Archive for the ‘YORUBA WRITERS’ Category

WAR AGAINST USE OF white WORD “MAMA”-REPLACING AFRICAN WORDS that Mean MOTHER-LIKE “IYA” in YORUBA !-SEND US YOUR AFRICAN WORD for MOTHER SO WE CAN PUT IT ON THIS LIST!

March 11, 2013

ROM afrikannames.comAFRICAN WORDS FOR MOTHER”A mother cannot die.” -Democratic Republic of the CONGOEnjoy this list of African names.AKA (AH-kah). Mother. Nigeria (Eleme) FEKA (EH-kah). Mother earth. West Africa FINE -(EE-neh). Mother. Nigeria (Ishan) FIYA – YORUBA- MOTHERJIBOO (jee-boh). New mother. Gambia (Mandinka) FMAMAWA (MAHM-wah). Small mother. Liberia FMANYI (mahn-yee). The mother of twins. Cameroon (Mungaka) FMASALA (mah-SAH-lah). The great mother. Sudan FNAHWALLA (nah-WAHL-lah). The mother of the family. Cameroon (Mubako) FNANA (NAH-nah). Mother of the earth. Ghana FNANJAMBA (nahn-JAHM-bah). Mother of twins. Angola (Ovimbundu)NINA (NEE-nah). Mother. East Africa (Kiswahili) FNNENMA (n-NEHN-mah). Mother of beauty. Nigeria (Igbo) FNNEORA (n-neh-OH-rah). Mother loved by all. Nigeria (Igbo) FNOBANTU (noh-BAHN-too). Mother of nations. Azania (Xhosa) FNOBUNTU (noh-BOON-too). Mother of humanity. Azania (Xhosa) FNOLUNDI (noh-LOON-dee). Mother of horizons. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMALI (NOH-MAH-lee). Mother of riches. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMANDE noh-MOHN-deh). Mother of patience. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMPI (nohm-PEE). Mother of war. Azania (Xhosa) FNOMSA (NOHM-sah). Mother of kindness. Azania (Xhosa) FNONDYEBO (non-dyeh-boh). Mother of plenty. Azania (Xhosa) FNOZIZWE (noh-ZEEZ-weh). Mother of nations. Azania (Nguni)NOZUKO (noh-ZOO-koh). Mother of glory. Azania (Xhosa) FUMAYMA (o-MAH-ee-mah). Little mother. North Africa (Arabic) FUMI (OO-mee). My mother. Kiswahili FUMM (oom). Mother. North Africa (Arabic) FYENYO (yehn-yoh). Mother is rejoicing. Nigeria (Yoruba) FYEYO (yeh-YOH). Mother. Tanzania FYETUNDE (yeh-TOON-deh). The mother comes back. Nigeria (Yoruba) FYINGI (YEEN-gee). My beloved mother. NigeriaSent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN”Mama”(and Papa) were introduced into Yoruba language early by Yorubas who wanted to show they were educated, according Ojogbon Akinwunmi Isola.. So long ago that many think it is a Yoruba word! Now it has replaced -IYA almost completely! SO we must start using IYA instead and correct those who use it because word by word Yoruba is being replaced by english words killing the Yoruba Language! So do your part from today! We can and will SAVE Yoruba! Olodumare ase!
All Nigerian/­AFRICAN Languages must learn from the mistake of educated Yorubas! DO NOT mix your Language! Reclaim your word for mother first for it is the most important word in any language!
“MAMA” must be replaced with the African word in your Language?

SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE!-CHECK THIS GREAT SITE!

February 24, 2013

http://www.ceyoleng.org/Index.php

GOMINA OSUN MOVES TO SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE!

January 7, 2012

Aregbesola makes case for Yoruba Academy

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December 8, 2011, 10:04 pm

News

OSOGBO—The Osun State Governor, Rauf Aregbesola, has said the establishment of a Yoruba Academy would go a long way to promote the Yoruba culture and tradition as well as enhance the speaking of the language by a new generation.

The governor disclosed the intention of his government to enact a law that would make it compulsory for every school, both private and public to include in their curricular activities, teaching of Yoruba language.

