Posts Tagged ‘Black woman’

BLACK POLYGAMY OOO!- DISABLED BEGGER HAS 4 WIVES! FROM SUN NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

February 13, 2017

from the sun newspaper,nigeria

Super street beggar

Has 4 wives, 11 children

By Vincent Kalu

Begging for a living is hardly an enviable means of livelihood, but for Adamu Hassan Yauri, it is his source of blessing.  After his life seemingly ground to a halt and he found himself stranded at life’s dead-end, beggary offered him an alternative route to an honourable life. Through boom and bust these past 19 years, he has flourished, married four wives, fathered 11 children and sustained his large family on beggary proceeds.

The decision to earn a living as beggar was forced upon him by circumstances beyond his control, following an automobile accident in 1998 that led to the amputation of his right leg.

The native of Yauri Local Government Area, Kebbi State spoke with Saturday Sun at his residence in Igando, Lagos. He debunked any misconceptions about him being a polio victim.  According to him, he grew up as a normal human being without any defect and was on his way to making a success out of his life, attending school and at the same time trading in onions from his home town in the north to the southeast town of Onitsha, Anambra State. But in 1998, his life took a sudden turn.  It started first with his business partner who fractured his legs in an automobile accident.

“I went to visit him at the hospital.  On my way home, I was involved in a motorcycle accident,” he recalled. “Me and my parents spent all our savings on hospital bills, yet doctors couldn’t save my leg.  Eventually, they amputated my right leg.”

At the time, Yauri was a Senior Secondary One student.   The amputation of his limb was a double blow: “I had to drop out of school; otherwise I never planned to stop my education at that level.  The accident also crashed the onion business I was doing to sponsor my education.”

The hard knock of  life soon set in.  To spare him the misery of a wretched life, one of his brothers sold him the idea of moving south to Lagos where begging was a lucrative way of life.

“I followed my brother to Lagos in 1999, and as he told me, I found that begging was lucrative.  People took pity on me because of my condition, and in no time, I was making money, enough to start planning to get married.”

Marriage to four wives

He started this family by marrying one wife.  After some time, he married a second, then a third, and finally a fourth wife.  One of his spouses died, and he has lost two children too.  Aside from these tragedies, Yauri is a happy man, a proud father of nine children, six of them including a set of twins by his first wife.

“I’m the one taking care of them,” he said with pride, “and God is the one taking care of all of us. We may not have money to eat the best of food, but we always make do with the little we have and we are always happy.”

How come a disabled beggar was able to marry four women? Yauri avowed it was easy for the women to fall in love and subsequently marry him.  “It was from this occupation that I married these women,” he boasted.  Of his three wives, the first is from Kwara State, the second from Kano, while the third is a Nigerien.  He is emphatic he and each of the women started as lovers.  He explained his love life with the story of his first wife, Shafatu, from Ilorin, Kwara State, whom he first knew as a secondary school student assisting her beverage seller -mother at Ikotun market.

“All my women loved me dearly and accepted my proposal. Our initial problem was their families’ objections, but my ladies said it must be me or never. Don’t you see the work of God? I paid the bride price and performed the necessary marriage rites for all of them; I didn’t get any of them free, neither did I elope with any of them,” he said.

His women not only accepted him for what he is, they took him for better or for worse, including his means of livelihood.  And after marriage, they joined him in his daily routine of begging to make ends meet. Indeed, begging has become the family’s profession so much so some of the younger children, who are not yet in school, loiter around their mothers where they beg.

Satisfying his women

Don’t ask Yauri how he satisfies three women sexually.  He would respond with a chuckle, followed by a jovial question: “Is the number of children, both living and dead, not evidence of my virility?”

For him, his disability neither extends to his libido nor affects his ability to impregnate his wives.  He will tell you his wives have no cause to complain––though he is quick to add: “I cannot kill myself, I am not a machine.”

He basked in his good fortune of being so blessed with offspring despite his disability and poverty.  Instead of complaining, he counts his blessings.  “There abound many able bodied men who are still unmarried till date, and there are several rich men that have spent so much money seeking medical help to have children and yet do not have any.  I am not gloating over their misfortune, but rather citing this as an example of God’s love for me, a poor, ordinary, disabled beggar.”

