Posts Tagged ‘BLACK RACE’

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES WHEN GIRLS ARE ABUSED ATI OVERLOOKED!-BUT THIS FILM SHOOT DEALS WITH THAT!

November 4, 2018

Teenvogue.com

Creators’ Circle is a fashion series that gives visionary young artists carte blanche to execute a photo shoot or art display —100 percent on their own terms.
Fashion is at its best when it’s born from a desire to challenge, to represent, to honor, and to progress. As stylists, designers and photographers have demonstrated time and time again, fashion can be so much more than what we wear: it’s a representation of how we see the world. Artists wield the power to empower and to represent the world as we’d like to see it — that’s the magic of fashion.
Earlier this year, photographer Zoe Lawrence was scrolling through Instagram stories when she saw a post by her friend, Cienna, that she empathized with on a deeply personal level. “She posted something about her little sister [Halia] feeling inadequate and it brought me back to my own experience throughout grade school,” says Zoe. “Black girls are are often overlooked, ignored and quieted, and we learn early on that we are not part of the standard for beauty. That can be damaging to an impressionable 12-year-old child.”
Zoe reached out to Cienna via DM, explaining that she wanted to put together a photo shoot featuring Halia with the goal of showing her that her voice matters and that she is beautiful, despite what mainstream beauty standards propagate. Soon, the two were exchanging their own stories about growing up and dealing with colorism .
“I’ve spoken to other dark-skinned black girls about experiencing colorism and how it affected their self-confidence,” says Zoe. “Cienna and I have both done our work to unlearn those harmful messages. What saved my self esteem was surrounding myself with black people. Black people are healing. Swapping experiences, opening up dialogues, building a community within your own community, keeping your allies close — these are all ways to combat anti-blackness.”
And, of course, through art.
Materialized as a means of empowerment for Halia and to serve as a visual love letter for black girls, this photoshoot is the latest in our Creator’s Circle series. Starring Halia and Cienna, it features designs from two clothing companies with black men and women at their helm. “This shoot was a chance for Halia to get dressed up in clothes she wouldn’t normally wear and see herself in the media, specifically fashion photography,” explains Zoe.
The standout denim and knitwear in the shoot are created by Los Angeles-based brand, No Sesso. The Italian name literally translates to “no sex/ gender.” Founded by Pierre Davis in 2015, No Sesso is a community brand focused on “empowering people of all colors, shapes, and identities via fashion presentations, parties, educational activations, and more,” according to their website. “I’ve walked in three of their runway shows — at this point they’re family to me,” says Zoe. “I always feel taken care of by them and feel a great sense of inspiration when I work with them.”
Kenneth Nicholson brought the impeccably tailored menswear to the shoot. Having served in the United States Army, the designer is inspired by military dress and mixes its precise tailoring with other techniques and aesthetics he picked up during his global travels. “I fell in love with how detail oriented Kenneth is with his pieces,” says Zoe. “I like to use brands that showcase black people in an refreshing way and I feel like both of these designers do a amazing job at showing how dynamic black people are.”
The shoot toes the line between stately-cool family portraiture and a hazy fairy-like dreamworld — two very different concepts that somehow flow seamlessly into one another. At first glance, you probably wouldn’t glean the weight of the message the project encapsulates. It’s only once you hear the personal story behind it that it’s importance and underlying themes really sink in. “Always keep in mind that the world’s disdain for your skin isn’t personal, it’s political,” concludes Zoe. “I hope young black girls can remember that sentiment the next time they catch themselves internalizing any form of anti-blackness.” Ariana Marsh
Creators’ Circle is a fashion series that gives visionary young artists carte blanche to execute a photo shoot or art display —100 percent on their own terms.
Fashion is at its best when it’s born from a desire to challenge, to represent, to honor, and to progress. As stylists, designers and photographers have demonstrated time and time again, fashion can be so much more than what we wear: it’s a representation of how we see the world. Artists wield the power to empower and to represent the world as we’d like to see it — that’s the magic of fashion.
Earlier this year, photographer Zoe Lawrence was scrolling through Instagram stories when she saw a post by her friend, Cienna, that she empathized with on a deeply personal level. “She posted something about her little sister [Halia] feeling inadequate and it brought me back to my own experience throughout grade school,” says Zoe. “Black girls are are often overlooked, ignored and quieted, and we learn early on that we are not part of the standard for beauty. That can be damaging to an impressionable 12-year-old child.”
Zoe reached out to Cienna via DM, explaining that she wanted to put together a photo shoot featuring Halia with the goal of showing her that her voice matters and that she is beautiful, despite what mainstream beauty standards propagate. Soon, the two were exchanging their own stories about growing up and dealing with colorism .
“I’ve spoken to other dark-skinned black girls about experiencing colorism and how it affected their self-confidence,” says Zoe. “Cienna and I have both done our work to unlearn those harmful messages. What saved my self esteem was surrounding myself with black people. Black people are healing. Swapping experiences, opening up dialogues, building a community within your own community, keeping your allies close — these are all ways to combat anti-blackness.”
And, of course, through art.
Materialized as a means of empowerment for Halia and to serve as a visual love letter for black girls, this photoshoot is the latest in our Creator’s Circle series. Starring Halia and Cienna, it features designs from two clothing companies with black men and women at their helm. “This shoot was a chance for Halia to get dressed up in clothes she wouldn’t normally wear and see herself in the media, specifically fashion photography,” explains Zoe.
The standout denim and knitwear in the shoot are created by Los Angeles-based brand, No Sesso. The Italian name literally translates to “no sex/ gender.” Founded by Pierre Davis in 2015, No Sesso is a community brand focused on “empowering people of all colors, shapes, and identities via fashion presentations, parties, educational activations, and more,” according to their website. “I’ve walked in three of their runway shows — at this point they’re family to me,” says Zoe. “I always feel taken care of by them and feel a great sense of inspiration when I work with them.”
Kenneth Nicholson brought the impeccably tailored menswear to the shoot. Having served in the United States Army, the designer is inspired by military dress and mixes its precise tailoring with other techniques and aesthetics he picked up during his global travels. “I fell in love with how detail oriented Kenneth is with his pieces,” says Zoe. “I like to use brands that showcase black people in an refreshing way and I feel like both of these designers do a amazing job at showing how dynamic black people are.”
The shoot toes the line between stately-cool family portraiture and a hazy fairy-like dreamworld — two very different concepts that somehow flow seamlessly into one another. At first glance, you probably wouldn’t glean the weight of the message the project encapsulates. It’s only once you hear the personal story behind it that it’s importance and underlying themes really sink in. “Always keep in mind that the world’s disdain for your skin isn’t personal, it’s political,” concludes Zoe. “I hope young black girls can remember that sentiment the next time they catch themselves internalizing any form of anti-blackness.” Ariana Marsh

