Archive for the ‘GHANA’ Category

AFRICA!-MOTHER AFRICA!-BACK TO AFRICA-GHANA IS A NATURAL CHOICE FOR MANY BLACKAMERIKKKANS! -FROM THEGRIO.COM- O SE O ABURO MI ZAINABU AYIRA O!

November 7, 2013

FROM THEGRIO.COM

O SE O ABURO MI ZAINABU AYIRA!

Travel and Leisure
Why Ghana is fast becoming a hub for African-Americans
by Ezinne Ukoha | November 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM

ghana
Local chiefs wait for visiting Dutch Crown Prince Willem Alexander and Princess Maxima

Local chiefs wait for visiting Dutch Crown Prince Willem Alexander and Princess Maxima at Elmina Castle April 15, 2002 in Ghana. From Elmina the Dutch shipped over 50,000 slaves to Surinam and an unknown number to other destinations in North and South America. (Photo by Michel Porro/Getty Images)
Related Posts

TheGrio’s 100: Chinedu Echeruo, founder of HopStop helps us navigate big cities
Young Africans in America on a mission to rebrand homeland
Ghana VP sworn in hours after president’s death
US couple detained in Ghana for trying to adopt
Africans in fashion speak on coming all-African issue of L’Uomo Vogue

We are now living in a time when Africa evokes images of vibrancy and growth instead of poverty, war and struggle.

In this context, Ghana is fast becoming a mecca for black Americans who are looking for lucrative opportunities in a new environment. According to recent reports, about 10,000 African-Americans visit Ghana yearly. Currently almost 3,000 American blacks reside in the capital, Accra, the major hub of Ghana.

Signs of a growing trend

While these numbers are not huge, they are still significant. Almost six years ago there were only 1,000 African-American expatriates living in Ghana, so clearly the numbers are rising steadily.

What has attracted them? The fact is this burgeoning nation has consistently enjoyed a peaceful political climate without many threats of internal or external strife since it gained its independence from the British back in 1957. The temperate weather also makes it an attractive choice.

But most importantly, there are elements that could resonate with anyone seeking a more laid back lifestyle. The pristine beaches, affordable living and a sense of spiritual calm that permeates the landscape makes Ghana an attractive alternative to the proverbial American “rat race.”

Ghana is living up to that hype, in addition to being a land of economic opportunity and bountiful resources.

Why relocate to Ghana?

Most Americans are starting to grasp the notion that they may have better luck financially in another country. As the American economy continues to falter, some blacks are finding that places new and unfamiliar could challenge them in ways leading to upward mobility.

Monies saved and invested elsewhere can yield bigger dividends. The educational attainment of many African-Americans can be put to immediate use in countries that have not been able to offer their populations similar luxuries until recently.

Much has been written about American blacks moving to South Africa for these very reasons, but I would like to suggest Ghana be added to the short list of locales for those considering planting new roots in the Motherland.

Technology, teaching and more opportunities

There are a plethora of companies in Ghana eager to recruit foreign applicants. If you are lucky enough to be well versed in all things digital, securing employment with a well-established technology firm is a strong possibility. Organizations such as Blogging Ghana have created platforms for interactivity within the social media realm that are reaching a global audience. Employees of such firms will have the opportunity to be proponents for change in an emerging field.

Or you can more easily start a family business. More than half of the African-Americans that reside in Accra are entrepreneurs. Local chiefs are often more than willing to grant prized land and other resources to budding entrepreneurs interested in real estate development, or other commercial ventures. This could also lead to a lucrative life in farming – or “agribusiness” – for those interested in a totally new, yet viable way of making a living.

Teaching is another highly desirable profession. English is the official language of Ghana; thus, entering academia as a teacher of the language could be one means of entrance into a coveted class. Plus, there are many supports extended to foreign pupils and the qualified staff who instruct them. You and your family could benefit from this aspect of the economy as native speakers.

Realistic challenges to immigration

But nothing comes easy. Newly minted migrants have encountered some issues adjusting to the regulatory patterns and overall atmosphere of their adopted homes. As progressive as Ghana is compared to their regional neighbors, there are still some difficulties that arise when it comes to everyday comfort. Coming from a Western culture creates certain expectations, and the thought of not having stable electricity, or constant running water can be a pain. Yes, this does happen, and may be a deal-breaker.

In addition, government agencies can also be hard to work with and in some cases they can prolong the process of becoming a citizen, which will limit your access to certain jobs. But, for many recent immigrants, aside from the “malaria issue” (which unfortunately is still the norm), settling in Accra isn’t nearly as intimidating as one would imagine.

Most importantly, acquaint yourself with the history of this very diverse country. Many Ghanaians are well traveled and knowledgeable about world affairs, so you have to be able to hold your own.

Weighing options for change

You have to look before you leap, so it’s advisable to visit first before you make such a drastic decision. You should ideally be armed with a well-drafted blueprint of what your vocation will be and have a few promising options lined up to assuage any doubts. Yes, it can take a considerable amount of time to achieve residency, but if you like Ghana and want to take a risk in your quest for a better life, you will likely succeed.

Ghana is the perfect choice if you are looking to experience living in Africa, because it has managed to take advantage of global opportunities, which has allowed the country to develop a comfortable level of stability. African-Americans will enjoy making a life in a place that will make them feel connected and celebrated in a way that they probably don’t fully enjoy in the U.S. as “minorities.”

Plus, you don’t have to be a millionaire in order to live quite decently. Moreover, there are resources available, like The African American Association of Ghana (AAGG), to help make your transition a smooth one.

Overall, you will be living among a people who are just as excited to get to know you as you are to know them. Ghanaians are very hospitable, which makes it easy to make friends and quickly build a network, which is ultimately the key to survival in any foreign country.

That’s what makes Ghana a welcoming and worthwhile choice for African-Americans who might be thinking of relocating to a new land of opportunity.

Follow Ezinne Ukoha on Twitter @nilegirl.

>MALCOLM X SAID IT IN 1964 AND WE ARE STILL SLAVES IN AMERIKKKA- "I’M NOT AN AMERICAN,I’M A VICTIM OF AMERICANCISM!"-YES EVEN WITH OBAMA THERE!-WAKE UP BLACK PEOPLE AND GET BACK TO YOUR TRUE BLACK SELVES AND BLACK FREEDOM ONLY AVAILABLE IN THE BLACK MAN’S LAND-AFRICA!

