Posts Tagged ‘RACISM’

BRAZIL OOOOOO!!!!BLACK IN BRAZIL OOOO!!!-TEACHER CHANGES TO BLACK HAIRSTYLE TO SUPPORT BULLIED STUDENT ATTACKED BECAUSE OF HER WOOLLY HAIR!!!-FROM GOOD BLACK NEWS.COM

March 31, 2017

article via bbc.com A Brazilian teacher has come up with a unique way to help a schoolgirl who was being bullied because of her hair. Ana Barbara Ferreira, from Sao Paulo, Brazil, said her student was “sad” after being ridiculed by a boy, who had said her hair was “ugly”. “At that moment, the only […]

via Teacher Ana Barbara Ferreira Changes Hairstyle to Support Bullied Student — GOOD BLACK NEWS

YORUBAS OOOOO!—MUHAMMAD ALI IN YORUBA DRESS PLAYING THE TALKING DRUM,1964

June 8, 2016

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The Yoruba

The Champ, The Greatest has joined our ancestors. Sleep well , Mohammed Ali Jan 17 1942 – Jun 3 2016. He is pictured here during his 1964 visit to West Africa, wearing the Yoruba traditional outfit for men, and playing the gangan Yoruba talking drum. The world has lost another gem.

4 June at 06:08 · Public · in Timeline Photos

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Omigbule Bukola

orun re, akoni lo!
1 · 4 June at 21:42

Opeyemi Ajoke Adebisi

MAY HE RIP
5 June at 14:32

Yemisi Alabi

RIP
Sunday at 20:59

A Soldier’s Veve

Elatchê! Now maybe we can get some help down here.
Monday at 00:31

Adé Túnjí

R. I. P. THE UNDISPUTED CHAMPION
Monday at 15:01

Elugbadebo John

R . I . P
Monday at 15:29

Alex Flowers

Ali is missed
Monday at 16:27

Adegboyega Shamsideen Thompson

Ęgbon wā, Momodu, Ę Sùn ‘Rē O…
Today at 02:38

BLACK PEOPLE!–MARY TURNER WAS LYNCHED ALONG SIDE HER HUSBAND IN 1918! –FROM MARYTURNERPROJECT.ORG,SEEN ON FACEBOOK

September 22, 2015

from maryturnerproject.org

mary turner historical marker

Remembering Mary Turner

  WARNING: This website contains graphic information, violent images, and adult language.

In May of 1918, Hampton Smith, a 31 year old White plantation owner in Brooks County, Georgia was shot and killed by one of his Black workers named Sydney Johnson. Hampton Smith was known for abusing and beating his workers to the point few people in the area would work for him. To solve this labor shortage, Smith turned to the debt peonage system of the day and found a ready labor pool. He used that system by bailing people out of jail, people typically arrested for petty offenses, and having them work off their debt (the bail money) to him on his plantation. Nineteen year old Sydney Johnson, arrested for “rolling dice” and fined thirty dollars, was one such unfortunate person.

After a few days of work on Smith’s plantation, and shortly after being refused his earned wages and beaten by Smith for not working while he was sick, Sidney Johnson shot and killed Hampton Smith. What ensued after the shooting was a mob driven manhunt for Johnson and others thought to be involved in his decision to kill Hampton Smith. That manhunt lasted for more than a week and resulted in the deaths of at least 13 people with some historical accounts suggesting a higher number of persons killed. One of the people killed was a woman named Mary Turner.

Twenty year-old Mary Turner (m.n. Hattie Graham), 8 months pregnant at the time and whose husband had been killed in this “lynching rampage” on Sunday, May 19th, publicly objected to her husband’s murder. She also had the audacity to threaten to swear out warrants for those responsible. Those “unwise remarks,” as the area papers put it, enraged locals. Consequently, Mary Turner fled for her life only to be caught and taken to a place called Folsom’s Bridge on the Brooks and Lowndes Counties’ shared border. To punish her, at Folsom’s Bridge the mob tied Mary Turner by her ankles, hung her upside down from a tree, poured gasoline on her and burned off her clothes. One member of the mob then cut her stomach open and her unborn child dropped to the ground where it was reportedly stomped on and crushed by a member of the mob. Her body was then riddled with gunfire from the mob. Later that night she and her baby were buried ten feet away from where they were murdered. The makeshift grave was marked with only a “whiskey bottle” with a “cigar” stuffed in its neck.

Three days after the murder of Mary Turner and her baby, three more bodies were found in the area and Sydney Johnson was killed in a shoot out with police on South Troup Street in Valdosta, Georgia. Once killed, the crowd of more than 700 people cut off his genitals and threw them into the street. A rope was then tied to his neck and his body was drug for nearly 20 miles to Campground Church in Morven, Georgia, 16 miles away. There, what remained of his body was burned. During and shortly after this chain of events it is reported that more than 500 people fled Lowndes and Brooks Counties in fear for their lives.

