Posts Tagged ‘CULTURE’

YORUBA OOOO!-A CHRISTIAN DISCOVERS PRIDE IN YORUBA RELIGION ATI CULTURE!

October 21, 2018

Proudly Yoruba

When I was researching extensively for my masters in 2002,
I “discovered” the religion of the Yoruba, previously vaguely encountered in my vagrant and vacant childhood in Isale Eko, and Awe-Oyo, with the whitewashed remnants of its ancient lore, embedded in festivals of spectacles, song, dance, mime of syncretic cantatas, careta, gelede and Ifa festivities.

It was a glimmer of the golden past, with the Eyo re-incarnation pageant, the kaleidoscopically colorful egungun, speaking with affected guttural growls, embedded with chanting akewi, serenading in evening soirées to cascades of altercating bata drums.

A Christian Baptist by upbringing, I found myself strangely connected within my department of theatre arts, Ibadan, reading about my progenitor ancestors embodied in the worship of the pantheons of Yoruba Gods, and the profound wisdom of the Ifa oracle.

I found myself, for the first time in my squeaky clean whitewashed westernised life, discovering who I really am.

There was an immediate connection with my illustrious heritage: a self revealing and exhilarating deja vu.

Then it made sense, as our love for the Orishas, whose interconnectedness, opposites, syncretic and paradoxical characteristicsshowed why what is truely the greatest symbol of being Yoruba, the philosophy of *omoluabi*, is a shared common value.

Indeed within the depths of the religion, it now became clear why we are who we are, pieces of the same shattered god head, a fulfilling oracle embracing all Yoruba.

Within the religion of the Orisha, I discovered why all Yoruba are innately and fundamentally imbued with the spirit of a longing for peace, and knowledge, a sense of communal harmony, love of fellowship and fellowman, irrevocable reverence of elders, communion with ever present ancestors, the persisting profuse and profound greeting rituals, and reciprocal wishing of the proverbial peace ( sh’alafia ni)….to all and sundry.

It was there, I too, a Christian still, found in myself, the *who* in the riddle:

“who am I ?”,

and ever since then, within the profundity of the realisation of my illustrious religious and cultural past, a glow of pride has been over my head, proud of being a scion of Oduduwa, imprimatur of the orisha worship itself, proud of my heritage, protected by the spirits of my forefathers.

Indeed, walking tall, I’m proud to be a member of a master race, a race so profound in sculptural artistry, that Europeans thought in it, they had found their ephemeral fabled Atlantis.

That’s why I raise up my gaze with pride, anywhere in this world and tell who care to hear that:
Im a member of a superior master race:

That I’m :
*Proudly Yoruba.*

Dolapo sikuade

OLOJO FESTIVAL-ILE-IFE IS COMING OOOO!-BOOK FOR EVENTS NOW OOOO!

