, co anchor at the opening with Dayo Olajuwon on Saturday started on a light mode with, “Say to your neighbour good afternoon and how do you do?’ Though ‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ started almost an hour late, people patiently waited while formalities including introduction of guests and the Chams family song rendered by uniformly attired staff of the ICT company were observed.

While Isola and Kola Oyewo who directed his adaptation were at the premieres, only Tunde Awosanmi, director of the English version was present. Isola informed that Osofisan was away on sabbatical outside the country.

One source, different plays

And as Isola, author of ‘Ole Ku’, ‘Efunsetan Aniwura and other plays disclosed earlier at the press preview of the play some weeks ago, though the adaptations are from the same source material – Fagunwa’s Ireke Onibudo written in 1949, the edu-taining plays indeed differ in their treatment of love, the central theme of the original novel.

Similarly, some popular Nollywood actors in the Yoruba genre who feature in ‘Agbara Ife’ gave a good account of themselves. Peter Fatomilola, Toyosi Arigbabuwo, Samson Eluwole (Jinadu Ewele) and Kayode Olaiya (Aderupoko) who started their careers on the stage showed that their skills have not deserted them. Others including Gbolagade Akinpelu (Ogun Majek), John Adewole (Tafa Oloyede) and Jolaade Adejobi (Mama Wande) also distinguished themselves.

In a short speech at the end of ‘Agbara Ife’ on Sunday, Demola Aladekomo, Managing Director of Chams Plc, thanked the audience and stressed the importance of love. He also specially acknowledged the team responsible for the second edition of the theatre series including Fiyinfolu Okedare, Ayodeji Akindele, Isioma Eboka, Bisola Oladipo and Dayo Olajuwon.

The Chams Theatre Series debuted last year with Yoruba and English adaptations of Fagunwa’s ‘Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmole’ by Osofisan and Isola. It is, according to Aladekomo, “a strategic intervention and contribution to the rejuvenation of the arts and stage culture in Nigeria. It is also a means of promoting our culture and re-orientating Nigerians to the values that we hold dear.”

‘Agbara Ife’ showed in Ibadan, Oyo State yesterday while ‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ will show in the city today and tomorrow. Both plays will also be staged in Abuja and Akure before the series ends on November 30.
)

Posted by seyi on Nov 21 2009

pls when is it gonna be stage in Abuja,time days and venue would be most appreciated.

Posted by Fatai on Nov 28 2009

Thank you Chams Plc.

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from tribune.com.ng

Chams set Lagos, Ibadan aglow with Ireke Onibudo
By Adewale Oshodi – Updated: Tuesday 17-11-2009

A scene in the play IN the first two weekends in the month of November, Lagos and Ibadan theatre lovers were treated to live stage performances, Ireke Onibudo, sponsored by IT giant, Chams Plc. Adewale Oshodi reports how the performances in both cities went, and what lovers of theatre in Abuja and Akure should expect when, the performance train moves to their cities.

For the second year running, Information Technology (IT) firm, Chams Nigeria Plc, through its Chams Theatre Series (CTS) subsidiary, has demonstrated its commitment to the revival of the arts and stage culture in the country.

It all began last year, when Chams sponsored the adaptation of Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa’s work, Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale, in both English and Yoruba for stage performances in four cities across the country.

This year, another of Fagunwa’s works, Ireke Onibudo, which theatre lovers in Lagos and Ibadan had already enjoyed, will be staged in Abuja between Saturday 21 and Sunday 22, November, 2009 while the train will move to Akure between Saturday 23 and Monday 30, November, 2009.

Apart from the fact that both English and Yoruba adaptations of Ireke Onibudo are being staged free of charge for theatre lovers in these cities, students also have a special session to enjoy the play.

Already, those who have watched the play in Lagos and Ibadan can testify to the brilliance of the playwrights, who adapted the book Professor Femi Osofisan, for the English adaptation and Professor Akinwumi Isola, for the Yoruba adaptation as well as the Artistic Directors Dr. Tunde Awosanmi, for the English adaptation and Dr. Kola Oyewo, for the Yoruba adaption.

The play, Ireke Onibudo, based on Fagunwa’s 1942 book of same title, was about the adventures of an eponymous hero, Ireke Onibudo, before he finally found his true love who helped him to overcome all his troubles. The play placed emphasis on the capabilities of man in the struggle for survival.

Both adaptations gave prominence to the interplay of humour, as well the presence of all dramatic ingredients which Fagunwa injected into the writing of the play, like fables, folktales, poetry, perseverance, love etc.

The cast of both adaptations were made from seasoned theatre professionals who proved their mettle by rendering a near-perfect performance. For the English adaptation, artistes like Toyin Oshinaike, Albert Akaeze, Kunle Agboola, Charles Ihimodu, among others, and the Yoruba adaptation, artistes like Peter Fatomilola, Gbolagade Akinpelu, Samson Eluwole, Toyosi Arigbabuowo, Kayode Olaiya, among others, gave a performance that could only be described as excellent.