Some may ask, why bring up “the past” and these atrocities now? “It happened so long ago.” We think we should bring these crimes up and face them for many reasons. We should bring them up to acknowledge the lives lost, along with the reality that no justice has ever occurred for the victims, their families and so many others affected by these events. We should bring them up because few in the region speak publicly about these events yet wonder why race relations in the area are often so strained. We should bring them up because these events remain one of the most gruesome cases of racism and racial terrorism in this nation’s history, yet they are omitted from the history we teach our children. We should bring them up because Mary Turner’s murder remains one of the most horrific crimes committed against a human being in this nation’s history. And last but not least, we should bring these events up so we can face our collective past in order to see how it might affect the present and the future. Please help us do that.

To find out what you can do please email us or visit our Get Involved page.

The information above is drawn from the following scholarly and historical sources.

Dr. Julie Armstrong Buckner’s text, Mary Turner and the Memory of Lynching, Georgia University Press, 2011.

Dr. Christopher Myers’s article “Killing Them by the Wholesale: A Lynching Rampage in South Georgia” pgs. 214-235 in Georgia Historical Quarterly. Vol. XC. No. 2. Summer 2006.

“Memorandum For Govenor Dorsey from Walter F. White,” July 10, 1918, Papers of the NAACP, Group I. Series C, Box 353, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Walter White’s “The Work of a Mob,” The Crisis 16 (September 1918), 221.

BLACK PEOPLE! -THIS SISTER TOOK THE CONFEDERATE FLAG DOWN FROM THE CAPITOL OF SOUTH CAROLINA OOOOO!-FROM JEROME PAYNE ON FACEBOOK ATI GOODBLACKNEWS.ORG

July 14, 2015

flag
Photos from Jerome Payne’s post in NATIONAL BLACKOUT/DAYS OF ABSENCE FOR TRAYVON MARTIN
Back to Album
Jerome Payne‎NATIONAL BLACKOUT/DAYS OF ABSENCE FOR TRAYVON MARTIN

Meet the woman who climbed the pole of the South Carolina state capital and took the flag down herself I guess she’ll be charged with destruction of property and get a 3 million dollar bail lol but true
She should be praised for her act of bravery.
June 27

Jamon Jordan, Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade, Cydney Weaver and 19 others like this.
Joseph Kohn I understand she’s out of jail, and she has $106,721USD
raised by 4,146 people in 1 day for her defense! http://igg.me/at/black-lives-direct-action/x/8671245
CLICK HERE to support Bail for Bree Newsome
Support Bree Newsome, brave activist in jail for…
indiegogo.com
June 28 at 2:40pm · Edited · Like · 1
Joseph Kohn Sign her petition here:
http://act.colorofchange.org/…/DropTheFlagDropTheCh…/…
Drop any charges against Bree, organizer arrested for taking down the…
act.colorofchange.org
June 28 at 2:15pm · Like · 1
Kathleen Wills I haven’t seen the media rush to embrace this sister — the way they fawned all over the sister who cursed and whacked her son in public in Baltimore.

Wonder why…
June 28 at 6:17pm · Like · 2
Granar Chist Well done bird. (I’m English. I’m not being offensive)
July 8 at 5:01pm · Like · 1

From:Photos from Jerome Payne’s post in NATIONAL BLACKOUT/DAYS OF ABSENCE FOR TRAYVON MARTIN
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FROM GOODBLACKNEWS.org

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29Jun2015
Bree Newsome Speaks For The 1st Time After Taking Down Confederate Flag from State Capitol
Posted in Politics, Community, Adults, Protests by goodblacknews

Activist Bree Newsome Takes Down Confederate Flag from South Carolina State Capitol grounds (Photo via bluenationreview.com)

EDITOR’S NOTE: Over the weekend, a young freedom fighter and community organizer mounted an awe-inspiring campaign to bring down the Confederate battle flag. Brittany “Bree” Newsome, in a courageous act of civil disobedience, scaled a metal pole using a climbing harness, to remove the flag from the grounds of the South Carolina state capitol. Her long dread locks danced in the wind as she descended to the ground while quoting scripture. She refused law enforcement commands to end her mission and was immediately arrested along with ally James Ian Tyson, who is also from Charlotte, North Carolina.

Bree Newsome arrest feature

Earlier this week, social justice activist and blogger Shaun King offered a “bounty” on the flag and offered to pay any necessary bail bond fees. Newsome declined the cash reward, asking that all proceeds go to funds supporting victims of the Charleston church massacre. Social media users raised more than $75,000 to fund legal expenses. South Carolina House Minority Leader Todd Rutherford, a renowned defense attorney, has agreed to represent Newsome and Tyson as they face criminal charges.

Newsome released the following statement exclusively to Blue Nation Review:

Now is the time for true courage.

