BLACK PEOPLE O! -TARGET WILL SPENT 2 BILLION WITH BLACK BUSINESSES O!

April 9, 2021 by

Target says it will spend more than $2 billion with Black-owned businesses by 2025

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Target said it will spend more than $2 billion with Black-owned businesses by 2025 by adding new brands to its shelves, hiring Black-owned construction or advertising firms and launching a new program fort start-ups. Over the past year, major companies like Nike, Walmart and Ulta Beauty have rolled out their own racial-equity pledges, such as featuring more Black people in their ads and reducing the number of police or security in stores. Generation Z — the group of teens and early 20-somethings who are aging into shopping and establishing relationships with brands — care more about social justice than previous generations, according to an annual survey of teens by Piper Sandler released Wednesday. Target said it will hire more Black-owned companies, launch a program to identify and support promising minority entrepreneurs and add products from more than 500 Black-owned brands to its shelves or website. Altogether, the discounter said Wednesday, it will spend more than $2 billion with Black-owned businesses by 2025. “We have a rich history of working with diverse businesses, but there’s more we can do to spark change across the retail industry, support the Black community and ensure Black guests feel welcomed and represented when they shop at Target,” chief growth officer Christina Hennington said in a news release. The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and protests across the country have ratcheted up pressure on corporate leaders to advance racial equity and do more than simply cut a check — or risk losing business. The uneven death toll of the coronavirus pandemic and financial toll of the recession also spotlighted the country’s sharp racial disparities with health care and economic opportunity. Floyd was killed in Target’s hometown of Minneapolis, now the site of the murder trial for the police officer who kneeled on Floyd’s neck. One Target store, located near the site of Floyd’s death, had to be completely rebuilt and some of its other stores were damaged during rioting. Companies have spoken out about diversity and inclusion as consumers pay attention and some direct their dollars toward businesses that align with their values. Generation Z — the group of teens and early 20-somethings who are aging into shopping and establishing relationships with brands — care more about social justice compared with former generations, according to an annual survey of teens by Piper Sandler released Wednesday. Teens surveyed by the firm ranked racial equity as their most important political and social issue, followed by the environment and Black Lives Matter. Over the past year, major retailers like Nike, Walmart and Ulta Beauty have rolled out their own pledges, such as devoting more shelf space to Black-owned products, evaluating how they hire and promote employees, featuring more Black people in their ads and reducing the number of police or security in stores to prevent racial profiling. A growing number of retailers, including Macy’s, Sephora and Gap, have signed on to the 15 Percent Pledge, which aims to make Black-owned products on store shelves proportional to the country’s Black population. Among Target’s changes, the retailer said it will more actively seek out advertising firms, suppliers, construction companies and other kinds of businesses that are Black-owned. It said it will create a program called Forward Founders for early-stage start-ups led by Black entrepreneurs to help them develop, test and scale products to sell at mass retailers like Target. It will be modeled off of Target Accelerators, a program for start-ups that the retailer uses to foster up-and-coming brands and ultimately, to sell fresh and exclusive products that attract customers and help it differentiate from competitors. In some categories, such as beauty, Target said it already has 50 Black-owned and Black-founded brands — but would like to add more for other kinds of merchandise. Target previously committed to increasing Black representation in its workforce by 20% over the next three years. The company and its foundation are also giving $10 million to nonprofit organizations focused on addressing barriers for Black communities. VIDEO01:28 Retailers pledge 15% of shelf space to Black-owned businesses In this article TGT +0.70 (+0.34%)

GHANA FOOD OOO!

April 9, 2021 by

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BLACK PEOPLE O! -EBONY MAGAZINE WILL RISE FROM THE DEAD O!

April 8, 2021 by

Ex-NBA player who owns Lenexa business will buy bankrupt Ebony magazine.

Ex-NBA player Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman buys Ebony magazine out of bankruptcy

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Ebony magazine was a staple in many Black families for most of the 90s and 2000s. The print publications told the stories of all people and things African American — perspectives not often found in mainstream media. Last year, the magazine went up for sale, and now, it has been purchased by a former NBA player who hopes to bring new life into it.

As the Chicago Tribune reported, Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman — who formerly played for the Milwaukee Bucks — bought both Ebony and Jet in US Bankruptcy Court this week through his Bridgeman Sports and Media company.

Ebony kind of stood for Black excellence, showing people doing positive things that could benefit everyone,” Bridgeman told the Tribune.

“When you look at Ebony, you look at the history not just for Black people, but of the United States,” he continued“I think it’s something that a generation is missing, and we want to bring that back as much as we can.”

Ebony was founded in 1945 by John H. Johnson in 1945 and spent years dominating Black media before the development of digital publications gradually caused its demise. Jet and Ebony were sold to Texas’ CVG Group in 2016, with the latter magazine facing $80K worth of lawsuits from several unpaid freelancers.