The fact that the translators, Professors Osofisan and Isola, as well as the artistic directors, Dr. Awosanmi and Dr. Oyewo, are among the best that could be found anywhere in the world, really had a great impact on the performances.

The play treated the audience to a series of Yoruba folklore songs, which as a result of the changing world, are no longer popular. The audience was also reminded about the beautiful Ekun Iyawo, literally bridal chant or wailing, rendered by the bride on the eve of her marriage, which is one of the final rites of marriage ceremonies in traditional Yoruba society.

The costumes used really depicted the situation in which the artistes were at a particular point in time; like Ireke’s torn agbada after being severely beaten in the town of Alupayida; or Ireke’s mother’s costume, an all white net that covered her entire head to toe, to depict a ghost when she appeared to Ireke under the sea; or even the Arogidigba (Queen of the Coast) and her lieutenants who had a silky, beautiful and shimering attire to complement the popular belief that the queen of the underwater is a stunning beauty.

The sound effects were creatively employed to intensify the reality of the setting. The effects brought life to the performance. Sounds of birds chirpings in the forest, or sounds of the underwater, as well as its usage to create an atmosphere of fear, was simply excellent.

The lights were used as transistional guide to seamlessly link the scenes. Therefore, Abuja and Akure residents can expect to also enjoy what Lagos and Ibadan theatre lovers had enjoyed by storming the Cyprian Ekwensi Centre for Arts and Culture, Abuja and Adegbemila Hall, Akure, when the performance train gets to their cities.

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FROM

THIS BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED SISTER IS FIGHTING BLEACHING BOTH IN UK AND NIGERIA!

September 6, 2008

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY TINU OGINNI IS FIGHTING BLEACHING IN U.K. AND NIGERIA!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY TINU OGINNI IS FIGHTING BLEACHING IN U.K. AND NIGERIA!

dapada-say-no-to-bleaching1

EGBA MI O! HELP US HERE AT BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!

October 10, 2007

My problem is that this site has grown so fast and I don’t yet have the money to get a laptop and internet connection which is expensive here in Nigeria- about 2,000dollars in all to keep up with servicing this site and posting and answering on time etc. Any BROTHERS/SISTERS who want to send me your widow’s mite toward this can contact me at:

yeyeolade@yahoo.com.
I am praying about it and I know that Olodumare(GOD) will provide so I can give you the BLACK RACE the service you deserve!
Your SISTER, BLACK for the RACE,
Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

Oluwa ba wa se o . ASE! (God will work it out! in Yoruba. ASE=let it be so!)

YORUBA VOCABULARY KNOWN AS LUKUMI IN CUBA BY OBA ERNESTO PICHARDO,1998

March 20, 2007

FROM: http://www.church-of-the-lukumi.org

CLBA Journal 2000-05

LANGUAGE

“Yoruba Vocabulary Known As Lukumi in Cuba”

ã Oba Ernesto Pichardo 1998

Yoruba is the mother tongue of millions who live in the Western Region of Nigeria and adjoining areas. Their language was first written by Christian missionaries in the early part of the nineteenth century. Yoruba has certain regional dialects but a generally accepted “Standard Yoruba” is being taught in schools and is found in books. There are two slightly different forms of Standard Yoruba; one that corresponds to the Oyo province and the other is associated with Lagos.

Yoruba is a tone language. It has three tones similar to the Chinese language: high, mid tone, low. There is no grammatical gender in traditional Yoruba (ó=he/she/it). Yoruba language known as Lukumi language in Cuba presents a different challenge.Yoruba slaves in Cuba had no possible access to colonial schools and books from Christian missionaries. The language inherited in Cuba is the traditional oral speech and its regional variables from the homeland.

The documentation of the spoken Yoruba in Cuba reflects the difficult task of writing a vocabulary from oral Yoruba to written Spanish language. The following illustrates how this was accomplished.

The Yoruba alphabet has the letters: a, b, d, e, e, f, g, gb, h, I, j, k, l, m, n, o, o, p, r, s, s, t, u, w, y

Our technology does not allow to place Yoruba language symbols. The following repeated letters carry a period under each:

E = (.) O = (.) S = (.)

Yoruba in comparison to Spanish does not have the letters: c, ch, ll, ñ, q, v, x, z.

Spanish in comparison to Yoruba does not have the letters: e(.), gb, o(.), s(.).

Yoruba alphabet is divided into 7 vowels and 18 consonants. The seven vowels are: A, E, E(.), I, O, O(.), U. In Spanish they are pronounced; A = alabar, E = similar to tenéis, E(.) = similar to remo, I = similar to litro, O = sounds like ou, O(.) = loma, U = similar to luna.