I realized that now is the time for true courage the morning after the Charleston Massacre shook me to the core of my being. I couldn’t sleep. I sat awake in the dead of night. All the ghosts of the past seemed to be rising.

Not long ago, I had watched the beginning of Selma, the reenactment of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing and had shuddered at the horrors of history.

But this was neither a scene from a movie nor was it the past. A white man had just entered a black church and massacred people as they prayed. He had assassinated a civil rights leader. This was not a page in a textbook I was reading nor an inscription on a monument I was visiting.

This was now.

This was real.

This was—this is—still happening.

I began my activism by participating in the Moral Monday movement, fighting to restore voting rights in North Carolina after the Supreme Court struck down key protections of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

I traveled down to Florida where the Dream Defenders were demanding justice for Trayvon Martin, who reminded me of a modern-day Emmett Till.

I marched with the Ohio Students Association as they demanded justice for victims of police brutality.

I watched in horror as black Americans were tear-gassed in their own neighborhoods in Ferguson, MO. “Reminds me of the Klan,” my grandmother said as we watched the news together. As a young black girl in South Carolina, she had witnessed the Klan drag her neighbor from his house and brutally beat him because he was a black physician who had treated a white woman.

I visited with black residents of West Baltimore, MD who, under curfew, had to present work papers to police to enter and exit their own neighborhood. “These are my freedom papers to show the slave catchers,” my friend said with a wry smile.

And now, in the past 6 days, I’ve seen arson attacks against 5 black churches in the South, including in Charlotte, NC where I organize alongside other community members striving to create greater self-sufficiency and political empowerment in low-income neighborhoods.

For far too long, white supremacy has dominated the politics of America resulting in the creation of racist laws and cultural practices designed to subjugate non-whites. And the emblem of the confederacy, the stars and bars, in all its manifestations, has long been the most recognizable banner of this political ideology. It’s the banner of racial intimidation and fear whose popularity experiences an uptick whenever black Americans appear to be making gains economically and politically in this country.

It’s a reminder how, for centuries, the oppressive status quo has been undergirded by white supremacist violence with the tacit approval of too many political leaders.

The night of the Charleston Massacre, I had a crisis of faith. The people who gathered for Bible study in Emmanuel AME Church that night—Cynthia Marie Graham Hurd, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lee Lance, Depayne Middleton-Doctor, Tywanza Sanders, Daniel Simmons, Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, Myra Thompson and Rev. Clementa Pinckney (rest in peace)—were only doing what Christians are called to do when anyone knocks on the door of the church: invite them into fellowship and worship.

The day after the massacre I was asked what the next step was and I said I didn’t know. We’ve been here before and here we are again: black people slain simply for being black; an attack on the black church as a place of spiritual refuge and community organization.

I refuse to be ruled by fear. How can America be free and be ruled by fear? How can anyone be?

So, earlier this week I gathered with a small group of concerned citizens, both black and white, who represented various walks of life, spiritual beliefs, gender identities and sexual orientations. Like millions of others in America and around the world, including South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley and President Barack Obama, we felt (and still feel) that the confederate battle flag in South Carolina, hung in 1962 at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, must come down. (Of course, we are not the first to demand the flag’s removal. Civil rights groups in South Carolina and nationwide have been calling for the flag’s removal since the moment it was raised, and I acknowledge their efforts in working to remove the flag over the years via the legislative process.)

We discussed it and decided to remove the flag immediately, both as an act of civil disobedience and as a demonstration of the power people have when we work together. Achieving this would require many roles, including someone who must volunteer to scale the pole and remove the flag. It was decided that this role should go to a black woman and that a white man should be the one to help her over the fence as a sign that our alliance transcended both racial and gender divides. We made this decision because for us, this is not simply about a flag, but rather it is about abolishing the spirit of hatred and oppression in all its forms.

I removed the flag not only in defiance of those who enslaved my ancestors in the southern United States, but also in defiance of the oppression that continues against black people globally in 2015, including the ongoing ethnic cleansing in the Dominican Republic. I did it in solidarity with the South African students who toppled a statue of the white supremacist, colonialist Cecil Rhodes. I did it for all the fierce black women on the front lines of the movement and for all the little black girls who are watching us. I did it because I am free.

To all those who might label me an “outside agitator,” I say to you that humanitarianism has no borders. I am a global citizen. My prayers are with the poor, the afflicted and the oppressed everywhere in the world, as Christ instructs. If this act of disobedience can also serve as a symbol to other peoples’ struggles against oppression or as a symbol of victory over fear and hate, then I know all the more that I did the right thing.