The Governor spoke in Osogbo, the state capital at the anniversary lecture, tagged, “Reclaiming Our Cultural Concept: Yoruba Vegesimal and Decimal Number System in Perspective”, as well as Book Lunch marking the one year anniversary of his administration in office.

He lamented that the culture, language and values of the race have faded away.

The governor stated, “We will enact a law that will make it compulsory for every school, both private and public to teach Yoruba language. We will take the bill to the House of Assembly latest by February and work towards ensuring that by March, it becomes law that every school must comply with. We will compel teaching of Yoruba language on everybody studying in Osun from elementary to university level.

“Also, we will establish a Yoruba Academy for Language, Culture and Tradition where those who are interested in learning Yoruba language we be learning our culture and whatever associated with it”, he said.

The governor who expressed disgust over the disappearance of Yoruba language and culture, especially among the younger ones, said that his administration would do everything it requires to revive the lost glory.

Aregbesola noted that there were differences between culture and religion, the governor added that “it was our failure to recognize our culture and tradition as very important machinery for development that makes us to be lagging behind.”

>ALAGBA ADEBAYO FALETI ON WHY HIS "FILA" THE WAY HE DOES!

March 30, 2011

>

nationalmirroronline.net/…/3/19/index.2.html

The man with the cap ‘It’s easy for me to just bend it anyhow’

Font size: YEMISI ADENIRAN 19/03/2011 00:26:00

Not many people know why Adebayo Faleti wears his Fila (cap) the way he does.The 73 yearold actor and culture icon shared the secret behind his unusual style with YEMISI ADENIRAN

what informs your peculiar way of donning your cap?

Nothing, I do not know how to style it and with it sewn this long, it is easier for me to just bend it anyhow.

Where did you grow up and what fond memories of your childhood do you have?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.

What were the circumstances of your birth?

Were you born with a silver spoon in your mouth?

I grew up in the village and you can imagine how much fun that was. It was much excitement that many children of today are not likely to understand for obvious reasons. I was the first born of my father, so, I had all the attention from them. He would endeavour to put me through all the necessary training and exposure within his power and jurisdiction to make me a proper child and it was all interesting. I was allowed to be part of all the pranks that children engaged in and my ‘sins’ were gladly forgiven. There were rivers to swim in, forests to hunt in, drums to beat and many other beautiful things to remember. There were those wonderful days of moonlight tales when we listened to legendary and thrilling stories that are related to issues of life. It was all fun. My father, for instance, made me to read Yoruba texts and story books to his hearing every evening, this way, I managed to get well trained. He was committed to anything that would make me successful in life. I honestly owe my success to his tolerance.
image

Let’s talk about your love life. What was it like and when did you get married?

I’m an African man and in those days, our styles were different from the way you people do it these days. We weren’t careless and were straight forward than you people. I did not marry early, I think I got married at the age of 30 or so and that was some 10 years after my peers. My mother was worried but like I said, my father was supportive and more tolerant. And you really can’t blame her, she was acting normally; she wanted to be sure that all was well with me. I had almost everything late; education and marriage, but we thank God all has ended well.

Are you a polygamist?

No, I am not. I am married to just one woman. I live with one wife at a time. But really, I would have loved to be a polygamist.

Why?

It is the best way to manage women. You know, it is only one woman that can inflict any punishment on a man. If they are two, it is not possible. You will simply boycott her room and go to the other. By the time you go to her afterwards, she will receive you with open arms.

But they can gang up against you?

That is not possible. I would not have permitted unity or friendliness between them. I would have made sure they were poles apart and this would disallow them from conspiring against me. The best way is to make them enemies and you will enjoy yourself. I really want to work on a movie that talks about true friendship, true love. The movie will dwell on the recipe for a good marriage which will be based on true friendship. Couples to be should be true friends who are ready to bear each other’s burden. It is good to have your friend as your wife or husband. Friendship should precede everything. That is why the olden days’ marriages lasted longer. The courtship was usually long enough and that availed them enough space to study and know each other well.

