Archive for the ‘WRITERS’ Category

WAR AGAINST USE OF white WORD “MAMA”-REPLACING AFRICAN WORDS that Mean MOTHER-LIKE “IYA” in YORUBA !-SEND US YOUR AFRICAN WORD for MOTHER SO WE CAN PUT IT ON THIS LIST!

March 11, 2013

ROM afrikannames.comAFRICAN WORDS FOR MOTHER”A mother cannot die.” -Democratic Republic of the CONGOEnjoy this list of African names.AKA (AH-kah). Mother. Nigeria (Eleme) FEKA (EH-kah). Mother earth. West Africa FINE -(EE-neh). Mother. Nigeria (Ishan) FIYA – YORUBA- MOTHERJIBOO (jee-boh). New mother. Gambia (Mandinka) FMAMAWA (MAHM-wah). Small mother. Liberia FMANYI (mahn-yee). The mother of twins. Cameroon (Mungaka) FMASALA (mah-SAH-lah). The great mother. Sudan FNAHWALLA (nah-WAHL-lah). The mother of the family. Cameroon (Mubako) FNANA (NAH-nah). Mother of the earth. Ghana FNANJAMBA (nahn-JAHM-bah). Mother of twins. Angola (Ovimbundu)NINA (NEE-nah). Mother. East Africa (Kiswahili) FNNENMA (n-NEHN-mah). Mother of beauty. Nigeria (Igbo) FNNEORA (n-neh-OH-rah). Mother loved by all. Nigeria (Igbo) FNOBANTU (noh-BAHN-too). Mother of nations. Azania (Xhosa) FNOBUNTU (noh-BOON-too). Mother of humanity. Azania (Xhosa) FNOLUNDI (noh-LOON-dee). Mother of horizons. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMALI (NOH-MAH-lee). Mother of riches. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMANDE noh-MOHN-deh). Mother of patience. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMPI (nohm-PEE). Mother of war. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMSA (NOHM-sah). Mother of kindness. Azania (Xhosa) FNONDYEBO (non-dyeh-boh). Mother of plenty. Azania (Xhosa) FNOZIZWE (noh-ZEEZ-weh). Mother of nations. Azania (Nguni)NOZUKO (noh-ZOO-koh). Mother of glory. Azania (Xhosa) FUMAYMA (o-MAH-ee-mah). Little mother. North Africa (Arabic) FUMI (OO-mee). My mother. Kiswahili FUMM (oom). Mother. North Africa (Arabic) FYENYO (yehn-yoh). Mother is rejoicing. Nigeria (Yoruba) FYEYO (yeh-YOH). Mother. Tanzania FYETUNDE (yeh-TOON-deh). The mother comes back. Nigeria (Yoruba) FYINGI (YEEN-gee). My beloved mother. NigeriaSent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN”Mama”(and Papa) were introduced into Yoruba language early by Yorubas who wanted to show they were educated, according Ojogbon Akinwunmi Isola.. So long ago that many think it is a Yoruba word! Now it has replaced -IYA almost completely! SO we must start using IYA instead and correct those who use it because word by word Yoruba is being replaced by english words killing the Yoruba Language! So do your part from today! We can and will SAVE Yoruba! Olodumare ase!
All Nigerian/­AFRICAN Languages must learn from the mistake of educated Yorubas! DO NOT mix your Language! Reclaim your word for mother first for it is the most important word in any language!
“MAMA” must be replaced with the African word in your Language?

>ALAGBA ADEBAYO FALETI ON WHY HIS "FILA" THE WAY HE DOES!

March 30, 2011

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nationalmirroronline.net/…/3/19/index.2.html

The man with the cap ‘It’s easy for me to just bend it anyhow’

Font size: YEMISI ADENIRAN 19/03/2011 00:26:00

Not many people know why Adebayo Faleti wears his Fila (cap) the way he does.The 73 yearold actor and culture icon shared the secret behind his unusual style with YEMISI ADENIRAN

what informs your peculiar way of donning your cap?

Nothing, I do not know how to style it and with it sewn this long, it is easier for me to just bend it anyhow.

Where did you grow up and what fond memories of your childhood do you have?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.

What were the circumstances of your birth?

Were you born with a silver spoon in your mouth?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.
image

Let’s talk about your love life. What was it like and when did you get married?

I’m an African man and in those days, our styles were different from the way you people do it these days. We weren’t careless and were straight forward than you people. I did not marry early, I think I got married at the age of 30 or so and that was some 10 years after my peers. My mother was worried but like I said, my father was supportive and more tolerant. And you really can’t blame her, she was acting normally; she wanted to be sure that all was well with me. I had almost everything late; education and marriage, but we thank God all has ended well.

Are you a polygamist?

No, I am not. I am married to just one woman. I live with one wife at a time. But really, I would have loved to be a polygamist.

Why?

It is the best way to manage women. You know, it is only one woman that can inflict any punishment on a man. If they are two, it is not possible. You will simply boycott her room and go to the other. By the time you go to her afterwards, she will receive you with open arms.

But they can gang up against you?

That is not possible. I would not have permitted unity or friendliness between them. I would have made sure they were poles apart and this would disallow them from conspiring against me. The best way is to make them enemies and you will enjoy yourself. I really want to work on a movie that talks about true friendship, true love. The movie will dwell on the recipe for a good marriage which will be based on true friendship. Couples to be should be true friends who are ready to bear each other’s burden. It is good to have your friend as your wife or husband. Friendship should precede everything. That is why the olden days’ marriages lasted longer. The courtship was usually long enough and that availed them enough space to study and know each other well.

>TONY MARINHO-AFRICAN WRITER/ACTIVIST!-HIS POEM-"THE NEW AFRICAN TALKING DRUM"

August 4, 2010

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from africanwriter.com

The New African Talking Drum – A Poem by Tony Marinho

By Tony Marinho Published July 11, 2010 

The dreaded new African talking drum

Drums damaging every eardrum

Day, night, its message, a bush fire,

Consuming village to presidential villa

It talks in all 340 tribal tongues

Drumming into dreams, destroying sleep and lungs.

But no one dances in the noisy polluting heat

Of the new African talking drum beat

President to prostitute

Restaurant to research institute

Police to petrol station

Right across the darkened nation

It drums a dirge, mourning

From dusk to dawning,

www – the world wide waking,

As power dies again, again, and again.

Nigeria requires a 100,000Mw revolution in energy

Making every city an electri-City.

To be truly ‘I fine pass my neighbour’

Silence the new African talking drum – the generator.

– Tony Marinho

‘I fine pass my neighbour’ is colloquial for a small family size generator

Engraved

Objection!

The many sided coin and other stories

Bobo learns to fly

Deadly cargo!

The Epidemic

Introducing: The Manopause Man Aka Mr Man O. Pause and the Manopause (Strategies for Communication in Southern Afr)

The victim

 WEBSITE- tonymarinho.com


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