Posts Tagged ‘CHURCHES’

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE-BOSEDE BAKAREY ON “A Spiritual Approach to Healthcare and Its Certainty of Healing” on YouTube

October 24, 2018

https://youtu.be/oPexaBPJVK4

REDEMPTION CAMP IN NIGERIA IS NIGERIA’S VATICAN CITY!-NIGERIA OOO!- BY TUNDUN ADEYEMO IN TELL MAGAZINE NIGERIA!

September 6, 2015

FROM TELL MAGAZINE,NIGERIA

Redemption Camp, Nigeria’s Vatican City

As a guest at the rather posh Redemption Camp home of an ardent member of the Redeemed Christian Church of God, one has the luxury of unlimited and super fast Internet access. The atmosphere is cool, the air conditioning unit is on and the noise of some people praying can be heard.rccg camp

It is the 63rd Annual Convention of the Redeemed Christian Church of God. The writer has warm memories of coming to the Redemption Camp. Mum has been attending the Camp for nearly a quarter of a century. About 21 years ago, the writer came with her. She remembers praying for her Junior Secondary School examination results.

Those days, we slept on the benches and would wait till the crowd thins out to begin the journey to Ibadan at six in the morning. Then, there was much grass and barren land. Now, it is a city. The latest auditorium is said to be three kilometres in length and width, and about four times the size of the present auditorium. Estimated to cost around N20 billion, the gist online is that the auditorium would seat three million worshippers.

It is impossible to get a taste of the hugeness of the camp by strolling across it. Over 25 years of consistent construction, growth and increase has made the Camp perhaps one of the fastest growing cities in the whole of the world. It gets bigger and bigger.

The Camp has many adjoining roads, hundreds of restaurants, a secondary school called the Redeemer High School, several primary schools and Redeemer University. The Redemption Camp has its own clinic, ATM points, super markets, shops, a public market, post office, estates built by a consortium of banks, high street banks, international guest houses, the Redeemed Christian Bible College, facilities for children and youths and its very own water, electrical and electronics departments. Dove Television has its offices on the site as well as Liveway Radio, which entertains Redemption Camp residents with excellent music, sermons all day. The ever-expanding Camp is the Nigerian version of The Vatican.

The Redemption Camp could also be described as a ‘city of paradise’. Why? Residents enjoy uninterrupted power and water supply. This may seem commonplace and a non-issue. But, when you have experienced living without power or without water, you begin to appreciate ‘little’ miracles.

Experts at holding massive events, hundreds of thousands of people gather here every year for the annual convention, which is one of the church’s flagship programmes. The RCCG hosts the Holy Ghost Congress every December and on the first Friday of the month, there is the Holy Ghost Service. These services are attended by hundreds of thousands of people. The crowds will shock you. Oxford Circus in Britain is nothing compared to this. It is probably a hundred times the crowd at the Old Trafford. Or more. Who knows? There are people everywhere.

The Redemption Camp is also a place to make money. Hundreds of small businesses exist to service the needs of the crowds that gather. There is no question or doubt in my mind that God answers prayers. He answers prayers in the Redemption Camp like He does everywhere else His name is called in ‘spirit and in truth’. So, let’s be honest, and say God answers prayers. Everywhere. Anywhere.

So if God can hear you in your home, why do people bother to come here? Why am I here? What is the attraction the Convention and the Redemption brand offers to people from across the nation? My theories are disputable. First, people come because the version of Christianity appeals to the humanity in people. The General Overseer of the church, Pastor E. A. Adeboye emphasises holiness and righteous living. In a country where corruption is in the fabric of nearly every Nigerian, the call to live holy and pure is an appeal. In a country where the people who loot the treasury and federal ministries have front row seats, the call to holiness is deeply interesting.

Secondly, the church accommodates people from all walks of life. What this translates to is that common people have a stake in the church. Most often whilst walking to the auditorium, you find mothers washing their little children on the edges of the auditorium, people washing their pots and pans, others were brushing their teeth, it is surreal. There is a mini scramble for water at the taps. Just across from them, are hundreds of people doing private things like brushing their teeth and urinating in the open view of everyone! It is unsettling and uncomfortable to behold. A few yards from them are several blocks of bathrooms and toilets for both sexes. The deacons, senior pastors, pastors and assistant pastors were not amongst this crowd. In the United Kingdom, anti-social orders would be slapped on all these people doing ‘bathroom things’ in the open.

