Posts Tagged ‘BUSINESS’

Ethiopia oooo! THIS ETHIOPIAN COFFEE BRAND IS OPENING CAFES IN CHINA!-FROM QUARTZ AFRICA

October 23, 2018

GARDEN OF COFFEE
Coming to China
BUNA SITEGNE
This Ethiopian homegrown coffee brand is opening 100 cafés in China
By Abdi Latif DahirOctober 22, 2018
Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu has a dream: that everyone should one day taste hand-roasted Ethiopian coffee.

Widely acknowledged as the birthplace of coffee, Ethiopia is one of the world’s largest coffee bean producers and Africa’s top grower of the plant. Coffee is also brewed and drank in the Horn of Africa nation in elaborate ceremonies, often using crafting techniques passed down from generations over centuries. As an entrepreneur, Alemu always wanted to replicate this dynamic experience—what she calls “the magical process”—to coffee lovers worldwide.

And so was born in 2016 the idea for Garden of Coffee, a brand that uses artisanal methods to source, process, roast, and package Ethiopia’s legendary beans. Twenty workers at the company’s atelier in Addis Ababa currently oversee this activity, roasting five types of coffee beans only for individual orders and shipping them to over 20 countries including Russia, Sweden, Germany, and the United States.

This personalized roasting, Alemu says, helps preserve the quality of the coffee for the final customer, reduces the ecological footprint associated with factory roasting, and creates a business model that values local manufacturing. This is especially vital as Ethiopia takes crucial steps in improving governance and accelerating poverty reduction and economic growth through job creation.

The 2015 Quartz Africa Innovator also employs similar ethical practices with her shoe brand SoleRebels, which are made by locally-trained artisans in Ethiopia and shipped all over the world.

China-bound
Alemu is now venturing out of Ethiopia. In August, Garden of Coffee launched in China, a tea-loving market that is increasingly turning towards coffee. Starbucks, Coca-Cola, e-commerce giant Alibaba, hedge fund manager Bill Ackman, and local Chinese start-up Luckin Coffee have in recent years all bet big on China’s nascent coffee scene. Java House, East Africa’s largest chain of coffee shops, also said in August it would capitalize on this increased demand for specialty coffee to supply the Chinese market.

GARDEN OF COFFEE
Garden of Coffee’s WeChat promo
Through a deal with Suzhou Reyto trading company, GOC says it will ship 12 tons of hand-roasted coffee to China in the first year. The company has also launched advertisement and marketing on the multi-purpose messaging and social media app WeChat, will soon place its product on the shopping site Taobao. But it’s big plan is  to open over 100 café roasteries across China by 2022. Through a subscription service, customers will also be able to receive their favorite coffee of choice in one, two, or four-week intervals.

By embracing traditional Ethiopian roasting methods and taking them globally, Alemu says she hopes to shape the “fourth wave” that is defining coffee’s evolution. The first wave involved the mass drinking of the brew, the second grew with the rise of a coffee culture through brands like Starbucks, while the third focused on artisanal coffee making. The fourth wave now focuses less on commercialization, more on long-term sustainability, besides promoting and preserving local ways of farming. Placing Ethiopian coffee at the heart of this movement is only pragmatic, argues Alemu. But it is also a judicious growth strategy: because of demand, Garden of Coffee is set to increase its hand-roasting artisans to 300 by 2021.

GARDEN OF COFFEE
Garden of Coffee roasted samples
“We are doing this not only because hand-roasting coffee is an ancient art that we strongly feel is worth preserving and promoting, but because we believe this method of coffee roasting is the key to unlocking Ethiopian coffee’s true magical tastes,” Alemu tells Quartz. “That’s the critical distinction.”

GARDEN OF COFFEE
More than a coffee shop
Sign up to the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief here for news and analysis on African business, tech and innovation in your inbox

china, coffee, ethiopia, horn of africa, arabica
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NIGERIA OOO!- FORBES SAYS “BEST ECONOMY IN AFRICA OOOO!