Even if there were borders to my empathy, those borders would most certainly extend into South Carolina. Several of my African ancestors entered this continent through the slave market in Charleston. Their unpaid toil brought wealth to America via Carolina plantations. I am descended from those who survived racial oppression as they built this nation: My 4th great grandfather, who stood on an auction block in South Carolina refusing to be sold without his wife and newborn baby; that newborn baby, my 3rd great grandmother, enslaved for 27 years on a plantation in Rembert, SC where she prayed daily for her children to see freedom; her husband, my 3rd great grandfather, an enslaved plowboy on the same plantation who founded a church on the eve of the Civil War that stands to this day; their son, my great-great grandfather, the one they called “Free Baby” because he was their first child born free, all in South Carolina.

You see, I know my history and my heritage. The Confederacy is neither the only legacy of the south nor an admirable one. The southern heritage I embrace is the legacy of a people unbowed by racial oppression. It includes towering figures of the Civil Rights Movement like Ida B. Wells, Martin Luther King, Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, Rosa Parks, Medgar Evers and Ella Baker. It includes the many people who rarely make the history books but without whom there is no movement. It includes pillars of the community like Rev. Clementa Pinckney and Emmanuel AME Church.

The history of the South is also in many ways complex and full of inconvenient truths. But in order to move into the future we must reckon with the past. That’s why I commend people like Sen. Paul Thurmond for having the courage to speak truth in this moment.

Words cannot express how deeply touched I am to see how yesterday’s action inspired so many. The artwork, poems, music and memes are simply beautiful! I am also deeply grateful to those who have generously donated to the defense fund established in my name and to those who have offered to cover my legal expenses.

As you are admiring my courage in that moment, please remember that this is not, never has been and never should be just about one woman. This action required collective courage just as this movement requires collective courage. Not everyone who participated in the strategizing for this non-violent direct action volunteered to have their names in the news so I will respect their privacy. Nonetheless, I’m honored to be counted among the many freedom fighters, both living and dead.

I see no greater moral cause than liberation, equality and justice f­­or all God’s people. What better reason to risk your own freedom than to fight for the freedom of others? That’s the moral courage demonstrated yesterday by James Ian Tyson who helped me across the fence and stood guard as I climbed. History will rightly remember him alongside the many white allies who, over the centuries, have risked their own safety in defense of black life and in the name of racial equality.

While I remain highly critical of the nature of policing itself in the United States, both the police and the jailhouse personnel I encountered on Saturday were nothing short of professional in their interactions with me. I know there was some concern from supporters on the outside that I might be harmed while in police custody, but that was not the case.

It is important to remember that our struggle doesn’t end when the flag comes down. The Confederacy is a southern thing, but white supremacy is not. Our generation has taken up the banner to fight battles many thought were won long ago. We must fight with all vigor now so that our grandchildren aren’t still fighting these battles in another 50 years. Black Lives Matter. This is non-negotiable.

I encourage everyone to understand the history, recognize the problems of the present and take action to show the world that the status quo is not acceptable. The last few days have confirmed to me that people understand the importance of action and are ready to take such action. Whether the topic is trending nationally or it’s an issue affecting our local communities, those of us who are conscious must do what is right in this moment. And we must do it without fear. New eras require new models of leadership. This is a multi-leader movement. I believe that. I stand by that. I am because we are. I am one of many.

This moment is a call to action for us all. All honor and praise to God.

#TakeItDown #BlackLivesMatter #FreeBree

Read more: http://bluenationreview.com/exclusive-bree-newsome-speaks-for-the-first-time-after-courageous-act-of-civil-disobedience/#ixzz3eW4OGI8v
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10 thoughts on “Bree Newsome Speaks For The 1st Time After Taking Down Confederate Flag from State Capitol”

Pingback: South Carolina Senate Votes to Remove Confederate Flag From State Capitol Grounds; House Vote Still Needed | GOOD BLACK NEWS
Simone Lightfoot
July 1, 2015 at 10:40 PM

You go Bree. Soooo proud of you and thank you for such detailed recount, it will go down in history and the level of specificity you have laid out will help generations to come know exactly what your motives were, where your spirit was and the significance in strategic, tactical implementation. You are the bomb!
Reply
GettingrealwithPTSD
July 1, 2015 at 6:48 AM

Such a relief that this brave woman took down that hateful flag. Thank you Bree Newsome!
Reply
GettingrealwithPTSD
July 1, 2015 at 6:46 AM

Reblogged this on GettingrealwithPTSD.
Reply
Sunshinebright
June 30, 2015 at 7:34 AM

Reblogged this on Sunshinebright and commented:
I applaud this young woman’s courage in recognizing the wrongs, in her opinion, committed against people of color, and doing what she deems as the right thing. She knew the outcome: arrest; but felt so deeply to “right a wrong” in her opinion, that she took the chance.
Reply
Dr. Rex
June 30, 2015 at 4:05 AM

Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
The reasons behind her actions!
Reply
Xena
June 29, 2015 at 11:39 PM

Reblogged this on We Hold These Truths To Be Self-Evident.
Reply
joel
June 29, 2015 at 11:14 PM