April 25, 2011

>

http://www.primarysourcebook.com/modern/malcolm-x-speech-in-ghana

Malcolm X Speech in Ghana

Posted by Auron Renius on Thursday, December 23, 2010 Under: Speeches

Malcolm X was an African-American Muslim minister famous for his outspoken stile of public speaking on civil rights. Always controversial, many saw him as a hero who courageously fought against the crimes of white America against African Americans, while others saw him as an advocate of racism, black supremacy and violence. This is an excerpt from a speech given by Malcolm X on the 13th May, 1964 at the University of Ghana;

I intend for my talk to be very informal, because our position in America is an informal position, [Laughter] and I find that it is very difficult to use formal terms to describe a very informal position. No condition of any people on earth is more deplorable than the condition, or plight, of the twenty-two million Black people in America. And our condition is so deplorable because we are in a country that professes to be a democracy and professes to be striving to give justice and freedom and equality to everyone who is born under its constitution.

If we were born in South Africa or in Angola or some part of this earth where they don’t profess to be for freedom, that would be another thing; but when we are born in a country that stands up and represents itself as the leader of the Free World, and you still have to beg and crawl just to get a chance to drink a cup of coffee, then the condition is very deplorable indeed.

‘A victim of Americanism’

So tonight, so that you will understand me and why I speak as I do, it should probably be pointed out at the outset that I am not a politician. I don’t know anything about politics. I’m from America but I’m not an American. I didn’t go there of my own free choice. [Applause] If I were an American there would be no problem, there’d be no need for legislation or civil rights or anything else.

So I just try to face the fact as it actually is and come to this meeting as one of the victims of America, one of the victims of Americanism, one of the victims of democracy, one of the victims of a very hypocritical system that is going all over this earth today representing itself as being qualified to tell other people how to run their country when they can’t get the dirty things that are going on in their own country straightened out. [Applause]

So if someone else from America comes to you to speak, they’re probably speaking as Americans, and they speak as people who see America through the eyes of an American. And usually those types of persons refer to America, or that which exists in America, as the American Dream. But for the twenty million of us in America who are of African descent, it is not an American dream; it’s an American nightmare. [Laughter]

I don’t feel that I am a visitor in Ghana or in any part of Africa. I feel that I am at home. I’ve been away for four hundred years, [Laughter] but not of my own volition, not of my own will. Our people didn’t go to America on the Queen Mary, we didn’t go by Pan American, and we didn’t go to America on the Mayflower. We went in slave ships, we went in chains. We weren’t immigrants to America, we were cargo for purposes of a system that was bent upon making a profit. So this is the category or level of which I speak. I may not speak it in the language many of you would use, but I think you will understand the meaning of my terms.

When I was in Ibadan [in Nigeria] at the University of Ibadan last Friday night, the students there gave me a new name, which I go for—meaning I like it. [Laughter] Omowale, which they say means in Yoruba—if I am pronouncing that correctly, and if I am not pronouncing it correctly it’s because I haven’t had a chance to pronounce it for four hundred years [Laughter]—which means in that dialect, The child has returned.

It was an honor for me to be referred to as a child who had sense enough to return to the land of his forefathers—to his fatherland and to his motherland. Not sent back here by the State Department, [Laughter] but come back here of my own free will. [Applause]

I am happy and I imagine, since it is the policy that whenever a Black man leaves America and travels in any part of Africa, or Asia, or Latin America and says things contrary to what the American propaganda machine turns out, usually he finds upon his return home that his passport is lifted. Well, if they had not wanted me to say the things I am saying, they should never have given me a passport in the first place. The policy usually is the lifting of the passport. Now I am not here to condemn America, I am not here to make America look bad, but I am here to tell you the truth about the situation that Black people in America find themselves confronted with. And if truth condemns America, then she stands condemned. [Applause]

This is the most beautiful continent that I’ve ever seen; it’s the richest continent I’ve ever seen, and strange as it may seem, I find many white Americans here smiling in the faces of our African brothers like they have been loving them all of the time. [Laughter and applause]

Source: hartford-hwp.com

In : Speeches

Next post: my-mother-from-am… Previous post: us-declaration-of…

Tags: “malcolm x” “civil rights” “african american” america “human rights” africa activism

YORUBA MALE ATTIRE! -THE BEST IN THE WORLD-THESE PROUD BLACK MEN RULE THE PLANET WHEN IT COMES TO CLOTHES!

April 6, 2011

FROM

OJOGBON AKINWUMNI ISOLA,ORLANDO JULIUS AND HIS BLACKamerikkkan WIFE ADUKE

OBAMA WITH HIS YORUBA FRIENDS IN YORUBA DRESS!

OKO IFEDOLAPO!

Traditional Attire of Nigerian and African Men
74
rate or flag this pageTweet this

By Philipo
Click thumbnail to view full-size
See all 14 photos

Surprisingly, most men in Nigeria especially Lagos State wear the traditional Yoruba cloths. This comes in various styles and designs. They have different names depending on the type of design like:

Agbada – this is a 4-piece Nigerian Agbada apparel that is made up of hat, buba, flowing Agbada and pants with embroidery.

Babariga – This is men’s 4-piece African Babariga clothing apparel comprising a Hat, long-sleeved shirt, flowing Buba and pants with embroidery.

3-piece Gbarie outfit. Hand-loomed Aso Oke material with matching embroidery.

They are suitable for special occasions and events. Have you seen what the Nigerian women wear? See this http://hubpages.com/_1rfosdrnucsn9/hub/Glamorous-and-Gorgeous-Yoruba-Nigerian-Women-Dress

>BACK TO AFRICA! – CHIEF ALFRED SAM LED OKLAHOMA BLACKS TO AFRICAN IN 1916!