September 13, 2018

https://www.vanguardngr.com/2018/09/forbes-names-nigeria-best-economy-in-africa/


AFRICA!-BLACKAMERIKKKANS-INVEST IN AFRICA!-AND COME BACK TO AFRICA AND BE BLACK FREE!- FROM PANAFRICANVISIONS.COM

November 7, 2013

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Pan African Visions » Business in Africa, Editorial, Featured, Interviews, Partnership, Perspective » Game Changing Mission? African Americans Could Invest $230 Billion In Africa By 2017
Game Changing Mission? African Americans Could Invest $230 Billion In Africa By 2017

July 12th, 2013 | 13 Comments
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-Jerome Almon shares his vision of getting African-Americans to Bank on Africa

By Ajong Mbapndah L

Jerome AlmonU.S Businessman Jerome Almon says it is time for African-Americans to bank more on Africa and matching words with actions, he is launching a venture that will attract hundreds of billions of new investments in the continent. Almon, a veteran who also runs a successful entertainment company says investing in the continent will create wealth and opportunities for Africans and will also be economically beneficial to Africans in the U.S. Countries like India and China have made great progress in part because of strong ties and it is time for African Americans to have the same level of engagement with Africa said Almon in an interview to discuss his initiative with Ajong Mbapndah L

Mr Almon, you have been in the news recently with an ambitious plan to get African Americans invest about $230 billion by 2017, can you break down the vision in very simple terms for us?

It is a simple plan that ask a simple question, “Why should we have to ask others for help when we can help ourselves as Africans. African Americans spend well over a trillion dollars annually, and it does us no good, however investing in Africa through tourism, business ventures, and so on makes Africa financially independent while increasing the wealth and opportunities of Africans on the Continent and in America and it creates a cycle of economic growth for every country and its people in Africa and it makes all Africans everywhere more financially wealthy. It’s just common sense that we do it. We have complete power and control to do as we want with our money and resources-let’s do what’s best for us.

How did you conceive the idea and from the initial reactions you have got, how receptive is the public to your vision?

I looked around and saw nothing but opportunity for the African diaspora to help-especially African Americans with the huge amount of hard currency we spend every year and said to myself it’s time for us to do our share. Africans in every other region of the world were and are doing more than their share. Bottom line it works. The reaction to the plan at first was shock, but when the information was reviewed the people saw how reasonable and workable the plan was and really liked it. The amount of money is less than 8% of African American’s consumer spending. We were once on top of the world economically from Zimbabwe to Timbuktu to Egypt, let’s get back where we belong.

Definitely much could change in Africa with that kind of money, how do you think the money can be raised especially with the economic challenges that many African Americans are facing now?

It is very important that Africans in America not accept whatever they hear in the corporate media. African Americans are constantly told they are poor even though we spend more money than the GDP of all the countries on Earth with the exception of 15 (out of 229 ranked). We are as poor as Bill Gates is-which is not at all. If we spent our money among ourselves as Africans the way the Chinese, Europeans, and Indians, we would create more jobs than there are Africans in America. Equally we are not experiencing an economic downturn in the African American community, we are experiencing the lack of basic economic literacy and the lack of maximizing our potential in this area. For example, my hometown Detroit is bankrupt, but it is not bankrupt due to the lack of money as my website http://www.detroit1st.com shows. Africans in Detroit spend $30 billion a year, which would make Detroiter’s wealthier than over half the countries on Earth. If you convince someone that they are poor, they will behave as if they are poor. That is why the economic relationship with Africa is so important, think of what would happen if we as Africans followed such a common sense system with all of Africa’s natural resources?! The huge population of young people that can be the next innovators that produce the next Apple or Google, the large amount mineral wealth and natural resources that Africa has puts us as a people in a unique position. It is a matter of just seeing what is right in front of our eyes. The money is there, that cannot be disputed, it is a matter of consolidating it for African advancement. Through a basic media education program with 10 simple facts will allow us all to have a blue print to work from. The biggest issue is not that people don’t have the money and don’t want to help, they don’t know how to help and where to send the money. African Americans give away $12 billion annually to charities that don’t help Africans-American or otherwise. I say let’s spend and invest that $12 billion amongst Africa and Africans. Once you get the truth it compels you to act, it is impossible not to. Look at the fact that Africans from the Continent send more money back to Africa than all the foreign aid combined! There is endless potential if the North American, Caribbean, European, Australian, and South American Africans join in. Actually, it is normal for a society to invest 10% of its GDP into the economy, so we can do it-it happens every day. Any economic distress African Americans have is caused by our lack of doing business with Africans and Africa period. If Africans in America invested in Africa, there would be no poor African Americans-economically this is indisputable.

