Archive for the ‘JAMAICA’ Category

THIS BLACK REVOLUTIONARY BROTHER JOHN CASHIN FROM THE FAMOUS CASHIN FAMILY OF ALABAMA WENT BACK TO AFRICA 20 YEARS AGO AND HAS NEVER LOOKED BACK! FROM GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA,FEB.2008

September 10, 2008

from ngrguardiannews.com

Saturday, February 09, 2008

Cashing In On His Roots

When he came to Nigeria almost 20 years ago at the urging of his Nigerian friends living in the United States, John Marcus Cashin was enthralled by what he saw. An African-American, his childhood curiosity about the motherland had finally been satisfied but he won’t let go. He decided to stay. Now the chief executive of Metrolan Ventures, authorised resellers of Apple Super Computers, Cashin spoke to DEBO OLADIMEJI on his sojourn in Nigeria.

ALABAMA, United States-born John Marcus Cashin dramatically landed in Nigeria in the process of tracing his roots on Christmas Day in 1988. His singsong had always been: “We are all black. You should remember your brother coming home.”

Cashin recalls growing up in a segregated society, having attended a black nursery school and black kindergarten.

At the University of Alabama, he decided to study Communication and Broadcasting to liberate blacks from racism because “of the politics I grew up with. It is like you interview somebody white, they play it the same way. You interview somebody black, they edit it or only take what they want.

“So I knew the power of that when I was young and my parents complained about how the white reporter misinterpreted what Luther Martin King or Andrew Young said. They all try to confuse us,” he reminisced.

Born in 1959 to Dr. John Cashin, a dentist, now 80 and Mrs. Joan Marie, a psychologist, who passed on in 1997, Marcus, who is the first of three children, comes from an elite family. Like his father, his grandfather, Dr. John Legan Cashin, was also a dentist. His great grandfather, Hershel, one of the first black lawyers in Alabama, graduated from Cheney University in 1869.

Marcus’ sister, Sheryll Denise, graduated with Bachelor of Law from the prestigious Oxford University, England. His father owned a weekly newspaper called The Eagle Eye and a monthly magazine, The Valley Informer, published for Tennessee River Valley.

His father ran for the governorship of Alabama State in 1970 on the platform of his own predominantly black political party, the United Democratic Party of Alabama. The senior Cashin founded the party when, during the 1964 Democratic Convention, he observed that the whites wouldn’t allow the black delegates to have a say.

His father it was who introduced former President Bill Clinton as candidate of the Democrats to the Black Dental Association and the National Democratic Party of Alabama, the black community in Alabama, Tennessee, Virginia, New York and Washington DC.

Because his father was preoccupied with political activities and was always travelling for political reasons, Marcus was closer to his mother who happened to be always around to attend to his immediate needs.

She was on the board of the Community Action Agency for the whole of South East United States, an agency that helps the poor and distributes rations for the people on welfare.

His parents, he recalled, were always there to guide them. “Even though they knew something, they would tell us to go and look it up in the dictionary. We thought they were hard on us, not knowing that they were nurturing us on how to become a star in our field,” he said appreciatively.

Marcus attended Integrated University Place Elementary School in Brandon, where he was the first black to attend a white elementary school in the town. He and his brother, Carroll, were the first blacks to attend Integrated Blossom Wood Elementary School for their Second Grade.

He recalls that during his Junior High at Hartsville for his Seventh and Eighth Grade, his history teacher was the only one that gave him a B. “She did not like the way l used to answer my history questions, according to the history books l read in my father’s library. She was not comfortable that black people discovered certain things like George Washington Carver, who invented the machine that makes shoes and Lewis Latimer, who did the installation of the first electric steel lighting in New York City,” he explained.

He also remembers being a wrestler and sprinter while in his Ninth Grade at Ed White Junior High City Champ. He was indeed a state champion wrestler and a chess champion in his Fourth Grade. He attended Slammel Butler High School for his 10th to 12th Grades.

Marcus wanted to be an architect but his mother wanted him to be a doctor because her father, Dr. Marcus Carpenter, was one. However, although he was precocious and did well in the sciences at elementary school, he rebelled or was not keen to go the medical way. So he settled for Broadcasting and Film Communications at University of Alabama, which he wanted to use as a vehicle to project the black race.

“That meant that I got to find the right information and disseminated it to thousands of my people out there,” he stated.

But fortunately or unfortunately, he could not complete it. One day, while he was at the University of Alabama, he met a white lady, who introduced Geological Petroleum Engineering Technology to him, a course he ended up studying at the University of Southern Texas.

“I was riding home with a 25-year-old lady, who told me that she was studying Geology. I said, ‘what does that mean?’ She said that they had a way of getting petroleum out of the rock. I was just anxious to know more about the course,” he recounts. And that was the genesis of his final withdrawal from Alabama to Southern Texas.

While at Southern Texas, he developed more interest in Computer Science, which he did as a course. “I had to learn the computer to see how it worked. That was how I sharpened my knowledge about computer, joined a computer science club and used to go for their programmes.”

After graduation, he had a stint at Philip Petroleum Company in Texas before coming to Nigeria. But he actually started mixing with Nigerians while at Alabama. He had a girl friend, Angel John, who, though not a Nigerian, had lived next door to a Nigerian named Labu Adeleke. “Labu then asked whether I had ever heard about Fela and I said no. He said Fela Kuti, I said no. He said, ‘come over.’ So I went to his house,” Marcus recollects vividly.

Labu, he added, was the first Nigerian he ever met and who introduced him to Fela. Labu was studying Agricultural Science at Alabama University of Agriculture and “was really a cool guy” with whom he has lost contact for somet ime now.

The same Labu also introduced him to other Nigerian musicians such as Sunny Ade. “I like Fela’s music. I started listening to Fela since 1976,” he disclosed, adding that he got to know about FESTAC through Fela’s music.

“So in 1977, Labu invited me to come to FESTAC, saying Stevie Wonder would be there. But I couldn’t make it,” he said regretfully.

His performances at Southern Texas also attracted the attention of many Nigerians. “I was doing well in school and was on the Dean’s list 3.0. They had respect for me and everybody knew my name. Out of about 600 people, half of them were Nigerians. They saw my name out there and many of them became inquisitive about me,” he stated.

His Geography and Geo-Physics lecturer at Southern Texas, Dr. Ken Chinwezu, was also a Nigerian. Chinwezu told his students that the Niger Delta region in Nigeria was just like Louisiana, Mississippi Delta but that there is more oil in the Niger Delta.

“I was still in my last semester but I was working and going to school. We had two classes with him. One will start at 5pm and stop a 7pm and he will take a 30-minute break, then from 7.30 to 9pm, we had another break and everybody who went to a night school knew him,” he said with fond memories.