SICKLE CELL OOO!NIGERIA MUST LEAD THE WORLD TO FIND A CURE FOR IT!

October 25, 2018

http://sicklecellnews.com/news-every-african-must-do-something-about-sickle-cell/

“Irrespective of their genotype every African must do something about sickle cell”-Yeye Olade

The Return Of The Native-
Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade migrated from America to Africa 40 years ago

By Fatima Garba Mohammed

Yeye Olade, always attired in Aso Oke
A chance discussion about sickle cell at one-time gubernatorial hopeful Engineer Femi Babalola’s Ring Road, Ibadan office got Yeye Funua Akilimali Olade really worked up. Someone at the office had remarked that SCD was not a problem in his family and ‘in Jesus’ name’ would never be one.

lya, as she prefers to be called, rose up in defence of SCD, saying it was a peculiar Black Race problem, which deserved to be tackled by all Africans irrespective of their genotype.

Anyone who encountered Iya in the street in her Aso Oke would be forgiven for assuming she was going to or returning from a festive occasion such as a wedding, naming ceremony or burial. Her friends had told her repeatedly that Aso Oke was only worn on special days, but such is her love of Aso Oke that she wears them every day. Iya’s entire wardrobe comprises only Aso Oke! Indeed she has been wearing only Aso One since 1990!