We have seen a few celebrities with projects in Africa like Oprah Winfrey and a school in South Africa, Isaiah Washington with a foundation in Sierra Leone etc, but many will agree there is still a strong disconnect between African Americans and Africa, why is it that the bonds are not as strong as those between Indian Americans and India or Latinos and South America?

The answer to that question is simple-we haven’t tried. A simple PR and marketing campaign from the African Union and its 54 members directed to African Americans saying “come back home-see what we can do as a people for ourselves, let’s talk, let’s do some things that benefit us all. African Americans should initiate a similar program of gaining membership in the African Union, adopting an African country to visit and work with, and most importantly right now reaching out to the 54 African embassies in America and finding out what Africa needs from us. We will find out that we can do so much together- we have to think big not small. African Americans should also learn an African language, this is a bond that the Chinese, Indians, and Latinos have-a common language. It is natural that we do this, so let’s do it. Our fate in America is the same as Africans everywhere else. It’s a matter of leadership, we need new leadership to compliment current leadership and move Africa and Africans to the next level.

We understand this idea is new, so what is the road map, the plan of action, beyond the first step to get word out there when do we see the first concrete steps towards the realization of the vision?

OPERATIONBLAKKOUT (1)We must control our own message, currently most news on Africa is filtered through the non African media. We have enough money and the human talent to have an African Al Jazeera with branches in Africa and America. This also allows us to educate and end misconceptions we have of Africa and other Africans, which also provides great business opportunities in advertising and business ownership globally. Next we need to set time tables and specific goals in regards to the funds and projects. This can be easily done with a diaspora conference in Africa and in America and making maximum use of the internet and social media. The most important thing in this area is SHOW the people what great results come from the cooperation. We need to set a top 10 list of priorities such as education, economic literacy, infrastructure projects, GDP goals, and so on. We have to look at this as a grand project with grand results which requires a grand executable plan. These simple steps are 90% of the solution. African Americans are spending the money anyway, why not in Africa, why not on African goods and services? We can all be wealthy together or poor together, I say let’s be wealthy as a people. Let’s help fund projects such as The Great Renaissance Dam in Ethiopia. The dam cost around $5 billion dollars

Are there partners you have identified besides African Americans especially in the continent?

I have been contacted by the office of the President of Sierra Leone, the South African government, African Canadian groups, Ugandan, Kenyan, the office of the President of Rwanda through a journalist in East Africa, the government of Tanzania, Nigerian, Angolan, and Namibian businessmen and dozens of other Africans from as far away as Hong Kong. The key is working with the leadership and people in Africa to partner them with Africans in the West and getting lines of communication open and resources to the needed area as efficiently as possible.

As much as things are changing in the continent, there are still leaders in power for over thirty years and counting, corruption is still too rife for comfort and there are countries where democratic values are not respected, how can such realities affect your project?

Democracy is a powerful thing-it automatically changes a lot of things. And one of things it does is create a middle class by its very nature, and that ends the chance of such prolonged rule. At a certain stage in development it is not viable, nor acceptable. Presidents and Prime Ministers come and go, but the country and the people still need power plants, roads, bridges, and technology. The concentration has to be on improving the average African’s life, and the rest will take care of itself. The West, China, India all faced the same issue and concentrated on the economic and infrastructure issues at hand and the democracy came along with the progress in these areas. All of my research and experience in this area shows that poverty creates dictators, and prosperity creates transparency and freedom.

Personally are there any countries that you have visited or some you consider as the kind of models of development and progress you will like to see across the continent?