February 16, 2011

>

 FROM hierographics.org/yourhistoryonline/chief_alfred_c_sam.htm

The longest way home;: Chief Alfred C. Sam’s back-to-Africa movement,


Chief Alfred C. Sam  The Akim Trading Company, Limited  and Afro-American emigration to the Gold Coast    The impact of African emigrationism upon white Americans was minimal. Only when actual migrations took place did most whites suspect that such black sentiment existed. On such occasions, furthermore, they were always caught unawares because customary “Negro spokesmen” had perpetuated the myth of the docile black peasant, content to stay at the bottom of society. While European immigrants by the millions entered the country, the very thought that anyone would want to leave the United States to look for better opportunities elsewhere seemed absurd to most Americans.
Within this general context, white reactions varied. Northern liberals like Tourgee rejected emigration because they believed the American love of justice would overcome the prejudice of race. More conservative whites endorsed the “gospel of wealth,” as interpreted by Booker T. Washington, as the proper approach to race relations; they preferred the vision of industrious, uncomplaining workers to the prospect of radical malcontents who might upset the social equilibrium. The few whites who supported the American Colonization Society were either remnants of the pre-Civil War group that pictured emigration as a paternalistic solution to the race problem or representatives of a later generation that was concerned only for the welfare of Liberia. Although reactionaries like Thomas Dixon advocated deportation of blacks from the country, they found little support for the actual removal of Afro-Americans. Most whites simply wanted to keep the blacks at the lowest possible level of American society.
In Africa, however, the Afro-American emigration movement had considerable impact, although the thousand or so black peasants who sailed to Liberia between 1890 and 1910 helped that country but little. But the rhetoric of nationalism and the climate of protest among AfroAmericans reached far, and Bishop Turner’s newspapers found avid readers in Sierra Leone, the Gold Coast, and Lagos. His visits to West and South Africa stirred the Africans, to the dismay of colonial officials. Just as important, African students who had studied in American colleges returned home with a newly militant attitude toward the colonial powers. If white Americans considered blacks passive and content, Africans learned otherwise.1
Perhaps the most important effect of Bishop Turner’s campaign was to foster the hope for a better life in Africa in the memories of black Americans. For the African emigration movement did not stop in 1910; it has continued, in periodic outbursts, well into the twentieth century. The best-known movements were those led by Chief Alfred C. Sam and Marcus Garvey. But if the leaders and organizations changed with time, the blacks who responded so vigorously remained essentially the same.
Chief Alfred C. Sam, from Gold Coast Colony in West Africa, suddenly appeared in Oklahoma in the summer of 1913. He was selling stock in his company, Akim Trading Company, Limited, and advocating Afro-American emigration to the Gold Coast, where he claimed to own land. Sam appealed particularly to the residents of several all-black towns, remnants of E. P. McCabe’s settlement projects. Increasing prejudice and statewide disfranchisement had dashed all hopes for even local black independence; the blacks who fled to Oklahoma for refuge had found none. In their despair they embraced Chief Sam’s nationalistic emigration scheme, invested their money accordingly, and prepared to sail to Africa. After purchasing a steamship and christening it “Liberia,” Sam confounded his critics by sailing from Galveston with sixty emigrants and a black crew. Indeed, several hundred black Oklahomans who had gone to Galveston in the hope of sailing on Sam’s first voyage were left behind, while hundreds more waited in Oklahoma for Sam to return. Financial, diplomatic, and political troubles cost Sam the ship, and many of the emigrants eventually returned to the United States. Like other schemes before it, Sam’s efforts did little more than demonstrate Afro-American dissatisfaction.2
Chief Sam could hardly have found a state more hospitable to his scheme. In 1913 most of the blacks in Oklahoma had come from other states in their search for land and security.3 When Oklahoma proved to be just another Southern state in racial matters, the blacks were bound to be disillusioned, and candidates for emigration. National ism, moreover, already had a strong foothold in Oklahoma, as evidenced by its separate communities and the attempt to build a black state in the territory in the 1 890S. African emigration also had a strong local tradition. The blacks who traveled from Oklahoma to New York in 1892 and 1899, expecting to go to Africa, were solid evidence of that tradition. Samuel Chapman’s emigration clubs helped keep it alive in the late 1890s, while Bishop Turner’s newspapers and speeches fed the Afro-American desire to leave home for greener pastures. Chief Sam reaped what Turner had planted.4
The better-known Marcus Garvey came to the United States from Jamaica in 1916, just a year after Turner died. During the next ten years he built the largest mass movement in Afro-Ameri- can history around his Universal Negro Improvement Association. Garvey’s appeals to black nationalism and African emigration earned him the title “Black Moses,” a designation bestowed earlier on Bishop Turner. The black masses who had moved to Northern cities responded to this ideology in astounding numbers and intensity. Lack of business skill, however, caused the downfall of Garvey and his movement, and he was imprisoned for mail fraud and eventually deported. Few, if any, in his legion of followers settled in Africa, but the Afro-American community was thoroughly aroused. Many white Americans realized for the first time that the myth of the docile, satisfied black Sambo was false.5
     1. For the impact of American black nationalism on Africa see, for example: Shepperson and Price, Independent African; Shepperson, “American Negro Influence on the Emergence of African Nationalism,” Journal of African History, I (1960), 299-312; idem, “Ethiopianism and African Nationalism,” Phylon, 14 (Spring 1953), 9-18, idem, “External Factors in the Development of African Nationalism, with Particular Reference to British Central Africa,” Phylon, 22 (Fall 1961), 207-25 idem, “The United States and East Africa,” Phylon, 13 (Spring 1951), 25-34; Mary Benson, The African Patriots: The Story of the African National Congress of South Africa (Chicago, 1963), pp. 28, 29, 47, 49, and passim; Sundkler, Bantu Prophets, pp. 38-64; Thwaite, Seething African Pot, pp. 36-39; Coan, “The Expansion of Missions,” passim Thomas Hodgkin, Nationalism in Colonial Africa (New York, 1957), pp. 81, 101, 108, 180 f.; David Kimble, A Political History of Ghana (London, 1963), pp. 537-44; Ruth M. Slade, English-Speaking Missions in the Congo Independent State, 1878-1908 (Brussels, 1959), passim. 
     2. Bittle and Geis, The Longest Way Home, passim.
     3. Oklahoma’s black population multiplied almost sevenfold between 1890 and 1910; see U. S. Bureau of the Census, Negro Populatior’, 1790-1915 (Washington, 1918), p. 129.
     4. See Chapter 5 and p. 250 above.
     5. Cronon, Black Moses, passim; Frank Chalk, “DuBois and Garvey Confront Liberia: Two Incidents of the Coolidge Years,” a paper delivered at the 52d annual meeting of the Associa- tion for the Study of Negro Life and History, 13-17 October 1967, Greensboro, N.C.
From: Edwin S. Redkey. Black Exodus: Black Nationalist and Back-to-Africa Movements, 1890-1910 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1969). pp. 291-293.
 77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

FROM dacb.org




7
 

>SLAVERY! -SEE THE SLAVE CASTLES AT GHANA AND CRY YOUR HEART OUT BLACK PEOPLE!-ALL THAT WE HAVE BEEN THRU!-SISTER ALLISON SAMUELS AT NEWSWEEK TELLS HOW SHE SAW IT!