God’s love for him extends to his wives’ ease during childbirth. “I believe these blessings are God’s way to compensate me for my disability,” he reflected. “If my wives were to deliver through Caesarean Section, where would I get the money from?”

To increase his number of children or to not increase––the question, Yauri said, is for God. “If God gives me more children, I will take them, especially, as one wife has two children, while the other is left with one after the death of her second child, and these two women may want to have more children like the first wife who has six,” he clarified.

Pains of polygamy

To ask him how he is enjoying  polygamy, is to prompt a lamentation. His woes are best summarised in his statement that “it is hellish keeping three women under one roof.”

To avoid trouble, he tried to be equitable to all three women in the all-important, but sensitive aspect of conjugal responsibility.

To this end, he came up with a ‘sleeping formula’: “To each woman, I give two days in a week to sleep with her.  Two days for each woman, and one day of rest for me.”

He found out it was not enough to stave off trouble permanently.

“I did everything possible for all of them to live together in harmony, but trouble and quarrels always erupted,” he lamented but curiously, blaming the trouble on the Lagos environment.

His theory: “It was hellish keeping three wives together, especially in Lagos, where everybody is crazy.  Bring a naïve person to this city, by the time she arrives, Lagos would open her eyes.  If we were living in the village where our relatives are around us, they (his wives) can’t be a problem to me, even if they were four, because they would be punished for disobeying me. But this is Lagos, where everybody’s brain is something else. In the village, your brain is normal. But immediately you arrive in Lagos, it is either other people scatter your brain or you scatter it by yourself.”

He had resigned to a life of permanent querulous matrimony with the women. “Usually, two ganged-up against one; if I did anything, one would accuse me of favouring the other, and they would start quarreling with me. It was a difficult situation.”

His wives’ endless bickering ultimately drove him to keep them in separate apartments and locations, an arrangement they initially rejected until he was able to convince them of a constant conjugal visit.  “I live with one here in Igando, I rented a house for one at Okoko, and the other at Isheri,” he said, declaring “It is now that I have peace.  Before, it was so much trouble.”

Finding a way out of begging

While trying his best to meet his responsibility as the breadwinner, Yauri admitted that his large family now constitutes a problem.  As his children grow older, proceeds from begging shrink, and become insufficient to sustain the family.  The hard reality had forced him to seek other options to begging for a living.

His first alternative was to join the battalion of tricycle operators who make healthy wages conveying commuters over short distance.  Unfortunately, his tricycle was stolen by thieves. Occasionally, his friends who have other things to do borrow him their tricycles.  When such opportunity is not forthcoming, he goes a begging to make his usual paltry proceeds.

After trying his hands on the tricycle business, Yauri became somewhat ashamed of begging. Now in his 40s, he is eager to learn a vocation that would help sustain his family.

He would welcome any help, from government or individuals, towards training his children––though he insisted an explicit agreement would be made in this regards so he would not be disadvantaged by such benevolence.

Within the limit of his ability, he is ready to go any mile for the sake of a better future for his children.

SISTER IS TRIED OF amerikkka-FUK AMERIKKKA!!” ===BACK TO AFRICA OOOOO!—FROM FACEBOOK

February 2, 2017

CLICK ON HERE SINCE WE CANNOT GET THE VIDEO-
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade shared We Only Want What Is True/Villain X’s video.
· January 31 at 5:11pm ·
8,536 Views
We Only Want What Is True/Villain X added a new video: I just don’t care anymore!!!
· December 31, 2015 ·

Ikiesha Al-Shabazz Whittaker
I just don’t care anymore!!! I’m planning to leave this country!!! This is ur notice!!!! Fuk America!!!! #imtired #imdone #retiringthecape #movingoutofthiSGodforsakencorporation!!!
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade shared Hasani Carter-Nze’s post.
· January 31 at 4:56pm ·
Hasani Carter-Nze
· January 31 at 3:06pm · Columbus, OH, United States ·

I’m considering/planning to move out the country…I’m so tired of posting the stuff that’s going on…
Yet I fear that if I don’t, I’d just be guilty of preten…
See Mor

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOOOOO!-GABOUREY SIDIBE WITH AFRICAN BRAIDS Oooooo!