Ironically, it is Germany, Canada, and China. Germany is a very efficient country. It was the world’s largest exporter up until 5 years ago. When you consider that the country has less than a third of the population of the US and 7% of China’s population, it is amazing. I always saw this as a model for Africa-especially South Africa. With Canada you have nearly as much efficiency and you have a very modern country in terms of infrastructure and human rights. Also with Canada you have a country the size of the US with 1 tenth of the population, which is very similar to most African countries. Canada is also a great model to borrow from in terms of its modern infrastructure and facilities such as hospitals. The country also mirrors African American economically, with our consumer spending being almost identical to Canada’s GDP. This allows for us to see what we SHOULD have with the amount of money we spend. Finally, there are more Africans in America than there are Canadians on Earth, look what they do with their resources and look what we Africans in America do with ours. We should have everything Canada has in America, but also each African country. We can easily do this. With China we see where we should be as a whole. China and the Chinese diaspora are moving as one economically and have been really seriously since the 1980’s-look at the result. If we adopt such a philosophy for Africa with its unmatched mineral and natural wealth we can be where China is in a relatively short period of time. China went from and agrarian society in the 1950’s to dominating the world economically today through its 5 year plan economic system. In these countries we see our potential and future, the keys are having the right vision, efficient execution of a workable plan, and constant monitoring of the feedback data and progress to make the plan more efficient.

With such a great vision, people will love to know who Jerome Almon, we see there is information about music labels you are, involvement in show biz etc, can you tell us who Jerome Almon is and the kind of experiences he has that should make people believe that this is a serious vision and this is something he can provide the right leadership for?

IMAG0140-1My background is in economics and political science, I have worked on the UN Delphi Project out of Belgium, I have attended America’s best Universities, and I have the real world experience-which is most important. I have managed one of the busiest retailers in the world. I speak working Zulu, German, Arabic, and English. I am a paratrooper and own a successful entertainment company that produces events that have 1.5-2.5 million fans per event. But what I am most proud of is my studying the history, geography, and culture of Africa. I have spent countless hours talking to Africans from university, African military officers, and African academics about Africa. My heroes were and are mostly continental Africans such as Jerry Rawlings, Haile Selassie, Thomas Sankara, Jomo Kenyatta, Nelson Mandela, Kwame Nkrumah, Samora Machel, Julius Nyerere, Jose Dos Santos, Kenneth Kaunda, Anwar Sadat and on and on. I have studied Africa since I was 8 years old. It is Africa FIRST for me always.

After reading this interview if people got interested what should there do, how can they get involved, support or find out more information?

They can contact me at africafirst@thepowerof1trillion.com and visit the website http://www.thepowerof1trillion.com for basic information which will contain very specific information on the plan this month.
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Written by Panafricanvisions

Filed under: Business in Africa, Editorial, Featured, Interviews, Partnership, Perspective
13 Responses to “Game Changing Mission? African Americans Could Invest $230 Billion In Africa By 2017”

joe lewis says:
July 14, 2013 at 1:54 pm

i been looking for this info for a long time this is the gospel for lack of a better word rite now our people got to get it together i am into pan africanism i want to get deeply envolved with this project big time this is the only way our people going to survive
Reply
Achiampong Edward says:
July 21, 2013 at 7:42 am

Brilliant idea and we hope it does not end only in words. There is much that African Americans can do to help Africa. Africa will always be their home and will welcome them with open arms
Reply
Ehirim Stephen says:
July 21, 2013 at 7:47 am

It is interesting that with the rest of the world scrambling about Africa, African Americans have remain timid. I mean the China,France,Japan,India,Brazil,Korea,Canada ,UK, etc and even the USA are scrambling for Africa, but where are our African American brothers?Will the white Americans toy with Europe?will the Hispanic population in America ever fail in its duties towards Mexico and other South American Countries?African Americans must engage more with Africa.It can only be a win win situation
Reply
Stone Ncube says:
July 21, 2013 at 7:50 am

