Posts Tagged ‘African American History’

YORUBA VILLAGE IN amerikkka!-SOUTH CAROLINA-OYOTUNJI VILLAGE WHERE YORUBA RELIGION IN PRACTICED!–FROM VICE.COM

August 2, 2015

from vice.com

WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Sunday, August 02, 2015

OYOTUNJI 000000!–A YORUBA VILLAGE IN SOUTH CAROLINA!-FROM VICE.COM

from vice.com

An Oral History of the West African Village That Has Been in South Carolina for Four Decades

July 30, 2015

By Christopher Kilbourn

The king on his throne. All photos of an ancestor worship ceremony at Oyotunji by the author

At the tail end of the 1960s, elements within the Civil Rights Movement were having a debate about how the African-American community at large should confront the hostile and ignorant society in which it resided. Some advocated peaceful assimilation; others raised the idea of a violent, apocalyptic insurrection. And a few suggested moving to rural South Carolina, establishing a polygamous religious commune, and creating an outpost of West African culture through regular acts of ancestor worship, animal sacrifice, and other rituals.
On VICE News: Road-Tripping to South Carolina With the ‘New’ KKK This outpost is the Oyotunji African Village, founded by a man known as His Royal Highness Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi I, who in the late 60s was inspired to leave New York, purchase land in the Deep South, and establish a community born from the idea that black empowerment needed to focus on culture, not just economic independence.
More than four decades later, Oyotunji persists, providing a pleasant setting for converts to the Yoruba religion to live out their spiritual lives. According to a 1995 Essence article, the village had about 120 inhabitants during its mid-70s peak. Today there are around 25, and leadership has passed on to one of its founder’s 22 children, Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II.
Tourists are welcome to stop by the village, which sits about 50 miles outside of Charleston, near Sheldon, South Carolina. Its atmosphere of inclusiveness and cultural education stands in stark contrast to the recent church shooting and the intense fallout that resulted nearby. By all accounts, Oyotunji is not just a place to live, but a way of life: Its inhabitants construct temples to the pantheon of spirits called Orishas and pray to them every day. Curious about the life and perspectives of these traditionalist back-to-the-landers, I traveled to Sheldon, South Carolina, to learn a bit about Yoruba culture and gain some insight into Southern life in 2015. This is what they said:

Continued below.

Akintobe: I heard about it in Germany. I saw a little article in the military newspaper about a voodoo village in Beaufort [County], South Carolina, and it showed the king sitting on a throne that perhaps he made himself. I cut that picture out and placed it above my bed, and that’s where it stayed until I left, 30 months later. I don’t know why I did it. I was compelled by a spiritual force that I couldn’t resist. And I came here in December of ’74.

Ofalaya: I met the Oba in 2003 in Key West, Florida, when he was a prince. He came to Key West to declare one of the beaches there an African burial ground. And I met him there. And I did some volunteering at the African museum in Key West that he helped start. My sister’s a Shango priest, so I wasn’t unfamiliar with the culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II : I was born in Oyotunji in 1976, right here on the property during a storm. And the house blew over. I remember my dad telling me the story. And he came over there to rush and see if my mother was OK, and he said she came crawling out holding me from under some boards.

Olpeju

Olapeju: It’s not so much a religion as it is a culture or a lifestyle. We’re here to honor our ancestors. That means I honor yours. That means you honor mine. It’s a different dynamic than just going to church on Sunday and praying.

Akintobe: This is not part-time. Full-time. Twenty-five hours, daily. Sleeping, wake up, it’s part of you. Go to bed saying certain things, wake up saying certain things. God, God. To the Orishas, to the ancestors, daily. All day long. Praising. Giving thanks.

Ofalaya: After you go through your initiation, you spend three weeks with your Iyalosa. She would be your godparent who helps you go through the transition of becoming initiated, becoming a priest or a priestess. You have your physical parent or your biological parent, and then you have your spiritual parents. One of the Orisha will be your father and one of them will be your mother.

