Posts Tagged ‘RELIGION’

BLACK JESUS WAY BACK THEN O!

March 1, 2021

https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.google.com/url?rct%3Dj%26sa%3Dt%26url%3Dhttps://chicago.suntimes.com/murals-mosaics/2021/2/26/22276769/chicago-murals-risen-christ-mural-quinn-chapel-church-proctor-chisolm-black-jesus%26ct%3Dga%26cd%3DCAEYAioTMjE5NTYzNTcyNjMxNjA2NjYyMjIaNGRhZGI4ZDk1ZjhiYWZlNzpjb206ZW46VVM%26usg%3DAFQjCNHrK0SepugOlTrTAopmybpHw-JcpQ&source=gmail&ust=1614685997642000&usg=AFQjCNGJy6VSIUx-T6lG-JOg1ENamjccdQ

OYOTUNJI VILLAGE-SOUTH CAROLINA O! #2

February 23, 2021

Oyotunji: South Carolina’s African Village

Oyotunji: South Carolina’s African Village The Oldest Authentic African Village in North America

One of the darkest chapters of American history is the destruction of African Americans heritage. When forcibly brought over to the New World African slaves were stripped of their names, culture, and language. As generations passed, any knowledge of their African roots have been diminished and forgotten in the past. During the Civil Rights Movement, also known as the revolution, there were differing opinions on as to how black Americans would live in the United States. Martin Luther King spoke of integration while Malcolm X advocated for further segregation. Other than these two methods one other revolutionary offered another path: Cultural Revival. Adefunmi was born in Detroit Michigan under the name Walter King. Throughout King’s life, he went through his own spiritual journey before founding the current order of Yoruba in North America. Adefunmi first studied Haitian Vodou at the age of 20 and later became the first documented African-American to be ordained into the Yoruban Priesthood. In Harlem, New York Adefunmi set up his first Yoruba Temple but later moved it to its current location in Beaufort, South Carolina. Early in King’s journey, he ventured to Nigeria to search for spiritual guidance for his temple in North America but was outright rejected by the Yoruba people. After the success of his order, the revival of Yoruban beliefs in the United States, and the conflicts arising with the Cuban sect of the religion Adefunmi traveled to Nigeria a second-time. King was then welcomed with open arms and coronated as the Yorubian King of all of North America. Thus, the Yoruba Kingdom was born. Ghosts of the Plantation The Yoruba Temple has been moved several times before finally being placed in Sheldon, South Carolina. Originally founded in Harlem, Adefunmi hoped to move the Temple to Savanah, Georgia but had to settle for Sheldon, South Carolina. Even after arriving in Sheldon the village was moved once again due to noise complaints by the locals. Some consider it fate that the final location of the Yoruban Kingdom was on the site of a former slave plantation. Behind the Oyotunji Village is a large expanse of swamps which was at one-time rice paddies worked by slaves. The former plantation house is even still standing, although it has seen many face-lifts over the years which makes it almost unrecognizable as being a relic from the 19th century. As the slavery era has become a page in the history books, the plantation has been reclaimed by the swamp and the alligators who now call the murky waters home. The entire region around the African village played a critical role in the underground railroad, which Harrit Tubman was actively involved in. It is only fitting that a place where so many people were enslaved and suffered would be the center of  African cultural revival in North America. Entering the Yoruba Kingdom When leaving the United States and entering the Yoruba Kingdom, visitors must wait by the gate before given permission to tour the village. Resident devotee Efunsegun has been living in the village for the last two years. He first visited Oyotunji to do a simple flooring job in one of the buildings but ended up finding his spiritual calling in the Yoruba culture. Today, he makes up one person in the 5-7 families that call Oyotunji home. At the villages peak, the African Village was home to over 20 families. The population steadily declined as the younger generation left the compound for higher education and better employment opportunities. After being cleared to enter the Kingdom, Efunsegun then leads tourists to the ceremonial drum which is played everytime visitors enter the village. In Oyotunji’s heyday, the sounding of the drum would indicate that all villagers would need to emerge from their homes to welcome the guests and open the market. 