Marcus decided to follow four Nigerian schoolmates: Paul Ene, Joe Chuks Uzoka, Hyke (IK) Chuks and one Godwin to Nigeria in December 1988.

He retraced this journey to Nigeria: “I remember one of them saying that there was a business that we could do in Nigeria. IK told me that he would fly from New York to Lagos, then to Enugu and from there go to the village. That when I get to his village near Ozalla in Enugu State, I should ask of Chuk’s compound. He asked, ‘are you going to make it?’ and I said, ‘don’t worry, I will plan it.”

He asked IK the meaning of Enugu and was told that it stands for hilltop. “I said, ‘so I am going to the hilltop?”

His friend also gave him the name and phone number of an uncle in Enugu to call once he got to Lagos, because there was no telephone in their village. They agreed to meet on Christmas or Boxing Day of 1988. But he was reminded that if he did not go as planned, he would miss his friend, who was returning to the US after the Yuletide.

So Marcus left Miami for Germany, then to Nairobi, where he stayed for two days before going to Cameroun aboard Ethiopia Airline. He landed in Lagos on Christmas Day of 1988. Aboard the flight, he met some Nigerians as they wined, dined and chatted together.

“We all exchanged addresses. One of them warned me to beware of Nigerians. We landed safely at Murtala Mohammed Airport. N5.32 exchanged for a dollar at that time,” he recalls.

He checked into Sheraton Hotel in Ikeja and later walked down to the bar for some oranges. “I heard somebody calling my name John Cashin. His name is Kentler, a black American. He came to Nigeria too. We knew each other before. I told him that I was planning to go to Enugu to see my classmate.”

He was to go to Enugu the next day but he got to the airport and was told that the defunct Nigeria Airways, which was the national carrier, could not fly because of the harmattan. Then he remembered that if he did not get to Enugu and then his classmate’s village, he could miss him.

So he called IK’s brother office at Enugu and was able to talk to one of the nurses in his office who put him through to IK’s brother, whom he told that he was stranded in Lagos. He finally got another flight to Enugu a week after.

The passenger sitting next to him happened to be one Arthur Nwube, also a graduate of Alabama, who gave him his telephone number in Enugu and his address in Lagos, in case he had any problem.

Marcus eventually found his way to IK’s brother’s office in Enugu around 6.30pm and he sent somebody to take him to the village. They got to Chuks’ compound around 9pm.

“They were playing Prince’s music, Sign of the time in the dark. I said Sign of the time by Prince in the middle of an African jungle? No, it can’t be.””

It later dawned on him that IK brought the tape from Houston, Texas and was playing it in front of his house. “IK couldn’t believe that it was me, at that time of the night,” he recounted.

After a few days, Marcus went to buy a flight ticket back to Lagos, but again the weather was bad. So he had to stay back in the village until the weather improved for the plane to fly.

On getting to the airport, he met Godwin waiting for the same flight back to Lagos. He was on his way back to Houston. Godwin, with whom he used to discuss politics in the US, after a while, looked at him and said: “John Marcus Cashin, you are the only black American that I know that will come to Nigeria and Enugu.”

That was the beginning of Marcus’ sojourn in Nigeria. “We came back to Lagos. I stayed in Sheraton for about three to four weeks on and on. I did not want to go back. He urged me to stay back and renewed my visa for me. That was how I got hooked on Nigeria.”

He got into the computer business in the 1980s while still in school and working part-time. In Nigeria, he soon became an Apple man and a major reseller in Nigeria in 1998.

Marcus has been basically an Apple exporter, buying and reselling in the last 10 years under the auspices of Metrolan Ventures Limited.One thing that fascinated him about Nigeria is the level of freedom and the fact that there is no discrimination among the citizens.

The Apple magnate hopes that there is a drastic improvement in the supply of electricity soon. “You can imagine what the rate of development will be in Lagos with 24 hours supply of electricity,” he opined.

The last time that he visited his people in the United States was in 2001. He is in contact with his brothers and sisters via the telephone and the internet day in day out. His sister, Sheryll, a lawyer, is also into the business of Apple Computers.

He is not planning to marry yet “but it is possible for me to tie the nuptial knots in due course.”

© 2003 – 2007 @ Guardian Newspapers Limited (All Rights Reserved).
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September 6, 2008

AFRICAN HERITAGE INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

THIS BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED SISTER IS FIGHTING BLEACHING BOTH IN UK AND NIGERIA!

September 6, 2008

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY TINU OGINNI IS FIGHTING BLEACHING IN U.K. AND NIGERIA!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY TINU OGINNI IS FIGHTING BLEACHING IN U.K. AND NIGERIA!

dapada-say-no-to-bleaching1

“AFRICANS HARNESS ETHUSIASM FOR OBAMA”,ON YAHOO.NEWS

September 3, 2008

from news.yahoo.com

Africans harness enthusiasm for Obama
By EDWARD HARRIS, Associated Press Writer Edward Harris, Associated Press Writer – Sun Aug 31, 11:27 am ET
AP – Ndi Okereke-Onyiuke speaks to people at a fund raising campaign for American presidential candidate Barack … LAGOS, Nigeria – The performers pounded on animal-skin drums, the singer howled praise for Barack Obama, and the audience of fist-bumping supporters of the U.S. presidential candidate joined in the chorus: “We can do it! Yes we can!”

The shindig, held by a group calling itself “Africans for Obama 08,” drew hundreds of people from the Nigerian business elite. Each paid more than $2,000 to munch on grilled snails, sip from flutes of Veuve Cliquot and Moet & Chandon and join in a lively, if poorly executed, series of the “fist bumps” popularized by Obama and his wife, Michelle.

Interest in the U.S. presidential race is blooming around the world’s poorest continent as Obama emerges as the Democratic candidate, stunning many here who never believed that a son of Africa had a real shot at leading the United States. Now, with roasted snails and Champagne, text messages and T-shirts, both political organizers and entrepreneurs are seeking to harness the growing enthusiasm for Obama’s message of youthful change, which resonates on a continent where leaders often hang on as long as possible.

“In Africa, we just keep recycling the same old people, so change isn’t welcome. Let people who are unique, who are young, who have ideas — let them come up,” said Robinson Allen, a 40-year old banker at a recent gala in support of Obama. He said Obama’s achievements show a triumph over discrimination. “It’s an event that’s enabling for all people.”

The group says it plans to use the proceeds for advertisements in African media urging people to pray for Obama. The message, according to one organizer: “We can’t vote for you, but we can pray for you.” Similar efforts are under way in Tanzania, South Africa and Kenya, organizers said.