The consonants have the sounds; B (bi) = similar to boca, D (di) = similar to diente, F (fi) = like fuego, G (guí) = similar to garganta, GB (gbíi) = does not exist so the g is low and the b is extended, J (LL) = similar to lluvia, H (ji) = similar to jefe, K (ki) = similar to k, C and q in kilate, casa and querida, L (li) = like luna, M (mi) = like mira, N (ni) = similar to nada, P (pkuí) = similar to kuáa, R (ri) = similar the soft R in artillero, S (si) similar to sabio, S (shi) = similar to the CH in chiva, T (ti) = like tipo, W (ui) = similar to guira, Y (yi) = similar to yema (iema).

Examples of how the words may found written in Spanish:

Kan = kan, or can
Okan = okan or ocan
Nigbàyi = nibàyi
Ohundie = ojundie, ohundie, oundie
Onje = ounye, onye
S(.) E = che, she
Ijoko = iyoko, iyoco, illoco, illoko
Kigbe = quibe, kibe

Following the above can make it possible to restore the words in Spanish writing back to Standard Yoruba. On the other hand, trying to reconstruct the vocabulary would be a long-term task, especially in sentence composition. Standard Yoruba is also modern and presents new language features compared to the old.

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|Journal Home |art-culture |

YORUBA GRAMMAR 1

February 21, 2007

FROM: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/yoruba_people
Yoruba language
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Yoruba
ede Yorùbá
Spoken in: Nigeria, Benin, Togo and elsewhere
Total speakers: more than 20 million (Ethnologue, Sachnine 1997)
Ranking: 49
Language family: Niger-Congo
Atlantic-Congo
Volta-Congo
Benue-Congo
Defoid
Yoruboid
Edekiri
Yoruba
Official status
Official language of: Nigeria
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: yo
ISO 639-2: yor
ISO 639-3: yor
Note: This page may contain IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. See IPA chart for English for an English-​based pronunciation key.
Yoruba (native name ede Yorùbá, ‘the Yoruba language’) is a dialect continuum of West Africa with over 22 million speakers.[1] The native tongue of the Yoruba people, it is spoken, among other languages, in Nigeria, Benin, and Togo and traces of it are found among communities in Brazil, Sierra Leone (where it is called Oku), and Cuba (where it is called Nago). Yoruba is an isolating, tonal language with SVO syntax. Apart from referring to the aggregate of dialects and their speakers, the term Yoruba is used for the standard, written form of the language. Yoruba is classified as a Niger-Congo language of the Yoruboid branch of Defoid, Benue-Congo.

The traditional Yoruba area, the southwestern corner of Nigeria, is commonly called Yorubaland and is comprised of today’s Oyo, Osun, Ogun, Ondo, Ekiti, Kwara, and Lagos states as well as the western part of Kogi state. Geophysically, Yorubaland forms part of a plateau (elevation 366 m) bordered to the north and east by the Niger River. A large part of it is densely forested; the northern part however, including Oyo, lies in the savanna to the north of the forest.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Varieties
2.1 Dialects
2.2 Standard Yoruba
3 Writing system
4 Linguistic features
4.1 Phonology
4.1.1 Vowels and consonants
4.1.2 Tone
4.1.3 Assimilation and elision
4.2 Grammar
4.3 Vocabulary
5 Literature
5.1 Oral literature
5.2 Written literature
6 Notes and references
6.1 Notes
6.2 References
6.2.1 History
6.2.2 Dictionaries
6.2.3 Grammars and sketches
7 External links

[edit] History
The ancestor of the Yoruba speakers is, according to their oral traditions, Oduduwa, son of Olúdùmarè, the supreme god of the Yoruba. Although they share a common history, it is only since the second half of the nineteenth century that the children of Oduduwa share one name. Before the abolition of the slave trade, Yorubas among the liberated slaves in Freetown were known among Europeans as Akú, a name derived from the first words of Yoruba greetings such as Ẹ kú àárọ̀ ‘good morning’ and Ẹ kú alẹ́ ‘good evening’.[2] At some stage the term Yariba or Yoruba came into use, first confined to the Ọyọ Kingdom; the term was used among the Hausa (as it is today) but its origins are unclear [3] Under the influence of the Yoruba Samuel Ajayi Crowther, (first Bishop of West Africa and first African bishop of the Church of England, who was a war captive freed on the high seas en-route to slavery) and subsequent missionaries, and for a large part due to the development of a written version of the language, the term Yoruba was extended to include all speakers of related dialects.

