Posts Tagged ‘A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED W’

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES WHEN GIRLS ARE ABUSED ATI OVERLOOKED!-BUT THIS FILM SHOOT DEALS WITH THAT!

November 4, 2018

Teenvogue.com

Creators’ Circle is a fashion series that gives visionary young artists carte blanche to execute a photo shoot or art display —100 percent on their own terms.
Fashion is at its best when it’s born from a desire to challenge, to represent, to honor, and to progress. As stylists, designers and photographers have demonstrated time and time again, fashion can be so much more than what we wear: it’s a representation of how we see the world. Artists wield the power to empower and to represent the world as we’d like to see it — that’s the magic of fashion.
Earlier this year, photographer Zoe Lawrence was scrolling through Instagram stories when she saw a post by her friend, Cienna, that she empathized with on a deeply personal level. “She posted something about her little sister [Halia] feeling inadequate and it brought me back to my own experience throughout grade school,” says Zoe. “Black girls are are often overlooked, ignored and quieted, and we learn early on that we are not part of the standard for beauty. That can be damaging to an impressionable 12-year-old child.”
Zoe reached out to Cienna via DM, explaining that she wanted to put together a photo shoot featuring Halia with the goal of showing her that her voice matters and that she is beautiful, despite what mainstream beauty standards propagate. Soon, the two were exchanging their own stories about growing up and dealing with colorism .
“I’ve spoken to other dark-skinned black girls about experiencing colorism and how it affected their self-confidence,” says Zoe. “Cienna and I have both done our work to unlearn those harmful messages. What saved my self esteem was surrounding myself with black people. Black people are healing. Swapping experiences, opening up dialogues, building a community within your own community, keeping your allies close — these are all ways to combat anti-blackness.”
And, of course, through art.
Materialized as a means of empowerment for Halia and to serve as a visual love letter for black girls, this photoshoot is the latest in our Creator’s Circle series. Starring Halia and Cienna, it features designs from two clothing companies with black men and women at their helm. “This shoot was a chance for Halia to get dressed up in clothes she wouldn’t normally wear and see herself in the media, specifically fashion photography,” explains Zoe.
The standout denim and knitwear in the shoot are created by Los Angeles-based brand, No Sesso. The Italian name literally translates to “no sex/ gender.” Founded by Pierre Davis in 2015, No Sesso is a community brand focused on “empowering people of all colors, shapes, and identities via fashion presentations, parties, educational activations, and more,” according to their website. “I’ve walked in three of their runway shows — at this point they’re family to me,” says Zoe. “I always feel taken care of by them and feel a great sense of inspiration when I work with them.”
Kenneth Nicholson brought the impeccably tailored menswear to the shoot. Having served in the United States Army, the designer is inspired by military dress and mixes its precise tailoring with other techniques and aesthetics he picked up during his global travels. “I fell in love with how detail oriented Kenneth is with his pieces,” says Zoe. “I like to use brands that showcase black people in an refreshing way and I feel like both of these designers do a amazing job at showing how dynamic black people are.”
The shoot toes the line between stately-cool family portraiture and a hazy fairy-like dreamworld — two very different concepts that somehow flow seamlessly into one another. At first glance, you probably wouldn’t glean the weight of the message the project encapsulates. It’s only once you hear the personal story behind it that it’s importance and underlying themes really sink in. “Always keep in mind that the world’s disdain for your skin isn’t personal, it’s political,” concludes Zoe. “I hope young black girls can remember that sentiment the next time they catch themselves internalizing any form of anti-blackness.” Ariana Marsh
Creators’ Circle is a fashion series that gives visionary young artists carte blanche to execute a photo shoot or art display —100 percent on their own terms.
Fashion is at its best when it’s born from a desire to challenge, to represent, to honor, and to progress. As stylists, designers and photographers have demonstrated time and time again, fashion can be so much more than what we wear: it’s a representation of how we see the world. Artists wield the power to empower and to represent the world as we’d like to see it — that’s the magic of fashion.
Earlier this year, photographer Zoe Lawrence was scrolling through Instagram stories when she saw a post by her friend, Cienna, that she empathized with on a deeply personal level. “She posted something about her little sister [Halia] feeling inadequate and it brought me back to my own experience throughout grade school,” says Zoe. “Black girls are are often overlooked, ignored and quieted, and we learn early on that we are not part of the standard for beauty. That can be damaging to an impressionable 12-year-old child.”
Zoe reached out to Cienna via DM, explaining that she wanted to put together a photo shoot featuring Halia with the goal of showing her that her voice matters and that she is beautiful, despite what mainstream beauty standards propagate. Soon, the two were exchanging their own stories about growing up and dealing with colorism .
“I’ve spoken to other dark-skinned black girls about experiencing colorism and how it affected their self-confidence,” says Zoe. “Cienna and I have both done our work to unlearn those harmful messages. What saved my self esteem was surrounding myself with black people. Black people are healing. Swapping experiences, opening up dialogues, building a community within your own community, keeping your allies close — these are all ways to combat anti-blackness.”
And, of course, through art.
Materialized as a means of empowerment for Halia and to serve as a visual love letter for black girls, this photoshoot is the latest in our Creator’s Circle series. Starring Halia and Cienna, it features designs from two clothing companies with black men and women at their helm. “This shoot was a chance for Halia to get dressed up in clothes she wouldn’t normally wear and see herself in the media, specifically fashion photography,” explains Zoe.
The standout denim and knitwear in the shoot are created by Los Angeles-based brand, No Sesso. The Italian name literally translates to “no sex/ gender.” Founded by Pierre Davis in 2015, No Sesso is a community brand focused on “empowering people of all colors, shapes, and identities via fashion presentations, parties, educational activations, and more,” according to their website. “I’ve walked in three of their runway shows — at this point they’re family to me,” says Zoe. “I always feel taken care of by them and feel a great sense of inspiration when I work with them.”
Kenneth Nicholson brought the impeccably tailored menswear to the shoot. Having served in the United States Army, the designer is inspired by military dress and mixes its precise tailoring with other techniques and aesthetics he picked up during his global travels. “I fell in love with how detail oriented Kenneth is with his pieces,” says Zoe. “I like to use brands that showcase black people in an refreshing way and I feel like both of these designers do a amazing job at showing how dynamic black people are.”
The shoot toes the line between stately-cool family portraiture and a hazy fairy-like dreamworld — two very different concepts that somehow flow seamlessly into one another. At first glance, you probably wouldn’t glean the weight of the message the project encapsulates. It’s only once you hear the personal story behind it that it’s importance and underlying themes really sink in. “Always keep in mind that the world’s disdain for your skin isn’t personal, it’s political,” concludes Zoe. “I hope young black girls can remember that sentiment the next time they catch themselves internalizing any form of anti-blackness.” Ariana Marsh