Another Nigerian group, “Blacks Unite for Obama 08,” is running full-page ads in the country’s mass dailies asking customers to send text messages costing about 75 cents in support of Obama, while registering to win a trip to the United States.

In Ghana, songs boosting Obama run on the radio. An artist called Blakk Rasta sings in pidgin English of his pride at Obama’s quest: “Originally stepping out of Kenya, Africa/Adopted into the cold woodlands of America/Dem youthboy defied every order and turned a Senator.”

And in Uganda, about 5,000 students at Makarere University have joined the Obama Solidarity Group, essentially a fan club for the candidate. Its leader, Patrick Rutalo, cited Obama’s example in his own successful drive for student body president. “He inspires young leaders to go for highest offices,” said Rutalo.

In fact, the Obama infatuation seems to have somewhat annoyed Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, who told Ugandans to turn their attention in more self-fulfilling directions. “Obama, Obama, Obama. He is an American. Why are you looking at him and not yourself? Why don’t you build your strength here?” Museveni said at a news conference.

The interest in Obama may be highest in Kenya, where his father was born and lived before traveling to study in the United States. There, vendors sell T-shirts, key chains, banners and hats to capitalize on the popularity of the candidate locals consider practically a native son.

“I like him because of the things he stands for: He stands for hope, that anyone can live their dreams if they believe in themselves,” says Antony Otaye, a 28-year old graphic designer who makes Obama paraphernalia. “He is reviving the American Dream.”

At bars, patrons ask for a local beer, Senator Keg Lager, by the name “Obama Beer.” And a travel company is including on its itinerary a visit to the western Kenya village where Obama’s extended family still lives.

To Edwin Odhiambo, a 33-year old civil engineer, Obama represents resilience for Africans. He bought an Obama hat for about $6 and sported it recently at a popular restaurant in downtown Nairobi.

“It is a statement that regardless of one’s background, who your dad or mother is, or how you grew up, you can do something for yourself,” he said. “You cannot sit back and wallow in misery. You can always make good of something no matter what circumstances you are facing.”

For many Africans, who feel their hopes are hobbled by crushing poverty, corrupt leadership and crumbling infrastructure, the American Dream is also the African Dream. On a continent where most people struggle each day just to fill their children’s stomachs, America symbolizes the idea that hard work should mean success, not just survival.

About half of Nigerians surveyed in a recent poll said they were following the U.S. race at least somewhat closely. The same poll also found that 48 percent of Nigerians following the race believe Obama would change U.S. policy for the better, compared to 32 percent for presumptive Republican candidate John McCain. McCain, while also hailed by many as a fine candidate, hasn’t captured the African imagination.

“I don’t know John McCain. He’s not my brother,” said Olakunle Ologun, a banker who attended the recent Obama event in Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital. “We’re in support of our brother African, Obama.”

However, the support for Obama comes with some controversy. An organizer of the Africans for Obama 08 fundraiser, Nigerian Stock Exchange head Ndi Okereke-Onyiuke, was questioned by anti-corruption police after a complaint that she was violating U.S. electoral regulations by raising money for the Obama campaign. Okereke-Onyiuke wasn’t charged, and attendees were told repeatedly from the stage that proceeds couldn’t be sent to America.

On Sunday, anti-graft police said Okereke-Onyiuke didn’t break any Nigerian laws with her party, but directed her to return the roughly $630,000 she gathered at the event to its attendees. The agency did not explain why she was ordered to return the money if she had not violated any laws.

Some Nigerians also criticized the glitz of the event as insensitive to the plight of the majority of Nigeria’s 140 million people, who survive on less than $1 per day.

Others question the basis of many Africans’ support for Obama, saying it comes from a reflexive tribalism that has long plagued the continent. They point out that Obama, an American, has only a tenuous link to Africa through a mostly absent and unknown father.

“Obama is truly a new American (note: American), who stands on all the delicate cutting edges of America’s murky politics,” read an editorial published Aug. 18 in Nigeria’s Daily Trust newspaper. “It is unhelpful to own him via silly tribal fundraising projects from Africa that in itself is begging for ownership of some kind.”

___

Associated Press writers Tom Odula contributed to this report from Nairobi, Kenya; Godfrey Olukya contributed from Kampala, Uganda; and Francis Kokutse from Accra, Ghana.

EFFECTS OF BLEACHING CREAMS ARE DEADLY! FROM BLACKBEAUTYANDHAIR.COM-AUG. 26,2008

August 26, 2008

BLEACH AND THOSE CHEMICALS WILL DESTROY YOUR SKIN IN THE LONG RUN!

BLEACH AND THOSE CHEMICALS WILL DESTROY YOUR SKIN IN THE LONG RUN!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER ARE REGRETTING BLEACHING NOW!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER ARE REGRETTING BLEACHING NOW!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER!WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER!WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

DESTROY YOUR SKIN AND END UP WITH SKIN CANCER!BLEACH AND DIE!

DESTROY YOUR SKIN AND END UP WITH SKIN CANCER!BLEACH AND DIE!

from blackbeautyandhair.com

AUGUST 26,2008

Beyond the Pale

Hydroquinone, widely used in skin lightening creams, is soon to be banned altogether.BY Prisca McGuire

Poisoning, convulsions, asthma, leukaemia, liver damage, anaphylactic shock and infertility are not conditions normally associated with cosmetics. However, prolonged use of certain cosmetic creams, which contain bleaching agents, has been linked with all of the above.
In recent years, despite rigorous campaigning to raise awareness about the dangers of excessive exposure to the sun, the serious health risks which can arise from using unregulated bleaching creams has received little or no attention.

Why bleach?
Black skin renews itself quickly, rapidly producing new skin cells, this ability for regeneration keep our skin’s looking younger for longer. Whenever Black skin is damaged or traumatised, it produces an excess of melanin in the area. This hyper-pigmentation can result in a humble spot or cut producing a dark patch where it is healed. Skin bleaches are often used in an attempt to even out skin tone or remove dark patches caused by injury. However, in some sections of the society, particularly in African communities, skin bleaches are used to lighten the skin in the misguided belief that a lighter complexion is better.

The production of the most commonly used bleaching agent, hydroquinone (chemical formula C6H6O2), came about by accident, after Black workers in a rubber plant found that when a certain chemical came into contact with their skin it caused light patches of skin. The workers sued for damages as a result of their injuries, but their ‘discovery’ led to the commercial production of cosmetic creams containing hydroquinone as a bleaching agent.

Hydroquinone is a very powerful chemical that it used as the key ingredient in the photographic process of development, but is also used in the rubber industry as an antioxidant, and as an agent in hair dyes. Mercury is another product often used in some cosmetic products as a bleaching agent. Severly toxic, it can cause skin to go grey or blue black, rather than lighter, and in many cases has resulted in the user suffering from mercury poisoning.