When Iya, now 74, speaks English or Yoruba, you pause for a moment. You know at once she is not a native. Neither the tone nor the delivery of either language is Nigerian.

Born and bred in the United States, her given name, Michele Paul, is but a distant memory. At Oyotunji Village, South Carolina, USA, a babalawo (Ifa priest) had advised her husband and her to migrate to Africa.

Michele studied African History at San Francisco State University, and at the University of California, Berkeley did masters in Librarianship.

Goodbye, America
In 1978, at the age of 34, Michele packed bag and baggage and moved to Africa; her African-American husband was to join her later. She had applied for and gotten a job with Nigeria’s Ministry of Education, which assigned her to the Federal Government Girls College, Ilaro.

It was the perfect setting in which to raise her children (the oldest of whom was 12 at the time), away from what she considered the decadent culture of her birthplace.

‘l think being raised in America is the worst thing that could happen to a child,’ Iya asserts.

Yeye Olade with Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola, Governor of Osun State, Nigeria
English is a forbidden language in her home. She hired locals to steep her children in Yoruba language and culture. Needless to say, all Iya’s children speak Yoruba fluently. And they bear Yoruba names too. For herself, she picked a combination of Swahili, and Yoruba names to answer to. Her American passport bears her African names.

‘Getting my African name on my passport is my final repudiation of my slave name, Michele Paul,’ Iya submits. Her husband, formerly Christopher Leon Williams transformed to an agbada-donning Ayantuga Olade.

The children are all back in the US and married to Yoruba spouses. Yam pounding in a traditional mortar is nothing to them!

‘Getting my African name on my passport is my final repudiation

of my slave name, Michele Paul,’ Iya submits

Life in Retirement
lya now is Chief Librarian at Dr. Bayo Adebowale’s African Heritage and Research Library and Cultural Centre, perhaps the biggest privately-owned African Studies library in Africa. Trust her to keep away from the hustle and bustle of the urban metropolis: the library is located at Adeyipo Village, lgbo Elerin in Lagelu Local Government Area, Ibadan.

An adherent of the teachings of Mary Baker Eddy (Christian Science), lya says she has not taken any medication since she was 11. ‘Christian Science helps me to keep healthy,’ she asserts.

Yeye Olade with Gani Adams
Politics
Iya has wormed her way into the political ring in her adopted country, particularly in southwest Nigeria. She is well known to governors and the powers that be in every notable political party. She is fast becoming a king maker herself.

Iya is also known to monarchs – and to people monarchs want to know! She has visited with and has been visited by the cream of Yoruba society including Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola, Governor of Osun State and Gani Adams, the Aare Ona Kakanfo (Generalissimo) of Yorubaland.

Sickle Cell

The septuagenarian is not particularly impressed with the way Africa has been handling the SCD crisis of ignorance, myth and misconception.
‘Sickle Cell is predominantly a Black Race problem,’ she posits, ‘And Nigeria must take the lead in finding a solution.’

‘Sickle Cell is predominantly a Black Race problem,’ she posits,

‘And Nigeria must take the lead in finding a solution.’

No Regrets
Iya has never regretted her decision to settle down in Nigeria. In 40 years since migrating to Africa, she ‘very reluctantly’ visited the United States twice – in 1998 when she went to collect a poetry prize, and in 2007 when her mother was gravely ill. Her mother passed away two years later.

Iya Funua Olade considers African culture far superior to any other and enjoins Africans to celebrate their own history by giving meaningful African names to their children.

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ORIGINAL BLACK INDIANS FROM INDIA-THE ANDAMANESE PEOPLE ARE DYING OFF -FROM FACE2FACE AFRICA

October 24, 2018

From Face2Face Africa

BY FARIDA DAWKINS, at 05:00 pm, October 23, 2018, HISTORY

The almost extinct dark-skinned Andamanese people of India who are also called the ‘Negritios.