The first appearance in print of any variety of Yoruba dates from 1819, in the form of a small vocabulary collected by Bowdich, an English diplomatic agent in Ashanti.[4] This is relatively late for a West African language spoken as widely as Yoruba (cf. Akan, 1602; Ewe, 1658); it can be attributed to the fact that virtually no European trade took place on the Yoruba coast before the nineteenth century. Linguistic means —including, for example, historical-comparative linguistics, glottochronology, and dialectology — used along with both traditional (oral) historical sources and archaeological finds, have shed some light on the history of the Yorubas and their language before this point. The North-West Yoruba dialects, for example, show more linguistic innovations. According to some, this, combined with the fact that Southeast and Central Yoruba areas generally have older settlements, suggests a later date of immigration for Northwest Yoruba.[5].

[edit] Varieties

[edit] Dialects
The Yoruba dialect continuum itself consists of over fifteen varieties which can be classified into three major dialect areas: Northwest, Central, and Southeast.[6] Of course, clear boundaries can never be drawn and peripheral areas of dialectal regions often have some similarities to adjoining dialects.

North-West Yoruba (NWY).
Abẹokuta, Ibadan, Ọyọ, Ọsun and Lagos areas
Central Yoruba (CY)
Igbomina, Ifẹ, Ekiti, Akurẹ, Ẹfọn, and Ijẹsa areas.
South-East Yoruba (SEY)
Okitipupa, Ondo, Ọwọ, Ṣagamu, and parts of Ijẹbu.
North-West Yoruba is historically a part of the Oyo empire. In NWY dialects, Proto-Yoruba /gh/ (the velar fricative [ɣ]) and /gw/ have merged into /w/; the upper vowels /i ̣/ and /ụ/ were raised and merged with /i/ and /u/, just as their nasal counterparts, resulting in a vowel system with seven oral and three nasal vowels. Ethnographically, traditional government is based on a division of power between civil and war chiefs; lineage and descent are unilineal and agnatic.

South-East Yoruba was probably associated with the expansion of the Benin Empire after c. 1450 AD.[7] In contrast to NWY, lineage and descent are largely multilineal and cognatic, and the division of titles into war and civil is unknown. Linguistically, SEY has retained the /gh/ and /gw/ contrast, while it has lowered the nasal vowels /ịn/ and /ụn/ to /ẹn/ and /ọn/, respectively. SEY has collapsed the second and third person plural pronominal forms; thus, àn án wá can mean either ‘you (pl.) came’ or ‘they came’ in SEY dialects, whereas NWY for example has ẹ wá ‘you (pl.) came’ and wọ́n wá ‘they came’, respectively. The emergence of a plural of respect may have prevented coalescence of the two in NWY dialects.

Central Yoruba forms a transitional area in that the lexicon has much in common with NWY, whereas it shares many ethnographical features with SEY. Its vowel system is the least innovating of the three dialect groups, having retained nine oral-vowel contrasts and six or seven nasal vowels, and an extensive vowel harmony system.

[edit] Standard Yoruba
Main article: Standard Yoruba
Standard Yoruba (also known as literary Yoruba, the Yoruba koiné, common Yoruba and often simply as Yoruba) is a separate member of the dialect cluster. It is the written form of the language, the standard variety learnt at school and that spoken by newsreaders on the radio. Standard Yoruba has its origin in the 1850’s, when Samuel A. Crowther, native Yoruba and the first African Bishop, published a Yoruba grammar and started his translation of the Bible. Though for a large part based on the Ọyọ and Ibadan dialects, Standard Yoruba incorporates several features from other dialects[8]. Additionally, it has some features peculiar to itself only, for example the simplified vowel harmony system, as well as foreign structures, such as calques from English which originated in early translations of religious works.

Because the use of Standard Yoruba did not result from some deliberate linguistic policy, much controversy exists as to what constitutes ‘genuine Yoruba’, with some writers holding the opinion that the Ọyọ dialect is the most pure form, and others stating that there is no such thing as genuine Yoruba at all. Standard Yoruba, the variety learnt at school and used in the media, has nonetheless been a powerful consolidating factor in the emergence of a common Yoruba identity.

[edit] Writing system
Yoruba orthography originated in the early work of CMS missionaries working among the Aku in Freetown, notably Kilham and Raban. They assembled vocabularies and published short notes on Yoruba grammar. One of their informants in Sierra Leone was Crowther, who later would proceed to study his native language Yoruba. In early grammar primers and translations of portions of the English Bible, Crowther used the Latin alphabet largely without tone markings. The only diacritic used was a dot below certain vowels to signify their open variants [ɛ] and [ɔ], viz. ẹ and ọ. Over the years the orthography was revised to take care of tone marking among other things. In 1875 the Church Missionary Society (CMS) organised a conference on Yoruba Orthography; the standard devised there was the basis for the orthography of the steady flow of religious and educational literature over the next seventy years.