I have done things that I never thought I would ever do. Like chopping wood, and not using a cell phone.

You get up at 5 AM and spend your time with yourself, really. Because after that, until the time you go to bed, your time belongs to everyone, and whatever needs to be done in the nation. The farming is a big thing that we work together on. Someone weeds, someone waters, someone plants.

o2Olapeju: I have a job outside, so I also have to take into account my work schedule. But I assist with the raking.

Olayatan: Tours come. They invite us out for lectures and presentations. We do cultural events. We have priests who do consultations for people. They read them and give them counseling.

Akintobe: I’m a priest. I’ve been initiated into the secret mysteries of Obatala, who is my father. That was 1978. And then I went to the high priest of Ifa in West Africa in 1992. And I went back again in 2000 to finish it up. So I’m Babaaláwo, “father of secrets.”

HOW OYOTUNJI WAS FOUNDED

kingOba: My dad, he was born in ’28. He was about 41, 42 [when Oyotunji was built.] He had two temples in New York, and he was the first African American to tell black people that, Look, not only are you African, you have a culture and a religion, and here it is.

He said he was nothing until he ran into African culture. He was bumping in the dark.

Akintobe: He was a man who loved art; he was a commercial artist. And he was a dancer with the Katherine Dunham dance troupe. That’s when he toured Egypt and Cuba, and that’s when he really got into African culture. His mother and father came up under Marcus Garvey, so he came up early.5

Oba: He married a European woman, a Dutch woman in Greenwich Village. It was with [her] that he became radicalized as this African traditionalist. And he said it was because he noticed she had a culture: They had holidays and pageantry and all these sorts of things, and my dad was very interested in it.

And he asked her one time, and she said, “You don’t have a culture. You don’t have a religion. Because you have not been taught it.” And she opened him up. And she introduced him to a black nationalist, Harvey. And Harvey started taking him from Greenwich Village to Harlem, and that’s when it all started. He got fired up at those rallies and speeches. Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael and Martin Luther King.

He said, “We’ve got to get out of the city. We’ve got to do like they’re doing in Africa. If we’re nationalists, we’ve got to have a land, at least.” And so he started to design it. They chipped in and bought this property here for about $500. They began to build temples and institutions first. This is back in the 60s.an-oral-history-of-the-west-african-village-that-has-been-in-south-carolina-for-four-dec0

Akintobe: We didn’t have any electricity, we didn’t have any indoor plumbing. [This was] back in the 70s to ’85. We were so into studying, the initiations, learning as much as we could get our hands on, and trying to absorb and prepare ourselves as custodians of the culture. This place was like a university.

Olayatan: Kerosene lamps, outhouses. Wood stoves for cooking and heating. I loved the energy then. And I love the energy now, but it’s—that’s the way it was then.o3Olapeju

Oba: The early people who came here were not builders. They were PhDs and doctors and stuff. So they were building [houses] out of cover sheets and pallets. Not that you can’t build out of pallets, but you’ve got to do it right. And so the houses leaked, and they got blown over by storms.

Watch: ‘Triple Hate,’ our documentary on the KKK

Olayatan: Technology came in. We got electricity. We got running water. But somewhere between Nixon and Reagan, somewhere in there was a kind of turnaround. The economy started getting tougher. Folks were struggling for money. Then the oracle says, OK, things are going to get really tough. And we didn’t know what it meant at that time, but [he was predicting] the onslaught of drugs and crime in the city.

So he says, “OK, the priests have to go out and form other communities like this.” So [since the 80s,] they have [established] shrines and temples in various parts of the country and priests that administer to the community. To try and let them know you can reconnect with your ancestors and your ancestors’ culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II

THE NEW KINGo5

Oba: [In 2005], I was traveling across Seven Mile Bridge [in Florida] one day and I got a call from one of the elders. He said, “I’ve got to tell you something. Where are you?” I said, “I’m over the water, the best time. Going over a long bridge.” He said, “Oh, perfect.” And then he told me: “Your father passed away this morning.”