Why do people come to the RCCG Convention? The prayers and manner of worship lay emphasis on personal emancipation and deliverance. In a country where ‘the other person is the enemy, every one has an ‘other person’ they need to pray against. It is serious business. Warfare. There is the mother-in-law, the father-in-law, the boss at work, the grand-aunt, etc to arrest in prayers. People come in millions for this type of militaristic prayer.

Furthermore, because of poor national health provision, many people come to be healed of their diseases and worn body parts. Women looking for the fruit of the womb come, pastors looking for more ‘anointing’ come. Thieves, rogues, thugs and robbers also mingle in the crowd waiting for the time to strike. The appeal is unexplainable but it works.

The appeal, unlike other churches where the rich are probably worshipped, this church has a place for all people. Rich and Poor. When you walk the length and the breadth of the camp, you find people. You find them queuing for water, you find them sleeping in ad hoc sleeping bags at the end of the service. The beauty of it is that there are hundreds of them. Poor people, sleeping on the floor, on mats, exposed to mosquitoes. They are used to it, they are happy to be there. No one complains. They are there of their own free volition.

Politics aside, there is the need for government to address several teething problems. One, bad driving which is symptomatic of the Nigerian society reflects heavily when the culprits have the words ‘Missionary’ on cars. Two, mobile and Internet receptivity is not satisfactory. This is not the fault of the RCCG, but providers would do well to make sure their brand has a presence in the city.

Three, whilst most of the roads are great, some are in dire need of construction. Four, more toilets and bathrooms need to be built to cater for thousands of people. Five, there should be more discipline and etiquette where people urinate and do personal business. Six, the church should look into providing comfortable shelter for the hundreds who sleep on mats in the auditorium. The 63rd Annual Convention has come and gone, but the All- Sufficient God will remain the same for every one. Anywhere.

There is no question or doubt in my mind that God answers prayers. He answers prayers in the Redemption Camp like He does everywhere else His name is called in spirit and in truth. So, lets be honest, and say God answers prayers. Everywhere. Anywhere

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YORUBA CULTURAL NATIONALISM -MOVEMENT SINGLELY CARRIED ONLY BY THE YORUBAS ON THE ENTIRE AFRICAN CONTINENT TO FIGHT WhITE COLONIALISM ! -FROM THE NIGERIAN TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER

December 30, 2013

FROM THE NIGERIAN TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER

Yoruba cultural nationalism

Written by Diran Apata ⁠ ⁠ Sunday, 22 December 2013
⁠ ⁠ A few days ago, in a leisurely discussion involving many Yoruba men, women and children, I mentioned the movement of Yoruba Cultural Nationalism of about one-hundred years ago. Most of my hearers had no idea what I was talking about. That is what always happens whenever I happen to mention this movement. It is painful that our people, especially our youths, know nothing about it – painful because the story of the Yoruba Cultural Nationalist Movement, spanning the last years of the 19th century and the first years of the 20th,is one of the most glorious stories in the modern history of the Yoruba Nation. It is a story that we should all know inside and out – a story that our children should be told over and over at home and at school.

The following is the background to it. From about 1885, various European countries came scrambling for territorial empires all over Africa. Peoples after peoples of Africa fell to the European forces. The British, the French, the Germans, the Portuguese, the Belgians, the Dutch, all carved out empires for themselves. Most of Yorubaland became British possession (later to be included in Nigeria), and the rest became French and German possessions (later to be included in what are now Benin and Togo Republics).

But the conquest of Africa was not only military and territorial; it was also massively psychological. Usually, small European armies were taking over African territories, because they were armed with better weapons, or because the African nations were not fully aware about what was happening to them, and because they did not unite to defend their homelands. Naturally, the European colonialists became enormously arrogant. Everywhere, they proclaimed the doctrine that Africans were culturally and intellectually inferior to Europeans, that Africans were incapable of developing any civilisation, and that it was the duty of Europeans to bring civilisation to Africans.