Thanks Newsome a true patriot for the sake to save American eradicate the hatred while the world citizen get along with americans without any prejudice even american bombed their homelands many times over. and thank you Newsome for the vital job done remove the KKK flag sounds so loud hurts my ears and my heart.
Reply
Mr. Militant Negro
June 29, 2015 at 10:31 PM

Reblogged this on The Militant Negro™.
Reply

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BLACK PEOPLE!-HOMELESS IN HOUSTON CUT TO HALF!-FROM GOODBLACKNEWS.ORG

June 19, 2015

FROM YEYEOLADE.BLOGSPOT.COM
Friday, June 19, 2015
BLACK HOMELESS IN HOUSTON 60%-HOUSTON CUTS ITS HOMELESS POPULATION NEARLY IN HALF!-FROM GOODBLACKNEWS.ORG


Homeless shelter in Houston 6-12-15
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12Jun2015
Houston Cuts Its Homeless Population Nearly in Half
Posted in News, Community, Adults, U.S., Organizations by goodblacknews
Wendell Johnson readies his bed at the Salvation Army shelter September 23, 2005 in Houston. (Photo: Getty Images)
A new report from Coalition for the Homeless reveals that the number of unsheltered homeless people in the Houston area has dropped by 46 percent since 2011.
The statistics come from a “point-in-time” count of people who were experiencing homelessness on January 29, 2015, in the greater Houston area (Harris County and Fort Bend County) in Texas. The annual canvass found that there were 4,609 people either staying in emergency shelters, transitional housing or safe havens, or unsheltered (living in places not meant for human habitation, such as abandoned buildings or under bridges). In 2011, that number was 8,538. This puts the current homeless rate at 1 out of every 1,130 residents. That number was 1 out of every 450 residents in 2011. Just under 60 percent of those displaced citizens are black.
“It’s incredible,” said Marilyn Brown, president and CEO of Coalition for the Homeless in the Houston Chronicle’s article available behind the newspaper’s paywall. “When we see the result—that the number of homeless has been cut in half—we see we’ve gone from managing homelessness to ending it.” With 58 percent of the total homeless population installed in some type of housing, all signs point to that being true.
The coalition of homeless services providers said their success stems from the The Way Home, a local collaborative model adopted in 2012 with the goal of eradicating homelessness by installing permanent housing units and creating a coordinated intake, needs assessment and triage system that gets people the help they need more efficiently.
article by Kenrya Rankin Naasel via colorlines.com

SOUTH AFRICA-NIGERIA-SHOPRITE,NIGERIA!-WE WANT BLACK DOLLS IN YOUR STORES IN AFRICA OOOOOO!-LOOK WHAT YOUR STUPID WORKER TOLD ME YESTERDAY OOOO!–GO TO THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE AND TELL THEM WHY IT IS IMPORTANT FOR BLACK CHILDREN TO HAVE BLACK DOLLS IN AFRICA!-SHOPRITE,NIGERIA ON FACEBOOK!

May 5, 2015

from shoprite,nigeria on facebook

SHOPRITE,NIGERIA,SOUTH AFRICA!—- WE WANT BLACK DOLLS IN YOUR STORES IN AFRICA 000000!-LOOK WHAT YOUR STUPID WORKERS TOLD ME YESTERDAY OOOOO!-FROM SHOPRITE,NIGERIA,FACEBOOK

FROM SHOPRITE,NIGERIA,FACEBOOK
BLACK DOLLS I HAVE BEEN REQUESTING FOR AT SHOPRITE,NIGERIA,COCOA HOUSE IBADAN SINCE LAST YEAR FROM THE MANAGER WHO SAID THEY HAD ORDERED THEM!
YOUR WORKER IN THE MANAGER’S OFFICE YESTERDAY TOLD ME THAT “SHOPRITE DOES NOT CARRY BLACK DOLLS PERIOD!”SHAME ON YOU SHOPRITE-IN AFRICA YOU REFUSE TO HAVE BLACK DOLLS FOR BLACK CHILDREN! SEAT UP OR FACE OUR RAGE!

GO TO SHOPRITE,NIGERIA’S PAGE ON FACEBOOK AND TELL THEM YOU WANT BLACK DOLLS FOR BLACK CHILDREN!