September 2, 2018

https://theeventsspace.com/event/greenmount-lounge-ade-bar-ife-ile-ife-osun-state-nigeria-festival-olojo-festival-2018-2/ : Celebrating Olojo festival in style
ON September 29, 2017 6:12 AM /
IN Just Human , Metro, News /
Comments
By Dapo Akinrefon
THE 2017 Olojo festival is expected to be celebrated in grand style as all road leads to the ancient city of Ile-Ife. The significance of the festival is that it brings about the unification of the Yoruba race.
The festival takes place annually in October and involves several elaborate ritual prayers led by the Ooni. It is marked in a carnival-like atmosphere and is attended by people of all ages.
Olojo has remained popular in Ile-Ife because it is the only day in the year believed to be specially blessed by
Olodumare (the Creator of the universe).
•Ooni of Ife, Oba Enitan Ogunwusi during the 2016 Olojo festival
Aside from this, the Olojo is regarded as the celebration of first dusk and dawn, and creation of the universe. The ancient city will play host to indigenes and non-indigenes in the town, expected to come out in their multitudes to celebrate the annual festival. All the major streets in the town will wear new looks in preparation for the festival.
Besides, the whole town will be agog as the Ooni of Ile-Ife, Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi, Ojaja II, will for the second time since his enthronement in 2015, wear the sacred Are crown. The crown is made of 151 items, parts of which are a cutlass and a hoe. It is also believed that the crown weighs over 60kg and is worn once a year during the Olojo festival.
Olojo festival
It is expected that major gods of the ancient town are appeased during this period. Regarded as the biggest festival on the culture calendar of Ile-Ife, the
Olojo festival is celebrated in remembrance of Ogun , the god of iron who is believed to be the first son of
Oduduwa as well as the creation of the world according to Yoruba mythology.
Annual ritual: On the day of the festival, the Ooni of Ife appears after several days in seclusion and denial, communing with the ancestors and praying for his people. The days in seclusion are to make him pure and ensure the efficacy of his prayers. Prior to his emergence, women from his maternal and paternal families sweep the palace, symbolically ridding the palace of evil.
After this ritual, the Ooni of Ife appears in public with the Are crown. Historically, the crown is believed to be the original crown used by Oduduwa to lead a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to perform at the shrine of Ogun . The next stage of the ceremony is to lead the crowd to
Okemogun’s shrine. At the shrine, the progenitor of Oduduwa performs duties including the renewal of oath, divination for the Ooni at the foot of Oketage hill by Araba (Chief Priest), as well as visiting places of historical importance.
Also, the traditional chiefs with the swords of office marked with chalk and camwood, appear in ceremonial attire and dance to rhythms from Bembe, a traditional drum. The style of drumming and singing for each chief is different.
Only the Ooni can dance to the drum called Osirigi . Olojo has remained popular in Ile-Ife because of its myth and history as it connotes the day in the year specially blessed by Olodumare , the creator of the universe. Prayers are offered for peace and tranquillity in Yorubaland and Nigeria. Tradition holds that Ile-Ife is the cradle of the Yoruba, the city of survivors, spiritual seat of the Yoruba, and land of the ancients.
Ooni starts 7-day seclusion
In preparation for the 2017 edition of the festival, the Ife monarch went into seclusion and is expected to offer prayers for the town and the country. Prior to the seclusion, the Ooni visited
Ile mole, a shrine in Moore for prayers after which, he moved to the seclusion where he remained incommunicado till this evening.
Giving insight to what he will be doing during the seclusion, the Ooni of Ife told newsmen that during the period, he would offer prayers for the country and its leadership. According to the monarch, during the seclusion, he would not be receiving visitors nor see outside. He said: “Our ancestors will be appeased during the period and by the time I re-emerge on Saturday for the grand finale, the rites will be concluded.”
Speaking further, he said the festival “is a celebration of the creation of the universe and many visitors from within the country and the diaspora will come around to celebrate with us. My duty is specifically to offer prayers and that I will do to the best of my ability.” On the significance of the festival, the royal father said Olojo is the celebration of first dusk and dawn and creation of the universe, with an assurance to work towards promoting further, all notable cultural festivals in Yorubaland.: Celebrating Olojo festival in style
ON September 29, 2017 6:12 AM /
IN Just Human , Metro, News /
Comments
By Dapo Akinrefon
THE 2017 Olojo festival is expected to be celebrated in grand style as all road leads to the ancient city of Ile-Ife. The significance of the festival is that it brings about the unification of the Yoruba race.
The festival takes place annually in October and involves several elaborate ritual prayers led by the Ooni. It is marked in a carnival-like atmosphere and is attended by people of all ages.
Olojo has remained popular in Ile-Ife because it is the only day in the year believed to be specially blessed by
Olodumare (the Creator of the universe).
•Ooni of Ife, Oba Enitan Ogunwusi during the 2016 Olojo festival
Aside from this, the Olojo is regarded as the celebration of first dusk and dawn, and creation of the universe. The ancient city will play host to indigenes and non-indigenes in the town, expected to come out in their multitudes to celebrate the annual festival. All the major streets in the town will wear new looks in preparation for the festival.
Besides, the whole town will be agog as the Ooni of Ile-Ife, Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi, Ojaja II, will for the second time since his enthronement in 2015, wear the sacred Are crown. The crown is made of 151 items, parts of which are a cutlass and a hoe. It is also believed that the crown weighs over 60kg and is worn once a year during the Olojo festival.
Olojo festival
It is expected that major gods of the ancient town are appeased during this period. Regarded as the biggest festival on the culture calendar of Ile-Ife, the
Olojo festival is celebrated in remembrance of Ogun , the god of iron who is believed to be the first son of
Oduduwa as well as the creation of the world according to Yoruba mythology.
Annual ritual: On the day of the festival, the Ooni of Ife appears after several days in seclusion and denial, communing with the ancestors and praying for his people. The days in seclusion are to make him pure and ensure the efficacy of his prayers. Prior to his emergence, women from his maternal and paternal families sweep the palace, symbolically ridding the palace of evil.
After this ritual, the Ooni of Ife appears in public with the Are crown. Historically, the crown is believed to be the original crown used by Oduduwa to lead a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to perform at the shrine of Ogun . The next stage of the ceremony is to lead the crowd to
Okemogun’s shrine. At the shrine, the progenitor of Oduduwa performs duties including the renewal of oath, divination for the Ooni at the foot of Oketage hill by Araba (Chief Priest), as well as visiting places of historical importance.
Also, the traditional chiefs with the swords of office marked with chalk and camwood, appear in ceremonial attire and dance to rhythms from Bembe, a traditional drum. The style of drumming and singing for each chief is different.
Only the Ooni can dance to the drum called Osirigi . Olojo has remained popular in Ile-Ife because of its myth and history as it connotes the day in the year specially blessed by Olodumare , the creator of the universe. Prayers are offered for peace and tranquillity in Yorubaland and Nigeria. Tradition holds that Ile-Ife is the cradle of the Yoruba, the city of survivors, spiritual seat of the Yoruba, and land of the ancients.
Ooni starts 7-day seclusion
In preparation for the 2017 edition of the festival, the Ife monarch went into seclusion and is expected to offer prayers for the town and the country. Prior to the seclusion, the Ooni visited
Ile mole, a shrine in Moore for prayers after which, he moved to the seclusion where he remained incommunicado till this evening.
Giving insight to what he will be doing during the seclusion, the Ooni of Ife told newsmen that during the period, he would offer prayers for the country and its leadership. According to the monarch, during the seclusion, he would not be receiving visitors nor see outside. He said: “Our ancestors will be appeased during the period and by the time I re-emerge on Saturday for the grand finale, the rites will be concluded.”
Speaking further, he said the festival “is a celebration of the creation of the universe and many visitors from within the country and the diaspora will come around to celebrate with us. My duty is specifically to offer prayers and that I will do to the best of my ability.” On the significance of the festival, the royal father said Olojo is the celebration of first dusk and dawn and creation of the universe, with an assurance to work towards promoting further, all notable cultural festivals in Yorubaland.