I couldn’t even hear what he was saying before my mind was racing. And I came back to Oyotunji, and I went through three months of traditional preparation for coronation. It was the second time that we had done it on North American soil. For three months, we had to wear black and be secluded in the room. And we had to serve all of the chiefs.

They would ask the spirits, How are we doing? Each day, they would check in with the divinities, with the oracle, to find out exactly what’s needed. How’s my spirit? How’s my character? And so I had to feed them and cook for them every time. Basically, they had to demean my character all the way down from whatever I had picked up in my life.

I remember the day after coronation, people were saying, “That didn’t even look like you out there!” It had really changed me.

And so I remember what I always said to myself was, I want to be able to build Oyotunji. I want to be able to build it standard, nice.

So we’ve remodeled this temple here. We did the Oshun temple down the road. We built the bathroom, the shower house, the media center. All of these buildings here, we remodeled them. Redid the palace. We redo the road twice a year. We’ve been able to just continue to just build and build and build. The only thing we didn’t redo is my house.

RACE IN THE SOUTHo6

Akintobe: That young man [Dylann Roof, the Charleston shooter] just turned 21. To have such hate. And why? Not once did he say that he was discriminated against. Nothing of that sort. [It was] something that he just felt. That he could do it, get away with it.

Can the stroke of a pen change the heart of our enemy? That’s the question I always ask. Passing a law? Taking down the Confederate flag? How do you change the heart of our enemy?

Oba: America never went into repair mode. It’s always been, put a new tablecloth on the dirty table because we’ve got guests. And over time, you’re going to smell it coming through the cloth.

After the Civil War was won, the Klan would still carry the Confederate flag. So our ancestors got used to seeing the Confederate flag not as a symbol of culture and heritage. Fuck no. They rode in and burned your house down. That was your visual. If they came in and grew gardens to help poor black people, it’d be a different thing. But they didn’t. It was always segregation.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. –Olayatan

WHY CULTURE MATTERS

Olayatan: It’s important for us as Africans in America to know who we are, so we can know what we have brought to the world, and what we can bring to the world in the future.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. Because that culture talks about history, contribution, and all of those things that we as a species stick our chests out about. What my people have done. What my ancestors have done. And basically, Africans in America have been told, You ain’t done nothing. You ain’t nothing, you ain’t done nothing, you’re not gonna do nothing. Because you never did anything. And so many of our people have bought into that. And that’s a tragedy and it’s a sickness.

Oba: Europeans have to know this culture, especially in America. You’re talking about healing. Taking the flag down and all these superficial things are not healing. Understanding each other’s culture is healing.

Akintobe: Oyotunji is the solution. Something was missing, but I found it here. When you know thyself, nobody can say anything to you. Once you know thyself, if you know your historical past, your ancestral past, what your people were, what they did before captivity… You walk with your shoulders and your head high. You’ve got nothing to be ashamed about and everything to be proud of. Everything.

Christopher Kilbourn is a freelancer in New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter.

Topics: Oyotunji, South Carolina, Yoruba, Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi, Sheldon, ancestor worship, religion, black separatists, Charleston shooting

COMING TO OYOTUNJI

Olayatan: I came for a two-week visit on August 6, 1978. So I guess that’s coming up on 37 years.

Olapeju, wife of the king: It’s been about a year [since I moved here]. My aunt was married to the first kabiyesi (“king”—literally, “the one who no one opposes”), so my family’s been familiar with the culture for a while. I started coming down with her a couple years back, and I fell in love with the culture, my daughter fell in love with the culture. So we decided last year to go ahead and make the plunge. I don’t know if I’ll be here forever, but I definitely am enjoying the time that I’m here right now.

Akintobe: I heard about it in Germany. I saw a little article in the military newspaper about a voodoo village in Beaufort [County], South Carolina, and it showed the king sitting on a throne that perhaps he made himself. I cut that picture out and placed it above my bed, and that’s where it stayed until I left, 30 months later. I don’t know why I did it. I was compelled by a spiritual force that I couldn’t resist. And I came here in December of ’74.