GABOUREY SIDIBE-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY #1

September 16, 2018

https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_banners/2165590886/1493661895/600×200

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY AT NY FASHION WEEK OOOO!

September 10, 2018

Check out https@naijcom’s Tweet:

http://https@naijcom’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/naijcom/status/1039176139690967040?s=09

BLACK BEAUTY ANGIE STONE SPEAKS OUT ON ANTI-BLACK SKIN RACISM STILL ALIVE AND KICKING FROM SLAVERY! FROM TASTYCLIPS.COM

July 17, 2008

from tastyclips.com

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ANGIE STONE ON ATI-BLACK SKIN RACISM:THIS BLACK BEAUTY SPEAKS OUT ON THE BRAINWASHING OF SLAVERY STILL VERY MUCH ALIVE TODAY!

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VOL VII, ISSUE II
93acf5be2485b43a1

Just like in one of her songs, there’s No More Rain these days for ANGIE STONE. This soul queen from Columbia, South Carolina had success with the groups Sequence and Vertical Hold before launching a solo career that led to hit albums Black Butterfly, Mahogany Soul (with the anthem Brotha) and Stone Love. That just wasn’t enough for the fickle music industry. So Stone kept busy in the studio and started acting (TV sitcoms, plays and the film The Fighting Temptations) before signing with the resurrected Stax label to release her latest smash The Art of Love & War.