January 19, 2011

>

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B000JQU622&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrhttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0439567068&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrfrom theghanajournal.com

By Allison Samuels | NEWSWEEK090521_cu07slavecastle_330-vertical

By Allison Samuels | NEWSWEEK
It takes four hours on an un-air-conditioned minibus called a tro-tros to get from Accra, the capital of Ghana, to the town of Elmina. The drive is lovely, especially when the road dances above the beautiful Cape Coast and when it enters Elmina’s twisty streets lined with palm trees and hundreds of people trading fish like we buy hamburgers at McDonald’s. The town’s main attraction is a huge white castle that sits on top of a hill. From the road it appears so suddenly, it takes your breath away. The Elmina Castle, with its enormous white walls and red-tile roofs peering out onto the Indian Ocean, could easily be confused for some decaying Mediterranean resort. Such a pretty building—for a hellhole. Elmina Castle is actually one of 20 buildings running along the Ghanaian coast that housed African captives before they were shipped off to the New World. Which is why these buildings are more commonly, and oxymoronically, known as slave castles.
The Portuguese built Elmina Castle in 1482 as a trading post for goods bartered for local gold and gems. As demand for slaves increased in America and the Caribbean, the castle began to store a more precious and perishable trade. Although the castle is empty now, there are many reminders of its horrible past on the inside. In the middle of the courtyard stands a cast-iron ball and chain the size of a backyard barbecue; slaves who disobeyed, including women who refused to sleep with their captors, were shackled to it and left to die in the burning African sun. The castle’s interior is rimmed with closet-size rooms where the Africans waited for their dock at the shore. When our guide offered my tour group a chance to get locked into a cell to experience what it might have felt like to be held there, I was the only one to decline. The tears were beginning to well up as I wandered off alone, thinking of how my ancestors would have been crammed on top of each with no room to breath, and without knowing that their lives would only get worse on the ships that would take them through the “middle passage” and across the ocean. If they made it that far.
The tour ended at a dank, dark cell that housed only a door: the “door of no return,” an iron gate that led to the planks where the captives were loaded on the ships. Wreaths, flowers and other mementos surrounding the door now pay tribute to the lives that passed through it, and were changed or lost forever. As I peered through the holes in the gate and gazed at the Indian Ocean beyond, I realized that walking in the footsteps of my African ancestors was perhaps even more painful than I imagined it would be ever since I watched Roots as a child in the ’70s. That feeling was complicated by the fact that because the history of slavery isn’t taught in the Ghanaian schools, many of the children and adults I met simply thought of me as a foreigner, and what they call “ye vu”—white visitor. I felt like a stranger in a land where the people looked exactly like me. Yet I felt like a native, too. I guess going home can be like that—sadness and wonder all mixed together. That’s especially true when you follow the path back to your ancestors and find yourself looking at the door of no return.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bib-05-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0486409120&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

OBAMA! -GHANAIAN WORLD CUP FANS APOLOGIZE TO OBAMA FOR DEFEATING US TEAM!

June 27, 2010

U.S. President Barack Obama watches a live telecast of the 2010 World Cup soccer match between the U.S. and Ghana during a short break between bilateral meetings with South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak and China's President Hu Jintao at the G20 Summit in Toronto June 26, 2010.

Ghanian national football team supporters, one of them carrying a placard ‘Obama we are sorry’, celebrate in Accra after Ghana beat the US 2-1 after extra time in Rustenberg on June 26, 2010 during the World Cup football tournament in South Africa. The Black Stars are bidding to become the first African side to reach the semi-finals of the tournament. Asamoah Gyan was Ghana’s match-winner, smashing home the winning goal in the third minute of extra time after shrugging off a challenge from Rennes club-mate Carlos Bocanegra on the edge of the American penalty area.

Ghanian national football team supporters, one of them carrying a placard 'Obama we are sorry', celebrate in Accra after Ghana beat the US 2-1 after extra time in Rustenberg on June 26, 2010 during the World Cup football tournament in South Africa. The Black Stars are bidding to become the first African side to reach the semi-finals of the tournament. Asamoah Gyan was Ghana's match-winner, smashing home the winning goal in the third minute of extra time after shrugging off a challenge from Rennes club-mate Carlos Bocanegra on the edge of the American penalty area.

EBONY MAGAZINE DOES NOT PUT BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES ON ITS COVER-SAYS WHITE BRAINWASHED BLACKS SINCE SLAVERY ONLY GO FOR CREOLE-CRAZY-MULATTO-MENTALITY-IMITATION-WHITE-GIRL-BEAUTY BUT IN THE 60’S WE WOOLLY HAIR BEAUTIES FORCED EBONY TO PUT ITS FIRST BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY,WITH WOOLLY HAIR AND AFRICAN FEATURES ON IT’S COVER AND NOW GABOUREY SIDIBE HAS BROKEN AGAIN THE IMITATION WHITE GIRL CEILING OF EBONY-BLACK ON BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

March 29, 2010

BLACK PEOPLE/AFRICANS!-SPEAK ONLY AFRICAN LANGUAGES TO YOUR CHILDREN IN YOUR HOUSE IF YOU WANT AFRICAN CHILDREN WITH AFRICAN BEHAVIOUR AND VALUES!-FROM ALL ALLAFRICA.COM WITH AFRI

February 15, 2010

FROM allafrica.com

——————————————————————————–

Daily Independent (Lagos)

Nigeria: Enforcing Indigenous Languages in Homes
Yemi Adebisi
14 February 2010

——————————————————————————–
Email|Print|Comment
Share:
Lagos — The National Institute for Cultural Orientation (NICO), a parastatal of the Federal Ministry of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation appears to be set to encourage the use of indigenous languages in Nigerian homes.

The institute also frowns at the mode of dressing of most Nigerian children, which it described as ‘near nudity,’ blaming this on the nonchalant attitude of Nigerian parents and the lack of respect for Nigerian culture. It has therefore assured that it would use its medium to address the total emancipation of Nigerian cultural details and encourage its proliferation. This would, according to the institute, help to market the value of Nigerian culture, home and abroad, when the essence and awareness of the culture is encouraged.

Apparently, the recent visit of the executive secretary/chief executive officer of NICO, Dr. Barclays F. Ayakoroma to Lagos office was primarily designed by the institute to gear up arrangement to start off the new academic session of its cultural institute. It was during the visit that Ayakoroma, in his chat with the media, unveiled plans to take Nigeria culture to all the nooks and crannies of the country and to ensure that it yields positive results than ever. NICO was established by Decree 93 of 1993.

The Institute has the primary responsibility of harnessing Nigeria’s cultural resources to meet the challenges of social integration, peace, unity and national development. It also serves as vital force for promoting Nigeria’s programme of Cultural Diplomacy and energising the various cultural establishments in the new direction advocated by Nigeria’s Cultural Policy and the World Decade for Cultural Development (1988-1997) declared by the United Nations.