Ofalaya: I met the Oba in 2003 in Key West, Florida, when he was a prince. He came to Key West to declare one of the beaches there an African burial ground. And I met him there. And I did some volunteering at the African museum in Key West that he helped start. My sister’s a Shango priest, so I wasn’t unfamiliar with the culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II : I was born in Oyotunji in 1976, right here on the property during a storm. And the house blew over. I remember my dad telling me the story. And he came over there to rush and see if my mother was OK, and he said she came crawling out holding me from under some boards.

Olapejuo3

Olapeju: It’s not so much a religion as it is a culture or a lifestyle. We’re here to honor our ancestors. That means I honor yours. That means you honor mine. It’s a different dynamic than just going to church on Sunday and praying.

Akintobe: This is not part-time. Full-time. Twenty-five hours, daily. Sleeping, wake up, it’s part of you. Go to bed saying certain things, wake up saying certain things. God, God. To the Orishas, to the ancestors, daily. All day long. Praising. Giving thanks.

Ofalaya: After you go through your initiation, you spend three weeks with your Iyalosa. She would be your godparent who helps you go through the transition of becoming initiated, becoming a priest or a priestess. You have your physical parent or your biological parent, and then you have your spiritual parents. One of the Orisha will be your father and one of them will be your mother.

I have done things that I never thought I would ever do. Like chopping wood, and not using a cell phone.

You get up at 5 AM and spend your time with yourself, really. Because after that, until the time you go to bed, your time belongs to everyone, and whatever needs to be done in the nation. The farming is a big thing that we work together on. Someone weeds, someone waters, someone plants.

Olapeju: I have a job outside, so I also have to take into account my work schedule. But I assist with the raking.

Olayatan: Tours come. They invite us out for lectures and presentations. We do cultural events. We have priests who do consultations for people. They read them and give them counseling.

Akintobe: I’m a priest. I’ve been initiated into the secret mysteries of Obatala, who is my father. That was 1978. And then I went to the high priest of Ifa in West Africa in 1992. And I went back again in 2000 to finish it up. So I’m Babaaláwo, “father of secrets.”

HOW OYOTUNJI WAS FOUNDED

Oba: My dad, he was born in ’28. He was about 41, 42 [when Oyotunji was built.] He had two temples in New York, and he was the first African American to tell black people that, Look, not only are you African, you have a culture and a religion, and here it is.

He said he was nothing until he ran into African culture. He was bumping in the dark.

Akintobe: He was a man who loved art; he was a commercial artist. And he was a dancer with the Katherine Dunham dance troupe. That’s when he toured Egypt and Cuba, and that’s when he really got into African culture. His mother and father came up under Marcus Garvey, so he came up early.

Oba: He married a European woman, a Dutch woman in Greenwich Village. It was with [her] that he became radicalized as this African traditionalist. And he said it was because he noticed she had a culture: They had holidays and pageantry and all these sorts of things, and my dad was very interested in it.

And he asked her one time, and she said, “You don’t have a culture. You don’t have a religion. Because you have not been taught it.” And she opened him up. And she introduced him to a black nationalist, Harvey. And Harvey started taking him from Greenwich Village to Harlem, and that’s when it all started. He got fired up at those rallies and speeches. Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael and Martin Luther King.

He said, “We’ve got to get out of the city. We’ve got to do like they’re doing in Africa. If we’re nationalists, we’ve got to have a land, at least.” And so he started to design it. They chipped in and bought this property here for about $500. They began to build temples and institutions first. This is back in the 60s.

Akintobe: We didn’t have any electricity, we didn’t have any indoor plumbing. [This was] back in the 70s to ’85. We were so into studying, the initiations, learning as much as we could get our hands on, and trying to absorb and prepare ourselves as custodians of the culture. This place was like a university.

Olayatan: Kerosene lamps, outhouses. Wood stoves for cooking and heating. I loved the energy then. And I love the energy now, but it’s—that’s the way it was then.