These attitudes gradually infected all aspects of European relationships with Africans all over tropical Africa. The growing disrespect of Africans even spread into the Christian missions. In the mission churches and schools, it was now being said that, to become a Christian, or to be regarded as educated or civilised, one must give up one’s native culture. One must give up such things as one’s indigenous name, clothing, manners, and language, and take on European ones. Even the Yoruba clergy working in the missions began to experience serious disrespect and discrimination from the mission bodies that they served.

For a start, some Yoruba Christian converts in Lagos did respond by trying to become “black Europeans”. They hoped that doing so would earn them acceptance into the “civilised” British community in Lagos. Many of these changed their names to European names. Some others adopted European dress items such as the stove-pipe hat, the feathered bonnet, high-heeled shoes, and gloves, etc. Some young persons who went to study in Britain returned home in only two or three years and claimed that they could no longer understand or speak the Yoruba language.

However, a powerful Yoruba reaction to all these rapidly brewed, and it soon became a great movement – the movement of Yoruba Cultural Nationalism. As it grew, most of those who had adopted aspects of European culture gave them up and returned to their Yoruba culture. There had been newspapers in Lagos for decades, and these newspapers joined excitedly in the movement. “We are Africans first (or we are Yoruba first) before we are Christians” became popular among Christians in Lagos.

This movement of Yoruba Cultural Nationalism produced very many effects. In popular culture and fashions, Yoruba Cultural Nationalism promoted a great pride in Yoruba clothes and dresses. The Yoruba way of dressing became very popular indeed. It became more attractive as new styles and modifications were added.

Yoruba men and women serving in the Lagos colonial service responded in their own way. Many of them resigned their jobs and started private businesses, schools and churches of their own.

In the Christian missions, the Yoruba clergy responded by introducing Yoruba culture into church services and church life. For instance, they introduced Yoruba music and songs, which the missions had earlier regarded as pagan. Some of the Yoruba clergy even went further than that. They withdrew from the service of the European mission organizations and started an African Church Movement. This created separate African churches in the various denominations – African Anglican churches, African Methodist churches, and African Baptist churches. The African churches brought Yoruba culture into the Christian church in a big way. They also wrote Yoruba hymns and published hymn books. But another movement soon started which went even further than the African Church Movement to integrate Yoruba culture into Christianity. This was the Aladura Movement. The Aladura Movement developed into a number of main branches – the Christ Apostolic Church, the Cherubim and Seraphim Church, and the Celestial Church of Christ.

Yoruba Cultural Nationalism also promoted a lot of interest in the study of Yoruba culture and history. Many books were written in these years on both subjects. And many literate Yoruba people wrote the traditional stories of their towns – some in English, and many in the Yoruba language. Lessons in Yoruba history and culture were introduced into schools, including the mission schools.

Yoruba Cultural Nationalism created a powerful Yoruba national consciousness. It unified the modern Yoruba elite for service to their nation. That unity was to express itself in many productive ways later – in the various Development Associations of the 1920s and 1930s, in the highly influential Egbe Omo Oduduwa from 1945, and in the first-rate government of the Western Region in the 1950s. It also charted great modern ambitions for the Yoruba nation – ambitions to acquire education, and to achieve modern economic progress, prosperity and power in the world. In these many ways, the movement of Yoruba Cultural Nationalism laid some of the foundations for Yoruba achievements and progress in the modern world.

All in all, Yoruba people did not merely challenge European cultural arrogance; they suppressed it quite successfully in their own country. Nowhere else in Black Africa, among no other Black African nation, did the Europeans experience another powerful cultural challenge like this.

A British colonial official who served for years in Nigeria in the 1950s testified to the later-day effects of Yoruba Cultural Nationalism. He wrote in his memoir that, in his experience, the Yoruba were one African people who never treated the British, or any other Europeans, as superiors or “as gods”. He wrote that the Yoruba are a people with “personal dignity and political finesse”. “In my experience” he added, “the Yoruba regarded themselves as superior to the British – – -. The Yoruba were often highly intelligent and they taunted the British with sending inferior people to Nigeria.” He also added that many other Nigerian peoples could usually not look the white man in the eyes, but that even the lowliest Yoruba servant tended to carry himself with confidence and pride.

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Published in⁠ Diran Apata’s Sunday message


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