YEYE OLADE IS 71 YEARS!-BLACK PEOPLE!-OJO IBI MI IN ADEYIPO VILLAGE IN YORUBALAND! -NIGERIA OOOOO!

October 14, 2015

from yeyeolade.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

OJO IBI MI 71th (MY 71th  BIRTHDAY!) IN THE VILLAGE OF YORUBALAND,NIGERIA OOOO!

OJO IBI MI(MY 71ST BIRTHDAY IS COMING UP OCTOBER 31ST). I WILL DO A
YORUBA CULTURAL CELEBRATION FOR THE VILLAGERS TO SHOW THEM THAT
BIRTHDAY IS NO WHITE boys’ cake,drinks-WE WILL HAVE YORUBA TRADITIONAL
SNACKS/FOOD,LECTURES ON HOW YORUBA LANGUAGE GOT KILLED,HOW IT CAN NOW
BE SAVED ATI DEADLY EFFECTS OF BLEACHING KILLING YOU SLOWLY!THEN A
BEST YORUBA SPEAKERS CONTESTS FOR CHILDREN,WOMEN,THEN THE FINAL FOR
WHO EVER WINS! OFCOURSE YORUBA TRADITIONAL MUSIC-OMOWURA,BATA
MUSIC,ATI….!
Alaroye will be given out as Ebun from its Display
table to choose from many back copies!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i_otGuA-k

MO ATI MI!

 66666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666

AAYEYE OJO IBI MI NI DEC.5,2015——WE HAD A “BEST YORUBA SSPEAKER CONTESTS FOR OMODE(CHILDREN) ATI ADULTS-10 ADULTS WON N500 EACH,OMODE N300 EACH! THIS IS ONE WAY SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE-BRIBE YORUBAS TO SPEAK UNDILUTED YYORUBA WITH BEST YORUBA SPEAKER CONTESTS AT EVERY EVENT,ANNUAL MEETING,COMPANYS ALL SO THAT YORUBA WILL NNOT DIE!

 

 

 

 

 

IGBELE-THE EVIL FOREST OF ITSEKIRILAND-A LOOK AT THEIR TRADITIONAL RELIGIOUS BELIEFS ON DEATH-FROM THE VANGUARD NEWSPAPER

August 2, 2015

FROM VANGUARD NEWSPAPER

You are here : Home » More… » Just Human » Igbele: Evil forest where Itsekiris dump corpses of witches, wizards

Igbele: Evil forest where Itsekiris dump corpses of witches, wizards

on July 31, 2015   /   in Just Human, News 7:59 pm   /   Comments

By Oghene Omonisa

The Ofuobu family of Ode-Itsekiri Town in the Warri Kingdom of Delta State recently lost their matriarch who died at the ripe age of 82. She lived a fruitful and illustrious life, leaving behind six children, many grand children and great-grand children. A successful trader, all her children are university graduates who equally turned out to be successful in their various professions. Her immediate and distant family members are proud of her because hers was a life worth celebrating. (Ofuobu is not the real name of the family. As a condition for granting this interview, the first son demanded that the family name not be mentioned. And on the request of this reporter, he came up with the fictitious name of Ofuobu, which literally means  keep it secret  in Itsekiri.)