We learned through her stint on VH1’s Celebrity Fit Club two years ago that she suffered from Type 2 diabetes. “[It] was brought on by Prednisone,” she told Tasty Clips. “I was taking some medication that saved my organs but enhanced the diabetes. I’m hearing that some research was done that said gastric bypass kills diabetes because the disease lives in your stomach. [It’s] under control because I don’t eat like I’m crazy and do what I’m supposed to do most of the time. When you’re a person on a steroid for medication a lot of working out doesn’t help you. It hurts you more than help you because you build muscle and mass. My regiment is joy and love and living life to the fullest. I go bowling two or three times a week and have a routine in my house. I clean instead of having a maid. If I stay active within the space I’m in I’ll be OK.”

These days, Stone serves as a spokesperson for the F.A.C.E. Diabetes campaign, which launched at Chicago’s Salem Baptist Church Children’s Ministry Building. Through a series of practical and sustainable programs in local communities, their goal is to help foster behavioral and attitudinal changes in areas critical to success in managing diabetes such as nutrition/cooking, physical activity, health and overall well-being.

Signing with a smaller label like Stax was a surprise. What made you make that decision? “Cause anyplace was better than J Records at the time. I’d had enough of [them] and I wanted a change. So I went and started from scratch with an independent label which eventually turned into another major situation.” Was J not giving you enough freedom? “Well I always had my freedom. It’s just that they start looking at you like they’re equal to you. When you become a slash artist/producer/mentor/and go-to girl for advice, you start to feel like an employee as well as an artist.” Are you happy with the way you’re being promoted? “Now. It’s getting better. Originally I wasn’t.” The Concord label is basically handling it. “[They’re] still handling it but I don’t think that they really have a clue, in terms of this level of success with an artist, of what to do.” Well, you seem to be doing an excellent job. “Guess what? The record is doing it because with very little presence I’m very excited and appreciative that [it’s] moving. Even though the pace is slower than normal, it’s moving nonetheless with very little awareness.”

How tough is it in the music industry now if you don’t have a certain look? “Well I think I look fabulous. Have you seen me lately?” I have. John Legend has a new artist Estelle who is considered difficult to promote because of her look. It really comes down to the music, doesn’t it? “It does come down to the music. We have to get out of this fairy tale guideline of looking a certain way. That’s not to discredit beautiful people, but God didn’t make us all look the same way. We all look the way we look. People need to recognize that in this world beauty is only skin deep. The industry is caught up in looks because that’s the way Satan has designed the game to control the mentality of the weaker species. I really feel sad because this young lady has a great record out and not even the relationship with [John Legend] can afford her a better outlook. It tells you that we’re in trouble.” There’s so much more to it and that seems to be gone. “Well, you know it goes back to the very beginning. If you were light skinned you were in, if you were dark skinned you were out. It very well works that way in the industry. You see very [few] dark skinned people on top of the game. Most of the superstars are very fair or mulatto people. You can check your stats. It works that way in the film world too. I have lost almost every single opportunity to star in a film to Macy Gray or Jill Scott because they’re light and I’m dark. I’ve been told so many times that it’s a certain look that they’re looking for. So you can’t even use weight anymore. You can’t use age because everybody’s over 35 that’s running around doing it. It comes down to what is more appealing. I’m only good for the pro political stuff that will afford all of my people from the hood to vote for the right president – or to support whatever because I’m more on their level, so to speak. So to me it hasn’t changed much. Slavery has just taken on a whole new different direction but it’s the same process.”

In addition to concerts, what can we expect from you this year? “I’m actually working on two books right now – [one is] poetry and [the other is] called Life and the Shadows of a Sex Symbol.” Is this biographical? “Hmmm. I won’t say that. There is some real stuff, then there’s some REAL stuff. You have to wait and see. I’m supposed to be working with Robi Reed on something and [also] Tracey Edmonds. I’m still working on a stage project and becoming a producer. I’m always ahead of the game. I have music in my back pocket.”

And apparently it runs in the family. Angie’s daughter Diamond Stone dubbed The Princess of Hip-Hop Soul is hitting the stage of Headliners on a bill led by southern Rock N Soul sensation Joe Tucker on June 14th. Diamond recently added a new title to Angie’s rep: Grandmom!


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