How do they work?
Bleaching creams work by stripping the skin of its natural pigmentation. However, in dark skinned people, the pigmentation is the skin’s natural protection from the sun. Bleaching doesn’t just superficially lighten the skin, it alters the skin’s ‘natural’ structure, removing and inhibiting the production of the colour creating melanin.
Once the skin has been ‘bleached’ it loses its natural protective barrier, making it susceptible to damage by the sun’s rays. This is also why many bleaching products contain either sunscreen, or come with instructions advising people to use sun protection creams along with the product. Prolonged use of these bleaching products can also prevent the formation of melanin in the deeper basal layers of the skin, which will leave the skin lighter, but also leave it more vulnerable to damage. Hydroquinone in particular, has been found to damage the connective tissue in the skin and cartilage, hence its removal from skincare products.

People who use bleaching products can end up with rough and blotchy skin, and then get caught up in the ‘bleaching trap’ by using more cream to try and correct the problem, and by doing so, find themsevles causing even more damage to their skin. Alternatively, they may find that because of exposure to the sun, their ‘lightened skin’ gets darker.

Anti-bleaching campaigns
Up until now it has been legal to sell and promote skin bleaches which contain a maximum of two per cent hydroquinone. Although there is anecdotal evidence of shops selling under the counter creams that contain over this legal limit. Even at national and international levels, standards differ. For example, anyone caught travelling to the Gambia with cosmetics containing hydroquinone is subject to a large fine. Yet, another African country was recently prepared to pay research scientist Sujata Jolly, two million pounds to develop a bleaching cream.

Sujata told us, ‘I couldn’t take the contract. Having seen the terrible effects skin bleaching has had on some people, there was no way I was prepared to take the contract, no matter how much money they offered.’ She said, ‘I’ve been campaigning against the use of bleaching creams for years, and have written and appealed to health ministers in an attempt to get them to do something, because I feel so strongly about the dangers of using these creams.’

Sujata adds that she’s not alone. Southwark Council’s Trading Standards Council recently led a campaign against the use of bleaching creams. The campaigning efforts have finally paid off, because this time next year, hydroquinone will no longer be approved as a bleaching agent for use in cosmetic creams in
the UK.

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) has received a directive (Twenty-fourth Commission Directive), from the European Commission, banning the use of hydroquinone as a skin lightener. The draft of the directive clearly states that ‘Harmful secondary effects have been shown to arise following prolonged use of hydroquinone as a skin-lightening cream. This particular use of hydroquinone must not therefore be authorised’. This means that not even the current allowance of two per cent of hydroquinone in cosmetics will be approved by law. Member states are already taking measures to implement the directive. However, worryingly, some major cosmetic companies are not even aware of the directive.

“DON’T KILL YOUR SKIN WITH BLEACHERS” WARNS JAMAICAN DOCTOR AT BIOMEDICINE.ORG

August 26, 2008

CHEMICALS IN THAT BLEACHING CREAM MAY TAKE A LONG TIME TO AFFECT YOU BUT SOONER OR LATER YOUR SKIN WILL SHOW THE EFFECT!

CHEMICALS IN THAT BLEACHING CREAM MAY TAKE A LONG TIME TO AFFECT YOU BUT SOONER OR LATER YOUR SKIN WILL SHOW THE EFFECT!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER REGRET EVER HAVE BLEACHED NOW!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER REGRET EVER HAVE BLEACHED NOW!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

BLEACH AND DESTROY YOUR SKIN! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER!

BLEACH AND DESTROY YOUR SKIN! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER!

from biomedicine.org

Don’t Kill Your Skin With Bleachers, Warns Doctor “Healthy skin is beautiful skin whatever the color”

“Healthy skin is beautiful skin, whatever the color”, says Dr.Clive Anderson, consultant dermatologist and venereologist at Nuttall //Medical Centre, Jamaica.

The doctor’s address is part of a move to get Jamaicans aware of the dangers of skin bleaching. Accordingly, many of the island’s youth resort to bleaching or lightening the skin with various creams got off the streets.

Government health officials plan to launch a campaign against skin bleaching, dubbed ‘Don’t kill the skin’, next month. They intend to use advertisements, literature and talks to convince people about the harm of bleaching. bleaching may lead to melanoma, one of the leading causes of death in the island, warn doctors.

Most of the creams contain hydroquinone, a chemical that counteracts melanin; the natural pigment responsible for the tone of skin or complexion.

Hydroquinone is a prescription drug in Europe and highly regulated in the U.S.

Melanin has the role of protecting the skin from harmful effects of the sun, hence using any cream that suppresses melanin production, can only have adverse effects, according to doctors.

The government has banned creams by the names Neprosone Gel, Hyprogel, Dermo Gel Plus and Movate Cream among others. In addition to the heavy campaigning against bleaching, fines of 50,000 Jamaican dollars will be charged for the illegal sale of banned skin lighteners under the country’s Food and Drug Act.

Doctors list the side effects of bleaching creams as skin cancer, thinning of the skin, irreversible stretch marks, easy bruising and tearing of the skin, rashes, enlarged blood vessels, susceptibility to infection, delayed wound healing, hyper pigmentation, acne and hormonal disturbances.

‘Beauty’ does seem to come at a very high cost.

Date:1/22/2007

August 26, 2008

FROM radicalleft.net
Beyoncé Knowles & the Skin-Whitening Controversy
by max blunt at 04:35PM (CEST) on August 11, 2008 | Permanent Link | Cosmos

Cosmetics company L’Oreal has been accused of

“whitening” singer Beyoncé Knowles’ skin colour in

a series of press ads in women’s magazines in the US

The ads for L’Oreal Paris’ Feria hair color product,

are in the Elle, Allure and Essence magazines

Cosmetics company L’Oreal has been accused of “whitening” singer Beyoncé Knowles’ skin colour in a series of press ads in women’s magazines in the US.

The ads, for L’Oreal Paris’ Feria hair colour product, feature in the September editions of Elle, Allure and Essence magazines in the US.

In the ads the 26-year-old star, who is married to rapper Jay Z, appears to be much whiter than typical pictures of the singer-cum-actress.

There has been a backlash in the US over the images. The New York post said that the “digital lightening” made her “virtually unrecognisable”.

Gossip website TMZ described the Beyoncé images as “bleached out” and “Photoshopped”, launching an online poll to ask if the whitening was “a slap to blacks?”.

However, L’Oreal maintained there has been no lightening of the singer’s complexion in the ads.

“We highly value our relationship with Ms Knowles. It is categorically untrue that L’Oreal Paris altered Ms Knowles’ features or skin tone in the campaign for Feria hair color,” the company said in a statement.