Evil forest

But even before members of the Ofoubu family contemplated plans for her burial rites, one thought quietly occupied their minds: the  ife  (oracle) consultation to determine if she was a witch while alive. It would eternally be devastating, embarrassing and stigmatizing for the family if they go and  bife (find out through oracle consultation) and the outcome was negative; that is, if she was a witch while alive, and so could not be given a proper burial, but her corpse would be dumped at  igbele, the evil forest where the corpses of witches and wizards are abandoned to be devoured by vultures and monkeys.

The Ofuobu family is Itsekiri and  ife  consultation is a ritual in Itsekiri traditions which every corpse undergoes before burial.

Ife, bife, ife bibi

“There is a slight distinction between  ife  and  bife”, says Pa Enoko Peduru, an Itsekiri elder in Warri, who is well grounded in the customs and traditions. He explains that while  ife  is the oracle,  bife  is the Itsekiri word for consulting oracle, or finding out through oracle. The act of consulting oracle is known as ife bibi. And the Itsekiri word for an oracle priest is  obi ife.

Oracle consultation is not peculiar to the Itsekiris, he says. “There are different ethnic groups that also consult oracle, and they have their various names for it. The Urhobos call it  evwa; the Ijaws,  agbraka. To the Binis, it is iha, while the Yorubas call it  ifa.”

“Every ethnic group has its share of witches and wizards”, avers Pa Omajuwa Matsese, a self-avowed traditionalist at Ajamimogha, Warri, who, along with his son, Faith, spoke to this reporter.

Pa Metsese explains that  ife bibi  is not unique to the Itsekiris, because when a person dies in some other ethnic groups, especially in controversial circumstances, family members of the deceased might insist on finding out through oracle the cause of the death.

“It could be found out that the person was killed through witchcraft or other evil means, or he has died from his past evil or wicked deeds”, Pa Metsese says, adding that such oracles are just for the sake of revelation as nothing is done to either the killer of the deceased nor the deceased if he had died from his past evil deeds.

“Itsekiris do not allow that”, he declares. “In our own case, if it is found out that the dead person was a witch, he is not buried on our soil inside town. His corpse is thrown into  igbele, the evil forest, across the river.” But if the oracle reveals that the person has died from the evil deeds of another person,  ife bibi  awaits the culprit. “That is what makes our own oracle casting for the dead unique”, he enthuses.

Faith, the young Metsese, a geologist graduate and businessman chips in that depending on the prowess of the  obi  ife, the  ife  could even reveal some relevant descriptions of the person responsible for a death. It could be that the culprit is a family member of the deceased: a parent, sibling, uncle, or aunty.

“That goes to show you how relevant  ife  bibi  is”, the elder Metsese says. But to avoid family conflict, the  obi  ife  could just say the death was caused from within or from outside.

To  bife  and dump the corpse of a witch at  igbele  is an age-long tradition of the Itsekiris. Though similar customs and traditions in burial rites, marriage ceremonies, inheritance and others with other ethnic groups, especially their Urhobo and Ijaw neighbours, this aspect of  ife bibi  is peculiar to the Itsekiris.

“It’s the unique way of our traditions of punishing the evil ones in our midst”, Pa Peduru says with pride. “If you feel you could commit evil through witchcraft or any other supernatural means and leave the world in peace,  ife  bibi awaits you.” He adds that spiritually, such a person pays for it as his corpse being dumped at  igbele  causes his spirit to be restless, going by the belief, which also brings shame to his family.

But  ife  bibi  is not only done to determine if somebody was a witch while alive, he says.

Like many Itsekiris who spoke on this, it was corroborated by Pa Oleko Ejutemiden, an  obi  ife  at Ode-Itsekiri, also known as Big Warri, an island town across the Warri River, which is regarded as the traditional capital of the Itsekiri nation. The oracle priest adds that through  ife  bibi, everything could be revealed about a death, depending on the enquiry made to the  ife. It responds to enquiries on whether a person died a natural death?  If not, what or who was responsible?

Mr. Alfred Omagbemi, a veteran broadcaster and Itsekiri cultural advocate, however reveals that not only the corpses of evil ones are dumped at igbele. He says there are some deaths that have their peculiar ‘spirits’, causing the corpses not deserving to be buried inside town. “They are when a person commits suicide, drowns or burns.”

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Prince Posy

Prince Posy from Facebook19 hours ago

I beg make una carry una wahala go joor everybody want come advice and talk…… As if Na una better pass, I beg una better pack well and look for some thing better to do or talk about… Wish kind matter be all this one, when we see the main issue noon of us go ever talk Na the one when one cool parson just laugh over Na him everybody go want come claim saint put, just don’t want to insult or be rude to any body here is high time we stop or I will start the fight with who so ever want it ………

Catherine Egbe

Catherine Egbe from Facebook20 hours ago

How can you sincerely call your comment a joke? Who jokes with something like this???? Would you be happy if someone jokes with your family member being a witch on social media??? Or you think the Iboris are not humans like you? This is a very expensive joke that can cause harm to members of that family beyond what you can imagine. You cannot joke with people’s lives like this!!!