Andamanese children
The Andamanese people are referred to as the ‘Negritos’ that reside in India’s Andaman and the Nicobar Islands in the southeastern portion of the Bay of Bengal. The name ‘Negritos’ is derived from their dark skin tone and physique. They settled in their current location during the Last Glacial Maximum, approximately 26,000 years ago and lived in isolation up until the 18th century incorporating little to no contact with the outside world.

After mingling with other civilizations, most Andamanese died and 7,000 survived. Now it said that only 400 to 450 Andamanese people live today. They are made up of the Great Andamanese, Jarawas of the Great Andaman archipelago, the Jangil of Rutland Island, the Onge of Little Andaman and the Sentinelese of North Sentinel Island.

The Andamanese are considered a scheduled tribe or belonging to a caste of disenfranchised Indians.

MORE ABOUT THIS
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The Andamanese are comprised of the five large tribes mentioned above; the Great Andamanese on Strait Island are speculated to be 50 in number, the Jarawa of the Jarawas of the Great Andaman archipelago, the Jangil of Rutland Island, the Onge of Little Andaman, and the Sentinelese of North Sentinel Island now residing in the West Coast and central parts of South and Middle Andaman Islands are 380 in number as of 2011, the Jangil or Rutland Jarawa of Rutland Island were extinct in 1921, the Onge of Little Andaman have 101 members as of 2011 and the Sentinelese of North Sentinel Island is estimated to have 100 to 200 tribe members.

History

Theory suggests that during the Great Coastal Migration or the Southern Dispersal, populations along the southern coast of Asia, the Arabian Peninsula via Persia and India to Southeast Asia to Oceania crossed East Africa through the Bab-el-Mandeb straits 70,000 years ago.

Though Chaubey and Endicott (2013) disagree and say that the Andamanese people migrated from Africa due to the time frame, what else explains their physical features of dark skin, frizzy hair and short stature? One can venture to say their way of life and attributes can be compared to the Pygmy people.

Dental structure states that the structure the Andamanese people’s teeth showed that they were from Africa and South Asia. Further study concluded that dental morphology was similar to that of South Asians.

The cranial formation of the tribe indicates it is similar to that of Africans.

Originally, the Andamanese were hunter-gatherers hunting pigs and fish using bows, adzes – which are cutting tools similar to axes that date back to the stone age and wooden harpoons. They did not know how to generate fire, instead, they used preserved embers from carved out trees as a result of lightning strikes.

The Andamanese, having no permanent or temporary housing structure instead slept on mats or leaves. They also used leaves and hibiscus fiber to make clothing.

They have been documented to also use paint on their bodies.

Oko-pai-ad or tribal members thought to have super-natural powers assisted other members with healthcare using herbal medicine made by medicinal plants.

The Andamanese people speak Aka-Jeru, Ongan or Jarawa-Ongan and Sentinelese – which can be spoken by 50 individuals. Not much is known about the Sentinelese language because tribe members are completely cut off from the rest of the world.

During the British invasion of the southeastern regions of South Andaman from 1789 to 1793, the majority of the Andamanese people perished due to alcoholism, pneumonia, measles and influenza. In 1867 during what was dubbed the Andaman Islands Expedition, British colonialists avenged the death of sailors by the Andamanese by killing them off the Onge. By 1875, the tribe was close to extinction.

In a full-on attempt to obliterate the tribe, the British and Indian governments worked together to establish punitive codes that allowed them to impinge upon Andamanese territory. This exacerbated the dwindling population.

The Andamanese have no formal governance structure and make decisions using group consensus.

When visited by outsiders, the instinct of the Andamanese is to attack, in some cases, some have been killed. In 1996, attacks ceased when settlers took a Jarawa teenager named Enmei to the hospital to nurse his broken foot.

The Andamanese continue to keep strangers at arms-length so there is no current information on how they live their life presently.