OBAMA’S EX-PASTOR REV. JEREMIAH WRIGHT TELLS THE TRUTH ABOUT amerikkka in his SERMON “GOD DAMN AMERICA!”–FROM AUTUM ASHANTE ON FACEBOOK

April 14, 2015

Autum Ashante’ https://youtu.be/TYqrXVNfYUI
Jeremiah Wright: “God Damn America”
A longer reel of the famous “God Damn America” sermon from President Obama’s former pastor,…
youtube.com
11 hrs ·

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Image result for images of police killings of black menPOLICE KILLINGS OF BLACK MEN ON GOOGLE SEARCH
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BLACK PEOPLE !—SELMA MARCH 50 YEARS LATER!-BLACK PEOPLE MUST STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM NOW!-FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,LONDON,UK

March 9, 2015

FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,LONDON,UK
The Guardian Winner of the Pulitzer prize

Bloody Sunday veterans in Selma, Alabama, 50 years on – video

Edmund Pettus bridge, Selma

OBAMA,MICHELLE,BUSH ATI WIFE AT SELMA MARCH

OBAMA,MICHELLE,BUSH ATI WIFE AT SELMA MARCH

Brown-Chapel-African-Meth-013Selma-Commemorates-50th-A-012

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Selma 50th anniversary
Bloody Sunday veterans in Selma, Alabama, 50 years on – video
“>https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/us-news/video/2015/mar/09/bloody-sunday-veterans-selma-alabama-video
In 1965, sheriff deputies attacked non-violent civil rights protesters in Selma, Alabama, sparking nationwide outrage. Now known as Bloody Sunday, the event was pivotal in the struggle to secure African American voting rights. To mark the 50th anniversary of the attack, thousands of supporters, local Selma residents and President Barack Obama poured into the small Alabama city this past weekend to remember the historic events

Mae Ryan, Source: Guardian

BLACK PEOPLE!- AL SHARPTON GOT THIS ONE BLACK RIGHT!-BLACK ON BROTHER!-FROM FACEBOOK

January 17, 2015

AL

BLACK AMERIKKKA!-COP KILLINGS!-THIS BROTHER BRIAN BROWNE NOW LIVING IN NIGERIA TELLS IT LIKE IT BLACK IS!-MICHAEL BROWN/ERIC GARNER-NO JUSTICE,NO PEACE!-FROM THE NATION NEWSPAPER,NIGERIA

December 30, 2014

from the nation newspaper,nigeria

Home » Brian Browne » A Nation that betrays its own
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Brown - Anti-NYPD protesters march through the Upper East Side of Manhattan with their hands up in solidarity with Michael Brown on New York City. Despite calls from New York City Mayor Bill de Blasi

A Nation that betrays its own

Law is the house that justice built but no longer occupies.

BULLED into deep complacency by the election of Barak Obama, the political conscience of Black America has finally begun to stir to life. Sadly, it took the daytime killings of Black men by White police officers to revive the community back to political life.

Protests have occurred in major cities throughout the nation. Black people have been jolted by the realization that their lives remain less valuable than they should be, than what they had been told to believe. They hoped racial discrimination had become a residual breach of the national contract on social equality. The painful lesson relearned is that Black Americans are disposable byproducts of a political economy with little need for most of them and one that affords diminishing living space for that beleaguered majority of Black America.

The killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson was one thing. The strangulation of Eric Garner in New York was quite another. In the Brown case, conflicting interpretations of that day’s events abounded. The shooter said one thing, Brown’s friend said another. Witness accounts varied on important points. Although the aggressor police officer’s testimony remains highly implausible, it cannot be ruled impossible. The possibility that he was being truthful is slight but the possibility nonetheless exists.

(In a telling postscript in the Brown case, a witness whose testimony was cited by the prosecutor has been discovered to be a mentally unbalanced racist. Moreover, this witness may not even have been at the scene when the shooting occurred. She has previously inserted herself in other cases, giving unreliable testimony. The prosecutor in Brown should have been aware of her flagrant history; yet, he still presented her to the grand jury without informing them of her habit of bearing false witness. For this alone, the prosecutor should be investigated for professional misconduct.)

The cloud of factual discrepancy and differing versions of the fatal encounter do not haunt the Garner case.  What haunts that case is the episode was videoed for the world to see. Yet, the picture made no difference to the New York prosecutor and the grand jury he selected. Normally, a picture is worth a thousand words. This video encapsulated more than a thousand words. It showed all that is wrong in the racial history of the nation claiming to be the world’s finest democracy. As long as the legal system affirms killings like Garner’s, the claimed greatness of the American political economy is as true as it is false.

Mr. Garner was a large, burly Black man living in New York City. Estranged from the world of prosperity and steady employment, the man did what millions of city dwellers across the nation do. He street-hustled. Among his money-making ventures, the man would at times buy packs of cigarettes then resell individual cigarettes to people. The area was a poor neighborhood where many people could not afford an entire pack; they would muster coins for one or two cigarettes at a time. Garner was doing no harm; that same day, he even helped resolve an altercation. However, his street hustle was illegal because all cigarette sales are to be taxed.

The day of the encounter, Garner may not even have been selling the loose cigarettes. Had he been guilty of such sales that day, his transgression was de minimis. A loose cigarette probably sold for no more than a dollar each.  The city tax on the tobacco sales is 10 percent. Had he sold five cigarettes, he owed the city 50 cents (90 kobo) in taxes. For this small indiscretion, a swarm of police officers descended on him like a small army corralling a thief who had pinched the national treasury and the crown jewels.

