Posts Tagged ‘queens’

AKUA–A TRADITIONAL HEALER WHO BECOME A QUEEN IN JAMAICA BUT WAS KILLED BY THE BRITISH!

October 23, 2018

From Face2Face Africa

BY ELIZABETH OFOSUAH JOHNSON, at 06:00 pm, October 23, 2018, HISTORY

Akua, the influential slave healer who became queen in Jamaica but was executed by the British.

The Queen of Kingston in Jamaica or Cubah Cornwallis, as she is popularly known, is lost in history due to the improper documentation that makes it hard to follow or believe in her existence. In trying to read about the adventurous life of this woman who took the unwilling journey into slavery from Africa and was later executed for resisting oppression, it is easy to think that one is reading about two different women while trying to make sense of her story. That withstanding, it is equally important to attempt to make sense of her story and tell it as it is – an important part of history.

Cubah Cornwallis’s real name was Akua from the Ashanti Empire in Ghana which was then the Gold Coast. Nothing much is said about her life before being captured and sold off as an enslaved girl to the Carribean, but through historical readings, it can be speculated that she was captured during the early years of the many Ashanti Empire wars in an attempt to expand their Empire and have more power than the British. It is very possible that Akua was captured during the same time King Takyi was captured, or perhaps a little earlier than he was.

After making it alive to the Carribean on a slave ship, Akua was purchased by Captain William Cornwallis who later had an affair with her and made her his house help. It was during her time serving the captain that she was given the name Cubah, an incorrect way of mentioning her name. Akua served Captain William Cornwallis until he left Jamaica. In order to escape slavery, she moved to Port Royal permanently and purchased a house.

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Obeah practice in Jamaica

While in Africa, she had studied the use of herbs and spices in curing diseases and healing wounds and had added to her knowledge the Obeah practices started by the Africans in Jamaica that was regarded as witchcraft and black magic by the British and foreign traders. Akua converted her house into a hostel and hospital to treat and heal her fellow black people who were denied medical attention due to the colour of their skin.

Soon, her hospital and short stay hotel became the most visited in Jamaica and other parts of the Caribbean. Akua treated people from all walks of life and race. She is remembered for having hosted and treated King Henry IV when he was still a prince. She also treated sailors who went to sea and returned with strange sicknesses and was famous for her remedies for yellow fever, malaria and scurvy.

After a while, she became one of the few black women who commanded respect and high social ranking. Akua was strongly against slavery and racism and spoke about it regularly. It is believed that she is closely linked to slave rebellions, especially the Tacky Rebellion that lasted from May 1760 to July 1760.

By 1759, Akua was recognised and crowned the Queen of Kingston, as elected by slaves in Kingston. During meetings to discuss ways of ending slavery and ill-treatment of the black society, Akua’s royalty was recognised as she was given a high seat, sitting in state with a robe and a crown that distinguished her amongst the others.

Port Royal, Jamaica in the 17th century

During the Tacky Rebellion, she was given the role of the Queen of the Ashanti. The British were highly suspicious of Queen Akua’s involvement in the rebellion and were worried about the power she possessed because of her supposed Obeah black magic practises. She was accused of taking the role of resistance force and was almost killed by the British.

Rather than be killed, the British ordered that she be transported from the island in order to bring her power to an end. The plan was to sell her off to slavery again, but Queen Akua was successful in bribing the captain of the ship and was left on the western shores of Jamaica where another group of Fantis were.

While in the western shores, she joined the Fanti community and later joined the leeward rebels. Unfortunately for Queen Akua, she was recognised, recaptured and was executed by the British to serve as a warning to slaves who were given a second chance.

Even though it is hard to give exact dates and years for specific events that took place in Queen Akua’s life, it is safe to say that she found herself in Jamaica in the 1750s and was crowned Queen of Kingston at around 1760 just before the Tacky wars.

The interesting life of Queen Akua is one worth tracing for proper documentation and celebration.

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ELIZABETH OFOSUAH JOHNSON , Staff Writer

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Elizabeth Johnson is a Ghanaian –Nigerian avid reader and lover of the Creative Arts. She is also a writer and has worked with various online platforms as an editor and content creator. She also produces a literary radio show and has worked as a festival administrator. Her story was featured in the 2017 Independence anthology by Afridiaspora. Her play has been staged by African Theater Workshop and she is the 2018 winner of the Random Thoughts writing Prize.