April 29, 2010

>LATI OWO wikipedia.org

Àkójọ àwọn olùkọ̀wé ará Nàìjíríà
Lát’ọwọ́ Wikipedia
Lọ sí: atọ́ka, àwárí
Àwọn àkóónú [bòmọ́lẹ̀]
1 A
2 B-E
3 F-K
4 L-N
5 O – P
6 R-T
7 U-Z
8 Itokasi

[àtúnṣe] A
(Abimbola Adelakun)
Aderemi Adegbite
Adam Abdulahi
Yusufu Adamu
Carol Azams
Chris Abani
Chinua Achebe (1930– )
Wale Adebanwi
Bayo Adebowale (1944–)
Remi Adedeji (1937– )
Abiola Adegboyega
Dapo Adeniyi
Mobolaji Adenubi
Kole Ade-Odutola
Kayode Aderinokun
Pius Adesanmi
Akin Adesokan
Nwaizu Charles Chioma(1982-)
Anne Omolola Famuyiwa
Sean Adetula
Toyin Abiodun
Toyin Adewale-Gabriel
Dapo Adeleke
Sola Adeyemi (1965– )
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (1977– )
Emeka Agbayi
Rita Aghadiuno
Tolu Ajayi (1946– )
Segun Akinlolu
Segun Akinyode
Akilu Aliyu
Odinaka Anudu
Isiaka Aliagan
Olufunmi Aluko
T.M. Aluko (1918– )
Elechi Amadi (1934– )
Ifi Amadiume
Peter Anny-Nzekwue
Ike Anya
G. O. Apata
Sefi Atta (1964– )
Babatunde Awoyele
Anne Axis
Unoma Nguemo Azuah
Nnorom Azuonye
Tunde Akinloye
Ayotokunbo Ajewole
((Rosemary Shimite Erazua-Oniha))
[àtúnṣe] B-E
Babafemi Badejo
Francoise Balogun
Biyi Bandele
A. Igoni Barrett (1979– )
Charles Bodunde
Qasim Bolaji-Ashogbon
Tubal Rabbi Cain (1964–)
Chin Ce (1966– )
John Pepper Clark (1935– )
Samuel Ajayi Crowther (1809–1891)
Olumbe Bassir
Folasayo Dele-Ogunrinde
Umaru Dembo
David Diai
Jude Dibia (1975– )
Ebereonwu
Philip Effiong
[1]