The current orthography of Yoruba derives from a 1966 report of the Yoruba Orthography Committee, along with Ayọ Bamgboṣe’s 1965 Yoruba Orthography, a study of the earlier orthographies and an attempt to bring Yoruba orthography in line with actual speech as much as possible. Still largely similar to the older orthography, it employs the Latin alphabet modified by the use of the digraph gb and certain diacritics, including the traditional vertical line set under the letters E̩/e̩, O̩/o̩, and S̩/s̩. In many publications the line is replaced by a dot (Ẹ/ẹ, Ọ/ọ, Ṣ/ṣ). The vertical line has been used to avoid the mark being fully covered by an underline.

A B D E Ẹ F G Gb H I J K L M N O Ọ P R S Ṣ T U W Y
a b d e ẹ f g gb h i j k l m n o ọ p r s ṣ t u w y

The Latin letters c, q, v, x, z are not used.

The pronunciation of the letters without diacritics corresponds more or less to their International Phonetic Alphabet equivalents, except for the labial-velar stops k͡p (written as

) and [g͡b] (written as ), in which both consonants are pronounced simultaneously rather than sequentially. The diacritic underneath vowels indicates an open vowel, pronounced with the root of the tongue retracted (so e̩ is pronounced with an IPA [ɛ̙] and o̩ with an IPA [ɔ̙]). represents a postalveolar consonant [ʃ] like the English sh, represents a palatal approximant like English y, and a voiced palatal plosive, as is common in many African orthographies.

In addition to the vertical bars, three further diacritics are used on vowels and syllabic nasal consonants to indicate the language’s tones: an acute accent (´) for the high tone, a grave accent (`) for the low tone, and an optional macron (¯) for the middle tone. These are used in addition to the line in e̩ and o̩. When more than one tone is used in one syllable, the vowel can either be written once for each tone (for example, *òó for a vowel [o] with tone rising from low to high) or, more rarely in current usage, combined into a single accent. In this case, a caron is used for the rising tone (so the previous example would be written ǒ) and a tilde for other possibilities.

Á À Ā É È Ē Ẹ / E̩ Ẹ́ / É̩ Ẹ̀ / È̩ Ẹ̄ / Ē̩ Í Ì Ī Ó Ò Ō Ọ / O̩ Ọ́/ Ó̩ Ọ̀ / Ò̩ Ọ̄ / Ō̩ Ú Ù Ū Ṣ / S̩
á à ā é è ē ẹ / e̩ ẹ́ / é̩ ẹ̀ / è̩ ẹ̄ / ē̩ í ì ī ó ò ō ọ / o̩ ọ́ / ó̩ ọ̀ / ò̩ ọ̄ / ō̩ ú ù ū ṣ / s̩

[edit] Linguistic features

[edit] Phonology
The three possible syllable structures of Yoruba are consonant+vowel (CV), vowel alone (V), and syllabic nasal (N). Every syllable bears one of the three tones: high ́, mid ̄ (generally left unmarked), and low ̀. The sentence ‘n̄ ò lọ’ I didn’t go provides examples of the three syllable types:

n̄ — [ŋ̄] — I
ò — [ó] — not (negation)
lọ — [lɔ] — to go

[edit] Vowels and consonants
Standard Yoruba has seven oral and five nasal vowels. There are no diphthongs in Yoruba; sequences of vowels are pronounced as separate syllables. Dialects differ in the number of vowels they have; see above.

Yoruba vowel diagram.[9] Oral vowels are marked by black dots, while the coloured regions indicate the ranges in possible quality of the nasal vowels. Oral vowels Nasal vowels
Front Back Front Back
Close i u ĩ ũ
Close-mid e o
Open-mid ɛ ɔ ɛ̃ ɔ̃
Open a

The status of a fifth nasal vowel, [ã], is controversial. Although the sound does occur in speech, several authors have argued it to be not phonemically contrastive; often, it is in free variation with [ɔ̃].[10] Orthographically, nasal vowels are normally represented by an oral vowel symbol followed by n, i.e. in, un, ẹn, ọn, except in case of the [n] allophone of /l/ (see below) preceding a nasal vowel, i.e. inú ‘inside, belly’ is actually pronounced [īnṹ].[11]

Bilabial Labiodental Alveolar Postalveolar Palatal Velar Labial-velar Glottal
Plosive b t d ɟ k g k͡p g͡b
Nasal m (n)
Fricative f s ʃ h
Approximant ɾ j w
Lateral approximant l

The voiceless plosives /t/ and /k/ are slightly aspirated; in some Yoruba varieties, /t/ and /d/ are more dental. The rhotic consonant is realized as a flap ([ɾ]), or in some varieties (notably Lagos Yoruba) as the postalveolar approximant [ɹ]. Like many other languages of the region, Yoruba has the labial-velar stops /k͡p/ and /g͡b/, e.g. pápá [k͡pák͡pá] ‘field’, gbọ̄gbọ̄ [g͡bɔg͡bɔ] ‘all’. Notably, it lacks the common voiceless bilabial plosive /p/, which is why /k͡p/ is written as

. It also lacks a phoneme /n/; though the letter is used for the sound in the orthography, it strictly speaking refers to an allophone of /l/ which immediately precedes a nasal vowel.