FARIDA DAWKINS , Staff Writer

Farida Dawkins is a blogger, video content creator and staff writer at Face2Face Africa. She enjoys writing about relatable and controversial lifestyle issues that pertain to women in Africa and the African diaspora.

BLACK IS THE ORIGIN OF ALL RACES OOOO!- SORRY BRITISH PEOPLE OOO!

October 6, 2018

https://imgur.com/gallery/ibzHK

http://

AFRICA IS THE BIG STORY OOOO!

October 6, 2018

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6447879941290885120

“irrespective of their genotype every African must do something about sickle cell “– Sickle Cell Newsweek

September 23, 2018

http://sicklecellnews.com/news-every-african-must-do-something-about-sickle-cell/

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SERENA WILLIAMS OOOOO!SERENA OOO!—A STRONG BLACK MAN LOVES YOU OOO!-ANDRE L..HOLMES OOO!-Don’t Marry that white boy OOO!-WE ARE PRAYING FOR YOU AND VENUS!!-GOD WILL GIVE GREAT BLACK MEN WHO APPRECIATE YOUR BLACKEST BEAUTY OOOOO!-From Facebook

March 31, 2017

http://bleacherreport.com/…/1333270-serena-williams-rumored…

YOU DUMB UGLY BLACK SELf HATING NIGGERS!!!!! YOU BETTER NOT LET SERENA GET AWAY! look YALL THEY HAVE PUSHED SERENA TO THE OTHER SIDE!! Sad she has to go to a european guy because THE NIGGER Wants to chase MEN Or the so called white gurls,the so called latinas everything except his own pride of woman.Serena is too strong physically & Mentally for the NIGGER! THE NIGGER SAYS SERENA LOOKS UGLY BECAUSE OF HER AFRICAN GENETICS! I SWEAR ON MY LIFE IF SERENA MARRYS ANY DUDE WHO IS NOT SOME KINDA OF BROTHER I WILL HATE MY OWN AFRICAN BLACK BROTHERS FOR THE REST OF MY DAYS! THIS IS JUST ABSURD!!!! On just 1 hand how many times have u seen a black man show Serena Williams This Kinda of affection? THIS IS A DISGRACE!!!! Makes My african bros look PATHETIC!!! ALWAYS PUSHING THE BLACK WOMAN AWAY BECAUSE SHE IS TO BLACK LOOKING! Always chasing the mixed breeds or others.I tell ya,i look forward to the day i move out of the usa because everyday the media news makes me wanna vomit when i see what little i can stomach of it.Damm shame because i better hurry and become a pro boxer so I can marry her! what a damm sad shame! other races can have any other black woman but not SERENA!!! A STRONG MIGHTY POWER NZINGA SPIRITED BLACK WOMAN NEEDS HER A BLACK MAN!!! BUT THE BLACK MAN HAS BECOME THE NIGGER!!!!

Serena Williams and her coach Patrick Mouratouglou may just have better chemistry than most professional tandems. Rumors abound the two are actually an item. The Detroit Free Press reports on rumblings from French website PKTennis …

bleacherreport.com

BLACK!-THE FIRST RACE!-THE FIRST PEOPLE-THE ORIGINAL PEOPLE ON ALL THE EARTH!-FROM MONTU ASE ON FACEBOOK

August 25, 2015

from montu ase on facebook

BLACK!-THE ORIGINAL PEOPLE!-THE FIRST RACE ON THE PLANET!–FROM MONTU ASE ON FACEBOOK!

FROM MONTU ASE ON FACEBOOK

BLACK POWER!-BLACK MAN OVER ALL!-FROM AUTUM ASHANTE ON FACEBOOK!

February 10, 2015

BLACK DEFEATS

“WE WILL SHOOT BACK!”-BLACK PEOPLE!- WAKE UP!-SELF-DEFENCE IS THE ANSWER!-FROM “WE WILL SHOOT BACK:ARMED RESISTANCE IN THE MISSISSIPPI FREEDOM MOVEMENT” ON FACEBOOK!

February 10, 2015

WE WILL SHOOT BACK!


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