NICO has a vision to be the apex and leading Cultural Training Institute in Nigeria and Nigeria’s contribution to world progress and civilisation through research and documentation, cultural assets and services, both tangible and intangible.

NICO is also committed to train cultural development officers, motivators and communicators who would be grounded in Nigerian cultural realities, philosophy and practices that are essential for national integration, peace, unity and development in a multi-ethnic nation.

It would be recalled that the institute has presented for graduation, the first set of students in the Certificate, Graduate and Diploma in Cultural Studies. By November 2009, registration processes started for the second set. Ayakoroma visited Lagos to ensure the successful take off of the new academic session. According to him, he was satisfied with the current academic programme and expressed hope that sooner, the training school will be in its rightful place in the culture sector. The vision of NICO is to run a school that will produce graduands that will occupy strategic position in various cultural institutions.

“Just like the Federal Training School trains clerical officers all over the country, ASCON trains administrative officers, and NIPS trains top government officers in the civil service and the military, we are positioning ourselves to train cultural workers at the middle and top level of cultural administration,” he said.

The secretary observed that NICO would only gain its relevance in the scheme of things when it comes out with some programmes that will impact the lives of the generality of the people. At the national level, according to him, there are programmes lined up, but specifically, the indigenous language programme appears to be a strategic option. With the notion that many Nigerians are not intact, language wise and that most of Nigerian children find it difficult speaking indigenous language, because of inter-tribal marriages and so on, NICO has developed a programme that will encourage the speaking of the indigenous languages.

“If these children are given the opportunity to learn indigenous languages, they approach them with every sense of commitment. This programme has gained ground to some extent. In the last long vacation of Nigerian primary and secondary schools, the programme took place in the six zonal offices of NICO.”

The institute has set up an agenda to introduce a programme entitled ‘Language in the Barracks’ to support its vision to immortalize indigenous languages. This is with the intention of taking indigenous language training scheme to police and military barracks. It was discovered, however, that among some military or police families, the wives might be Yoruba while the husbands, Igbo. It boils down on the challenge of the particular language that the children will be disposed to speak. NICO therefore believes that with this programme, parents as well as children will have the opportunity to learn those languages. The institute has also concluded plans, according to the executive secretary, to start a television programme called ‘WAZOBIA Quiz’. They are looking at a scenario whereby the parents and their children come for a quiz programme based on culture such as ‘Nigerian People and Places’. Such segment will be in the three Nigeria major languages.

“If the father is speaking Yoruba and Hausa for example, and the wife is Igbo, we expect that one of the children that will appear with you for the programme will also speak one of the languages. We believe it will be an interesting programme and it will enhance or energise the study or interest of Nigerian languages,” he said. This, to an extent, might help improve the readiness of Nigerian families to cherish the more the indigenous languages. NICO declared its intention to encourage the speaking of indigenous languages at homes and offices in Nigeria and not having English as lingua franca in respected homes. Other roundtable programme of the institute include annual roundtable conference, workshop on ‘Repositioning Cultural Workers for Improved Productivity’, World Culture Day celebration in May among others. The secretary also intimidated the media about the plan of the institute to start cultural club in secondary schools. This will be taking to secondary schools to catch the young ones culturally, like the debating and literary societies. The intention of the institute is for the children to appreciate every area of Nigerian culture, be it music or dressing.

He expressed his disappointment on how Nigerian parents are showing lackadaisical attitude to the dressing mode of most Nigerian children. According to him, some of these children go on the street almost in nudity. “It is very worrisome. The jeans, T-shirts, and the type of short sketches that our children wear in the name of fashion are really worrisome. That is why we are also looking at organising a programme called ‘Nigeria’s Dress Culture’. We want to look at aspect of dress culture.”

Relevant Links
West Africa
Nigeria
Arts
Some Nigerian universities have been observed to institutionalised dress codes. Ayakoroma therefore appealed that such institutions should be encouraged, because if the students are allowed to dress the way they want, “very soon we will begin to see nude boys and girls on our streets in the name of fashion.”

NICO has vowed to step up actions on the creation of awareness on the essence and importance of culture in Nigeria. Culture, according to him, is what makes a man. He therefore warned that with the level of richness of Nigerian culture, it would be very unfortunate if Nigerian parents failed to carry their children along and sell them to the western world in the name of civilisation.

He also significantly pointed out that for Nigeria to move forward, there is a need for Nigerians to cooperate with the institute to appraise the level of corruption in Nigeria from cultural point of view.

OBAMA IN GHANA:”I HAVE THE BLOOD OF AFRICA WITHIN ME!”

August 8, 2009

"WELCOME HOME"GREETS YOU WHEN YOU GO BACK TO AFRICA FOR A VISIT LIKE OBAMA!

AT THE HOSPITAL STILL

AT THE HOSPITAL STILL

THE OBAMAS AT THE LA GENERAL HOSPITAL,ACCRA

THE OBAMAS AT THE LA GENERAL HOSPITAL,ACCRA

THE OBAMAS ARRIVING IN GHANA JULY 2009

THE OBAMAS ARRIVING IN GHANA JULY 2009

PH2009071003540FROM huffingtonpost.com

– Obama In Ghana: “I Have The Blood Of Africa Within Me” First Posted: 07-11-09 08:33 AM | Updated: 07-12-09 03:20 PM

(AP) ACCRA, Ghana — America’s president and Africa’s son, Barack Obama dashed with pride onto the continent of his ancestors Saturday, challenging its people to shed corruption and conflict in favor of peace. Campaigning to all of Africa, he said “Yes you can.”

“I say this knowing full well the tragic past that has sometimes haunted this part of the world,” Obama told a riveted Ghanaian Parliament. “I have the blood of Africa within me.”

In the faces of those who lined the streets and in many of Obama’s own words, this trip was personal. Beyond his message, the story was his presence _ the first black U.S. president coming to poor, proud, predominantly black sub-Sahara Africa for his first time in office.

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy
The emotional touchstone of his visit: a tour of Cape Coast Castle, the cannon-lined fortress where slaves were kept in squalid dungeons, then shipped in chains to America through a “Door of No Return” that opens to the sea.

Obama absorbed the experience with his wife, Michelle, and their girls, Sasha and Malia.

“I’ll never forget the image of my two young daughters, the descendants of Africans and African-Americans, walking through those doors of no return but then walking back (through) those doors,” he said later at a grand departure ceremony. “It was a remarkable reminder that, while the future is unknowable, the winds always blow in the direction of human progress.” Ghanaians lined up on the tarmac lingered for a time even after Air Force One disappeared into the nighttime sky.