Knowles has worked with the cosmetics company since 2001.
Millions of Black Women ‘Bleach’ Their Skin [Source]
It’s great that L’Oreal has publicly denied that it had deliberately tried to make Beyoncé appear whiter in its latest campaign.

However, “bleaching” is still a huge issue for young women around the world.

The 27-year-old singer, who has an African American father and Creole mother, is naturally light-skinned, with dark brown hair, but appears with very pale skin and strawberry blonde hair as the face of L’Oreal.

She appears, if not exactly “white” then definitely racially ambiguous. It is a tactic Beyoncé appears to have used herself previously – perhaps to make her image more commercial.

Her trademark has been very long blonde hair extensions and yes, looking as light as possible. Whether or not this was her actual intention, her commercial success is undeniable.

Beyond her endorsements, as a solo artist she has sold many millions of albums and singles worldwide, dwarfing the solo earnings of other members of the Grammy-winning girl group Destiny’s Child, who incidentally are much darker.

This is not the first time advertisers have been accused of white-washing. There was uproar when the black “Halifax man”, appeared to have become progressively lighter and his voice was dubbed.

Halifax denied the accusation. Then there was the infamous Ford company photo where black faces were simply changed to white. Ford apologised.

But the problem goes beyond the airbrushing and whitewashing of global corporations.

“Bleaching” is a huge industry in developing countries. This legacy of slavery or colonization, where lighter-skinned or white people were given visible privileges over hundreds of years has resulted in societies where the lighter you are, the higher your status socially and economically.

In India, women strive to achieve the “wheat” colour much-requested on Asian dating websites. In the Caribbean, light skin is also highly desired while in African countries even seemingly minor variations in skin tone can contribute to ethnic conflict.

Containing the active ingredients hydroquinone and/or mercury, bleaching creams have been linked with the disfiguring condition ochronosis, marked by the darkening and thickening of the skin.

Also, there is the appearance of tiny dome-shaped bumps and greyish-brown spots, according to the US FDA which proposed a ban on skin-lightening creams without a prescription back in 2006.

In the UK, the amount of hydroquinone allowed in retail skin-lightening creams has been limited to just 2% but demand means there is a ready unofficial market for stronger potions.

Ironically, skin-lightening creams are often a misnomer, since after discontinuing use, normal sun exposure can make you darker than before.

Women can then become psychologically addicted to creams and over years destroy not just their complexions, but also their health and self-esteem.

Marketers are well aware of how a “white” or “black” face on packaging can affect sales.

The purpose of the recent Italian Vogue issue featuring completely black models was mainly to combat the widely held perception that black faces “don’t sell”.

However, advertisers may not be aware of how younger girls are influenced by images of women being airbrushed ever lighter, skinnier, blonder.

L’Oreal have denied that their actions were deliberate, but nevertheless yet another message, that the whiter you are the more successful you will be, has been sent.

“SKIN BLEACHING IS DANGEROUS”SAYS BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED TINUOLA OGINNI FROM NIGERIAN TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER 2008

August 26, 2008

TINU OGINNI-THE BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY CAMPAIGNING AGAINST BLEACHING AND THIS ARTICLE IS ABOUT HER!

TINU OGINNI-THE BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY CAMPAIGNING AGAINST BLEACHING AND THIS ARTICLE IS ABOUT HER!

YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AND IT YOU NEED OPERATION THEY WILL NOT BE ABLE TO SEW YOUR SKIN UP AGAIN-THEREBY YOU WILL DIE!

YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AND IT YOU NEED OPERATION THEY WILL NOT BE ABLE TO SEW YOUR SKIN UP AGAIN-THEREBY YOU WILL DIE!

THESE BLEACHING CHEMICALS WILL SLOWLY DESTROY YOUR SKIN FOREVER!

THESE BLEACHING CHEMICALS WILL SLOWLY DESTROY YOUR SKIN FOREVER!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACH AND BE A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

“BLEACH AND DESTROY YOUR SKIN! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER!”]BLEACH AND DESTROY YOUR SKIN! BLEACH AND DIE OF SKIN CANCER![/caption]
BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

BLEACH AND LOOK LIKE A MONSTER WHILE YOU ARE WAITING TO DIE!

from tribune.com.ng

Skin bleaching is dangerous
updated: Friday 04-07-2008

She is Tinu Oginni, a beauty and make-up expert based in the United Kingdom, with a mission to create more awareness about the long term effect of using bleaching products to change skin tone by people of all ages and background. She also wants to create more awareness on why we are dark in colour and enable us build our confidence in being black, enrich our lives and reveal our hidden beauty so that we live in good state of health.

According to her, in this modern appearance- conscious society in which we live, there is a myth that lighter, pale complexion portrays beauty, riches, success, and people are often commended on the fairness of their skin. “This misguided belief has resulted in making a lot of people bow to this social pressure, which is enormous and cuts across all the strata of our society.”

“It is imperative, therefore, on our part that we put a halt to this. Banning of products containing hydroquinone and mercury will not stop the products from entering Nigeria, but the only way to make a positive impact on preventing this anormaly from spreading is to create more awareness about the long term effects of using skin bleaching products on our skin,” said Ogini.

She stated that in order to combat this problem, confidence teaching must start in the homes and then in the schools to enable children value themselves, i.e, their colour, religion, culture, family, country.” “Beauty is more than skin deep. The radiance that shines through an individual and her comportments are all attributes that attest not only to her beauty but also her confidence.

To change your skin colour is to betray your maker and your faith, for in the realm of religion there must be no room for vanity, “ she said. Bleaching, according to her, is most certainly not pleasing in the eyes of the Lord. “In order to change the psyche of our people, I am organizing a national crusade across the six geo-political zones of Nigeria in which various lectures intended to expose the negative underpinnings of bleaching will be delivered by scholars and researchers such as dermatologists, psychologists, beauticians and religious leaders among others.”

Areas of concern will include: Why we have our skin colour; medical, social, spiritual and economic implications of bleaching our skin. The campaign against this anomally aims to educate through the aggressive use of the mass media such as, television, radio jingles, newspapers, magazines, flyers, posters, bill board, public campaign, seminars and workshop.

What is bleaching?
Bleaching is using products that contain hydroquinone and mercury to change our colour. There is also a new product in market containing kajoic acid. All these products work by inhibiting the production of melanin. Hydroquinone is a severely toxic and very powerful chemical used in photo processing, the manufacture of rubber and is an active agent in hair dye. Mercury in the form of Mercury Chloride and Ammoniated Mercury is carcinogenic (Cancer-causing agent). They appear on the list of toxic substances that can only be purchased via pharmacies with prescribed labels of toxicity.