– See more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2015/07/igbele-evil-forest-where-itsekiris-dump-corpses-of-witches-wizards/#sthash.8wjbK988.dpuf

YORUBA O! -O’DUA MUSEUM ATI HALL of FAME OPENS AT COCOA HOUSE,IBADAN!

April 21, 2013

O’dua Museum, Hall of Fame: Preserving a people’s legacy

Posted by: Our Reporter

on April 13, 2013

in Travels on Saturday

Leave a comment

The transformation was rapid and dramatic. Suddenly one was transported from the sophistication of a cosmopolitan high-rise building in the centre of a city to a rural setting more than 40 years ago.

Such is the transformation that one experiences on visiting the recently commissioned O’odua Museum and Hall of Fame in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital.

As the guard opened the wooden door with intricate designs to usher one in, the voice of the late Hubert Ogunde could be heard singing in Yoruba. It was as if he was just around the corner. As one climbed the staircase to the museum floor, one was no longer on the 20th floor of the Cocoa House.

One was transported back in time to the years gone by. What one felt all around was the African essence.

Both sides of the wall are decorated with batiks. A traditional African mat is rolled out on the floor.

The next point is the corridor with a signpost signalling that the museum is on the right, while the Hall of Fame is on the left. Museums, all over the world, always have special appeal. So, the first place to visit was the museum. Even before seeing some of the artifacts, the ambience created was purely rural: local mats used on the floor, red earthen walls, bamboo sticks used as part of the declaration.

The museum captures the totally of Yoruba way of life in the old days. Pots and bronze carvings of different sizes are displayed. The different kinds of Yoruba drums are also arranged neatly.

Appurtenances of royalty such as beads, horse-tail, crowns and walking sticks are displayed at the royalty section.

One of the most interesting section of the museum is the war section where old war weapons such as guns are on display. The treaty that brought an end to the Yoruba war of the 19th century titled Proclamation of Peace at Kiriji-Mesin Battlefield was boldly displayed.

Professor Wole Soyinka, who declared the place open early this month, commended the management of O’dua Investment Limited and had this to say: “The museum showcases the beginning of Yoruba technology and the ingenuity of our forbearers, but I want to say there is still more to do now that an appeal has been made to people to donate materials to enrich the arts, crafts and antiquities contents of the museum.

“Let me say that it is with a thought of nostalgia that I return to the Cocoa House and I must say I am very happy with what I have seen here.

”Cocoa House is one of those firsts Yoruba recorded in Nigeria. This area specifically used to be the centre of arts and Yoruba culture. But the negative side of it is that Nigeria once went into a downward spin, including Cocoa House and the University of Ibadan. The deterioration was much. Everything decayed and the famous Cocoa House could not save itself. But what we have seen so far impressed me, from the Ground Floor to the Top Floor of this building. This Cocoa House is the contemporary Oranmiyan staff for Yoruba.”

The curator of the museum, Mr. Babajide Famuyiwa, explained the reason behind the establishment of the museum: “ It is created to showcase the essence of the Yoruba people. What the Yoruba call Omoluabi. The Yoruba people have played a major part in the economic development of the country. They have helped in the development of every sphere of endeavour in the country. So in that wise, it was decided that we should look at these and bring them in focus. That informed the creation of the O’odua Museum and Hall of Fame.

“It is not only about the pre-colonial artifacts that are on display. Colonial era items that had influenced life in the past are also there. For those who may not have heard of gramophone, polaroid camera, type-writer and so on, they will find the museum useful. The museum would be a treasure trove for many young persons wishing to know more about the past.

“The Hall of Fame section is a kind of pantheon for Yoruba personalities from all walks of life. They include the late Professor Awojobi, Hubert Ogunde, Mrs. Funmilayo Ransome Kuti , Rashidi Yekini and many others.

“A tour of the hall of fame and museum has an icing. One has an opportunity for a wonderful bird-eye view of the Ibadan city. There are also strong binoculars that one could use to view any part of Ibadan.

“There are two sections to it, the museum and the hall of fame. Let us start with the museum.

In the museum, we try to showcase some Yoruba artifacts. There are certain peculiarities with the ancient civilization in the ancient time. This is reflected in the collections we have in the museum. We have musical instruments, pottery, craft in terms of traditional weaving. What we try to do is to exhibit and display some of the things that the Yoruba used in those days.

“We tried to look at the concept of Omoluabi, that is, those who have lived according to certain Yoruba societal moral values and made remarkable success in life through these. We like achievements of Yoruba sons and daughters in the area technology, politics, sports, arts and many other endeavours. This is what have done.