June 14, 2016

image.jpeg

YORUBAS OOOOO!—MUHAMMAD ALI IN YORUBA DRESS PLAYING THE TALKING DRUM,1964

June 8, 2016

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The Yoruba

The Champ, The Greatest has joined our ancestors. Sleep well , Mohammed Ali Jan 17 1942 – Jun 3 2016. He is pictured here during his 1964 visit to West Africa, wearing the Yoruba traditional outfit for men, and playing the gangan Yoruba talking drum. The world has lost another gem.

4 June at 06:08 · Public · in Timeline Photos

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Omigbule Bukola

orun re, akoni lo!
1 · 4 June at 21:42

Opeyemi Ajoke Adebisi

MAY HE RIP
5 June at 14:32

Yemisi Alabi

RIP
Sunday at 20:59

A Soldier’s Veve

Elatchê! Now maybe we can get some help down here.
Monday at 00:31

Adé Túnjí

R. I. P. THE UNDISPUTED CHAMPION
Monday at 15:01

Elugbadebo John

R . I . P
Monday at 15:29

Alex Flowers

Ali is missed
Monday at 16:27

Adegboyega Shamsideen Thompson

Ęgbon wā, Momodu, Ę Sùn ‘Rē O…
Today at 02:38

BLACK WOMEN OOOOOO!–“CURVES,CLOTHES AND COLORED GIRLS…” BY MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK

June 3, 2016

FROM MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK

Menelik Charles's photo.

Curves, clothes and colored girls…

Whether petite ‘n’ chic, medium ‘n’ marvelous, or thick ‘n’ delicious, Black women carry off clothes like Father Christmas carrying a sack load of presents. He makes it look so easy. The weird thing with many Black women is that the ‘trashy’ women among them often look just as delicious as the sought-after Black dimes.

This is because Black women start off with noticeable genetic and aesthetic advantage over women of other races. That is, more attractive features, skin coloring, and a slow ageing process means the only real difference between a trashy-looking Black woman and a classy-looking one are the clothes!

But even then, trashy clothes often look spectacularly sexy on Black women because of those crazy colored-girl curves, and their cat-like, elegant, auras!

Cosmetic surgery, lip implants, sun beds and Botox are scant consolation for other races of women in this respect. The advantages Black women have are overwhelming and insurmountable. The one area which is, sadly, proving to be the undoing of many Black-American and Caribbean women is their general lack of feminine attitude, and behavior.

So while ‘clothes maketh the man’, it is the feminine personality (not her clothes) which maketh the woman. I sometime wonder whether Black women of America and the Caribbean will ever truly realise and appreciate this simple fact. But that’s a subject for another day.

In the mean time let’s just enjoy the kaleidoscope of color, clothes and curves our sisters present to us each and every day…and be thankful 🙂

(c) Menelik Charles.

BLACK WOMEN!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MISS FIYAH-FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

March 2, 2016
WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-MISS FIYAH!–FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

RICK ROSS BACK TO AFRICA FOR THE 2ND TIME IN NIGERIA AND LOVES NIGERIAN WOMEN-BLACK WOMEN!-‘

August 24, 2012

http://yeyeolade.blogspot.com/2012/08/black-women-are-best-rick-ross-arrives.html NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.

AZEEZAT-OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SINGS HER HEART OUT IN NIGERIA! -THE NATION NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

July 20, 2012

MUHAMMAD ALI LOVES US BLACK WOMEN AND HAS NOT MESSED WITH ANY WHITE WOMEN SINCE AS HE SAYS-“LEARNED BETTER!”

March 15, 2012



SONJA ROI CLAY, ALI'S FIRST WIFE WHO COULD NOT FOLLOW BLACK MUSLIM RULES SO SHE WAS DIVORCED AND HAS SINCE PASSED ON.

2ND WIFE KHADIJA BELINDA ALI


3RD WIFE VERONICA PORSE,MOTHER OF LAILA THE BOXER WAS 9 YEARS WITH HIM BEFORE DIVORCE!