27 Acres of Orisha and Witches The Yoruba shrines are spread out throughout Oyotunji and are the focal point of village life. Each shrine is dedicated to an Orisha which is the human reincarnation of a spirit. Other than the demi-gods there are also witches who draw their power from hollow trees. Much like the shrines, these witch trees have offerings placed at their base and are adorned with various scarves and fabrics. The Yoruba pantheon consists of over 400 Orisha, 9 of which have shrines in Oyotunji. Eshu-the messenger god, Yemaya-goddess of the sea, and Shango -God of Thunder are just a few of the gods which are enshrined in the village. Like many other religions, each Orisha has its own personality as well as powers. Each devotee has two Orisha acting as their father and mother, these spirits both have direct involvement in the person’s life. In order to appease these spirits, followers of the Orisha will do anything from offering toy cars to performing animal sacrifices to win over their favor. You can read more about Yoruba witches here! The resident priestesses also perform various spiritual services for a price. The reason for charging devotees for these rites is due to the amount of time and preparation put into each ritual. These services range from a simple blessing to fortune telling, and even the more complex funeral processions or men’s rite of passage. Some locals misinterpret the meaning of these rituals, using spiritual readings to predict the lottery or be granted forgiveness for ill-doings.  Priestesses will usually advise against using these practices for such self-fish reasons. In the end, however, holy women will usually still perform these rites just to satisfy the follower’s wishes. You can read more about the spiritual services performed at Oyotunji here! Reviving African Culture Oyotunji stands as a refuge for many African-Americans who wish to find a sense of belonging and their own ancestors. One of the first things an oppressive imperialist regime will do to quell any resistance within their borders is to strip their opposition of their culture and language. The cultural genocide against Native Americans and African-Americans is one of the darkest chapters of US history which to this day has not been properly addressed. The village of Oyotunji exists as a path to give the black community a sense of their roots and ancestors. Although Walter King was able to trace back his lineage to the Yoruba people, that does not mean that every African-American is descendant of the same tribe. Regardless of where in Africa one’s forefathers may have come from, Oyotunji is a community for all black Americans in search of a connection to their ancestral motherland. Pilgrims and Revolutionaries Currently, only a handful of people call Oyotunji their home, most of which are priestesses who perform many of the spiritual services and rituals. This extraordinary group of women were on the front lines during the civil rights movement and the revolution, thus giving them a copious amount of knowledge and a unique insight on the world. During the day there is little to no activity in the village. If the locals are not holding a special event or recognizing a holiday, one may even come under the assumption that the Kingdom is abandoned. According to Efunsegun, there may be days when Oyotunji will see no visitors at all. Then out of the blue, the village will suddenly receive new guests as well as old residents numbering well over a hundred. Long Live the King The founding king, Adefunmi, passed away in 2005. His crown was then passed down to his son, Adefunmi II. The King’s wife and children all live in Oyotunji and are sometimes even available to answer questions from visitors. As long as guests enter the Yoruba village with a smile and an open mind, the locals will be extremely welcoming and hospitable. Although life in the Kingdom has slowed down since the 70s and 80s, there is still hope that this village will exist for decades to come. A fire recently burned down one of the Orisha’s temples and destroyed many artifacts in the process. The Queen mentioned that the fire served as a blessing in disguise, the King has since been inspired to double his efforts towards rebuilding the temple and helping the village. In the past, seclusion helped the Oyotunji village to thrive and develop their own sense of identity and culture in peace. As revolutionaries aged and their children left the village, the Yoruba Kingdom must find other means to survive. The best way to ensure that all the hard work the village has put into uncovering their roots is preserved for future generations is to open the gates of their kingdom and educate Americans about Yoruba culture. You can read more about Oyotunji’s festivals and events here!    