“At the Hall of Fame, we have people like Professor Soyinka, the late Hubert Ogunde, ex-president Olusegun Obasanjo , M.K.O. Abiola, Rashidi Yekini, the late Chief Obafemi Awolowo, the late Chief S.L. Akintola, the late Mrs. Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti and many others.”

He talked also about the media viewing centre: “The media viewing centre can take about 20 persons. The idea is that when people go round, they could come to see the video clips of some of these personalities on display in the hall of fame. They would hear there voice, see them in action through these video clips.

“The place is opened to everybody coming to the city of Ibadan. We encourage school children, university students, researchers and so on. It is open for now from Monday to Friday from 10am to 4pm. We believe as time goes on, the management would consider adding weekends to the opening days. For now, the fee has not been officially sanctioned. It is not likely to be more than 200 naira per person. “

The O’dua Museum and Hall of Fame has succeeded in adding to the richness of the essence of the ancient city of Ibadan. Before it used to be the University of Ibadan and few other places.

MODERN AFRICAN WOMEN PREPARE FOR MARRIAGE IN ThE TRADITiONAL CALABAR FATTENING ROOM On AFRICAN REALITY TV! -FROM THE PUNCH NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

April 20, 2013

Modern babes in fattening room

2013-04-17 00:15:03

In a fresh and ambitious re-enactment of the Efik pre-marriage tradition, Fattening Room, six ladies drawn from different parts of Africa land in seclusion, writes AKEEM LASISI

 At a time many people fear that the country’s many cultural practices are on the extinction plane, Fattening Room, a major bridal practice of the Efik People of Cross River, appears to have got a new lease of life. It will soon become a spectacle to be watched on the screen, through the acts of six modern ladies who have just experienced it.

The producer, EbonyLife, which has come up with some powerful reality shows in recent times, describes  Fattening Room as an authentic experience set in the historically significant city of Calabar, also home to the famous Calabar Cultural Festival.

“The Fattening Room is unique to the Efik culture of Nigeria and is practised when young women enter a house of seclusion to learn everything a woman needs to know about running an honourable home, raising children that are as good as gold and managing to keep her husband happy and at home,” the company’s Director of Reality Programmes, Pamela Ofoegbu, notes.

The organisation believes that the time has come to discover the inner chambers of tradition that have always been reserved for women only, when six young ladies from across Africa enter the Fattening Room for the very first time.

She adds, “The ladies start the series in the strict Efik tradition and journey towards modern invention while always honouring their African roots.  It has been an incredible journey back to time as we celebrate our rich African heritage on a beautiful trado-modern backdrop. Our ladies from Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya emerged from the Fattening Room with a better appreciation of the Efik culture and tradition and also of themselves as strong African women full of value and worth.”

Just ‘escaping’ from the room are Roselyn Ashkar, a fashion model and journalist from Ghana; Sally Berold, an adventurer and freelance experiential marketing specialist from South Africa; Stephanie Unachukwu, a Nigerian designer and Patricia Kihoto, a singer, actress and radio personality from Kenya.

Others are Thsepo Maphanyanye,  a publicity and public relations executive from Botswana,  and Limpo Funjika, a business development manager and aspiring TV presenter from Zambia.

While the Series Producer at EbonyLife, founded by Mo Abudu,  Priscilia Nzimiro, says producing the Fattening Room has been a wonderful and enlightening experience,  with Content Director, Kenneth Gyang, lauding the treat as being engaging, the cast generally say the experience has been revealing.

Says Tshepo, “Participating in the fattening room has certainly been a surge of all kinds of emotions but best of all it has been without a doubt an incredible journey of discovery and a once in a lifetime opportunity of exposure to such a rich culture experienced alongside an amazing circle of young women from nations across Africa.Certainly one of my best experiences.”

For Limpo, it has provided her an opportunity to learn; and for Patricia, it has been a lot of fun although she concedes she has learnt a lot, even about herself.

Also says Stephanie, “I have had the opportunity to learn new skills in the short amount of time I’ve been here and look forward to the rest of the show and what it holds.”

Abudu congratulates all the participants and salutes the crew for the feat at producing Fattening Room. She notes, “It is a true testimony of ‘If you can think it, you can do it.’ As a team, during one of our strategy sessions about a year ago inTinapa, we wanted to develop and produce a reality show that showcased the rich culture of Calabar that is now home to EbonyLife TV and we thought what better way to do that, than the Efik tradition of The Fattening Room! And with the genius minds of the EbonyLifeTV team at work, we gave it a treatment that will simply wow everyone when it airs! We simply took an old Efik culture and gave it a modern twist. “

FELA ANIKULAPO-KUTI- OUR GREAT NIGERIAN MUSICIAN COMES BACK ALIVE TO NIGERIA THRU BROADWAY PRODUCTION COMING TO LAGOS,BACK TO FELA’S ROOTS!