What are the long term effects of using bleaching products on our skin?
Bleaching leads to increase thinning of the skin and stretch marks.
Bleaching is associated to being a carcinogen. (Cancer- causing agent).
Bleaching pills are toxic and can cause damage to internal organs such as kidney and liver.
Bleaching leaves odour which is anything from stale, mousy, to fishy
Skin bleaching can cause rough, blotchy skin, leaving it with a spotty cavier appearance.

Why do people use skin bleaching products?
1. Uneven complexion tone (skin with blemishes).
2. Consumers being lured by marketing ploy.
3. Lack of basic information and education on why we are dark in colour (ignorance).
4. Social pressure (some consider bleaching as fashionable).
There is usually an underlying cause for uneven complexion tone. They include: Eczema, acne, poor nutrition. Visit a dermatologist, do not apply unprescribed cream on your skin! Manufacturers of skin bleaching products use marketing ploy to lure customers, i.e putting toning and lightening in the same sentence.

Skin lightening and toning are two different things Lightening is bleaching. Toning is freshenening up your skin. Manufacturers of skin bleaching products may not be fully versed with the side effect of their products. Some products present misleading labels or are economical with the truth (i.e. 2% hydroquinone while it contains 6% or even more). Manufacturers of skin bleaching products coming into Nigeria must label their products to include the proper warning label i.e (bleaching may harm your skin)

A lot of people lack basic information and education on why our skin is dark in colour.In Nigeria shinning of the sun is intense. God created us with the right skin type to survive the harshness. Our body produces melanin which protects our skin from the harmful (ultra violet ray of the sun). Without melanin production, we would need to cover our skin with sun screen; without melanin production, our skin will be vulnerable and risk a greater chance of developing cancer. The more melanin we produce the darker we are. We are beautiful creatures that God made and gave us different skin tone. All colours are beautiful but there are ways we can care for our skin by maintaining or improving its look and texture. Fortunately, a woman skin does not have to be truly flawless to look like it is, the steps to create a perfect finish starts with a great skin care programme, i.e,

Cleanse your skin to remove make-up and impurities.

Exfoliate your skin to remove dead surface cells.

Freshen your skin to tone and refine pores.

Moisturize your skin for soft, smooth skin.

Protect your skin from environmental damage using foundation while colour cosmetics will produce the fabulous finish when required.

NIGERIAN SISTER TINUOLA OGINNI CAMPAIGNS AGAINST BLEACHING OUR BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKIN! FROM NIGERIAN TRIBUNE,JUNE 2008

August 26, 2008

IT MAY TAKE YEARS OR HAPPEN JUST LIKE THAT BUT BLEACHING CHEMICALS ARE GOING TO AFFECT YOUR SKIN EVENTUALLY!

IT MAY TAKE YEARS OR HAPPEN JUST LIKE THAT BUT BLEACHING CHEMICALS ARE GOING TO AFFECT YOUR SKIN EVENTUALLY!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER ARE REGRETTING EVER BLEACHING NOW!

THIS SOUTH AFRICAN BROTHER AND SISTER ARE REGRETTING EVER BLEACHING NOW!

YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN AND EVENTUALLY IT WILL BREAK OUT!

YOUR SKIN WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN AND EVENTUALLY IT WILL BREAK OUT!

BLEACHING WILL MAKE YOU A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACHING WILL MAKE YOU A MONSTER LIKE MICHAEL JACKSON!

BLEACHING CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOUR SKIN EVENTUALLY IN MANY WAYS!

BLEACHING CHEMICALS WILL AFFECT YOUR SKIN EVENTUALLY IN MANY WAYS!

TINUOLA OGINNI,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FIGHTS BLEACHING!

TINUOLA OGINNI,A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY FIGHTS BLEACHING!

from tribune.com.ng

A Nigerian’s campaign against skin bleaching
updated: Friday 13-06-2008

(L-R) Miss Tinuola Oginni, addressing
blacks resident in the United Kingdon
during one of her numerous campaigns
against skin bleaching.Assistant Editor, Jackson Udom, just back from London, writes on what Miss Tinuola Oginni, a London-based make-up artiste, is doing on the streets of London, with her solo crusade against bleaching by blacks resident in London and her plans to take the battle to her roots.

The bleaching culture crept into the consciousness of Nigerians several years ago, with little or nothing done to check its spread, which, surprisingly, cuts across virtually all sexes, class and groups.

Despite its grevious health consequences, Nigerians, particularly, the women and some men have turned deaf ear to the health implications of bleaching. But one Nigerian has decided to take the bull by the horn, and that person is London-based Miss Tinuola Oginni.

Nigerian Tribune encountered this amazon on the streets of London on three different occasions preaching against bleaching, and this caught the attention of this reporter, which led to the attempt at unravelling the reasons behind such a public crusade by a Nigerian against bleaching in a foreign land largely peopled by whites.

According to those who spoke with Nigerian Tribune on what they described as “the yeoman war against bleaching” by the London-trained make-up artist, “the crusade against bleaching has taken Tinu to virtually all the nooks and crannies of the United Kingdom. It is aimed at discouraging or completely eradicating the spirit of bleaching among Africans. She is more concerned about the health implications associated with bleaching and that is why she goes around the UK to let the people believe in the colour of their skin”.

Nigerian Tribune also gathered that she has also taken her crusade against bleaching to churches particularly those with predominantly African. It was further learnt that the crusade has, on a daily basis, been receiving the support of religious organisations.

In a chat with Nigerian Tribune at one of the venues of her anti-bleaching crusade, the make-up artiste said she was moved to preach against bleaching because of what she witnessed when her very close friend was to undergo an operation in the hospital.

“I am out on the streets against bleaching because of the experience I had when my very close friend was admitted for operation in an hospital. She did not survive the operation because she had been bleaching for over 15 years. According to the GP’s report after the operation, which was very successful, they found it difficult closing her up after the operation because her outerskin layer hadbeen destroyed due to long years of bleaching.

Because of that she died. It was a painful loss. In fact, I am yet to overcome that loss. That is just one out of very many tragedies occasioned by attempts by Africans to want to look like Europeans. They forget that God gave them that skin colour because of the weather and made the Europeans white because of their weather.”

She further said “black Africans still see bleaching as the in thing in town. I am yet to see any white man who wants to change his skin to black and that is why I have taken it upon myself to alert blacks on the dangers inherent in bleaching.”