In July, the CVG Group was forced into Chapter 7 bankruptcy which was later converted to a Chapter 11 reorganization. In a fortunate turn of events, however, Bridgeman made a winning bid and was able to purchase the sister publications that inspired him as a child.

The former NBA star will helm the magazines alongside his children. They want to keep them digital, but plan to release specialty print issues every now and then.

“Nothing is ever easy, but this would be, I think, a labor of love,” he said.

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EBONY MAGAZINE RISES FROM THE DEAD O!

April 8, 2021 by

BLACK DEAF SIGN LANGUAGE BEING SAVED O!

April 7, 2021 by

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nullRACE AND CULTURE

Black deaf community works to preserve, celebrate Black American Sign Language

By Ana RiveraTuesday, April 6, 2021 10:31PM

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BASL was passed down for generations as a way to segregate Black deaf students — now, the Black deaf community is taking ownership of a sign language they are proud to call their own.RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) — For Daisy Rivenbark, Black American Sign Language is much more than a language. It’s a part of who she is.

“I am extremely proud. I can’t explain it. I can’t hide it. I can’t deny it. I mean, it’s my language. It’s who I am,” said Rivenbark, NCDHHS Deaf Services Specialist.
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But when she moved to North Carolina from Washington D.C., she couldn’t understand why signing to other deaf people was sometimes a challenge.

“I struggled. I’m like, ‘why can’t you understand me? I don’t understand why you can’t understand me?’ The interpreters in D.C., they understand me just fine. But over the years I realize, oh, I sign just a little different,” Rivenbark said.

Rivenbark said Black American Sign Language — or BASL — is a little different for everyone, and it’s more than just using different signs than what’s used in American Sign Language. It’s a certain swag and an intersection of language and culture.

“We sign pretty much big, instead of smaller signing space. We sign big and very expressive,” Rivenbark explained. “We show power in our signs. That’s kind of how we show our pride and how we walk.”

That’s why finding others in her community has been so important.
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“I feel like if we ignore who we are, then we have lost ourselves in society because society says it’s wrong,” said Valeria McMillan, a sign language interpreter.

McMillan, who is friends with Rivenbark, said BASL is a product of educational segregation. Something her mother – who is deaf – experienced firsthand.

“We struggled academic-wise, how to read and write back and forth because nobody had any formal education to teach deaf students,” said Lillian Russell McMillan, Valerie’s mother.

Through that struggle, BASL was created. Now groups in the Triangle are working to celebrate and preserve the language.

“Using Black ASL is a different language and it really informs the community what natural language can look like,” said Derek Gambrell, president of the North Carolina Deaf Black Advocates.
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Gambrell said they focus on programming that fosters and protects the language and the people in their community.

“BASL is a form of communication and a sense of identity that entails history and our culture. That should be preserved as part of our identity,” Gambrell said.

Passed down for generations as a way to segregate Black deaf students — now, the Black deaf community is taking ownership of a language they are proud to call their own.

“BASL is our language and it reflects our culture, and it’s who we are,” Rivenbark said.|

The North Carolina Black Deaf Advocates are hosting an informational panel about Black ASL on April 30. If you’d like to learn more, visit NCBDA.org.Report a correction or typoRELATED TOPICS:
societyraleighncdeafblack historyafrican americansrace in americasign languagerace and culture

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POLICE SUED FOR RACISM O!

April 7, 2021 by

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GEORGE FLOYD TRIAL-BLACK PEOPLE’S CHARACTER ON TRIAL O!

April 6, 2021 by

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The Ghana Empire: Great and Magnificent Ancient Kingdom of Africa

April 6, 2021 by

Map of the Ghana Empire ca 300 -1200 Let me tell you about one of the greatest Ancient kingdoms of Africa, the Ghana Empire, a place known to its northern neighbors as the “Land of Gold“. No, I am not talking about the modern-day country of Ghana, which used to be called the Gold Coast […]

The Ghana Empire: Great and Magnificent Ancient Kingdom of Africa

George Floyd: Black families say justice is not promised in Chauvin trial – CNN

April 6, 2021 by

https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/04/us/black-families-derek-chauvin-trial/index.html

Proverbe sur Dieu et les faibles/ Proverb on God attending to the Weak

April 5, 2021 by

Le soleil / The sun C’est Dieu même qui chasse les mouches de l’animal dépourvu de queue (proverbe Minah, Ehwe – Ghana, Togo). It is God Himself who chases away flies from the tail-less animal (Minah, Ewe proverb – Ghana, Togo).

Proverbe sur Dieu et les faibles/ Proverb on God attending to the Weak

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