Gardner had no chance. While a number of officers pinned him to the ground, one officer administered a choke hold unauthorized by the police department that hired him. Adding indignity to impending death, another officer placed his hands on Garner’s head, using his full weight to press the man’s face into the hard, cruel New York City pavement. The man pleaded roughly a dozen times that he could not breathe. A dozen times, his uniformed assailants ignored the desperate alarm. His last moments on earth were with his face pressed to the ground that he might take in the foulness and grime of the urban sidewalk as his life’s breath was slowly stolen from him by those hired to protect him.

As he lay dying, no officer sought to revive him. They walked around his body nonchalantly as if walking around an animal struck by a passing car. There was no urgency in their actions, no remorse on their faces. They felt they had done their job. What they had done to Garner was so disproportionate to his alleged wrong; no logical excuse can be assayed for this ending. At most, they should have given Garner a citation as they do any traffic offender or errant merchant. The reason for lethally attacking him for less than a dollar remains cloaked in racism.

The coroner properly ruled the outrageous death a homicide. Yet, the grand jury and prosecutor thought otherwise. Upon seeing video, they did not see Garner as a human being. All they saw was black and his blackness obscured any sight and sense of justice they might have otherwise known.

Had Garner lived during slavery, he would still be alive.  The law enforcement officers would have been more careful with him because he would have been the property of a White man. They would have acted with due care in returning the valued property to his owner. He would have been tussled a bit but not executed. Strange how the worth of a Black man’s life is not established by the mere fact of being a human being. It is established by how closely associated he is to White society. To exist outside the social mainstream, makes a Black man a dreaded superfluity, a victim transmuted into the villain in his own execution. Police men who kill him will be excused because they serve a function in society. While you, the Black man, do not.

Garner and Brown have not been the only casualties of this dynamic.  The average White racist feels the nation is slipping from their control due to Obama’s presidency and to demographic changes that see Blacks and Latinos becoming larger percentages of the overall population. Perceived change prompts a backlash. The average racist joins the Tea Party or sends anonymous cant to rightwing blogs. Those racists in blue police uniforms are more apt to pull the trigger when the face on the wrong end of the barrel is Black or Brown.

In Ohio, a Black man, walking in a store while holding a non-lethal pellet rifle, was gun downed by police with no reasonable warning. Ohio law allows people to openly carry lethal weapons.  Thus, the man committed no crime. Yet, he was killed and the offending police officers were given no reprimand. It boggles the mind and makes a farce of justice when an innocent man can be executed and those who committed the misdeed are exonerated. He did no wrong yet he is gone. They wronged him yet they suffer not even minor sanction. When such partiality occurs in a foreign nation, America criticizes and writes annual reports condemning it. When it happens in America, the power establishment protects if not celebrates the transgression as a necessary function of law and order. In the process, justice is disinherited.

Protests against these attacked were organized in major cities throughout the nation.  Had this been the summer and not the advent of winter, more people would have been taken to the streets in a greater number of cities.  The best aspect of this wave of protests is that they were organized by grassroots activists and not the normal servitors who inhabit the Black establishment.  The youthful organizers’ first plank is to halt the street executions by the police.  But they will not stop there. They will see that defending the right to life is insufficient in itself.  That is where the Civil Rights Movement left off.

Today’s protesters hopefully will assume the mantle of true leadership the current Black Establishment now deploys for their narrow elitist interests. These new leaders will discover the incompleteness in securing the right to life if unaccompanied by demanding the right to live not merely survive on the social periphery. They will demand jobs, education, economic reform and justice. This will attract a backlash much as the Civil Rights Movement did. The most vocal segment of the backlash will be the right-wing conservatives. The most dangerous element of that backlash will be the falsely liberal establishment.

That establishment has given their Black surrogates marching orders to stop the genuine young leaders from organizing more people’s marches. The Black establishment did not need to be given the directive.  They already felt the heat. They realized their positions were placed in jeopardy. No one was bounded by quandary more than President Obama. If Black people started to display independent action, his job would be on the line.  No, not the White House job. Whether for good or bad, his mark there has mostly been made.

The position jeopardized by the young Black leaders is the post-White House sinecure the establishment has designed for him – that of the unofficial leader of Black America. For the past six years, he had proven his worth by keeping Black activism in deep freeze despite the  hardtack policies he has initialed resulting in the deterioration of community institutions, particularly Black universities, and a growing disparity between average Black and White per capita wealth and income. During the Obama years, the Black community has been weakened willfully by establishment policy and practice. The establishment hired Obama to smile and pontificate his people all the way to the poor house. He was doing an excellent job of it until the unruly police began to exhibit a deadly overt racism that would cause the somnambulant Black community to awaken. Obama’s slickness was undone by the gratuitous violence of the new praetorians.