The White House said Obama held no big public events in a city frenzied to see him because Obama wanted to put the light on Africa, not himself. But reality proved otherwise.

Obama billboards dotted the roads. Women wore dresses made of cloth bearing his image. Tribal chiefs, lawmakers, church leaders, street vendors _ to them, it felt like history.

Story continues below

“All Ghanaians want to see you,” lamented Ghana’s president, John Atta Mills, before feting Obama to a breakfast banquet of hundreds of guests at the coastal presidential castle.

To their disappointment, most people did not see him. The lack of open events and the heavy security kept many in this West African nation away from Obama. They watched him on TV.

Overall, there was no dampening the tone of joy. Headlines screamed of Obama fever.

“It makes us proud of Ghana,” said Richard Kwasi-Yeboah, a 49-year-old selling posters of the American president. “We’re proud he chose us. It proves that Ghana is really free.”

At the heart of Obama’s message here: African nations crippled by coups and chaos, like Ghana has been in the past, can reshape themselves into lawful democracies. He said it takes good governance, sustained development, improved health care.

And that the moment is now.

“Africa doesn’t need strongmen,” Obama said. “It needs strong institutions.”

The son of a white woman from Kansas and a black man from Kenya, Obama bluntly told Africa to take more responsibility for itself but proclaimed: “America will be with you.”

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the poorest places in the world.

Obama also got openly personal _ recalling the grandfather who endured being called “boy” as a cook for the British in Kenya, the father who once herded goats in a small Kenyan village. Not mentioned was the path of his wife, Michelle, who is a descendant of slaves.

In essence, Obama’s history with Africa seemed to give him freer license to speak about the continent, as if he were being honest with a friend. He gave an unsentimental account of squandered opportunities, brutality and bribery in postcolonial Africa.

About every time Obama cited his basic argument _ that democracy is about more than holding elections, that Africa resist the drug trade and enforce a rule of law _ members of Parliament raucously cheered him on. Then again, this audience was friendly. When Obama left, a choir sang a song to his campaign theme of “Yes we can,” a line he used himself.

Evoking the memory of American civil rights giant Martin Luther King Jr., Obama noted that King was in Ghana in 1957 to hail Ghana’s independence from the British. He quoted King as calling the moment a triumph of justice, and told young Africans they must remember that.

“You can conquer disease, end conflicts and make change from the bottom up,” Obama said. “You can do that. Yes you can. Because in this moment, history is on the move.”

All together, Obama was spending less than 24 hours in Ghana. But they packed in personal moments, in contrast to his summit-heavy travels across Russia and Italy over the last week.

At a maternal health clinic in Accra, he turned into a sentimental dad when he met a group of mothers holding newborns. “This is the highlight of the trip,” he said, beaming.

By afternoon, he was contemplating the human capacity for evil at the castle, which served as a headquarters for the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Obama walked with his arm around Malia, 11. The first lady held the hand of Sasha, 8.

“Hopefully one of the things that was imparted to them during this trip was their sense of obligation to fight oppression and cruelty wherever it appears,” the president said.

Ghana and the U.S. have something of a diplomatic kinship. Obama is the third straight U.S. president to visit this tropical nation; George W. Bush was here just last year.

That reflects just how much the United States, which dwarfs Ghana’s size, wants this country to be a model of democracy and invests tens of millions of tax dollars to help it.

But what the Obama White House did not want on this trip was the Bill Clinton moment. In 1998, on a blisteringly hot day, a crowd at a Clinton rally nearly caused a horrific trample.

That also affected why Obama did not hold an outdoor event of his own.

Obama will be back to Africa. But he suggested that he won’t go for the traditional model of devoting a trip to Africa alone, as if it is separated from world affairs. Instead, African nations might be wrapped into his multinational travels more often.

“What happens here,” he said, “has an impact everywhere.”

___

Associated Press writers Mark S. Smith and Todd Pitman contributed to this story from Accra.

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OF THE BLACK WORLD SAYING THE PLEDGE IN THE GHANA PARLIMENT

OUR BLACK PRESIDENT OF THE BLACK WORLD SAYING THE PLEDGE IN THE GHANA PARLIMENT

7777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

FROM huffingtonpost.com

Obama’s visit to fort a ‘full-circle experience’
Ghana’s coastal castle was departure point for African slaves

George Osodi / AP
On Saturday, President Barack Obama and his family will visit this coastal castle in Ghana that was Britain’s West Africa headquarters for the shipment of millions of slaves to Europe and America. Video

updated 3:29 p.m. ET July 10, 2009
CAPE COAST, Ghana – From the rampart of a whitewashed fort once used to ship countless slaves from Africa to the Americas, Cheryl Hardin gazed through watery eyes at the route forcibly taken across the sea by her ancestors centuries before.

“It never gets any easier,” the 48-year-old pediatrician said, wiping away tears on her fourth trip to Ghana’s Cape Coast Castle in two decades. “It feels the same as when I first visited — painful, incomprehensible.”

On Saturday, Barack Obama and his family will follow in the footsteps of countless African-Americans who have tried to reconnect with their past on these shores. Though Obama was not descended from slaves — his father was Kenyan — he will carry the legacy of the African-American experience with him as America’s first black president.

For many, the trip will be steeped in symbolism.

“The world’s least powerful people were shipped off from here as slaves,” Hardin said Tuesday, looking past a row of cannons pointing toward the Atlantic Ocean. “Now Obama, an African-American, the most powerful person in the world, is going to be standing here. For us it will be a full-circle experience.”

Built in the 1600s, Cape Coast Castle served as Britain’s West Africa headquarters for the trans-Atlantic slave trade, which saw European powers and African chiefs export millions in shackles to Europe and the Americas.

Nearly two centuries later, misery still lingers
The slave trade ended here in 1833, and visitors can now trek through the fort’s dungeons, dark rooms once crammed with more than 1,000 men and women at a time who slept in their own excrement. The dank air inside still stings the eyes.

Visiting for the first time, Hardin’s 47-year-old sister Wanda Milian said the dungeons felt “like burial tombs.”

“It felt suffocating. It felt still,” said Milian, who like her sister lives in Houston. “I don’t know what I expected. I didn’t expect to experience the sense of loss, the sense of hopelessness and desolation.”

Those who rebelled were packed into similar rooms with hardly enough air to breath, left to die without food or water. Their faint scratch marks are still visible on walls.