IFAYEMI ELEBURIBON with Musicians oooo!

July 3, 2020

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=309332116917567&id=100035223440740&sfnsn=scwspmo&extid=fEDH5k3H1COcwvkE&d=n&vh=i

“YORUBA CULTURE FACES EXTINCTION O!- IFAYEMI ELEBURIBON SAYS O!

July 3, 2020

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=3245389752147972&id=100000309384838&sfnsn=scwspmo&extid=vkCO6joIhsdwggHI

Watch “ESU Is Not The Devil: Mistranslation Has Africans Demonizing Their Own Spirituality” on YouTube

November 12, 2018

https://youtu.be/iYx9YWxfOjk

YORUBA OOOO!-A CHRISTIAN DISCOVERS PRIDE IN YORUBA RELIGION ATI CULTURE!

October 21, 2018

Proudly Yoruba

When I was researching extensively for my masters in 2002,
I “discovered” the religion of the Yoruba, previously vaguely encountered in my vagrant and vacant childhood in Isale Eko, and Awe-Oyo, with the whitewashed remnants of its ancient lore, embedded in festivals of spectacles, song, dance, mime of syncretic cantatas, careta, gelede and Ifa festivities.

It was a glimmer of the golden past, with the Eyo re-incarnation pageant, the kaleidoscopically colorful egungun, speaking with affected guttural growls, embedded with chanting akewi, serenading in evening soirées to cascades of altercating bata drums.

A Christian Baptist by upbringing, I found myself strangely connected within my department of theatre arts, Ibadan, reading about my progenitor ancestors embodied in the worship of the pantheons of Yoruba Gods, and the profound wisdom of the Ifa oracle.

I found myself, for the first time in my squeaky clean whitewashed westernised life, discovering who I really am.

There was an immediate connection with my illustrious heritage: a self revealing and exhilarating deja vu.

Then it made sense, as our love for the Orishas, whose interconnectedness, opposites, syncretic and paradoxical characteristicsshowed why what is truely the greatest symbol of being Yoruba, the philosophy of *omoluabi*, is a shared common value.

Indeed within the depths of the religion, it now became clear why we are who we are, pieces of the same shattered god head, a fulfilling oracle embracing all Yoruba.

Within the religion of the Orisha, I discovered why all Yoruba are innately and fundamentally imbued with the spirit of a longing for peace, and knowledge, a sense of communal harmony, love of fellowship and fellowman, irrevocable reverence of elders, communion with ever present ancestors, the persisting profuse and profound greeting rituals, and reciprocal wishing of the proverbial peace ( sh’alafia ni)….to all and sundry.

It was there, I too, a Christian still, found in myself, the *who* in the riddle:

“who am I ?”,

and ever since then, within the profundity of the realisation of my illustrious religious and cultural past, a glow of pride has been over my head, proud of being a scion of Oduduwa, imprimatur of the orisha worship itself, proud of my heritage, protected by the spirits of my forefathers.

Indeed, walking tall, I’m proud to be a member of a master race, a race so profound in sculptural artistry, that Europeans thought in it, they had found their ephemeral fabled Atlantis.

That’s why I raise up my gaze with pride, anywhere in this world and tell who care to hear that:
Im a member of a superior master race:

That I’m :
*Proudly Yoruba.*

Dolapo sikuade

BOSEDE BAKAREY, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PRACTITIONER ON “The Certainty of God’s Healing (Part 1)” on YouTube

October 21, 2018

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH GETS IT’S FIRST AFRICAN HEAD!-BOSEDE BAKAREY FROM NIGERIA!!!-FROM MARK JACOBS LIVES!

October 21, 2018

From
MARK JACOBS LIVES!
4 Jun 2013
BOSEDE BAKAREY, A NEGROE TO HEAD CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH

Bosede Bakarey, another negroe first
negroes love some religion i tell you. i was almost certain that the gangsters in vatican city would’ve appointed a negroe pope as europe, america make one last scramble for africa. but i was to be disappointed, they threw the spanish speaking subjects a bone.

well the christian science church threw a dart at the map and called up Bosede to the big house. and she sure is happy!