A delicious twist of irony is in the making. Black political consciousness may reawaken under the very watch of a man endorsed by the establishment to keep the Black community politically dormant. Sensing things were going awry, Obama went into gear. He sent fellow Black elitist, Attorney General Eric Holder, to Ferguson to express concern in hope that a tactful display of implied solidarity would keep the natives from turning restless.  Holder announced his feckless Justice Department would investigate the Ferguson Police Department as a way to soothe community anger. The people realized this Justice Department has a nose for privilege and not a resilient sternum when it comes to protecting the weak and under from the rich and powerful above. Holder’s Justice Department refused to prosecute Wall Street for the visible criminality resulting in the 2008 financial crisis and will not take account of those who tortured and terrorized detainees in the alleged war against terror. That same department will not reform the police.

It is part of the same federal government that militarized the police by providing the surplus military equipment that has transformed local law enforcement into a paramilitary agency unsuitable for democratic society.

The protests continued. Then the First Couple took to the media to demonstrate their blackness by citing they had been victims of racism because they had been ignored by taxi drivers or mistaken as store clerks by White shoppers. If these trite remarks were supposed to evoke a sense of solidarity with the average Black, they missed the mark. If this is all the Obamas have experienced, no wonder they are out of touch. They should consider themselves fortunate, then open a listening ear that they may learn the realities of the everyday lives of everyday people. (In part, they cited these inanities so as not to offend their White sponsors. If the President testifies that racism is limited to such innocuous inconveniences, it means that racism did not cause dire condition of the Black community.)

Raising these trivial incidents insults the millions of Black men and women who have felt the heavy intimidation and have been scarred by the instruments of this unjust system. The bones of thousands of Black men lie in the woods, swamps and along the back roads of the south. So many of us have been stopped along isolate stretches of road by policemen with their hands twitching at their holsters or brandishing their billy clubs, waiting and wanting to draw their pistol or swing that club. As rivulets of sweat swim down your back, you tell yourself to be still and don’t move, no matter the provocation or meanness of the man. They await merely one odd movement or angry word and they will pounce. You will be found guilty of causing the assault against you.

When their trite examples did not work, Obama summoned a white House meeting of the young activists. His advice was to take it slowly as change comes gradually. This advice was not commended by any true interpretation of history. Change may come slowly but those who succeed in bringing reform rarely seek it piecemeal. They ask for the whole thing then take as much as they can get. The young activists should have retorted that, since the bullets did not kill Brown gradually and the stranglehold did not gradually asphyxiate Garner, they see no reason why their pursuit of justice should march gradually.

Next, Obama deployed mercenary cleric Al Sharpton to confuse and sidetrack the grassroots movement by holding a march on Washington of his own. During the Obama presidency, Sharpton has visited the White House an extraordinary 60 times. He has become Obama’s man Friday just as Obama is Wall Street’s man Friday. Sharpton is the servant of the servant. However, this tack did not work well either. The people are on to Sharpton. They know he has been an FBI informant, ratting on other Black leaders. He may still be. He refused to allow activists from Ferguson a place in his orchestrated rally. He feared they might say something incendiary or anti-Obama. The crowd began to shout him down.  Eventually, some activists managed to seize the microphone and speak their piece.

Establishment backlash against the protests went into full gear when a mentally unstable Black man killed two police officers in New York, afterward killing himself. The New York Mayor called for protests to be suspended until the burial of the fallen officers. Former Mayor Giuliani criticized Black leaders for inciting hate. Police officials declared that their department had gone on “war footing.” To that declaration, most Black men would respond, “That is nothing new. You have always been on war footing against us.”

The murder of the two police officers is a tragedy but no greater than the killing of Brown, Gardner and others.  The protests did not lead to the officer’s death. The proximate cause of the officers’ demise was that police nationwide had been too lethal. When a White supremacist executed two police officers earlier this year and draped the corpses in racist flags, the establishment did not rail that White supremacists should disband their racist campaign and organizations. Police officials did not assert they needed to be on war footing against White hate groups. White establishment politicians said little or nothing about this episode. Now that a Black assailant is involved, they shout to the rafters and quake with self-righteous indignation. It is all part of the ploy to keep Blacks in a lowly place.

The protesters smartly refused to stop demonstrating. To do so would have been a wrongful, coerced admission that their actions prompted the killings of the officers. What they should do is expand the scope of the protests. While protesting police brutality, they should also advocate tighter gun control so that unstable people cannot get easy access to weapons. The spirit of the expanded protests would be that neither the police nor the populace needs to be on war footing. Both should take intelligent steps toward peace.

Finally, perhaps the Black community is awakening. Theirs must be a dual arising. First, they must come to grips with the fact that the current ways of the political economy work against them. Second, they must realize that the established Black leadership is wedded to the current ways of the political economy. The people must seek reform as well as reject those who claim to be their leaders. Perhaps, just perhaps, the son of the Civil Rights Movement is being born out of the deaths of Brown and Garner.

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