4TH WIFE-STILL HANGING IN THERE SINCE 1986- YOLANDA-"LONNIE"(BLACKS CALL HER TYPE 'MORANY'(FREAKLES,REDDISH,NEAR ALBINO LOOKING)

Thursday, March 15, 2012
MUHAMMED ALI LOVES BLACK WOMEN AND HAS NOT MESSED WITH WHITE WOMEN SINCE HE HAS SAID “LEARNED BETTER” FROM THE BLACK MUSLIMS!

1,715
Uploaded by historycomestolife on Mar 20, 2011

Top Comments

I agree with Muhammed Ali’s racial seperatism, and I am a white man
flash34able 7 months ago 5
Yep I agree with Ali, I love my race of women. Any black man who doesn’t agree and would rather have a child that looks NOTHING like him obviously has some insecurities.
The1Heart1 7 months ago 4

see all
All Comments (12)
yeyeolade
Respond to this video…

MUHAMMAD ALI WAS TAUGHT BY THE BLACK MUSLIMS TO LEAVE WHITE WOMEN ALONE AND TREASURE BLACK WOMEN! THAT COMMENT ON THE LIGHTNESS OF HIS CHILDREN HAS TO DO WITH SLAVERY CAUSE WE KNOW HOW THEY RAPED BLACK WOMEN THEN AND THE MIXTURE IS COMING FROM THAT! HE HAS STUCK WITH BLACK WOMEN SINCE AS HE SAID -“LEARNED BETTER”! BLACK ON TO THAT! GOD MADE THE BLACK WOMEN FOR THE BLACK MAN!
yeyeolade 1 second ago

@pedrom41 I have nothing against anyone perfering and dating there own as long as they don’t harrass those who choose to date otherwise or look otherwise based on there race.
hydrolito 5 days ago
The preservation of an ethnicity is simply an impossibility. Diversity is the key of evolution as well as power. This is why the most successful countries are inclusive and don’t discriminate against others. Examples includes The Mongols, The arabic nations in the middle ages and most of the western world. You guys are idiots if you seriously think that people are merely extensions of a race rather the individuals.
PinkHeartChainsaw 2 months ago
I totally agree. I am Russian and I want to preserve my people. Political correctness talks about diversity but mixing destroys both peoples so that in the end, we’re all just some random mix, where is the diversity then?
Mr. Ali speaks a sentiment which we all feel but political correctness seeks to censor.
ForImperium 3 months ago
Has anyone seen his daughters? He had a baby with another black woman but yet his kids look mixed race.
MrCherubhair1 4 months ago
Muhammad Ali is awesome!
SGTLima66 5 months ago
@The1Heart1 TRUE DAT
Netertaat 6 months ago
I, too, agree with Ali’s comments.If I don’t want to marry or date a white woman that doesn’t mean that I hate white people. It simply means that I prefer and feel more confortable staying with my own. What’s wrong with that? Conversely, I don’t hold as a racist a white person who prefers date and marry his/her own.
pedrom41 7 months ago 2

SAVING YORUBA LANGUAGE! -YOU CAN NOW TEXT AND THE RECEIVER CAN GET THE VOICE MESSAGE IN YORUBA! (OR ANY OTHER AFRICAN LANGUAGE!)

March 15, 2012

Ife researchers unveil local language text-to-voice application – 234next

Move over twitter. Nigerian texters unhappy that their messages can only be accessed by people able to read in English Language can now breathe easier as local researchers have concluded work on an application that renders texts in local languages in audio.

To help secure, protect, and bring back most of the local languages that are going into extinction, Information and Communication Technology researchers at the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, last week unveiled the technology through which texts are converted into voice messages in Nigerian indigenous languages by the recipient’s handset.

The research work is led by Tunji Odejobi, a local computer expert in constraint satisfaction and programming and Rick Wallace, a professor at the Cork University, Ireland.

“Even if you don’t even know how to read and write in the formal sense of it, the technology can leverage that,” Mr Odejobi said.

“So technology has redefined what we call literacy now. But the key item in this is the use of language. If you want to a local language that doesn’t speak your language, then you can use technology to get your mind across to such people. That is what we have done. You can use what we are doing today to achieve such communication in various languages between the sender and receivers of a message. If we don’t do this, we are just going to kill our languages silently. It can help smoothen the culture by having common language of communication and giving other languages a place to showcase their values and culture too,” he added.
test
Source: 234next news
August 15, 2011 By Bunmi Awolusi


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