Brilliant initiative and it will be great if this does not end up like others which raise hope only to end up disappointing people.
Reply
Essim Braitwhite says:
July 21, 2013 at 7:53 am

Whao, are African Americans about to wake up in recognition of their historic ties to Africa and the potentials the continent has for them?great project and kudos to Mr Almon
Reply
Amedofu Ayew says:
July 21, 2013 at 8:00 am

Nice interview and one of the best I have seen from an African American concerning Africa. It is good to see more engagement and it can be limited to Oprah opening a school in South Africa or Isaiah Washington working in Sierra Leone, bigger broad based projects can be carried out as well. The power sector has potential, and could definitely do with support from African Americans
Reply
Atabong Elvis says:
July 21, 2013 at 2:14 pm

I am really impressed by Mr. Almon’s vision and hope he can see it through, I will definitely look up the website
Reply
Jonathan says:
October 30, 2013 at 8:37 pm

If people really want to learn and know more about Africa. I am free for any questions. But I have a message for you do not be mislead. In African their is a huge investment from all types of people from the Western world including Asia but non from Africans outside Africa. Opportunities are endless and in Africa depending on the country you can never go wrong. At least am familiar with the situation in Southern Africa so I will any type of information in Southern Africa is welcome for your own information Southern Africa is short of real estate so this is another area of investment you can think of. For more and any other information just inbox me at mwanzaj23@yahoo.com
Reply
Lincoln NJENGA says:
November 5, 2013 at 2:32 pm

Dear Bro Almon,
Your boldness and courage will do doubt provoke thought beyond your imagination. I frankly had not looked at the Great African Re-union with such vividness. Indeed, the African-American engagement with mother Africa is enough to restore dignity and respect of the African. To some, the thought is actually scary.

And you are right; a second scramble for Africa is in the offing seeing that it is the last bastion for growth on planet earth. And on this score, China is first off the blocks! I imagine the word out there is if USA can elect (and re-elect) an African president, Africa is certainly ready for business.

May the God of all Creation, the Holy One of Israel-who has begun this good work in you-be gracious to you and bring this Great Vision to a glorious completion to the glory and honour of His holy name!

Your proposal for an African Diaspora Conference is therefore spot on given the increasingly important economic role African Diaspora remittances is playing in many countries. For instance, I am involved in a Kenya Diaspora initiative whose objective is to harness/mainstream the reasonably large remittances it receives annually for faster economic development.

The African Union estimates that Africans in the Diaspora exceed 170 million! Brazil has of late shown keen interest in the Continent. Perhaps this may be due to the fact that it is home to the largest number of the African Diaspora in the world.

Press on, brother, press on!
Lincoln
Reply
Frank Simmons says:
November 6, 2013 at 12:23 am

Yes , right on with the progress.
Reply
Justin Aadil says:
November 6, 2013 at 12:13 pm

Im into marketing and can help with a marketing plan
Nothing to it except to do it
Thx
Reply
Leslie says:
November 6, 2013 at 6:07 pm

Do you have a plan for investment? I did a direct import business of Artifacts for resale. I did alright for a while but it’s like people were no longer interested in African Art/carving.
Reply
A. B. MOMANYI says:
November 7, 2013 at 3:48 am

WELCOME HOME BRO. THERE ARE ENOUGH RESOURCES AND ROOM FOR ALL AFRICAN PEOPLE.WE WILL SHARE IDEAS AND ALL THE INFORMATION REQUIRED TO MAKE IT A SUCCESS.
Reply

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BACK TO AFRICA !- THIS BLACK AMERIKKKAN DAN FOSTER DID SO WELL ADJUSTING IN NIGERIA THAT HE’S WRITING A BOOK ABOUT HOW TO DO BUSINESS IN NIGERIA- IMAGINE! BLACK ON!-FROM NAIRALAND.COM

May 26, 2011


FROM NAIRALAND.COM
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
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Author Topic: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book) (Read 5257 views)
Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa”

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

–Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin, Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there. This guy neva jam Grin Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!

gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria

deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.
Also, True !

PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there. It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.

Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?, Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio, lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?

JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food. Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East

* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps. Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.


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