Oba: The early people who came here were not builders. They were PhDs and doctors and stuff. So they were building [houses] out of cover sheets and pallets. Not that you can’t build out of pallets, but you’ve got to do it right. And so the houses leaked, and they got blown over by storms.

 

Olayatan: Technology came in. We got electricity. We got running water. But somewhere between Nixon and Reagan, somewhere in there was a kind of turnaround. The economy started getting tougher. Folks were struggling for money. Then the oracle says, OK, things are going to get really tough. And we didn’t know what it meant at that time, but [he was predicting] the onslaught of drugs and crime in the city.

So he says, “OK, the priests have to go out and form other communities like this.” So [since the 80s,] they have [established] shrines and temples in various parts of the country and priests that administer to the community. To try and let them know you can reconnect with your ancestors and your ancestors’ culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II

THE NEW KING

Oba: [In 2005], I was traveling across Seven Mile Bridge [in Florida] one day and I got a call from one of the elders. He said, “I’ve got to tell you something. Where are you?” I said, “I’m over the water, the best time. Going over a long bridge.” He said, “Oh, perfect.” And then he told me: “Your father passed away this morning.”

I couldn’t even hear what he was saying before my mind was racing. And I came back to Oyotunji, and I went through three months of traditional preparation for coronation. It was the second time that we had done it on North American soil. For three months, we had to wear black and be secluded in the room. And we had to serve all of the chiefs.

They would ask the spirits, How are we doing? Each day, they would check in with the divinities, with the oracle, to find out exactly what’s needed. How’s my spirit? How’s my character? And so I had to feed them and cook for them every time. Basically, they had to demean my character all the way down from whatever I had picked up in my life.

I remember the day after coronation, people were saying, “That didn’t even look like you out there!” It had really changed me.

And so I remember what I always said to myself was, I want to be able to build Oyotunji. I want to be able to build it standard, nice.

So we’ve remodeled this temple here. We did the Oshun temple down the road. We built the bathroom, the shower house, the media center. All of these buildings here, we remodeled them. Redid the palace. We redo the road twice a year. We’ve been able to just continue to just build and build and build. The only thing we didn’t redo is my house.

RACE IN THE SOUTH

Akintobe: That young man [Dylann Roof, the Charleston shooter] just turned 21. To have such hate. And why? Not once did he say that he was discriminated against. Nothing of that sort. [It was] something that he just felt. That he could do it, get away with it.

Can the stroke of a pen change the heart of our enemy? That’s the question I always ask. Passing a law? Taking down the Confederate flag? How do you change the heart of our enemy?

Oba: America never went into repair mode. It’s always been, put a new tablecloth on the dirty table because we’ve got guests. And over time, you’re going to smell it coming through the cloth.

After the Civil War was won, the Klan would still carry the Confederate flag. So our ancestors got used to seeing the Confederate flag not as a symbol of culture and heritage. Fuck no. They rode in and burned your house down. That was your visual. If they came in and grew gardens to help poor black people, it’d be a different thing. But they didn’t. It was always segregation.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. –Olayatan

WHY CULTURE MATTERS

Olayatan: It’s important for us as Africans in America to know who we are, so we can know what we have brought to the world, and what we can bring to the world in the future.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. Because that culture talks about history, contribution, and all of those things that we as a species stick our chests out about. What my people have done. What my ancestors have done. And basically, Africans in America have been told, You ain’t done nothing. You ain’t nothing, you ain’t done nothing, you’re not gonna do nothing. Because you never did anything. And so many of our people have bought into that. And that’s a tragedy and it’s a sickness.

Oba: Europeans have to know this culture, especially in America. You’re talking about healing. Taking the flag down and all these superficial things are not healing. Understanding each other’s culture is healing.

Akintobe: Oyotunji is the solution. Something was missing, but I found it here. When you know thyself, nobody can say anything to you. Once you know thyself, if you know your historical past, your ancestral past, what your people were, what they did before captivity… You walk with your shoulders and your head high. You’ve got nothing to be ashamed about and everything to be proud of. Everything.