Down by the shore is the fort’s so-called “Door of No Return,” the last glimpse of Africa the slaves would ever see before they were loaded into canoes that took them to ships that crossed the ocean.

Horrible history contrasts with present
Today, the door opens onto a different world: a gentle shore where boys freely kick a white soccer ball through the surf, where gray-bearded men sit in beached canoes fixing lime-green fishing nets, where women sell maize meal from plates on their heads.

Behind them is Africa’s poverty: smoke from cooking fires rises from a maze of thin wooden shacks, their rusted corrugated aluminum roofs held down by rocks. Children bathe naked in a tiny dirt courtyard.

“I just can’t wrap my mind around this,” said Milian, who works at a Methodist church. “If it weren’t for all this” — for slavery — “I wouldn’t be standing here today. I wouldn’t be who I am. I wouldn’t have the opportunities I do. I wouldn’t practice the religion I do.”

Milian also grappled with the irony that fort housed a church while the trade went on, and that African chiefs and merchants made it all possible, brutally capturing millions and marching them from the continent’s interior to be sold in exchange for guns, iron and rum.

“It’s mixed up,” Milian said. “It’s not an easy puzzle to put together.”

Though slavery in the U.S. ended after the Civil War in 1865, its legacy has lived on. The U.S. Senate on June 18 unanimously passed a resolution apologizing for slavery and racial segregation.

“This is part of our history,” said Hardin, who first visited Ghana in the late 1980s and later married a Ghanaian engineer she met in the U.S.

Her 15-year-old son was along for the first time. “I want him to understand what his liberty really means, who he really is,” Hardin said.

But racism, both sisters agreed, would not end with Obama’s visit.

“Let’s not be naive. When your skin is darker, you are still going to be treated differently,” Hardin said. But Obama’s trip “will be a turning point, not just for America but for the world.”

Milian said Obama’s journey would also bear a message to those who organized the trade.

“It will say they failed, it all failed,” she said. “The human mind is capable of horrible things, but the fact that we’re standing here, the fact Obama will be standing here, proves we are also capable of great resilience.”

77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

FROM blog.taragana.com

Obama says tour of Ghanaian slave fortress should be eye-opener for daughters
Bureau News July 11th, 2009
Obama: Daughters should learn from slave tour

CAPE COAST, Ghana — President Barack Obama says he hopes his family’s tour of a former slave fortress on the coast of Ghana shows his daughters that history can take very cruel turns.

Eleven-year-old Malia and eight-year-old Sasha accompanied Obama on a tour of Cape Coast Castle Saturday.

Speaking afterward, Obama said his daughters are “growing up in such a blessed way.” He said one of the things he hopes they picked up from the tour is a sense of their obligation to fight oppression and cruelty everywhere.

Cape Coast Castle was the place where shackled Africans were held in squalid dungeons before they were shipped off into slavery.

——————————————————————————–

BLEACHING!-TYRA BANKS DID A WHOLE SHOW ON BLACKamerikkkans BLEACHING FROM CHILDHOOD AND THEIR HEALTH PROBLEMS NOW!-FROM TYRASHOW.WARNERBROS.COM

June 13, 2009

BLEACH,THE CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOU AND YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN!

BLEACH,THE CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOU AND YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN!

THIS BROTHER AND SISTER IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE NOW REGRETTING BLEACHING!

THIS BROTHER AND SISTER IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE NOW REGRETTING BLEACHING!

IT IS CHEMICALS SO THE LONGER YOU USE THEM THE MORE THEY DAMAGE YOUR SKIN AND IN THE END GIVE YOU SKIN CANCER!

IT IS CHEMICALS SO THE LONGER YOU USE THEM THE MORE THEY DAMAGE YOUR SKIN AND IN THE END GIVE YOU SKIN CANCER!

SEE HOW IT CAN AFFECT YOU AFTER TIME!

SEE HOW IT CAN AFFECT YOU AFTER TIME!

BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON IF YOU BLEACH!

BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON IF YOU BLEACH!

From tyrashow.warnerbros.com

Dangers of Skin Bleaching
Shocking info on how bleaching can endanger your health.

Tyra has met women willing to do almost anything to lighten the color of their skin … including the use of bleach, despite the negative or harmful side effects. What’s really scary is that you can buy bleaching creams in stores across the country. While these creams are intended to be used on small spots to reduce scarring, as we saw on the show, some women slather creams over their entire bodies. But is the result worth the risk — even if the risk is cancer? Read on for the scary side effects of these controversial creams.

Mercury
Even small doses of Mercury can cause neurological damage. This concern is so great, Minnesota has outlawed cosmetics like skin lighteners that intentionally feature it. But some “mom and pop” shops carry creams with that contain extreme levels of such ingredients.

Hydroquinone
This component of many skin-bleaching techniques is also found in film developing products. (Note: Your body is a work of art, but should you treat it like a chemically processed photo in a darkroom? We think not!) The idea of using this ingredient didn’t sound good to the French, who banned it for fear of cancer risks.

Alpha Hydroxy Acids
These are most commonly found in facial chemical peels, which are better known as procedures reserved for serious and infrequent skin overhauls administered by professionals. These should not be in anything you use at home regularly.

Arsenic
Most people hear this word and immediately think “poison,” which is exactly what arsenic is. Not something you want to find on the list of ingredients in your face cream, but that might be the case with some skin lighteners.