May 16, 2011



FELA AND HIS FAMOUS MOTHER FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,AN ORGINAL FREEDOM FIGHTER FOR WOMEN!

FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,FELA'S MOTHER-THE GREAT WOMAN LEADER WHO FOUGHT THE OBA(KING) TO A STAND STILL OVER TAXING MARKET WOMEN AND WON!

BLACK PRESIDENT- AN ALBUM AND A MOVIE FELA MADE OUT OF THIS!

FELA MARRIED 22 WIVES INSTEAD OF THE USUAL DUMPING OF GIRLFRIENDS THAT OTHER MEN DO- BLACK POLYGAMY IS THE ANSWER TO THE BLACK WOMAN'S MEN PROBLEM AND IF AFRICAN CULTURE!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/may/15/taking-fela-kuti-home

Taking Fela Kuti home

Sahr Ngaujah has spent the last two years playing the great Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti on stage in New York and London. Last month he took the production back to Kuti’s native Nigeria. Here, he describes the extraordinary and emotional trip

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* Sahr Ngaujah
* The Observer, Sunday 15 May 2011
* Article history

sahr-ngaujah
Man on a mission … Sahr Ngaujah on the beach near Lagos, Nigeria, in April. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Observer

The air was humid and thick; a constant wind blew in from the sea, sponging up every sweat bead on our skin. A cacophony of sound permeated the air – revving and idling engines, okada motorcycle taxi horns, heavy bass lines and people talking loud. Posters bearing the faces of various smiling politicians were plastered on every inch of space.

1. Fela!
2. Sadler’s Wells,
3. London

1. Starts 20 July
2. Until 28 August
3. Box office:
0844 412 4300
4. More details

In New York and London, our task was to recreate Fela Kuti’s world in the Nigeria of the 1970s, viewed from within his club, the Africa Shrine. Now we were entering Nigeria to bring Fela back to his own people, to recreate the Shrine of the 70s at a big theatre built by his children and called the New Africa Shrine.

As our plane came over Lagos we were keenly aware that today was election day, the first round, with two weeks to go. We were arriving under curfew. It was a sunny day and as we looked out of our windows it was clear the curfew was taken seriously. All of the streets were clear, no movement save the military men at their posts at junctions throughout the city.

We disembarked amid a flurry of security personnel, some private, some state, some local. We were ushered on to our buses, and with a full military escort we tore out of the airport and began barrelling down the empty expressway to Victoria Island. Welcome to Lagos! We had no idea what would await us in this infamous African metropolis, but we had a mission and a commitment to complete it.

I first visited Nigeria in 2008, just after the off-Broadway production of Fela! closed. I was there for Felabration, a week-long festival that takes place every October to mark Fela’s birthday. I spent my nights at the New Africa Shrine and my days visiting Fela’s house, Kalakuta. I often wondered what sort of impact this type of experience would have on my colleagues after all the effort they’d put into showing other people the world of Fela. Now they were here. We were to play the New Africa Shrine and the Eko Hotel’s conference centre, both holding 3,000. First we had to settle into our new environment and prepare to meet our first audience, the people of Fela’s Shrine.

In those early days my routine consisted of a lot of sleep to get over the jet lag, rehearsing my Yoruba pronunciations and running along the ocean in the Lekki district. Some of my colleagues were having their first experience of African markets and haggling, Nigerian style. At night we could be found recounting the day’s adventures in the courtyard of the Eko Hotel, enjoying the open-air bar while paying Midtown Manhattan prices for our favourite drinks, always under the watchful eye of our no-nonsense security escorts.
fela kuti Afrobeat king Fela Kuti. Photograph: Guardian

Among the richest moments were the time we spent with Fela’s family, with his children Femi, Yeni, Kunle and Seun, along with his siblings, cousins and wives. In 2008 one of Fela’s sons, Kunle, described Fela being buried. He described the scene of thousands of people filling the streets and covering every rooftop in the area. Now here I was with all my colleagues, seeing Fela’s grave. Then they opened the door of his room. His room had been sealed for years. There was his sax, his bed, hundreds of suits, there was everything.

Kunle hadn’t been in the room for 10 years. Seun hadn’t been in for three. But they opened that room to let those people who had dedicated so much to keep his memory alive glimpse Fela, my beloved colleagues who had sacrificed so much of their bodies and their blood to bring Fela’s world to life for thousands of people every night on 49th Street in New York.