Christopher Kilbourn is a freelancer in New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter.
Topics: Oyotunji, South Carolina, Yoruba, Oba Oseijemoyotunji

“WE WILL SHOOT BACK!”-BLACK PEOPLE!- WAKE UP!-SELF-DEFENCE IS THE ANSWER!-FROM “WE WILL SHOOT BACK:ARMED RESISTANCE IN THE MISSISSIPPI FREEDOM MOVEMENT” ON FACEBOOK!

February 10, 2015

WE WILL SHOOT BACK!

“BLACKS ARE IN FACT THE TRUE JEWS OF THE BIBLE PART I “-YOUTUBE VIDEO

June 17, 2009

Blacks are in fact the true jews of the bible watch ! part 1

SOJOURNER TRUTH-THE FIRST BLACK WOMAN STATUE AT THE CAPITOL-“SOJOURNER TRUTH STATUE IN CAPITOL AT LAST”-FROM FINALCALL.COM

May 19, 2009

2909_1145083743849_1130188385_423979_1479197_ns_truth_statue05-12-2009FROM finalcall.com

Sojourner Truth statue in Capitol at last
By Askia Muhammad
Senior Correspondent
Updated May 18, 2009 – 12:24:01 AM

WASHINGTON (FinalCall.com) – After a nearly 13-year struggle, “Truth” has been firmly established at the United States Capitol.

First Lady Michelle Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton applaud as bust of Sojourner Truth is unveiled. Photo: Askia Muhammad
A bronze bust of abolitionist and women’s suffragist Isabella Baumfree—who began calling herself “Sojourner Truth” at age 46—was unveiled in Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitor’s Center April 28, finally establishing the “Truth” of the struggle of many Black women at the seat of Congress.

The event marked drastic changes in American life in the 126 years since Sojourner Truth’s death, and since a dedicated group of Black women began to fight in October 1996 to have her recognized with a statue in the Capitol, along with those of White women’s rights advocates.

The ceremony was headed by women who’ve reached unprecedented heights: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, the first woman in that position; Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who succeeded the first woman in that post; and Michelle Obama, like Mrs. Truth, herself a descendant of slaves.

“I hope that Sojourner Truth would be proud to see me, a descendant of slaves, serving as first lady of the United States,” Mrs. Obama told the crowd of more than 1,000. She said she is glad that Black children touring the Capitol—“boys and girls like my own daughters”—could now “come to Emancipation Hall and see the face of a woman who looks like them.”

Mrs. Truth was an early crusader for women’s right to vote and for an end to slavery. She met presidents Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and Ulysses S. Grant in 1870. She delivered her signature speech: “Ain’t I A Woman?” at a women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio, in 1851. She died in November 1883 at her home in Battle Creek, Mich.

Oscar award-winning actress Cicely Tyson performed the “Ain’t I A Woman?” speech, receiving a prolonged standing ovation from the mostly female, mostly Black audience, which was organized by the National Congress of Black Women.

The struggle began with the late Dr. C. DeLores Tucker, founder and former chair of NCBW. Dr. Tucker originally wanted to add Mrs. Truth’s likeness to the eight-ton, marble, “Portrait Monument,” statues of the White heroines of the women’s suffrage movement Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

When that campaign failed in 1997, Dr. Tucker famously condemned the White, marble statue, saying it had been “chiseled in hate,” because a portion of the stone where NCBW wanted Mrs. Truth’s likeness to be hewn remained formless.

Later, a plan for Mrs. Truth to have a stand-alone bust in the Capitol was approved by Congress in 2006. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex.) and then-Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) were the key sponsors of that legislation. The bill was signed into law by President George W. Bush.

The resulting bust—featuring Mrs. Truth wearing her trademark bonnet—was created by California-based sculptor Artis Lane. Behind the leadership of Dr. E. Faye Williams, who succeeded Dr. Tucker when she died in 2005, NCBW raised more than $500,000—often in $1 and $5 contributions—to pay for the final installation.