There is also a syllabic nasal which forms a syllable nucleus by itself. When it precedes a vowel it is a velar nasal [ŋ], e.g. n ò lọ [ŋ ò lọ] ‘I didn’t go’. In other cases its place of articulation is homorganic with the following consonant, for example ó ń lọ [ó ń lọ] ‘he is going’, ó ń fò [ó ɱ́ fò] ‘he is jumping’.

[edit] Tone
Yoruba is a tonal language with three level tones: High, Low and Mid; the latter is the default tone. [12] Every syllable must have at least one tone; a syllable containing a long vowel can have two tones. Contour tones (i.e. rising or falling tone melodies) are usually analysed as separate tones occurring on adjacent tone bearing units and thus have no phonemic status.[13] Tones are marked by use of the acute accent for High tone (á, ń), the grave accent for Low tone (à, ǹ); Mid is unmarked, except on syllabic nasals where it is indicated using a macron (a, n̄); see below). Examples:

H: ó bẹ́ ‘he jumped’; síbí ‘spoon’
M: ó bẹ ‘he is forward’; ara ‘body’
L: ó bẹ̀ ‘he asks for pardon’; ọ̀kọ̀ ‘spear’

[edit] Assimilation and elision
When a word precedes another word beginning with a vowel, assimilation or deletion (‘elision’) of one of the vowels often takes place [14]. In fact, since syllables in Yoruba normally end in a vowel, and most nouns start with one, this is a very common phenomenon, and indeed only is absent in very slow, unnatural speech. The orthography here follows speech in that word divisions are normally not indicated in words that are contracted as a result of assimilation or elision: ra ẹja → rẹja ‘buy fish’. Sometimes however, authors may choose to use an inverted comma to indicate an elided vowel as in ní ilé → n’ílé ‘in the house’.

Long vowels within words usually signal that a consonant has been elided word-internally. In such cases, the tone of the elided vowel is retained, e.g. àdìrò → ààrò ‘hearth’; koríko → koóko ‘grass’; òtító → òótó ‘truth’.

[edit] Grammar
This section is a stub. You can help by expanding it.

Yoruba is an isolating language. Basic constituent order is subject, verb, object (SVO), as in ó na Adé ‘he hit Adé’. The bare verb stem denotes a completed action (often called perfect); tense and aspect are marked by preverbal particles such as ń ‘imperfect/present continuous’, ti ‘past’. Negation is expressed by a preverbal particle kò. Serial verb constructions are common, as in many other languages of West Africa.

Yoruba has a distinction between human and non-human nouns; probably a remainder of the noun class system of proto-Niger-Congo, the distinction is only apparent in the fact that the two groups require different interrogative particles: tani for human nouns (‘who?’) and kini for non-human nouns (‘what?’). The associative construction (covering possessive/genitive and related notions) consists of juxtaposing nouns in the order modified-modifier as in inú àpótí {inside box} ‘the inside of the box’, fìlà Àkàndé ‘Akande’s cap’ or àpótí aṣọ ‘box for clothes’ (Bamgboṣe 1966:110, Rowlands 1969:45-6). More than two nouns can be juxtaposed: rélùweè abẹ́ ilẹ̀ (railway under ground) ‘underground railway’, inú àpótí aṣọ ‘the inside of the clothes box’. In the rare case where this results in two possible readings, disambiguation is left to the context.

There are two ‘prepositions’: ní ‘on, at, in’ and sí ‘onto, towards’. The former indicates location and absence of movement, the latter encodes location/direction with movement (Sachnine 1997:19). Position and direction are expressed by these prepositions in combination with spatial relational nouns like orí ‘top’, apá ‘side’, inú ‘inside’, etí ‘edge’, abẹ́ ‘under’, ilẹ̀ ‘down’, etc. Many of these spatial relational terms are historically related to body-part terms.

[edit] Vocabulary
To the north of Yorubaland, Hausa is spoken. The long-standing contact between the Yoruba and the Hausa culture has influenced both languages. The imprint left by Hausa on Yoruba can be seen most clearly in the many loan-words. Two kinds of Hausa loan words can be distinguished: first, words of pure Hausa origin; and secondly, words that can be traced back to Arabic which have entered the Yoruba lexis through Hausa. Examples of the first type include gèjíyà ‘tiredness’ (

YORUBA(FREE DOWNLOAD OF YORUBA DICTIONARY AT FREELANG.NET/DICTIONARY/YOURBA.HTML)!