Days later I found myself filing off a bus to stand before the New Africa Shrine with those colleagues. As we crushed our way to the entrance we began to hear the sound that had become so familiar to us over the years through watching documentaries about our subject. We heard the voice of the people, calling for Fela, calling for the Kalakutans – the people of Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, the compound where he lived and recorded with his family and his band. As we crossed the threshold of the shrine it seemed as if everyone in the place agreed on what the first utterance to us should be. From the front door to the stage door, all we heard greeting us was: “Welcome home.” Indeed, we had arrived. We were humbled by the reception and had no idea of the measure of beauty awaiting us for the duration of our stay.

Fela Kuti is an immense subject, a bottomless character. Bill T Jones, our director, would say: “Fela was a tornado of a man.” When we first arrived people would say: “How can you bring Fela from America to Nigeria? Fela belongs to us.” Before we left they told us: “Fela has come home.” I don’t think they were talking about us – they were talking about his spirit.

We are holding these experiences in our hearts and can’t wait to unleash them on those planning to join us for the adventure in London this summer.

• Sahr witnessed landmark elections in Nigeria and wants you to help encourage the trend in the Democratic Republic of Congo (fallingwhistles.com/freeandfair). He wore clothes courtesy of Gozi, creative director of his new favourite brand, UMi-1 (gozi.co.uk).
*****************************8*********************************

FROM geojane.wordpress.com

Raymond Cauchetier
The women of Fela
Fela Kuti

By geojane

Apr 11 2011

Category: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment »

Fela Anikulapo Kuti October 15, 1938- August 2, 1997 Nigerian musician and composer, creator, singer, saxophonist, frontman, inventor, and pioneer of afrobeat music.

How do you say his name, Fella or Fey-la?

NOVA Professor of History, Dr. Joeseph Windham, wise and worldly, pronounces Fela like the latter. Whichever way you say it, his name stands for a powerful and humble man. A paradox that translates in the music he creates.

This is a photograph of Fela Kuti with some of the beautiful women he marries. These particular women became victims of sexual brutality, thus cast out and dishonored in their communities. Fela uses marriage as a means of protecting the women from discrimination. He makes it clear that they are heroines, deserved of the utmost respect and honor.

Picture sourced from: http://www.kalamu.com

fela 34.jpg

YORUBA LANGUAGE IS DYING!-NEW BOOK ON ISSUES IN YORUBA RELIGION/LANGUAGE/CULTURE BY ROTIMI OGUNJOBI

September 30, 2010

FROM yeyeolade.blogspot.com

YORUBA CULTURE-A NEW BOOK ON ISSUES FACING THE CULTURE/RELIGION-INCLUDES MY ESSAY “THE DEATH OF YORUBA LANGUAGE?”

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Perspectives of Yorubaland: Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
By Rotimi Ogunjobi

Perspectives of Yorubaland:
Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
Front Cover
Rotimi Ogunjobi
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xceedia – tee publishing, 2010 – Art – 128 pages

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Selected pages
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
References
References
Contents
The Lost Kingdom
7

The Place of Susan Wengers Art in Yorùbá Religion
13

Ethical Insights from Odu Ifá
36

Exploring Art and Spirituality In The Yorùbá Culture
41

Metaphysics and Gender in an African Ritual Play
48

Exploring Ile
62

The Batá Drums
71

Ìbéjì Custom in Yorùbáland
81

The Death Of Yorùbá Language?
89

ODU EJI OGBE Ori Chant
97

The Leopard and Chimera A fable
101

Appendix
128

Copyright

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2010
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abundantly Orisa African art Afro-Cuban añá animals art and religion Art In Yorùbá artist batá drums Beier bless me abundantly bulging eyes carved ceremonies child Chimera Cuba dance dead deaf fish deities divine English Eredo exhibition feast festival Gèlèdé goddess gods/goddesses human ìbéjì children ìbéjì figures Ibitokun’s Igbo igede Ile-Ife Ita Yemoo jee n sowo Kehinde king king’s father king’s palace Lawal Leopard Leopard’s head Leopard’s wife let me labor monuments mother mask myths National Museum NCMM Newark Museum Nigeria Obatala Odu Ifá Ogboni Olabimtan Olodumare Olokun Oranmiyan Orisa ma jee Orunmila Osogbo Osun groove palm-oil parents people’s performance religious ritual river sacred sacrifice Sango Santería shrine songs sowo asenu Orisa spiritual stew Susanne Wenger symbols Taiyewo tattoo told town Ori koo traditional Ulli Beier Wenger’s art worship Yorùbá art Yorùbá belief Yorùbá culture Yorùbá language Yorùbá religion Yorùbá Speaking Yorùbáland
Bibliographic information
Title Perspectives of Yorubaland: Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
Author Rotimi Ogunjobi
Editor Rotimi Ogunjobi
Edition illustrated
Publisher xceedia – tee publishing, 2010
ISBN 9784983710, 9789784983716
Length 128 pages
Subjects Art / General
Reference / General
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Posted by YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE at 1:59 AM


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