On why she decided to carry out the campaign in London and not in Africa, the Osun State-born artiste said, “the war has to start from here because African’s resident here are largely influenced by what they see. They see the whites and they want to look like them in colour, forgetting about the health hazards associated with such things”

She however, assured that plans were underway to take the crusade against bleaching to Africa, saying, “I have Africa, the continent of the blacks, in mind. In the next couple of weeks I will move my campaign there because that is where we have the largest population of blacks, but as they say, charity begins at home. Nigeria, my country, will be my first port of call,”

According to Miss Oginni, “we will need the support of government, organisations, highly placed individuals for the success of the crusade and it is my prayer that at the end of the campaign against this social abnormality the blacks will come to the understanding of the dangers inherent in bleaching. There is dignity in the black colour because it is a special gift from God and any attempt to want to tamper with it is an indirect way of being ungrateful to God.”

© 2004 – 2008 African Newspapers of Nigeria Plc. Publishers of Nigerian Tribune, Saturday Tribune, Sunday Tribune.
All Rights Reserved

WOFEYAC:UPDATE ON THE WORLD FESTIVAL ON YORUBA ARTS AND CULTURE AT WOFEYAC.ORG!

August 26, 2008

from wofeyac.org

WOFEYAC: Objectives
Objectives

i. Promote, preserve and protect Yoruba culture and its people

ii. Offer a credible platform for Yoruba cultural revitalization

iii. Use the platform for positive economic, social, cultural and historical advancement of Yoruba as a people

iv. Serve as a good means of projecting the creativity, rich spiritual and cultural artistry of Yoruba nation

v. Inculcate in our youths the core values of the Yorubas and the concept of Omoluabi through culture to make them better citizens of the world.

Programmes
Introduction
The Festival of Yoruba Arts and Culture, seeks to bring to the fore, the rich cultural heritage of the Yoruba all over the world. From the South west Nigeria to the rich agrarian hinterlands of Kwara, Kogi, Edo & Delta State as far as, Ghana, Benin Republic, Brazil and even the United State of America, Europe and other continents of the world, the Yoruba nation has a culture which needs to be revisited and revive.

2.0 THE OBJECTIVE OF THE FESTIVAL

— To organise a programme that will ensure we remain a people
– To showcase the artistic and cultural values of the Yoruba nation
— To re-awaken in the consciousness of the people and the ethics embedded in the culture of the people.
— To preserve our culture and arts for the on coming generations

2.1 VERY IMPORTANT NOTE
– The Festival has no fetish inclination
– It is purely entertainment
– It involves no sacrifices of any idol
– It is only meant to re-awaken our artistic and cultural values
– It has no religious tendency

3.0 ACTION PLAN

– Pre event
– Event
– Post Event

3.1 PRE EVENT
3.1.1 Stakeholders forum
This is a forum where the agenda for the festival and the activities of the same is unveiled and other issues discussed. At the end of the meeting, a communiqué will be issued

The meeting will form the basis for follow-up activities in keeping the forth coming festival in the minds of the enlightened segments of society through the print & electronic media.

The group of Stakeholders includes:
Royal Fathers, South-West States Governors Dignitaries, Media Community, Commissioners for Culture and Tourism, Information and Youth and Sports, Ministers for Information, Culture & Tourism, Professionals and Institutes of Arts and Culture/ Tourism, Academia, Leaders of various Yoruba socio-cultural groups.

These groups have been selected into various categories such as:
Life Patron,
Grand Patron
Patron
Life Advisers
Advisers
Special Ambassador
Ambassador
Special Partners

3.1.2 Stakeholders’ Dinner
A found Raising Activity
The essence of this is to raise funds for the festival. This will complement sponsorship drive within selected Public & Private sector organizations.

3.2 THE EVENT
A three day extravaganza of the Yoruba culture & heritage, exhibited at street level, out door and indoor venues in a selected city within South West, Nigeria.

3.2.1 CHOICE OF FESTIVAL VENUE:
– Availability of appropriate venues for street level, indoor & outdoor activities
– Availability of hotels, motels & guest houses capable of accommodating anticipated local & foreign guests.
– Availability of hostels capable of serving as camps for invited performing troupes.
– Availability of good road and accessible road

3.2.2 PROGRAMME OF EVENTS
3.2.2.1 Street exhibition of Arts and Culture
A 3 – day exhibition of arts/crafts, trades, professions, vocations, food, music, agriculture etc in about two or three streets in the host town. This is to afford the entire citizenry of the host town get a feel of the festival at street level.

– Each road will accommodate specific items for exhibition
– Efforts will be made to provide literature for each exhibited item/activity
– Opportunity for food/drink vendors especially of traditional Yoruba meals to sell to visitors.
– Each road will equally play host to various traditional musical group who will provide all –day entertainment.
– Each road will also play host to selected masquerades to add colour to the street level festival.

The Streetl activities offer various opportunities such as:
Branding
Merchandising
Direct Sales activities

3.2.2.2 Opening Ceremony
The festival will be flagged off with funfare

3.2.2.3 States Performance
The three days have been designated for all the participating states in the South west and those in the Diaspora.
The performance will include music, poems, masquerades, dancing, dressing and other performances of special interest.
This will form the basis for the daily activities at the festival grounds.

DAY ONE:
Immediately after the opening ceremony, the first three states and their troupes begin their performances.

Day Two
Performances by three other State & their troupes:

Day Three
Performances by troupes from Yoruba in the Diaspora including Kwara, Kogi, Edo, Delta, Benin Republic, Ghana, Brazil, Cuba, Europe, the United State and other continents.

3.2.2.4 SPECIAL RECEPTION
The Host Governor & The Paramount Ruler will receive the visiting Governors & leading traditional rulers of the performing states each day.

This colourful display of royalty will afford us an opportunity to showcase our Royal Fathers as the centre of our modern culture.

It will equally provide the platform for governors from other state to catch the excitement of the festival thereby preparing themselves in the hosting of subsequent editions.

3.2.3 FESTIVAL GROUND OPPORTUNITIES
The festival grounds provides the following opportunities
Branding/merchandising
Establishment of out door viewing/entertainment centres
Direct sales activities

3.2.4 INDOOR ACTIVITIES

This will include:
Nights of Yoruba Poetry
Grand Finale
Night of musical entertainment

3.2.4.1 Nights of Yoruba Poetry/Drama
– Literary events spiced with rich traditional music in an inviting atmosphere.
– Invited guests will be treated to reading of rich Yoruba literature, e.g. Drama, Alamo, Ewi, Itan, Aroba, Aalo, Arofo, Ijala, Rara, Ekun Iyawo etc.
– This activity portends full/part sponsorship by various groups in the public/private sector.

3.2.4.2 The Grand Finale
This event will serve as an opportunity to felicitate with all Stakeholders for a successful hosting of the World Yoruba Festival 2008.

Dignitaries from the public & private sectors – the sponsors and representatives of the participating States & communities will be feted by the host governor.

Leading Yoruba World Class Musicians will be on the band stand supported by other artistes.