February 17, 2007

FROM: freelang.net/dictionary/yoruba.html

FREELANG Dictionary : Yoruba-English

Features of this Yoruba dictionary

Install this Freelang dictionary and browse both the Yoruba-English and the English-Yoruba lists. Look up a word, add your own words, edit or delete an entry, and learn words at your own rhythm from a personal learning list. For a complete list of features click here or see the Help menu of the program.

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– no adware, no spyware, no registration –

Credits and copyrights

This dictionary was made by Renato B. Figueiredo.

List status: © Renato B. Figueiredo

Word list information

Yoruba Þ English: 282 words
English Þ Yoruba: 268 words
First upload: February 5, 2007

Download

1. Read and accept the terms of our copyright notice

2. Download the program
– 282 kb –

3. Download the word list
– 70 kb –

4. Run and install both in the same folder.
Any problem? Read our Installation Manual or the FAQ…

Other downloads

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Customize your dictionary: change the background color and download (or create) a new logo.
Other Freelang resources

Freelang also provides a Free Human Translation Help Service, where you can contact a translator in Yoruba, a list of common Words in all Languages including Yoruba, many downloadable Fonts for Foreign Languages, and a shop where you can buy Handheld Electronic Dictionaries and Translation Software for all platforms.

Take your time and check out all those features!