“This has been an awesome day for women, especially Black women today, because we know that like our struggles, Sojourner before us struggled to make sure that we would be free from the shackles of slavery. We’re so delighted that we were able to lead in this effort to put the first Black woman in the United States Capitol, and we’re even prouder that we had our own first lady, who looks like us here today to unveil that statue,” Dr. Williams told The Final Call.

“It took the work of all these women here who are gathered around me,” she continued, “the members of the National Congress of Black Women, out on street corners, out in parking lots, going to schools, working, begging, pleading, just for ‘A dollar for Truth,’ and fortunately many people gave it up.”

President Obama’s family was the largest personal donor to the effort, said Dr. Williams, along with Black women’s social organizations including Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and The Links.

“This is a day that words cannot describe,” William Tucker, husband and constant companion of Dr. Tucker in life and in her work, told The Final Call.

“The fulfillment of this day, fulfilling all the hopes and the dreams, the aspiration, the hard work, the labor and the toil of my dear late wife—C. Delores Tucker—this is fulfillment of all of that agony and toil of her life, that she toiled so hard for.

“Almost up until her death, her dying moments, she was concerned about this day: Sojourner Truth taking her place in this Capitol to undue the wrongs that history had committed on our people,” Mr. Tucker continued. “She was determined and dedicated to doing that, committed to doing that. Today is a fulfillment of all of that.”

Mrs. Truth’s life was an inspiration, several speakers, including both the Democratic and Republican leaders of the House and the Senate told the audience. Her original owners spoke only Dutch. The young Isabella Baumfree learned English when she was 10 years old. As a slave she suffered beatings and abuse, and was once sold for $100 “and a herd of sheep.”

Mrs. Truth later gained her freedom and changed her name to reflect her personal journey. When she left her owner after he failed to keep his agreement to allow her to work to earn her freedom, she later declared, “I did not run off, for I thought that wicked, but I walked off, believing that to be all right.”

“If women want any rights more than they’s got, why don’t they just take them, and not be talking about it,” she once said.

FCN is a distributor (and not a publisher) of content supplied by third parties. Original content supplied by FCN and FinalCall.com News is Copyright 2009 FCN Publishing, FinalCall.com. Content supplied by third parties are the property of their respective owners.

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THE BLACK OLMECS:”THE BIRTH OF OLMEC CULTURE MESOAMERICA’S MOTHER CULTURE”-FROM CARNAVAL.COM

May 19, 2009

olmec9book:"THE HISTORY OF THE AFRICAN OLMECS" BY PAUL ALFRED BARTONv81twoheadsfrom carnaval.com

COUNTDOWN to 2012
The year 2012 will be 520 years after Columbus
delivered the message of the promised land in 1492

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The Birth of Olmec Culture Mesoamerica’s mother culture

The Olmecs were the first Mesoamerican people to fathom the concept of zero, maintain a calendar, and use a hieroglyphic writing system based on the Manding system of West Africa. These intellectual achievements, as well as Olmec myths and rituals, were influential in the subsequent Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec cultures.
Once we move beyond recognizing the African roots of Mesoamerica’s mother culture we come to the more fascinating theories regarding the source of their culture and the cause of the trigger for an immigration representing so much knowledge and talent.
The Toltecs were never conquered and kept good records. Prof. Herman L. Hoeh in his exhaustive Compendium of World History explains the birth of the Olmec civilization by comparing dates with history before Christ.
The first seeds of Olmec culture began in the Americas as the result of Spain expelling the North Africans who had enslaved them in 1892 BC or 3 millenniums prior to 1492. The date has been kept by adding 520 years to the great flood and corresponds with the date of GIANTS arriving in Mesoamerica as recorded by the Toltec historian Ixtlilxochitl.