“Today, it’s like a fulfillment of prophesy that an African can be president of The Mother Church,” a term used to describe the denomination’s headquarters in Boston, she says. “We’re making history today. It’s never happened. So I’m so grateful to be a part of it.”

“It’s an honor to Africa. Sometimes I’m in awe when I think about it,” she says. “Who am I to be the president of The Mother Church? But I just know it’s God; it’s beyond me…. We can see the hand of God in it.”

Christian Science offers solutions to problems beyond physical healing, such as lack of resources, a significant challenge for many Africans. Poverty was something Bakarey herself struggled with at one time as a widow and the mother of three boys. Through Christian Science those needs were met in her life, she says. riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight!

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Posted in Uncategorized
Tagged africa, Bosede Bakarey, god, Mother Church, Nigeria, Vatican City
By mark jacobs

Osibanjo, Ambode, Kumuyi task Nigerians on CORRUPTION, graft, ethnicity, others By Gbenga Salau, Chris Irekamba, Emeka Nwachukwu and Isaac Taiwo |   08 October 2018   |     General Superintendent, Deeper Christian Life Ministry, Pastor William Folorunso Kumuyi (left); Vice President, Yemi Osinbajo; Governor Akinwunmi Ambode and his wife, Bolanle, during an interdenominational service to mark Nigeria’s 58th independence anniversary at the church headquarters in Gbagada, Lagos…yesterday. PHOTO: FEMI ADEBESIN-KUTI Vice President Yemi Osibanjo, Governor Akinwumi Ambode and the General Overseer of Deeper Christian Life Ministry Worldwide, Pastor Williams Folorunsho Kumuyi, have called on Nigerians to shun corruption and seek God’s intervention in Nigeria’s myriad of challenges. During a service organised at the church headquarters by the Lagos State government to mark the country’s 58th independence anniversary yesterday in Gbagada, they noted that for Nigeria to thrive, the citizenry must rise above personal interests. Osibanjo who spoke on the theme, Coming of Age, pointed out that the country had come of age and would continue to make progress if only Nigerians would eschew corruption, unrighteousness and ethnicity.

October 8, 2018

Osibanjo, Ambode, Kumuyi task Nigerians on corruption,graft, ethnicity, others

By Gbenga Salau, Chris Irekamba, Emeka Nwachukwu and Isaac Taiwo | 08 October 2018 | 4:19 am

General Superintendent, Deeper Christian Life Ministry, Pastor William Folorunso Kumuyi (left); Vice President, Yemi Osinbajo; Governor Akinwunmi Ambode and his wife, Bolanle, during an interdenominational service to mark Nigeria’s 58th independence anniversary at the church headquarters in Gbagada, Lagos…yesterday. PHOTO: FEMI ADEBESIN-KUTI

Vice President Yemi Osibanjo, Governor Akinwumi Ambode and the General Overseer of Deeper Christian Life Ministry Worldwide, Pastor Williams Folorunsho Kumuyi, have called on Nigerians to shun corruption and seek God’s intervention in Nigeria’s myriad of challenges.

During a service organised at the church headquarters by the Lagos State government to mark the country’s 58th independence anniversary yesterday in Gbagada, they noted that for Nigeria to thrive, the citizenry must rise above personal interests.

Osibanjo who spoke on the theme, Coming of Age, pointed out that the country had come of age and would continue to make progress if only Nigerians would eschew corruption, unrighteousness and ethnicity.

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FARRAKHAN SAYS-“WHY DID THEY GIVE YOU A WHITE JESUS TO WORSHIP? “

October 4, 2018

Check out @LouisFarrakhan’s Tweet:

https://twitter.com/LouisFarrakhan/status/1042059115223293953?s=09


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