YORUBA (ENGLISH TO YORUBA)VOCABULARY BY WORDGUMBO.COM

February 17, 2007

English to Yoruba (FROM wordgumbo.com)
a: 1. e.nìkan
aberration: 1. às.ìs.e
abide: 1. dè
accompany: 1. bá
account: 1. àlàyé
addled: 1. g
advice: 1. ìm ràn
ailment: 1. àìsàn; àrùn
alarm: 1. ìfòiyà
alien: 1. àjèjì; àjòjì
a little: 1. dí
alive: 1. ààyè
also: 1. w
answer: 1. dáhùn; fèsì | 2. èsì
ant: 1. èèrà
antelope: 1. àgb nrín
any: 1. e.nìkan
anybody: 1. e.nìkan
arm: 1. apá
arrival: 1. àb
article of clothing: 1. as.o.
as: 1. bí | 2. bí
ash: 1. eérú
ask: 1. b
ask for: 1. b
assemblage: 1. àwùjo.
at that place: 1. ib
average: 1. àárín
await: 1. dè
axe: 1. àáké
bag: 1. àpò | 2. àpò
bank: 1. bán’kì
basket: 1. agb n
be afraid of: 1. b rù
beauty: 1. e.wà
beg: 1. b
bicycle: 1. básíkùlù
bid: 1. b
bike: 1. básíkùlù
bind: 1. dì
bird: 1. e.iye.
blank: 1. funfun
blind: 1. f jú | 2. af jú
blood: 1. j
body: 1. ara
bone: 1. eegun; egungun
book: 1. ìwé
boot: 1. bàtà
boss: 1. ìjòyè | 2. baba
bottle: 1. ìgò
box: 1. àpótí
bridge: 1. afá; afárá
cassava: 1. gbágudá
catastrophe: 1. àgbákò
centre: 1. àárín
chair: 1. àga
chief: 1. ìjòyè
cinder: 1. eérú
clerk: 1. àk wé
clock: 1. aago; agogo
coconut: 1. àgbo.n
colour: 1. àw
come about: 1. dé
come across: 1. bá
connect: 1. dì
corn: 1. àgbàdo
counsel: 1. ìm ràn
custom: 1. às.à
cycle: 1. básíkùlù
danger: 1. ewu
death: 1. ikú
disease: 1. àìsàn; àrùn
dog: 1. ajá
doubt: 1. àníàní
dream: 1. àlà
drug: 1. egbòogi
dye: 1. àw
ear: 1. etí
earth: 1. il
egg: 1. e.yin
elephant: 1. erin
emmet: 1. èèrà
encounter: 1. bá
engine: 1. ro.
error: 1. às.ìs.e
evening: 1. al
exactly: 1. déédéé
expect: 1. dè
explanation: 1. àlàyé
extremely: 1. gidigidi
father: 1. bàbá | 2. bàbá
fear: 1. b rù
finger: 1. ìka
fire: 1. iná
fish: 1. e.ja
fisherman: 1. ape.ja
flesh: 1. e.ran
foolish: 1. g
foot: 1. e.s | 2. e.s
force: 1. agbára
foreign: 1. àjèjì; àjòjì
foreigner: 1. àlejò
forest: 1. ìgb ; igbó
forget: 1. gbàgbé
garment: 1. as.o.
gathering: 1. àwùjo.
get: 1. gbà
give back: 1. dá … padà
gladness: 1. ay
goat: 1. ewúr
gold: 1. góòlù
guest: 1. àlejò
habit: 1. às.à
happen: 1. dé
headache: 1. f rí
hog: 1. e.l d
house: 1. ilé
how: 1. bí | 2. bí | 3. bí
hunger: 1. ebi
illness: 1. àìsàn; àrùn
image: 1. àwòrán
Indian corn: 1. àgbàdo
in what way: 1. bí | 2. bí
iron: 1. irin
job: 1. is.
join: 1. dì
journey: 1. àjò; ìrìn-àjò
joy: 1. ay
lamp: 1. àtùpà
land: 1. il
language: 1. èdè
lay hold of: 1. gbà
leader: 1. ìjòyè
leaf: 1. ewé
leather: 1. awo.
leg: 1. e.s
leopard: 1. e.kùn
light: 1. iná
like: 1. bí
likewise: 1. w
location: 1. ibi
looking-glass: 1. dígí
love: 1. f ràn
lunatic: 1. as.iwèrè
machine: 1. ro.
maize: 1. àgbàdo
master: 1. baba
maybe: 1. bóyá; b yá
mayhap: 1. bóyá; b yá
mealies: 1. àgbàdo
mean: 1. àárín
medicine: 1. egbòogi
meet: 1. bá
meeting: 1. àwùjo.
metal: 1. irin
middle: 1. àárín
mirror: 1. dígí
mistake: 1. às.ìs.e
misunderstand: 1. èdèàìyédè
morning: 1. àár
mother: 1. ìyá
mouse: 1. èkúté
narrative: 1. ìtàn
nose: 1. ariwo
occur: 1. dé
odd: 1. àjèjì; àjòjì
old man: 1. arúgbó
one: 1. e.nìkan | 2. ìkan
or: 1. àbí
over there: 1. ib
palace: 1. ààfin
peculiar: 1. àjèjì; àjòjì
pepper: 1. ata
perchance: 1. bóyá; b yá
perhaps: 1. bóyá; b yá
peril: 1. ewu
period: 1. àsìkò
person: 1. ènìà; e.ni
pharmaceutical: 1. egbòogi
pick up: 1. gbà
picture: 1. àwòrán
pig: 1. e.l d
place: 1. ibi | 2. ibi
plate: 1. àwo
pocket: 1. àpò
porter: 1. aláarù
possibly: 1. bóyá; b yá
pour: 1. dà
power: 1. agbára
rather: 1. dí
reply: 1. dáhùn; fèsì | 2. èsì
request: 1. b
respond: 1. dáhùn; fèsì
return: 1. dá … padà
rice: 1. ìr sì
sack: 1. àpò
scatter: 1. dà
season: 1. àkókò
secret: 1. às.írí
see: 1. bá
serpent: 1. ejò
shade: 1. ibòòji
shadow: 1. ibòòji
shed: 1. dà
sheep: 1. àgùtàn
sheet: 1. ewé | 2. àwo
shoe: 1. bàtà
side: 1. apá; gb
sightless person: 1. af jú
silver: 1. fàdákà
skin: 1. awo.
slab: 1. àwo
slave: 1. e.rú
snake: 1. ejò
soil: 1. il
some: 1. dí | 2. e.nìkan
somebody: 1. e.nìkan
someone: 1. e.nìkan
some one: 1. e.nìkan
somewhat: 1. dí
sound: 1. ìró
spot: 1. ibi
story: 1. ìtàn
strange: 1. àjèjì; àjòjì | 2. àjèjì; àjòjì
stranger: 1. àlejò
strength: 1. agbára
stupid: 1. g
such a: 1. bí
such as: 1. bí
swine: 1. e.l d
tail: 1. ìrú
take: 1. gbà
tale: 1. ìtàn
that: 1. èwo
there: 1. ib | 2. ib
they: 1. àwo.n | 2. àwo.n
thou: 1. ìwo. | 2. ìwo. | 3. ìwo.
tie: 1. dì
tie up: 1. dì
timber: 1. igi
time: 1. ìgbà
tongue: 1. èdè
too: 1. w
to some extent: 1. dí
tree: 1. igi
trip: 1. àjò; ìrìn-àjò
us: 1. àwa
vigour: 1. agbára
village: 1. abúlé
voyage: 1. àjò; ìrìn-àjò
wait: 1. dè
wait for: 1. dè
wasp: 1. agb n
watch: 1. aago; agogo
way: 1. às.à
we: 1. àwa
what a: 1. bí
which: 1. èwo | 2. èwo
while: 1. ìgbà
white: 1. funfun | 2. funfun
who: 1. èwo
wife: 1. ìyàwó
window: 1. fèrèsé
wood: 1. igi
woods: 1. ìgb ; igbó
work: 1. is.
world: 1. aiyé; il aiyé
ye: 1. ìwo. | 2. ìwo.
yesterday: 1. àná
yon: 1. ib
yonder: 1. ib
you: 1. ìwo. | 2. ìwo. | 3. ìwo. | 4. ìwo.


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