Etebom Ekpo
Michael Echeruo (1937– )
Amatoritsero (Godwin) Ede
Eyitemi Egwuenu
Victor Ehikhamenor
Cyprian Ekwensi (1921– )
Buchi Emecheta (1944– )
E. Nolue Emenanjo
Perpetual Emenekwum-Eziefule
Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745–97)
Rosemary Esehagu (1981– )
Femi Euba
Awal Idris Evuti
Chielozona Eze
Vera Ezimora
Abitogun Oladipo Ojo
Itunu-Abitogun Oyinlade Oladipo
Akinbami Oluseyi Macaulay
Aderinola Richardson (nee Aderemi)
[àtúnṣe] F-K
Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa
Adebayo Faleti
Toyin Falola
Healson Adedayo Farore, Sr.
Dan Fulani
Bilkisu Funtuwa
Haliru Audu
Harry Oludare Garuba (1958– )
Jumoke Giwa
Helon Habila
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Ogaga Ifowodo
Anita Omoiataman Ihaza
Rita Ihekwaba
Senator Ihenyen
Ikhide R. Ikheloa (Nnamdi)
Esiaba Irobi
Akinwunmi Isola
Uzodinma Iweala
Obi “Obiwu” Iwuayanwu
Festus Iyayi
Abubakar Imam
Oritsegbemi Emmanuel Jakpa
Femi Jeboda
Prince Joshua Olawuyi
Biodun Jeyifo (1946– )
Mike Jimoh
Samuel Johnson
Kokalu O. Kalu
Uduma Kalu
Hamzat Kassim
Sulaiman Ibrahim Katsina
Olubukola Kwegan
[àtúnṣe] L-N
Abimbola Lagunju
Obakanse S. Lakanse
Akeem Lasisi
Amina Mama
Oliver Mbamara
Ayodele Morocco-Clarke (1973–)
John Munonye
Akanji Nasiru
Uche Nduka
Austyn Njoku
Obi Nwakanma
Martina Awele Nwakoby (1937– )
Nkem Nwankwo (1936–2001)
Flora Nwapa (1931–1993)
Njideka Nwapa-Ibuaka
Chuma Nwokolo
Angela Nwosu
Maik Nwosu
Nkechi Nwosu-Igbo
Azuka Nzegwu
Onuora Nzekwu
Godwin Ubong Akpan
[àtúnṣe] O – P
Obo Aba Hisanjani
Olu Obafemi
Iheoma Obibi
Obinna Charles Okwelume
Hyacinth Obunseh
Sunny E. Ododo
Taiwo Odubiyi
Odia Ofeimun
Chike Ofili
Sarah O’Gorman
Olu Oguibe
Ike Oguine
Molara Ogundipe
Samuel Olagunju Ogundipe
Tolulope Ogunlesi
Denrele Ogunwa
Omolola Ijeoma Ogunyemi
Yemi D. Ogunyemi
Ijeoma Ogwuegbu
Francis Ohanyido[2] (1970– )
Tanure Ojaide
Steve Nezianya
Bamiji Ojo
Akinloye Ojo
Olatubosun Oladapo
Gabriel Okara (1921– )
Oladejo Okedeji
Wale Okediran
Chika Okeke
Remi Okere
Niran Okewole
Christopher Okigbo (1932–1967)
Onookome Okome
Ike Okonta
Nnedi Okorafor
Dike Okoro
Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo
Wole Oguntokun
Osita Okoroafor
Ben Okri (1959– )
Afolabi Olabimtan
Simbo Olorunfemi
Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju
Esho Oluborode
Alade E. Oluwadamilola
Kole Omotosho (1943– )
Nduka Onwuegbute (1969– )
Osonye Tess Onwueme (1955– )
Dillibe Onyeama
Frank Onyebu
Nwando Onyeabo
Alexander Orok
Nnaemeka Oruh
Dennis Osadebay
Femi Osofisan
Chinye Phiona Osai
Sanya Osha
Sola Osofisan
E.C. Osondu
Niyi Osundare (1947– )
Tony Nduka Otiono
Helen Ovbiagele (1944– )
Jamin Owhovoriole
Stella Dia Oyedepo
Bunmi Oyinsan
Dupe Olorunjo
Naan Pocen
Seni Ogunkola
Tolulope Popoola
[àtúnṣe] R-T
Remi Raji
Aderemi Raji-Oyelade
Ken Saro-Wiwa (1941–95)
Lola Shoneyin
Mudi Sipikin
Ladipo Soetan
Zulu Sofola (1935–95)
Bode Sowande (1948–)
J. Sobowole Sowande
Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye
Wole Soyinka (1934– ), awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Literature
Emmanuel Sule
Mohammed Sule
Muritala Sule
Kola Tubosun
Adebisi Thompson
Amos Tutuola (1920-97)
Morenike Taire
Odijie Ehis Michael
[àtúnṣe] U-Z
Uche Nworah
Ebele Uche-Nwakile
Françoise Ugochukwu
Clarius Ugwuoha
Odili Ujubuonu
Gracy Ukala (formerly Osifo)
Adaora Lily Ulasi (1932– )
Sumaila Isah Umaisha
Karo Umukoro
Chika Unigwe
Emman Usman Shehu
Ronnie Uzoigwe
Jumoke Verissimo
Ugonna Wachuku (1971– )
Segun Williams
Ken Wiwa (1968– )
Molara Wood
Oladipo Yemitan
Sa’adu Zungur
Ubong Alfred

Àyọkà yí le fẹ̀ jù báyìí lọ. Ẹ ran Wikipedia lọ́wọ́ láti fẹ̀ẹ́ jù báyìí lọ![àtúnṣe] Itokasi
1.↑ Philip Effiong, Jr.
2.↑ [http://www.africanwriter.com/authors/102/Francis-Ohanyido
Jẹ́ kíkójáde láti “http://yo.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%80k%C3%B3j%E1%BB%8D_%C3%A0w%E1%BB%8Dn_ol%C3%B9k%E1%BB%8D%CC%80w%C3%A9_ar%C3%A1_N%C3%A0%C3%ACj%C3%ADr%C3%AD%C3%A0”
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Ọjọ́ tí a ṣe àtunṣe ojúewé yi gbẹ̀yìn ni 23:05, 5 November 2009.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of


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