4.0 SPONSORSHIP
Government support
Media partnerships
Brand/corporate support
Service partnerships

4.1 EVENTS SPONSORSHIP
These will include, but not limited to the following:
Stadium Rental
Street Branding/Sponsorship
Cultural centre Rental
Sponsorship of the Culture Gala Night/Closing Ceremony
Poetry/Artistes Night
Transportation, accommodation and welfare support for the State Contingents.
Police command and other security agents for security of lives and properties.
Payment for services at the outdoor/indoor venue e.g. P.A System, Big screens.
Coverage & Broad cast on TV/Radio Stations.
Other entertainments by Artistes/Musicians
To mention but few

4.2 SPONSORSHIP CATEGORIES/CLASSIFICATION
Platinum Sponsor – Full payment for all sponsor able items
Gold Sponsors – A maximum of two sponsors who together pick up the bill for the entire festival
Silver Sponsor;s) – A maximum of four sponsors who take up full sponsorship of the event
Partners –Brands/service that pick up specific items on our sponsorship bouquet.

4.3 MEDIA PARTNERSHIP
Festival partnership will be sought from:
Electronics Media
– Television
– Radio

Print Media
– Newspapers
– Magazines

4.4 SERVICE PARTNERSHIP
Also, support of the following service providers and festival partners will be solicited:
Banking partner
Airline partner

5.0 CONCLUSION
Contributions are expected from all our Stakeholders as a tree does not make a forest.

The festival is our collective responsibility and its success is a joy to all of us and a pride to our great nation – The Yorubaland, Nigeria and Africa in general.

Oodua a gbe wa o!

LATEST NEWS:ACCORDING TO THE NATION NEWSPAPER,WED. AUGUST 13,2008 THE FESTIVAL WILL BEGIN IN NOV. AND LAST FOR 6 MONTHS WITH A MONTH IN EACH YORUBA STATE. OSUN,ONDO,LAGOS,OGUN,EKITI,KWARA!

WORLD FESTIVAL OF YORUBA ARTS AND CULTURE

Preamble

The Yoruba is the largest contiguous group in Africa. South Western Nigeria, which is the economic nerve Centre of Nigeria and home to media, has the largest concentration of the Yorubas in Nigeria .

The World Festival of Yoruba Arts and Culture is conceived and designed to showcase the rich cultural content of the Yorubas, their socio-cultural artistry, tradition, heritage and other historical dynamics of the Yoruba people as a nation.

The event, which may appear sectional and exclusive, was meant to sensitize other nation and nationalities to mobilize and take advantage of what arts and culture has on offer to strengthen bond of friendship, global peace and harmony. It ultimately aims to serves as a bridge-building mechanism for all Yorubas in the African continent and the Diaspora.

Objectives
i. Promote, preserve and protect Yoruba culture and its people.

ii. Offer a credible platform for Yoruba cultural revitalization.

iii. Use the platform for positive economic, social, cultural and historical advancement of Yoruba as a people.

iv. Serve as a good means of projecting the creativity, rich spiritual and cultural artistry of Yoruba nation.

v. Inculcate in our youths the core values of the Yorubas and the concept of Omoluabi through culture to make them better citizens of the world

Programme Content
It will feature exhibitions, performances, convention of all Yoruba traditional rulers at home and abroad, world Yoruba leaders’ conference, street level artificial markets, packaged tours, regatta and a platform for individual and corporate investment opportunities. It will have a children’s village for drama sketches, story telling and traditional games.

Target Participants
There are about four categories of participants namely:

i. Nigerian participants from States with people of Yoruba extraction ( Lagos , Ogun, Oyo, Ondo, Ekiti, Osun, Edo, Kwara, Delta, Kogi and Niger States )

ii. People of Yoruba extraction from Brazil , Cuba , USA , Trinidad and Tobago , Canada , Republic of Benin , Togo , Cote D’Ivoire , Sierra Leone and so on. These countries are to stage performances at the festival

iii. Foreign tourists who may wish to savour the glamour, fun and taste the rich cultural heritage of the Yorubas

iv. Corporate and individual bodies who may wish to buy into the festival to showcase their services

Hosting
Lagos and Ogun states are being considered to co-host the Festival being the first of its kind and in view of the facilities required for a befitting outing. This consideration would not however preclude these two states from competing with other States with people of Yoruba extraction for the hosting right of the next festival in two years time.

Expected Outcomes

Among others, the Festival promises to:

i. Serve as an avenue for cultural renaissance

ii. Serve as unification platform

iii. Harness the economic, moral and cultural potentials of the Yorubas

iv. Offer direct economic gains/values to the people and corporate citizens

v. Promote investment opportunities

vi. Project and boost tourism potentials of the Nigerian nation

vii. Serve as avenue to promote global peace and harmony

Benefits to Sponsors

Government

i. It will have direct bearing to the host communities in view of the grassroots content

ii. It is also a most effective mass mobilization strategy

iii. It offers tremendous opportunities to project tourism potentials of the various localities, creativity of local participants and economic opportunities of your state

iv. It offers an informal interactive platform for would-be investors and potential stakeholders in your state’s economy.

Corporate
i. It will give the organization the benefit of reaching out to a broad and very captive audience and potential customers

ii. Tremendous branding opportunities

iii. It is a one-stop international market place

iv. In view of the international involvement in this festival, organizations will invariably enjoy the best of media publicity

v. Broadening of market outreach

vi. Organization’s logo will be included in our promotional materials including our website, programme of events banners, posters and souvenirs

vii. It will undoubtedly offer organizations a most potent means of fulfilling corporate social responsibility to a critical mass of the people

Conclusion
It is against the aforementioned that we seek your collaboration; participation and sponsorship to enable us achieve the outlined objectives.

7777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777

UPDATE: MARCH 10,2009
FROM the Guardian Newspaper,Nigeria

Organisers shift Yoruba arts festival

RECENT political developments in Ekiti and Ondo states have led to the postponement of the finals of the World Festival of Yoruba Arts and Culture (WOFEYAC) to the last quarter of this year.

The train of the festival, which opened in Ile-Ife, Osun State last November, should have moved to Ondo and Ekiti states before arriving in Ogun and Lagos states for the finals, but for the leadership changes in Ekiti and Ondo.

The Planning Co-ordinator of the festival, Mrs. Banke Akinlaja, said in a statement yesterday that the dates of the finals were shifted to allow calm return to the political terrain in the South-West.

“This festival is a programme that will continue years after years and we have to ensure that the foundation is well laid. Even if it takes us three years to get there, the task must be to get it right and have a programme that all Yoruba in the world will be proud of.”

Akinlaja said some of the programmes of the festival would continue from April where events promoting Yoruba culture and heritage would be taken round all the South-West states before the finals in the last quarter of the year.


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