The Mysterious Olmecs
1849 BC

Who was this mysterious people that have so baffled the modern-day historians and anthropologists? To find the answer to this riddle we must go back, once again, to the OLD World!
“In the year 1883 B.C. an invasion of Spain took place from the confines of North Africa. Having become a civilized land and wealthy due to changes in climate and the presence of many producing gold mines, Spain aroused the greed of Egypt and other North African nations.
A king by the name of GERION or DEABUS, with a large army and many ships, conquered Spain and forced the inhabitants to dig gold for their new African overlords. Many Spanish slaves died from overwork under this tyranny”
Osyris slew Gerion in 1849, upon which part of his tribe took to ship and sailed to the New World. A tradition found among the Toltecs of Mexico and preserved by Ixtlilxochitl declares there once were giants in their land. Even the date of the arrival of these giants has been preserved by the Toltec historian. It was 520 years after the flood. (Bancroft “Native Races of the Pacific States”, vol. V, p. 209. )
The year of the flood was 2370-2369. And 520 years AFTER the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and many of the giants were expelled.
Herman L Hoeh
Compedium of World History (google)
or Compendium of World History
1963 1966, 1969 Edition pf PhD Dissertation

The Book of Mormon
The Book of Mormon is about a small group of Jews who fled Jerusalem in 600 B.C. and sailed to America. However, there is an older book within The Book of Mormon called The Book of Ether. It tells about a group of people who fled the Tower of Babel at least 3000 years before Christ called the “Jaredites”. Because they were a righteous people the LORD did not confound their language, and a Prophet led them called “The Brother of Jared” (his actual name was Mahonri Moriancumr). All of the Jaredite names are Hamitic, and the descendants of Ham were black. Most Mormon scholars believe that the Jaredites were the ancient Olmecs; the first civilization on the American continent.
“The existence of the OLMEC culture in Mexico and Central America, along with terraced pyramids (similar to SUMERIAN ZIGGURATS), calendrical systems, mathematics and sculptured figures WITH BEARDS or Negroid features implies, to many observers, “a CONNECTION with such peoples as the…PHOENICIANS, HITTITES… or CARTHAGINIANS” — all of whom were CANAANITES
hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
“While official Mormon promotional literature and activities continue to make claims of scientific support from the fields of archaeology and anthropology, there are NO non-Mormon specialists in these fields who support the premise of an ancient Hebrew civilization in the pre-Columbian Americas. ”
John Keyser AMERICAN INDIANS AND THE BOOK OF MORMON hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
Olmecs by John Keyser on the web by google
Mormons & Olmecs by google

” It was 520 years after the flood….
The year of the flood was 2370-2369 BC. And 520 years after the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849 BC, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and MANY OF THE GIANTS EXPELLED.
(Bancroft, Native Races of the Pacific States, vol. v, p.209).
OLMEC CONSPIRACY
The widespread Academic Repression of overwhelming evidence of diffusion to the Americas by a profession based upon the discovery of truth would seem to support the many claims of Eurocentrism by Afrocentric web authors. We’d rather add it to our list under the title the Curse of Columbus. Here is a sample from the web
“A great deal has been made of the “Negroid” features of the Olmec colossal heads. Various dubious theories have been advanced.”
mesoweb.com/olmec
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“without proper evidence” & “academically irresponsible” to suggest African origin is racist
Billie Follensbee

“Olmec Heads” by google

African Empires of Ancient America
by Clyde A. Winters PhD
biography
“The view that Africans originated writing in America is not new. Scholars early recognized the affinity between Amerindian scripts and the Mande script(s).” Beginning with Rafinesque in 1832, Leo Wiener (1922) Harold Lawrence (1962)

LINKS
Makubwa Homepage
Links showing Afrocentric origins of Olmec civilization
Photo of Olmec and African Heads
Professor Alexander Von Wuthenau compared the Olmec heads to the Head of King Taharka, a Nubian-Kushite ruler of ancient Egypt.
A History of the African-Olmecs
by Paul Alfred Barton published Sept 2001 at amazon
Manding in West Africa Today
by CIA — The World Factbook — Mali || Senegal ||Gambia || Guinea-Bissau || Guinea

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