Posts Tagged ‘MUSIC’

MICHAEL JACKSON IN AFRICA!–BLACK PEOPLE!-FROM THISISAFRICA.ME ATI ADEGBOYEGA THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK

November 13, 2014

MICHAEL JACKSON IN AFRICA!—-FROM THISISAFRICA.ME ATI ADEGBOYEGA THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK!

FROM THISISAFRICA.ME
(THROUGH ADEGBOYEGA S. THOMPSON ON FACEBOOK)

The (Mis)Use of Kiswahili in Western popular culture

October 10, 2014 — That Kiswahili words and phrases sometimes crop up in western pop culture is not surprising; it is, after all, the most widely spoken African language on the continent. But every so often its use leaves native speakers a little puzzled.

Michael Jackson was made a prince of the Anyi people 1992 in Krinjabo, Cote d’Ivoire, in 1992, but his relationship with the continent began long before that. His use of Kiswahili in a song called “Liberian Girl” was a little odd though.

Michael Jackson was made a prince of the Anyi people 1992 in Krinjabo, Cote d’Ivoire, in 1992, but his relationship with the continent began long before that. His use of Kiswahili in a song called “Liberian Girl” was a little odd though.

Kiswahili is a language spoken by more than 100 million people, predominantly in several states of East Africa. The language also has a significant presence in major cities of Europe, the United States of America and the Gulf states where African Diaspora communities are found. As a result of its global reach and millions of speakers the language pervades the lives of many across the globe and is never far away, even if not realised. For example it is taught in several universities around the world, and many media stations such as the BBC, Voice of America, Radio Deutsche Welle, Radio Moscow International and Radio Japan International all have programmes in Kiswahili.
In the United States the African American holiday Kwanzaa takes it names from the Kiswahili phrase ‘matunda ya kwanza’ meaning ‘the first fruits of the harvest’; ‘kwanza’ is the Kiswahili word for first. If you’re English, American or Canadian you may have also found yourself shouting out a Kiswahili word when playing the popular wooden block game Jenga; Jenga being the Kiswahili root word for build. In western popular culture Kiswahili has found itself in film, television and music. Sometimes its been used in short snippets, while other times complete monologues of characters have been in Kiswahili. However while its use is apparent the correct use of the language has not always been so.
Hakuna Matata
Disney’s 1994 animated feature The Lion King is perhaps the most popular western film featuring Kiswahili. The film tells the story of a lion cub and future king named Simba. The film is full of Kiswahili words and phrases. The main character ‘Simba’ means lion (in Shona it means strength or power) and the friendly Baboon called Rafiki means friend. There are also many songs in kiswahiki in the film. One of which is when Rafiki sings to Simba ‘Asante sana squash banana, Wewe nugu mimi hapana’, which is Kiswahili for ‘Thank you very much, squash banana, you’re a baboon and I’m not.’

BLACK “PRINCE”-with an AFRO! -on the COVER OF V magazine!

September 19, 2013

NINA SIMONE-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-FULL-AFRICAN FEATURES and ALL-MUST NOT BE PROTRAYED by THIS imitation white girl looking “sister”!

August 2, 2013

http://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/nina-simone-zoe-saldana-e1353435699302.jpg

RICK ROSS BACK TO AFRICA FOR THE 2ND TIME IN NIGERIA AND LOVES NIGERIAN WOMEN-BLACK WOMEN!-‘

August 24, 2012

http://yeyeolade.blogspot.com/2012/08/black-women-are-best-rick-ross-arrives.html NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.NOLLYWOOD PLUS

News, Events, Entertainment, Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and yes… Gossip! *Wink*

Friday, August 24, 2012
Why I love Nigerian women -Rick Ross
When his 300 pounds frame touched down on Lagos soil last week, it didn’t take long for the widely-acclaimed American rapper, Rick Ross to make an impression of the most populous black city in the world. “I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great,” he gushed.
Few days before his trip, the tattoo-crazy artiste declared on Twitter, “Nigeria is rich with Oil. Generational wealth. I need some.”
For the Maybach Music Group boss, the trip to headline the inaugural edition of Summer Jam Festival was not his first to Nigeria.
The Miami born star first visited Nigeria in 2010, as one of the star performers at MTV Africa Music Awards (MAMA). But this time, Rozay as he is fondly called by fans came on the bill of St. Eve Concepts, publishers of St. Eve Magazine.
Ask him what he thinks about Nigerian ladies and he doesn’t mince words. Hear the thick-bearded lyricist: “We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.”
Entertainment Express had a brief chat with the showbiz mogul before he hit the imposing stage of New Expo Hall, Eko Hotels and Suites, Victoria Island, Lagos, to thrill anxious fans last Friday night.
Also read more about the highly anticipated concert that featured leading homegrown hip hop acts such as: Terry G, Flavour, Vector and others.

The whole nation is agog because of your visit, how do you feel right now?
I feel happy. I feel at home. It is a good thing to be loved among your people. Nigeria is home. Africa is where we all come from. This is our land and I am excited.

What are your expectations?
I have come here to entertain my hommies. I am here to have fun and let my people have a feel of me. You know after the show, have my hommies or whatever bringing me the best food. I smoke the best weed. I get the best massages. Already, I have gone on a tour to some parts of Lagos and I am excited about that. Nigeria is blessed. Nigeria is rich in oil and people. We have great people here, men and women.
Are you willing to take a Nigerian lady back to the States?
I’m single and I am enjoying life being a boss for now. But like all true bosses, one day you gotta give it up. Perhaps, then I would consider a Nigerian woman. I mean, black is black. We are all one. This is home for me. I am proud to be back home in the midst of my brothers and motherf**king sisters.
What do you like about Nigerian women?
We blacks are the best. We have the best set of ladies in the world. So, Nigerian women are the same.
If you settle down, would you like to have a Nigerian woman?
I am not going to say I feel the urge to settle down, but being a bachelor you go to sleep lonely a lot of nights, even for a boss. But I won’t say I’m ready to settle down; that ain’t even a consideration for me yet. You know what I mean? I just suck it up and then in the morning, someone’s available.

So far, how would you describe life in Nigeria?
It’s wonderful. I can feel the city already. It feels like it. My nose feels like it. People here are wonderful and I can feel the warmth all over. Even the people at the airport were great.

You have just been to some ghetto parts of Lagos, how would you compare it to the ghetto in the United States?
The ghetto life in the States is all about guns and cracks but I doubt if we have such here. I hear there are some dangerous spots here. The ghetto over there has houses but there are no such buildings here. It’s all fun all the same.

Your new album God Forgives, I don’t, how did you come about that title?
I had a lot of fun doing it, and I learnt a lot in the process, so I’m just excited it’s on the streets. It’s for the men on the street and those who hate.

What excites you the most about this album?
I’m just proud of the work. I mean, it’s like lightning in a bottle. You know what I’m saying, that’s one of the best ways to describe the new music, the concepts, the ideas — I just put a lot more into it.

What made you decide to get into film production?
I have always loved movies. After we shot the video for “Hustlin’,” a lot of people were asking me to do something. So, I was in Ireland, Paris, a lot of places that I went and it was just so surprising; I came back and we came up with the concept for M.I. YAYO which made the top 10 countdown of the ten biggest dealers in the history of my city. And then it just came up so phenomenal and groundbreaking; it’s a powerful piece to watch. I would also make a movie out of my visit to Lagos.

Many rappers adore you, do you see yourself as a role model?
I think I rep the hood. I see myself as a motivation for somebody who — you know, a young dude sitting in the house that wants to live his dream. I may not be a role model, but I most definitely could be a motivation for a lot of people in the hoods.

What would you say has kept you in the game?
Just not having no Plan B. I mean, that’s what it was. You know, once I make my mind up on something, ain’t no Plan B. Yeah.

How did you hook up with Jay-Z and the likes?
We needed to hook up. He belongs to where I belong. So once we sat down, he saw my vision, we chopped it up like bosses, so here it is.

What about Nigerian P-Square?
Those are my hommies, I love those niggas. They are good. I love their songs which was why we hooked up. There are many artistes here that I am familiar with.

How has your recent success changed you?
I get that question a lot, and other than the obvious, I don’t think it changed me a lot, you know what I mean? It might have made me more hungrier for more success — that’s with anything. You know, I tell everybody where I’m from.

Lagos rocks as Rick Ross dazzles fans
The time was 10 p.m. Friday, August 17. It was still a clear one hour gap to the 11 p.m. arrival time of the American super star rapper, Rick Ross, but the venue, Eko Hotels and Suites had already become jampacked with both human and vehicular traffic.
From the upper lounge of the Expo Centre where few journalists stood to catch a vintage view of the show, the 5, 000 capacity hall was a sea of human heads.

From the black door which was the main entrance to the other narrow door of the hall, young men and women stood glued and facing Rick Ross on stage. Despite the large crowd, more and more people pushed and shoved to come nearer the stage. Photographers, mobile phone cameras and video cameramen carried there equipment high above their heads making it look like the cameras had feet of their own.
At the main gate, the battle for entry was tough. The fervor of most of the fans was put in check at the entrance by menacing macho-looking men from K’s Security, yet few young men and ladies forced their way in.

However, the crowd waited for about an hour before the duo of Beat FM’s MC Larry D and Olisa Adibua would set the ball rolling. Obviously, the double-deck stage arrangement gave a wide floor space for performances, while the elevation housed Rick Ross’s official DJ, Zeez and DJ Jimmy Jatt at the other extreme.

Starting on a low energy, the show dragged on to slow note with performances by Dammy Krane, a new kid on the block who is signed to Tuface’s Hypertek record label, the ‘Down Low’ crooner Flowsick, Zaina and delectable Sheyi Shey. Their performances were obviously snowed under by the frightening task of setting the tone for the occasion.

As the organizers made the wait for Rick Ross worthwhile, Terry G came on stage. As usual, the dreadlocks wearing musician ‘killed’ it. He stood out from every other person that performed that night because of his zany theatrics and panache. He wowed the audience when he brought out his bell to complement his mental craze style on stage. The entire crowd simply went agog.
After the Benue born artiste left the stage, the eagerly expectant fans would again wait for some minutes before the international rap star came on stage. For a while, an upbeat tempo of adrenalin pumping music performances were dropped by known acts including self-styled ‘Kukere’ master, Iyanya, Timaya, Bovi and the South African duo of Liquid Deep.

Around some minutes to 11.p.m, the man of the moment, Rick Ross arrived in a colourful way. With Rick Ross’ arrival, the hall lit up in pink, white and orange colours. It was obvious a bigger star in status and clout had made an entrance. It was a grand entrance. Just before you could say jack, the night skyline of the Eko Hotel & Suites glowed in a grandiose carnival of colours like night skies at Christmas time.
The dramatic entry visibly brought the hall on its feet. The DJ stand which featured the well experienced and youthful disc jockey, Zeez came alive for the first time and later became very busy for the next two hours. Distinguishing of the award-winning Maybach record boss, he opened with his famous signature. “Can I get a Rozaaaay?”

From that unique opening, it was a roller-coaster of performances from the Rick Ross collection including fresh songs from his latest album with tracks such as: ‘Blowing money fast’, ‘Hustlin’, ‘Hold me back’, ‘I’m not a star’ and ’The boss’.The highpoint of the two-hour performance included songs he recorded with other acts like DJ Khaled, T-Pain, Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. The show climaxed when the huge rapper told the crowd how much he was happy to be in Nigeria after which he sang the ‘One Nation’ song which got the audience jumping and screaming for more. Obviously, it was over. Rick Ross had performed 13 songs in a single night.

Meanwhile, the low point of the show occurred with occasional technical hiccups from the sound system. The organizers also made a grave mistake of bringing Flavour, Vector and Eva after Rozay’s performance as they performed to an almost empty hall.
Indeed, it was a night heaven blazed. A night of stars from all walks of life. People from government, business, diplomatic circles, foreign dignitaries and of course, artistes, were all at the show.

Rick Ross – Profile of an entertainer
Born January 28, 1977, rapper William Roberts is best known by his hip-hop stage name, Rick Ross. These days, this self-proclaimed “Boss” – who stands more than six feet tall and weighs in at over 300 pounds – is living large and enjoying immense success, but don’t mistake his laid-back Southern demeanor for any lack of effort.

Growing up in Carol City, a lower-class, predominantly African-American suburb of Miami, Florida, the city Rick Ross knew was nothing like the glamorous South Beach we see on television — it was “a real hardcore place,” he has acknowledged. Even as a teenager, however, Rick Ross had the kind of drive that set him apart from the pack. He had big dreams, and he planned to accomplish them by any means necessary — a fact that led him to dabble in drug dealing and rapping as well as playing football.
In fact, he received a scholarship to play football at Albany State in Georgia, and it appeared that this might even open the door to an NFL contract, but after two weeks, Rick Ross realized that a career in sports ultimately wasn’t for him, so he left the programme.

Soon after his return from college, Rick Ross hooked up with childhood friends Elric “E-Class” Prince and Alex “Gucci Pucci” Bethune and signed to their management company, Poe Boy Entertainment, and he’s been hustling ever since. He appeared on the albums and mixtapes of other hometown artistes like Trina and Trick Daddy, making a name for himself in the local music scene long before coming out with his solo work. He eventually signed a joint deal with Trick Daddy’s Slip N’ Slide label, which has been under the Def Jam umbrella since 2007.

Rick Ross’ debut album, Port of Miami, was released in August 2006, and sold 187,000 copies in its first week, launching it straight to the top of the charts. A remix of the lead single,“Hustlin’,” by Jay Z and Young Jeezy drew even more attention to this Miami phenomenon, who dominated hip-hop playlists through much of 2007.

March 2008 marks the release of Rick Ross’ latest album, Trilla, as well as his documentary, M.I. YAYO, which looks at the top 10 drug dealers in Miami’s history.Though his past four solo albums have debuted at #1, in the past year Ross’ stock has risen faster than ever. The arrival of his instant-classic mixtape ‘Rich Forever’ – a self-released behemoth that some are calling the best rap of the year thusfar –and the constant barrage of new material, features and online contents that he and his MMG cohorts flood the streets with daily, has taken Ross to a new level.

MAHALIA JACKSON -A STUNNING BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY HERSELF SUNG UNDILUTED BLACK GOSPEL SO HEAR THIS VIDEO OF HER HERE!

February 26, 2012


http://www.last.fm/music/Mahalia+Jackson/+videos/+1-CmiGdWysQJQ
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New Orleans, United States
Mahalia Jackson (1911–1972 ) was a U.S. gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre.

Born on 26th October 1911, Jackson grew up in the “Black Pearl” section of the Carrollton neighbourhood of uptown New Orleans, Louisiana, and began singing in a Baptist church. In 1927 she moved to Chicago, Illinois, where she sang with the johnson brothers, one of the earliest professional gospel groups.

The Johnson Brothers broke up in the mid-1930s, and Jackson began her solo career, recording for Decca in 1937. The result, “God’s Gonna Separate the Wheat from the Tares”, was only a moderate success, but Jackson became a popular concert draw. She didn’t record again untill 1946, when she signed with Apollo Records, releasing several singles that are now highly regarded, though sales were sluggish at the time. “Move On up a Little Higher” (1948) became a huge success, however, and stores could not stock enough of it to meet demand. Jackson rocketed to fame in the U.S. and soon afterwards in Europe. “I Can Put My Trust in Jesus” won a prize from the French Academy, and “Silent Night” was one of the best-selling singles in the history of Norway. She began a radio series on CBS and signed to Columbia Records in 1954. With her mainstream success came an inevitable backlash from gospel purists who felt she had watered down her sound for popular accessibility.

RICK ROSS STORMS LAGOS,NIGERIA,AFRICA!-BACK TO AFRICA!-WHEITHER FOR A VISIT OR FINALLY!

May 16, 2011

http://naijagal.net/2010/12/16/rick-ross-storms-lagos/

At the Storm 360/Kilimanjaro Lagos Shutdown Concert…
January 10, 2011 8:01 am
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The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.

The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.

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WHEN STORM360/KILIMAJARO SHUT DOWN LAGOS WITH RICK ROSS, NAETO C AND OTHERS

Rick Ross

The Storm 360/Kilimanjaro, Lagos Shutdown Concert, which held on Monday, 27th December, 2010 at the prestigious Expo Center of Eko Hotel will be remembered as the standout show amongst the multitude of events that took place over the festive season.

Naeto C

The concert, which was expertly anchored by the Beat 99.9 FM’s Olisa Adibua, featured American rapper Rick Ross, as the leading artiste of the show. Also on the team of performers were some of Nigeria’s own finest musicians – Whiz Kid, Ice Prince, Dr SID, Sasha, YQ, Naeto C, MI. Together with the talented DJ Neptune, all the artistes thrilled the audience with hit after hit, while Olisa skillfully knitted each part of the concert into a perfect script. As Rick Ross finally stepped on stage, the expectant crowd went wild – even the VIP guests refused to be left out – screaming along the lyrics as he performed his hit tracks, ‘One Nation Under God’ and ‘BMF’.

For all who attended the show, one thing was obvious – Lagos shut down!

Short URL: http://gistmaster.com/?p=3044

FELA ANIKULAPO-KUTI- OUR GREAT NIGERIAN MUSICIAN COMES BACK ALIVE TO NIGERIA THRU BROADWAY PRODUCTION COMING TO LAGOS,BACK TO FELA’S ROOTS!

May 16, 2011



FELA AND HIS FAMOUS MOTHER FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,AN ORGINAL FREEDOM FIGHTER FOR WOMEN!

FUNMILAYO RANSOME-KUTI,FELA'S MOTHER-THE GREAT WOMAN LEADER WHO FOUGHT THE OBA(KING) TO A STAND STILL OVER TAXING MARKET WOMEN AND WON!

BLACK PRESIDENT- AN ALBUM AND A MOVIE FELA MADE OUT OF THIS!

FELA MARRIED 22 WIVES INSTEAD OF THE USUAL DUMPING OF GIRLFRIENDS THAT OTHER MEN DO- BLACK POLYGAMY IS THE ANSWER TO THE BLACK WOMAN'S MEN PROBLEM AND IF AFRICAN CULTURE!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/may/15/taking-fela-kuti-home

Taking Fela Kuti home

Sahr Ngaujah has spent the last two years playing the great Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti on stage in New York and London. Last month he took the production back to Kuti’s native Nigeria. Here, he describes the extraordinary and emotional trip

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* Sahr Ngaujah
* The Observer, Sunday 15 May 2011
* Article history

sahr-ngaujah
Man on a mission … Sahr Ngaujah on the beach near Lagos, Nigeria, in April. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Observer

The air was humid and thick; a constant wind blew in from the sea, sponging up every sweat bead on our skin. A cacophony of sound permeated the air – revving and idling engines, okada motorcycle taxi horns, heavy bass lines and people talking loud. Posters bearing the faces of various smiling politicians were plastered on every inch of space.

1. Fela!
2. Sadler’s Wells,
3. London

1. Starts 20 July
2. Until 28 August
3. Box office:
0844 412 4300
4. More details

In New York and London, our task was to recreate Fela Kuti’s world in the Nigeria of the 1970s, viewed from within his club, the Africa Shrine. Now we were entering Nigeria to bring Fela back to his own people, to recreate the Shrine of the 70s at a big theatre built by his children and called the New Africa Shrine.

As our plane came over Lagos we were keenly aware that today was election day, the first round, with two weeks to go. We were arriving under curfew. It was a sunny day and as we looked out of our windows it was clear the curfew was taken seriously. All of the streets were clear, no movement save the military men at their posts at junctions throughout the city.

We disembarked amid a flurry of security personnel, some private, some state, some local. We were ushered on to our buses, and with a full military escort we tore out of the airport and began barrelling down the empty expressway to Victoria Island. Welcome to Lagos! We had no idea what would await us in this infamous African metropolis, but we had a mission and a commitment to complete it.

I first visited Nigeria in 2008, just after the off-Broadway production of Fela! closed. I was there for Felabration, a week-long festival that takes place every October to mark Fela’s birthday. I spent my nights at the New Africa Shrine and my days visiting Fela’s house, Kalakuta. I often wondered what sort of impact this type of experience would have on my colleagues after all the effort they’d put into showing other people the world of Fela. Now they were here. We were to play the New Africa Shrine and the Eko Hotel’s conference centre, both holding 3,000. First we had to settle into our new environment and prepare to meet our first audience, the people of Fela’s Shrine.

In those early days my routine consisted of a lot of sleep to get over the jet lag, rehearsing my Yoruba pronunciations and running along the ocean in the Lekki district. Some of my colleagues were having their first experience of African markets and haggling, Nigerian style. At night we could be found recounting the day’s adventures in the courtyard of the Eko Hotel, enjoying the open-air bar while paying Midtown Manhattan prices for our favourite drinks, always under the watchful eye of our no-nonsense security escorts.
fela kuti Afrobeat king Fela Kuti. Photograph: Guardian

Among the richest moments were the time we spent with Fela’s family, with his children Femi, Yeni, Kunle and Seun, along with his siblings, cousins and wives. In 2008 one of Fela’s sons, Kunle, described Fela being buried. He described the scene of thousands of people filling the streets and covering every rooftop in the area. Now here I was with all my colleagues, seeing Fela’s grave. Then they opened the door of his room. His room had been sealed for years. There was his sax, his bed, hundreds of suits, there was everything.

Kunle hadn’t been in the room for 10 years. Seun hadn’t been in for three. But they opened that room to let those people who had dedicated so much to keep his memory alive glimpse Fela, my beloved colleagues who had sacrificed so much of their bodies and their blood to bring Fela’s world to life for thousands of people every night on 49th Street in New York.

Days later I found myself filing off a bus to stand before the New Africa Shrine with those colleagues. As we crushed our way to the entrance we began to hear the sound that had become so familiar to us over the years through watching documentaries about our subject. We heard the voice of the people, calling for Fela, calling for the Kalakutans – the people of Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, the compound where he lived and recorded with his family and his band. As we crossed the threshold of the shrine it seemed as if everyone in the place agreed on what the first utterance to us should be. From the front door to the stage door, all we heard greeting us was: “Welcome home.” Indeed, we had arrived. We were humbled by the reception and had no idea of the measure of beauty awaiting us for the duration of our stay.

Fela Kuti is an immense subject, a bottomless character. Bill T Jones, our director, would say: “Fela was a tornado of a man.” When we first arrived people would say: “How can you bring Fela from America to Nigeria? Fela belongs to us.” Before we left they told us: “Fela has come home.” I don’t think they were talking about us – they were talking about his spirit.

We are holding these experiences in our hearts and can’t wait to unleash them on those planning to join us for the adventure in London this summer.

• Sahr witnessed landmark elections in Nigeria and wants you to help encourage the trend in the Democratic Republic of Congo (fallingwhistles.com/freeandfair). He wore clothes courtesy of Gozi, creative director of his new favourite brand, UMi-1 (gozi.co.uk).
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FROM geojane.wordpress.com

Raymond Cauchetier
The women of Fela
Fela Kuti

By geojane

Apr 11 2011

Category: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment »

Fela Anikulapo Kuti October 15, 1938- August 2, 1997 Nigerian musician and composer, creator, singer, saxophonist, frontman, inventor, and pioneer of afrobeat music.

How do you say his name, Fella or Fey-la?

NOVA Professor of History, Dr. Joeseph Windham, wise and worldly, pronounces Fela like the latter. Whichever way you say it, his name stands for a powerful and humble man. A paradox that translates in the music he creates.

This is a photograph of Fela Kuti with some of the beautiful women he marries. These particular women became victims of sexual brutality, thus cast out and dishonored in their communities. Fela uses marriage as a means of protecting the women from discrimination. He makes it clear that they are heroines, deserved of the utmost respect and honor.

Picture sourced from: http://www.kalamu.com

fela 34.jpg

AKON!- OUR BLACK SKINNED HANDSOME BLACK MAN APPEARS IN NIGERIA,ILORIN,OCT. 2, 2010!

November 8, 2010

FROM jaguda.com
republished at-
yeyeolade.blogspot.com

http://yeyeolade.blogspot.com/2010/11/akon-black-skinned-handsome-black-man.html
(SEE FLICKS AT THIS POST ABOVE)


Monday, November 08, 2010
AKON! -BLACK SKINNED HANDSOME BLACK MAN STARS IN NIGERIA-ILLORIN,OCT.2,2010!
FROM jaguda.com

Live in Kwara state was some of the biggest events of the Independence Day weekend for Nigeria turning 50. The concert was held on October 2nd at Metropolitan Square in Illorin, Kwara State. The Concert featured International artist, Akon along with the biggest names in Naija entertainment, Dbanj, Sasha, Naeto C, Wande Coal, P-Square, YQ, Sauce Kid & co. Check out pics:
Source: Obi Asika’s FB album
Akon

Akon live on stage along side other Nigerian artist like Dbanj, Wande and others… Get more on Dbanj, Wande and others from these links…
http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/dbanj-playlist-youtube
http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/wande-coal-album-review-mushin-to-mohits
http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/2face-artist-profile
http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/nigerian-music-nigeria-latest-music-news-september-3-2010
http://www.nigeriamusicmovement.com/index.php/new-nigerian-music-nk-george
Reply
3.
HALIMAT says:
October 7, 2010 at 12:08 pm

infact that day is most happest in my life for seening Akon 4 live,oh i love akon so much,barvo!! to our dear governor of kwara state (bukola saraki)
Reply
4.
nexus says:
October 6, 2010 at 7:55 pm

ummm dbanj looks a little crazy almost busted without his sunglasses..so does naeto c. psquare taking off their shirts for men?! ok oh!
Reply
5.
temz says:
October 6, 2010 at 2:19 pm

1. What the heck is sasha wearing? Ugh
2. Sauce kid look like “were”, im sorry, but he does.
3. D-banj, i love you, but make una go put on weight
4. General pype: 3 gbosas for you
5. psquare: 3gbosa-1, bcos of that sagging pant


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