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BLACK KINGS ATI ONE BLACK QUEEN!-“THE MANY MODERN-DAY KINGS AND QUEENS OF NIGERIA”-FROM SLATE.COM

February 3, 2015

FROM SLATE.COM ATI YEYEOLADE.BLOGSPOT.COM

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

KINGS-NIGERIAN KINGS ATI ONE QUEEN!-“THE MANY MODERN-DAY KINGS AND QUEENS OF NIGERIA”-FROM SLATE.COM

from slate.com

The Many Modern-Day Kings and Queens of Nigeria

Behold
The Photo Blog
Jan. 27 2015 10:23 AM
The Many Modern-Day Kings and Queens of Nigeria
4
HRM Oba Jimoh Oyetunji Olanipekun Larooye II, Ataoja of Osogboland, 2012.
George Osodi
Up until the 1960s, kings and queens controlled hundreds of ethnic groups in Nigeria. Today, the descendents of those rulers still play important roles as intermediaries between politicians and the people in their communities and as custodians of the cultural heritage.
An upcoming exhibit at the Newark Museum, “Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs,” collects photos from George Osodi’s ongoing project, which has taken him into the palaces of more than 20 kings and queens all over the country. The project is intended to show off Nigeria’s history and cultural complexity, and to promote harmony in a country often torn apart by ethnic and religious conflict. Osodi is excited to show this work for the first time in the United States because he thinks the project has special relevance for Nigerians who’ve emigrated abroad and their children, who have never been to their homeland.
“I feel that it’s high time we as a country see this diversity as a point of unity in Nigeria rather than something that divides us,” he said.
9
HRM Lucky Ochuko Ararile, The Ovie of Umiaghwa Abraka Kingdom, 2012.
George Osodi
7
HRH Emir of Zauzau (Zaria) Alhaji, Dr. Shehu Idris, 2006.
George Osodi
5
The Emir of Kano’s Rolls Royce, 2012.
George Osodi
In his photos, Osodi places special attention to the fashions of the rulers—the red garments popular in the south, and the robes popular in the north—as well as the various architectural styles of their palaces, which have been influenced by Christianity and Islam, the country’s two dominant religions.
“We are living in a much more modern society today, and a lot of people have misplaced their cultural identity, especially because of technology and globalization,” he said. “I think it’s good to remind Nigerians who left the country and had the next generation born in foreign lands that you have a home, a place where you come from, and this is what it looks like.”
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HRH Queen Hajiya Hadizatu Ahmedu, Magajiya of Kubwada, 2012.
George Osodi
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HRM Oba Okunade Sijuwade, Olubuse II, Ooni of Ife, 2012.
George Osodi
In order to photograph the rulers, Osodi wrote official letters to introduce himself and his project, but he didn’t always have the best results. For those he was finally able to photograph—including his mother’s king, His Royal Majesty Agbogidi Obi James Ikechukwu Anyasi II, Obi of Idumuje Unor—his aim was to portray them in a stately and dignified manner, the same way in which they were likely to see themselves.
“These kings, some of them have had ancestors who were kings in the early days of slavery. Some were kings in the early days of the Europeans capturing various kingdoms. Some were heavily humiliated, and they were photographed in ways that were dehumanizing by some of these captors in the early days of colonialism,” Osodi said. “I wanted to now show them in the modern day as true kings of the 21st century.”
The exhibition, “Royals and Regalia,” is on display at the Newark Museum from Feb. 25 through Aug. 9.
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HRM Agbogidi Obi James Ikechukwu Anyasi II, Obi of Idumuje Unor, 2012.
George Osodi
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HRM The Emir of Kano Alhaji Ado Bayero Reception, 2012.
George Osodi

Jordan G. Teicher writes about photography for Slates Behold blog. Follow him on Twitter.

QUEEN MICHELLE OBAMA ! -MENELIK CHARLES’ ODE TO MICHELLE OBAMA! – FROM FACEBOOK!

March 26, 2014

Michelle Obama…America’s Chocolate Queen

BY Menelik CHARLES

Your skin is brown and clothing astounds
yet your beauty does confound

You’re proud of face and walk with grace
yet they can’t wait til you’re replaced

You reach to embrace where others shake
and Hug where others hesitate

By the President you stand near
and yet it’s YOU they fear

You read of smears ‘n’ sneers and
comments about your rear

You hear it all and stand so tall
while enemies stall ‘n’ fall

You’re the 1st Lady we applaud

(c) Menelik Charles.

— with Marilyn Aunty Mayo Cazoe-Cummings

· 
COMMENTS-

Menelik Charles
She’s a lady 

Yohanan EliYah
She has to be in the Top 5 of women who clean up well, because I have seen those pictures where she’s not really cute at all- but when she’s in 1st Lady character, OMG, I want her on my arm. All politics aside- I love this sistah.

Menelik Charles
Yep lol

Maria L. Castellon
Lovely and true poem…thanks!

Jonathan Chiles
Sir Charles,

Thank you for this excellent and poignant ode which honors our GREAT FIRST LADY and an even better MOTHER. ALL PRAISE unto Her and your considerable Artistry and Efforts.

Menelik Charles
Thanks bro Jonathan 

Jonathan Chiles
Thank you! You’ve built an impressive body of work. Compelling insight always and a dignified and wise world view – always.

Robert Rosenthall
THE WORLD’S QUEEN FROM THE ROYAL FAMILY OBAMA

MISS ISRAEL IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-YTYISH AYNAW!-From http://prettyperiod.me/

March 17, 2014

MISS ISRAEL IS A BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-YTYISH AYNAW!-From http://prettyperiod.me/


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