Bleaching seems like a crazy idea, and I think it is, but before we look at the mothers and judge we should look at ourselves. white wemon get fake tans, that can cause cancer, they bleach their teeth, that kills the enammal. these bleaching girls are a reflection of our own society. bleaching is wrong, but so can the other beauty routiens. these mothers are emotinaly and physacally damaging their dark skined chindren, butthe bigger problom is why they are doing it. it is the parents job to teach their kids that they are beautiful, and that what makes a beautiful person is their heart and their head. we should take that episode as a sign that our society doesnt understand true beauty, and evey girl on this planet should see that and change. Posted by kiwu 01/19/09 11:22 AM
ok i understand why somebody would want to bleach, they don’t think they are pretty enough or beautiful. im a white teenage girl and i HATE the way i look!!! i will do anyting just to lose a little weight. and if i don’t lose any weight i feel like i’ve faild so i end up cutting my arms. but there is one thing that has helped me is know that everybody is beautiful in their own way!!!! Posted by Ashlee 01/19/09 10:59 AM
Oh my God…i am black from africa. i have light brown shade. my favourate colour is the dark black that shines …like the colour of the lady that was complaining. also some white people want to look darker by tanning. what is wrong with people…i do not think it is about colour it is about self esteem issue. and abhoring once’s colour is a symptom of it. god has given you health and beauty and we complain about the blessings of God… Posted by kifaah 01/19/09 10:01 AM
HEy. Does Bleaching the skin even work ???????? Like I think thats crazy…. If i get any bleach on my fingers it stings.. let alone on a childs whole body, thats outragous. awful. I thought black people stuck up for there race and really belived in it. This is crazy crazy crazy. Posted by Dont Understand 01/19/09 7:35 AM
I would have to agree with Stephanie about showing both sides of the spectrum as it is all harmful whether it be UV lights or chemicals from bleaching chemicals. You have people like me that think black is beauty from one shade to the next. Posted by Kara 01/19/09 7:15 AM
Hi Tyra! I saw the show on black women who bleach their skin. I have to tell you that I was shocked! I am a dark skin puertorican woman and I am overweight. I will tell you that when I look in the mirror I see the most beautiful woman I have ever seen. I’m proud of everything about me, including my skin color. These women are telling the world ‘I’m black, I’m minority, and I’m not worth much. What they dont understand is that we have to be proud of who we are no matter what size, color, shape and weight. If you dont deem yourself beautiful, nobody else will. One thing that i dont understand is the following’ black women are trying to be white (getting together with white men, straightening their hair, light colored contacts, and white women are trying to be black (curling the hair with perms, darkening the skin in tanning salons under the sun in the summertime and at tanning salons in the winter. Why cant we just love who we are and be the best we can be? I’m so sick of people not being happy with how god made them! Ramona Posted by Ramona 01/19/09 12:33 AM
I knew of skin bleaching before watching the show from having lived in the Arab world. I would like you all to visit AVRF.org to see the faces of children who have **involuntarily** gone from black to white. This skin disease is called Vitiligo, and it needs to be recognized. I think the women on the show should be happy that they are one color. God makes us the way we are for a reason. Please visit AVRF.org and educate yourselves!! 🙂 Posted by Jessica 01/18/09 8:37 PM
Well, I am a brown skin young lady and proud of it. I wouldn’t change my skin color for the world and this is the attitude the women who are trying to bleach their skin should have because they are all beautiful. Dark skinned women are beautiful african americans as well. I do agree that they should be represented more in the media and videos. Posted by Quinita 01/18/09 8:02 PM
Hi’ Tyra I watch your show every day and i saw the show about the black girl that was bleaching they body but they shouldn’t do it ,because black is beautiful and what count is the beauty of they heart so tell them that we love them very much the color don’t have anything to do with they color ok. and that does people out their they don’t have heart or feel to hurt black humam ok Thank you Diana Alicea Posted by Diana Alicea 01/18/09 5:50 PM
Tyra, I DVR’d your show on skin bleaching and as a white woman I was a little offended when your undercover reporter was shocked to find out the creams were only marketed in “black” areas. As a white woman I wanted to let you know that tanning booths, which have harmful UV rays, are only marketed in “white” areas and that the tanning creams that they promote are named things such as “caramel delight” and “sensual chocolate”. It would have made more sense to me if you had shown both spectrums of caucasions tanning and african americans bleaching. It’s all the same, we just want to be something we’re not, sad as that is. Posted by Stephanie 01/18/09 5:24 PM
TYRA I WATCHED THE SHOW AND WAS A LITTLE OFFENDED BECAUSE I AM A BEAUTIFUL DARK SKINNED WOMAN WITH SELF ESTEEM. ITS TRULY UNFORTUNATE THESE YOUNG LADIES TRULY LACK IN THIS AREA AND THAT’S TRULY WHAT THE BOTTOM LINE IS. ALSO I BELIEVE IF THESE YOUNG WOMEN RECEIVED POSITIVE AFFIRMATIONS AT HOME OF HOW BEAUTIFUL THEY ARE AND THAT TRUE BEAUTY IS FROM THE INSIDE OUT THIS WOULD NOT BE AN ISSUE FOR THEM. MY PRAYER FOR THEM IS THAT THEY GROW IN ENOUGH SELF LOVE AND ACCEPT THEMSELVES FOR WHO THEY ARE AND HOW GOD MADE THEM. Posted by WANDA 01/18/09 4:09 PM
PS- I think my saving grace is my personality . If i were’nt the way I am, Lord knows what I would’ve done to myself by now. Posted by MusiqJunkie16 01/18/09 4:05 PM
I understand where the women on the show were coming from . I am a 16 year old dark-skinned female, insecure about my looks . I have had numerous thoughts about wanting to bleach my skin, etc. in order to make my complexion lighter. I have had guys that look right past me and on to my light-skin, modelesque friends ; “Friends” that have secluded me because I didn’t look like the rest of the light-skin girls. Not to add to the fact that they are all tall, beautiful, and built to perfection. I on the other hand am about 5’3, dark, and over-developed. [ I hate the stares from older gentlemen. ] You can see the difference in treatment between us all and it a serious problem that must be handled . I have no one to talk to because I highly doubt anyone would know how to react or help me. The only reason why i have not went through with these things to lighten my complexion is health reasons. Of course I have my days where I am the Fiercest Feline in the Jungle, but most of the time I’d rather live my life dark-skinned and average rather than light-skin and on an early ride to death. Just thought I’d share my experiences =], ~MusiqJunkie Posted by MusiqJunkie16 01/18/09 4:03 PM
tyra your right this article just described my mom. she is willing to do anything to make her skin lighter. i have tried to convince her that its bad for her skin. i also tried telling her that she should be happy with the shade she is. i think its beautiful. but my mom doesnt seem to believe me and what i have to say what wouold you tell her? Posted by nisha patel 01/18/09 2:25 PM
I agree with Tyra when she said on the show that the darker skin women who want to bleach are the victims of our color struck racist society that never celebrates dark skin especially in the media. I notice that black sitcoms and movies from years ago used dark skin women as love interest paired with the black man – you rarely see that today. Its almost like a dark skin black man cannot be in love with a dark skin woman in the media, he is always paired with a light skin or white woman. This sends a clear message to our african american men and women that having a light or white skin is more pretigious. If we dark skin women speak out – then you’re labeled jealous or player hating. It really hurts when your own brothers reject you and that’s when the bleaching extreme happens. Personally, I am brown skin and love my complexion, but I find dark skin stunning. They are show stoppers on the runway etc. Hurray for Barrack & Michelle Obama who is dark skin. I don’t know but somehow black women as a whole must find a way to protest this injustice in movies, and in hip hop without us being labeled as jealous. Posted by Jeannestar101 01/18/09 1:03 PM


%d bloggers like this: