Posts Tagged ‘YORUBAS’

SISTER IS TRIED OF amerikkka-FUK AMERIKKKA!!” ===BACK TO AFRICA OOOOO!—FROM FACEBOOK

February 2, 2017

CLICK ON HERE SINCE WE CANNOT GET THE VIDEO-
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade shared We Only Want What Is True/Villain X’s video.
· January 31 at 5:11pm ·
8,536 Views
We Only Want What Is True/Villain X added a new video: I just don’t care anymore!!!
· December 31, 2015 ·

Ikiesha Al-Shabazz Whittaker
I just don’t care anymore!!! I’m planning to leave this country!!! This is ur notice!!!! Fuk America!!!! #imtired #imdone #retiringthecape #movingoutofthiSGodforsakencorporation!!!
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
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Mrs.Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade shared Hasani Carter-Nze’s post.
· January 31 at 4:56pm ·
Hasani Carter-Nze
· January 31 at 3:06pm · Columbus, OH, United States ·

I’m considering/planning to move out the country…I’m so tired of posting the stuff that’s going on…
Yet I fear that if I don’t, I’d just be guilty of preten…
See Mor

YORUBAS OOOOO!—MUHAMMAD ALI IN YORUBA DRESS PLAYING THE TALKING DRUM,1964

June 8, 2016

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The Yoruba

The Champ, The Greatest has joined our ancestors. Sleep well , Mohammed Ali Jan 17 1942 – Jun 3 2016. He is pictured here during his 1964 visit to West Africa, wearing the Yoruba traditional outfit for men, and playing the gangan Yoruba talking drum. The world has lost another gem.

4 June at 06:08 · Public · in Timeline Photos

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Omigbule Bukola

orun re, akoni lo!
1 · 4 June at 21:42

Opeyemi Ajoke Adebisi

MAY HE RIP
5 June at 14:32

Yemisi Alabi

RIP
Sunday at 20:59

A Soldier’s Veve

Elatchê! Now maybe we can get some help down here.
Monday at 00:31

Adé Túnjí

R. I. P. THE UNDISPUTED CHAMPION
Monday at 15:01

Elugbadebo John

R . I . P
Monday at 15:29

Alex Flowers

Ali is missed
Monday at 16:27

Adegboyega Shamsideen Thompson

Ęgbon wā, Momodu, Ę Sùn ‘Rē O…
Today at 02:38

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY WINS MISS USA TITLE!–Deshau Barber Crowned Miss USA 2016 | MadameNoire — GOOD BLACK NEWS

June 7, 2016

AREGBESOLA OOOO!- PHOTO NEWS: Aregbesola Visits African Heritage Research Library AND Cultural Centre,ADEYIPO VILLAGE,IBADAN,OYO STATE-FROM OSUN DEFENDER NEWSPAPER

March 4, 2016

OYOTUNJI=A YORUBA VILLAGE

January 21, 2016

Monday, 24 February 2014

Follow the historical timeline of the Oyotunji African Village located near Sheldon, Beaufort County, South Carolina, USA

His Roya Highness Oba (King) Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I was born Walter Eugene King on October 5, 1928 in Detroit, Michigan, USA. He graduated from Cass Technical High School.
He was originally baptized into Christianity at Hartford Avenue Baptist Church at age 12.
He began the serious persuit of art and dance at Cass Tech. and at the Detroit Urban League. He began African studies at age 16 to begin his great quest for the gods of Africa.
His Exposure to African religion with the association with the Katherine Dunham Dance Troupe at the age of 20.
He traveled to Haiti the same year.
He founded the order of Damballah Whedo, Ancestor Priest in Harlem the following year.
On Aguat 26, 1959, he became the first African American to become fully initiated into the Orisa-Vodun African priesthood, by African Cubans in Matanzas, Cuba. This marked the beginning of the spread of Yoruba religion and culture among the African Americans.
With a few followers, and after dissolution of the Order of Damballah Whedo, he founded the Sango temple in New York city. He incorporated the African Theological Archministry in 1960.
The Sango Temple was relocated and remnamed the Yoruba Temple the same year
He introduced the Danshiki and began small scale manufacture of African attire in the summer of 1960.
He founded the Yoruba Academy for the academic study of Yoruba history, religion and language in 1961.
He opened the Ujamaa Market in 1961 beginning tword African boutiques which, like the Danshiki, spread throughout African American communities. Photo courtesy of jakukonbit.com
He published pamthlets ; The Yoruba Religion, The Yoruba state and the tribal origins of The African American. He participated in the Black Nationalist rallies of the 1960’s
during that time he formed the African Nationalist Independence Partition Party aimed at establishing “an African state in America by 1972! :Actual photo of RNA Baba Oseijeman in rear.
He designed A flag with red, gold and green bars; the gold emblazoned with a black ancient Egyptian ankh. The Yoruba temple would march thru the streets with flag and drums headed to the 67 Worlds Fair.
In the fall of 1970, he founded the Yoruba Village of Oyotunji in Beaufort County South Carolina, and began the careful reorganization of the Orisa vodu priesthood along the traditional Nigerian lines.
Add captHe was initiated to the Ifa priesthood by Oluwa of Ijeun at Abeokuta, Nigeria, in Agust of 1972.ion
He opened the first official Ogboni Parliament of Oyotunji Chiefs and land owners in 1973, and later that year founded the Igbimolosa ( Priest Council) to organize laws and rules and to adjudicate disputes among Orisa-Vodun priest.
Later in 1973 Oba Oseijeman commenced the construction of the Osagiyan Palace at Oyotunji.
HRM. Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi I has been called The Father of the Cultural Restoration Movement in N.America.
In 1981 Oba Efuntola was sponsored by the Caribbean Visual Arts and Research Center to present a paper at a conference of Orisa-Vodu priests at the Univeristy of Ile-Ife,Nigeria.
Oba ofuntola was presented to His Divine Royal Majesty King Okunade Sijuwade Olubuse II the “Ooni” of the ancient city of Ife, who ordered the Ife chiefs to perform coronation rights on him.
Thus Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adefunmi became the first of the line of Yoruba Kings consecrated by the Ooni of Ife.
In the summer of 1993 Oba Ofuntola was recognized as the oldest living Babalawo in the USA and became the Araba of Ijo Orunmila Igbo Mimo.
Later in 1993 Oba Ofuntola became the only Official representative of traditional African religion to address the Parliament of World Religions in the 100 yrs of the organization. African delagation pictured in rear right corner.
Oba Adefunmi’s Oyotunji Village has fostered the establishment of Yoruba temples in New York, Connecticut,Philadelphia, Indiana,Florida,Los Angeles, North Carolina ,Texas,Georgia,Milwaukee.
Oba Ofuntola and the Oyotunji village have initiated over 300 priest into the ministries of Orisa-Vodu.
In doing so, he has restored to the African American the ancient sacred priesthood of Orunmila,Esu,Ogun,Oya,Obatala,,Sango and Olokun.
Oyotunji has restored to the African American the anciet right of Gelede ( recognized by UNESCO) and Egungun Ancestor worship.

Photo Credits: http://www.oyotunji.org/

4 comments:

  1. Thank U,this is helpful info. We give thanks.

    Reply

  2. Iba ara torun Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adefunmi I…

    Reply

  3. What a man does for himself… Dies with him, what he does for others remains…and is Eternal!

    Reply

  4. What a man does for himself… Dies with him, what he does for others remains…and is Eternal!

    Reply

BLACK MEN!–GET BACK TO YOUR BLACK SELF ATI WEAR YORUBA/AFRICAN CLOTHES!-YORUBAS SET THE FASHION FOR THE WORLD!-FROM PROUDLY YORUBA ON FACEBOOK!

November 25, 2015

FROM PROUDLY YORUBA ON FACEBOOK

YORUBA OOOO!–WE ARE THE MOST FASHIONABLE ON EARTH!–BLACK PEOPLE CHECK OUR REAL ORGINAL STYLE WHERE WE GET OURS FROM!–YORUBA MEN OOOO!–YOU ARE SUPER BAD!-FROM PROUDLY YORUBA ON FACEBOOK!

FROM

Proudly Yorùbá ON FACEBOOK

November 21 at 8:37pm ·

When it comes to fashion, we own it. We are stylish, modish, fashionable
and flamboyantly confident as exhibited by our charming Yoruba cutie.
.
How many LIKES can he get??

Proudly Yorùbá’s photo.

Peter Bamikole

Peter Bamikole “modish” is not a compliment…lol

Olutoye Kehinde Aderemi

Olutoye Kehinde Aderemi Odua nie joo

YORUBA POLYGAMY OOOO!-OBASANJO’S GREAT 14 LOVE STORIES-FROM NAIJA.COM

October 22, 2015

FROM NAIJA.COM

Thursday, October 22, 2015

OBASANJO’S LOVE STORIES!-YORUBA POLYGAMY IN ACTION!-FROM NAIJA COM

FROM NAIJA.COM

Ex-president Olusegun Obasanjo in his controversial biography ‘My Watch’ has named his…
naij.com|By Naij.com
OLUREMI ,HIS FIRST WIFE
BOLA,OBASANJO’S REIGNING WIFE NOW

Women That Had Relationships With Ex-president Obasanjo

Clement Ejiofor 2 months ago 1215

Ex-president Chief Olusegun Obasanjo in his controversial biography ‘My Watch’ has named his 21 children, but didn’t list their mothers.
Meanwhile, Encomium Weekly discloses the names of the mothers of Obasanjo’s children and other women that had romances with the two-time president of Nigeria.
1. Oluremi Obasanjo
Obasanjo married with his first wife on June 22, 1963, at Camberwell Green Registry, South East London.
Oluremi was only 21. She is the mother of six of the 21 children of the ex-president.
They include Senator Iyabo Obasanjo, who was born on April 27, 1967; Busola Obasanjo, who was born on November 5, 1968; Olusegun Obasanjo, the first son, who was born on November 4, 1969; Olugbenga Obasanjo, who was born in 1971; Enitan Obasanjo, who was born on September 24, 1975 and Damilola Obasanjo, the last of the woman’s children who was born in 1982.
2. Stella Obasanjo
The late former Nigeria’s First Lady died on Sunday, October 23, 2005, in Spain after an unsuccessful tummy tuck surgery. She had only a child, Olumuyiwa Obasanjo, who was born in 1977, for Obasanjo.
3. Gold Oruh
An ex-director of Nigerian Television Authority met the ex-president as a reporter during the civil war in Port Harcourt, Rivers state.
Oruh had two children for him. They are Funke and Seun Obasanjo.

READ ALSO: Buhari Will Not Probe Obasanjo’s Administration
4. Taiwo Obasanjo
Taiwo is the twin sister of Kenny Martins, the politician and ex-chairman of Police Equipment Fund.
Obasanjo had two children from her. One of them is Esther Olubunmi Obasanjo who got married in August 2010.
Mrs. Obasanjo has since returned to her first name, Martins. The former president distanced from her since her secret romance with late Godwin Daboh became public knowledge.
5. Lynda Obasanjo
Lynda was another woman who had children for Chief Obasanjo. She was said to have had two children for him before she was killed on February 14, 1987, in daylight by armed robbers.
The names of her children are not known.
6. Mabel Okosode Obasanjo
Another woman, who reportedly had children for the former Nigerian leader.
7. Titilayo Obasanjo
Titilayo has a child or children for Obasanjo.
8. Adeboye Obasanjo
According to Oluremi Obasanjo in her book, Bitter Sweet My Life with Obasanjo, she is a mother of two and a divorcee brought to the ex-general by one of his aunts who lives in Arigbajo, Ogun state, when she (Remi) was chased out of their Ikoyi (Lagos) matrimonial home for challenging his (Obasanjo) philandering.
9. Kofoworola Mojisola Obasanjo
Kofoworola got married to Peter Kenneth Blackshire, a British Baptist minister in 2002, shares the same mother with Tunde Baiyewu, the British singer of Nigerian descent.
Tunde Baiyewu’s mother lost her husband and moved to Nigeria with her two children.
She met Obasanjo who was still an officer in the army. Their romance produced Kofo Obasanjo.
10. Bola Obasanjo
Bola is currently living with Chief Obasanjo. She also has a child for him named Funsho Obasanjo. The woman was previously based in London, but had to move to Nigeria to be his resident wife.
There are other women in Chief Olusegun Obasanjo’s life while they did not have children for him.
Obasanjo’s Other Women
Mowo Sofowora started dating former president as far back as 1973, when he was a Lt. Col. in the army.
Oluremi Obasanjo mentioned Mowo Sofowora as one of the women who caused problems in her marriage. She was said to be older than Obasanjo.
Labo Salako, the wife of late Captain Salako, who died in 1972, at Argungu in a motor accident.

READ ALSO: For Voting Jonathan, We Are All Guilty
Salako was Obasanjo’s mate in London. After the death of her husband, she moved in with the Obasanjo’s at their Ikoyi (Lagos) residence on the advice of Obasanjo and the wife, Remi, complied with her husband.
But before the wife knew what was going on, Labo was already having a boisterous affair with her husband.
Lamide Adegbenro is the wife of Chief Niyi Adegbenro, the former Commissioner for Agriculture in Ogun State and a kinsman of Chief Obasanjo.
Lamide Adegbenro, who should be in her 60s now was also mentioned by Mrs. Oluremi Obasanjo in her book as one of the many mistresses of her husband.
Ex-vice-president Atiku Abubakar also mentioned her during his face-off with Obasanjo that she got a gift of a brand new Peugeot 607 and $110,000 that was paid into her NATWEST Bank, UK account in 2003, by Otunba Fasawe.
Mrs. Alo, a former Vice Principal of Queens College, Yaba, Lagos, was also supposed to be a mistress of Chief Obasanjo.
Alo is reportedly still very close to Chief Obasanjo as she is a member of the board of directors of Obasanjo’s school, The Bells.

Naij.com Home Page

YEYE OLADE IS 71 YEARS!-BLACK PEOPLE!-OJO IBI MI IN ADEYIPO VILLAGE IN YORUBALAND! -NIGERIA OOOOO!

October 14, 2015

from yeyeolade.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

OJO IBI MI 71th (MY 71th  BIRTHDAY!) IN THE VILLAGE OF YORUBALAND,NIGERIA OOOO!

OJO IBI MI(MY 71ST BIRTHDAY IS COMING UP OCTOBER 31ST). I WILL DO A
YORUBA CULTURAL CELEBRATION FOR THE VILLAGERS TO SHOW THEM THAT
BIRTHDAY IS NO WHITE boys’ cake,drinks-WE WILL HAVE YORUBA TRADITIONAL
SNACKS/FOOD,LECTURES ON HOW YORUBA LANGUAGE GOT KILLED,HOW IT CAN NOW
BE SAVED ATI DEADLY EFFECTS OF BLEACHING KILLING YOU SLOWLY!THEN A
BEST YORUBA SPEAKERS CONTESTS FOR CHILDREN,WOMEN,THEN THE FINAL FOR
WHO EVER WINS! OFCOURSE YORUBA TRADITIONAL MUSIC-OMOWURA,BATA
MUSIC,ATI….!
Alaroye will be given out as Ebun from its Display
table to choose from many back copies!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i_otGuA-k

MO ATI MI!

 66666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666

AAYEYE OJO IBI MI NI DEC.5,2015——WE HAD A “BEST YORUBA SSPEAKER CONTESTS FOR OMODE(CHILDREN) ATI ADULTS-10 ADULTS WON N500 EACH,OMODE N300 EACH! THIS IS ONE WAY SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE-BRIBE YORUBAS TO SPEAK UNDILUTED YYORUBA WITH BEST YORUBA SPEAKER CONTESTS AT EVERY EVENT,ANNUAL MEETING,COMPANYS ALL SO THAT YORUBA WILL NNOT DIE!

 

 

 

 

 

YORUBA OOOOO!-BLACK POLYGAMY OOOOO!-THE OONI OF IFE ATI HIS 3 WIVES ATI CHILDREN!-FROM NAIJA.COM

August 20, 2015

FROM NAIJA.COM

Ooni of Ife

Ooni of Ife

The influential traditional ruler died in a London hospital after he was rushed to the United Kingdom last week. His sudden demise however has made life in Ile Ife come to a halt. Various markets have been closed down and the entire community is in a reflective mood following the death of the Royal Majesty. He is survived by three wives, children and grand children. See photos of his wives below:

Olori Monisola Sijuwade

Olori Monisola Sijuwade

Olori Ladun Sijuwade

Olori Dolapo Sijuwade

Olori Ladun Sijuwade

Olori Ladun Sijuwade

Olori Monisola Sijuwade is the first wife of the Oni, she is also the Yeyeluwa of Ife. Beautiful Olori Dolapo Sijuwade is one of the educated wife of Ooni. She is the CEO of Dalora Ventures and has been married to the king for about 30 years. She studied Economics and Politics at the Buckingham University.

READ ALSO: 10 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About The Late Ooni Of Ife

Here are the photos of the Oba’s children:

Prince Tokunbo Sijuwade

Prince Tokunbo Sijuwade

Prince Gbade Sijuwade

Prince Gbade Sijuwade

Princess Kemi Sijuwade

Princess Kemi Sijuwade

Prince Gbade Sijuwade

Prince Gbade Sijuwade

Prince Adegbite Sijuwade

Prince Adegbite Sijuwade

006

Princess Adedotun Sijuwade

Princess Adedotun Sijuwade

Princess Adedami Sijuwade

Princess Adedami Sijuwade

Princess Adetoun Sijuwade

Princess Adetoun Sijuwade

One of the sons of the King, Adegbite recently had his wedding introduction ceremony with TV presenter, Dolapo Oni. The Ooni, was involved in a long-standing dispute with two other respected traditional rulers – the Awujale of Ijebuland and the Alake of Egbaland. But it was resolved in late 2009.

Naij.com Home Page

Source: kemifilani.comNaij.com news
Tags: Oba okunade sijuade oni of ife Oba okunade sijuwade Ooni of ife

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YORUBA VILLAGE IN amerikkka!-SOUTH CAROLINA-OYOTUNJI VILLAGE WHERE YORUBA RELIGION IN PRACTICED!–FROM VICE.COM

August 2, 2015

from vice.com

WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Sunday, August 02, 2015

OYOTUNJI 000000!–A YORUBA VILLAGE IN SOUTH CAROLINA!-FROM VICE.COM

from vice.com

An Oral History of the West African Village That Has Been in South Carolina for Four Decades

July 30, 2015

By Christopher Kilbourn

The king on his throne. All photos of an ancestor worship ceremony at Oyotunji by the author

At the tail end of the 1960s, elements within the Civil Rights Movement were having a debate about how the African-American community at large should confront the hostile and ignorant society in which it resided. Some advocated peaceful assimilation; others raised the idea of a violent, apocalyptic insurrection. And a few suggested moving to rural South Carolina, establishing a polygamous religious commune, and creating an outpost of West African culture through regular acts of ancestor worship, animal sacrifice, and other rituals.
On VICE News: Road-Tripping to South Carolina With the ‘New’ KKK This outpost is the Oyotunji African Village, founded by a man known as His Royal Highness Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi I, who in the late 60s was inspired to leave New York, purchase land in the Deep South, and establish a community born from the idea that black empowerment needed to focus on culture, not just economic independence.
More than four decades later, Oyotunji persists, providing a pleasant setting for converts to the Yoruba religion to live out their spiritual lives. According to a 1995 Essence article, the village had about 120 inhabitants during its mid-70s peak. Today there are around 25, and leadership has passed on to one of its founder’s 22 children, Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II.
Tourists are welcome to stop by the village, which sits about 50 miles outside of Charleston, near Sheldon, South Carolina. Its atmosphere of inclusiveness and cultural education stands in stark contrast to the recent church shooting and the intense fallout that resulted nearby. By all accounts, Oyotunji is not just a place to live, but a way of life: Its inhabitants construct temples to the pantheon of spirits called Orishas and pray to them every day. Curious about the life and perspectives of these traditionalist back-to-the-landers, I traveled to Sheldon, South Carolina, to learn a bit about Yoruba culture and gain some insight into Southern life in 2015. This is what they said:

Continued below.

Akintobe: I heard about it in Germany. I saw a little article in the military newspaper about a voodoo village in Beaufort [County], South Carolina, and it showed the king sitting on a throne that perhaps he made himself. I cut that picture out and placed it above my bed, and that’s where it stayed until I left, 30 months later. I don’t know why I did it. I was compelled by a spiritual force that I couldn’t resist. And I came here in December of ’74.

Ofalaya: I met the Oba in 2003 in Key West, Florida, when he was a prince. He came to Key West to declare one of the beaches there an African burial ground. And I met him there. And I did some volunteering at the African museum in Key West that he helped start. My sister’s a Shango priest, so I wasn’t unfamiliar with the culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II : I was born in Oyotunji in 1976, right here on the property during a storm. And the house blew over. I remember my dad telling me the story. And he came over there to rush and see if my mother was OK, and he said she came crawling out holding me from under some boards.

Olpeju

Olapeju: It’s not so much a religion as it is a culture or a lifestyle. We’re here to honor our ancestors. That means I honor yours. That means you honor mine. It’s a different dynamic than just going to church on Sunday and praying.

Akintobe: This is not part-time. Full-time. Twenty-five hours, daily. Sleeping, wake up, it’s part of you. Go to bed saying certain things, wake up saying certain things. God, God. To the Orishas, to the ancestors, daily. All day long. Praising. Giving thanks.

Ofalaya: After you go through your initiation, you spend three weeks with your Iyalosa. She would be your godparent who helps you go through the transition of becoming initiated, becoming a priest or a priestess. You have your physical parent or your biological parent, and then you have your spiritual parents. One of the Orisha will be your father and one of them will be your mother.

I have done things that I never thought I would ever do. Like chopping wood, and not using a cell phone.

You get up at 5 AM and spend your time with yourself, really. Because after that, until the time you go to bed, your time belongs to everyone, and whatever needs to be done in the nation. The farming is a big thing that we work together on. Someone weeds, someone waters, someone plants.

o2Olapeju: I have a job outside, so I also have to take into account my work schedule. But I assist with the raking.

Olayatan: Tours come. They invite us out for lectures and presentations. We do cultural events. We have priests who do consultations for people. They read them and give them counseling.

Akintobe: I’m a priest. I’ve been initiated into the secret mysteries of Obatala, who is my father. That was 1978. And then I went to the high priest of Ifa in West Africa in 1992. And I went back again in 2000 to finish it up. So I’m Babaaláwo, “father of secrets.”

HOW OYOTUNJI WAS FOUNDED

kingOba: My dad, he was born in ’28. He was about 41, 42 [when Oyotunji was built.] He had two temples in New York, and he was the first African American to tell black people that, Look, not only are you African, you have a culture and a religion, and here it is.

He said he was nothing until he ran into African culture. He was bumping in the dark.

Akintobe: He was a man who loved art; he was a commercial artist. And he was a dancer with the Katherine Dunham dance troupe. That’s when he toured Egypt and Cuba, and that’s when he really got into African culture. His mother and father came up under Marcus Garvey, so he came up early.5

Oba: He married a European woman, a Dutch woman in Greenwich Village. It was with [her] that he became radicalized as this African traditionalist. And he said it was because he noticed she had a culture: They had holidays and pageantry and all these sorts of things, and my dad was very interested in it.

And he asked her one time, and she said, “You don’t have a culture. You don’t have a religion. Because you have not been taught it.” And she opened him up. And she introduced him to a black nationalist, Harvey. And Harvey started taking him from Greenwich Village to Harlem, and that’s when it all started. He got fired up at those rallies and speeches. Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael and Martin Luther King.

He said, “We’ve got to get out of the city. We’ve got to do like they’re doing in Africa. If we’re nationalists, we’ve got to have a land, at least.” And so he started to design it. They chipped in and bought this property here for about $500. They began to build temples and institutions first. This is back in the 60s.an-oral-history-of-the-west-african-village-that-has-been-in-south-carolina-for-four-dec0

Akintobe: We didn’t have any electricity, we didn’t have any indoor plumbing. [This was] back in the 70s to ’85. We were so into studying, the initiations, learning as much as we could get our hands on, and trying to absorb and prepare ourselves as custodians of the culture. This place was like a university.

Olayatan: Kerosene lamps, outhouses. Wood stoves for cooking and heating. I loved the energy then. And I love the energy now, but it’s—that’s the way it was then.o3Olapeju

Oba: The early people who came here were not builders. They were PhDs and doctors and stuff. So they were building [houses] out of cover sheets and pallets. Not that you can’t build out of pallets, but you’ve got to do it right. And so the houses leaked, and they got blown over by storms.

Watch: ‘Triple Hate,’ our documentary on the KKK

Olayatan: Technology came in. We got electricity. We got running water. But somewhere between Nixon and Reagan, somewhere in there was a kind of turnaround. The economy started getting tougher. Folks were struggling for money. Then the oracle says, OK, things are going to get really tough. And we didn’t know what it meant at that time, but [he was predicting] the onslaught of drugs and crime in the city.

So he says, “OK, the priests have to go out and form other communities like this.” So [since the 80s,] they have [established] shrines and temples in various parts of the country and priests that administer to the community. To try and let them know you can reconnect with your ancestors and your ancestors’ culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II

THE NEW KINGo5

Oba: [In 2005], I was traveling across Seven Mile Bridge [in Florida] one day and I got a call from one of the elders. He said, “I’ve got to tell you something. Where are you?” I said, “I’m over the water, the best time. Going over a long bridge.” He said, “Oh, perfect.” And then he told me: “Your father passed away this morning.”

I couldn’t even hear what he was saying before my mind was racing. And I came back to Oyotunji, and I went through three months of traditional preparation for coronation. It was the second time that we had done it on North American soil. For three months, we had to wear black and be secluded in the room. And we had to serve all of the chiefs.

They would ask the spirits, How are we doing? Each day, they would check in with the divinities, with the oracle, to find out exactly what’s needed. How’s my spirit? How’s my character? And so I had to feed them and cook for them every time. Basically, they had to demean my character all the way down from whatever I had picked up in my life.

I remember the day after coronation, people were saying, “That didn’t even look like you out there!” It had really changed me.

And so I remember what I always said to myself was, I want to be able to build Oyotunji. I want to be able to build it standard, nice.

So we’ve remodeled this temple here. We did the Oshun temple down the road. We built the bathroom, the shower house, the media center. All of these buildings here, we remodeled them. Redid the palace. We redo the road twice a year. We’ve been able to just continue to just build and build and build. The only thing we didn’t redo is my house.

RACE IN THE SOUTHo6

Akintobe: That young man [Dylann Roof, the Charleston shooter] just turned 21. To have such hate. And why? Not once did he say that he was discriminated against. Nothing of that sort. [It was] something that he just felt. That he could do it, get away with it.

Can the stroke of a pen change the heart of our enemy? That’s the question I always ask. Passing a law? Taking down the Confederate flag? How do you change the heart of our enemy?

Oba: America never went into repair mode. It’s always been, put a new tablecloth on the dirty table because we’ve got guests. And over time, you’re going to smell it coming through the cloth.

After the Civil War was won, the Klan would still carry the Confederate flag. So our ancestors got used to seeing the Confederate flag not as a symbol of culture and heritage. Fuck no. They rode in and burned your house down. That was your visual. If they came in and grew gardens to help poor black people, it’d be a different thing. But they didn’t. It was always segregation.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. –Olayatan

WHY CULTURE MATTERS

Olayatan: It’s important for us as Africans in America to know who we are, so we can know what we have brought to the world, and what we can bring to the world in the future.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. Because that culture talks about history, contribution, and all of those things that we as a species stick our chests out about. What my people have done. What my ancestors have done. And basically, Africans in America have been told, You ain’t done nothing. You ain’t nothing, you ain’t done nothing, you’re not gonna do nothing. Because you never did anything. And so many of our people have bought into that. And that’s a tragedy and it’s a sickness.

Oba: Europeans have to know this culture, especially in America. You’re talking about healing. Taking the flag down and all these superficial things are not healing. Understanding each other’s culture is healing.

Akintobe: Oyotunji is the solution. Something was missing, but I found it here. When you know thyself, nobody can say anything to you. Once you know thyself, if you know your historical past, your ancestral past, what your people were, what they did before captivity… You walk with your shoulders and your head high. You’ve got nothing to be ashamed about and everything to be proud of. Everything.

Christopher Kilbourn is a freelancer in New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter.

Topics: Oyotunji, South Carolina, Yoruba, Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi, Sheldon, ancestor worship, religion, black separatists, Charleston shooting

COMING TO OYOTUNJI

Olayatan: I came for a two-week visit on August 6, 1978. So I guess that’s coming up on 37 years.

Olapeju, wife of the king: It’s been about a year [since I moved here]. My aunt was married to the first kabiyesi (“king”—literally, “the one who no one opposes”), so my family’s been familiar with the culture for a while. I started coming down with her a couple years back, and I fell in love with the culture, my daughter fell in love with the culture. So we decided last year to go ahead and make the plunge. I don’t know if I’ll be here forever, but I definitely am enjoying the time that I’m here right now.

Akintobe: I heard about it in Germany. I saw a little article in the military newspaper about a voodoo village in Beaufort [County], South Carolina, and it showed the king sitting on a throne that perhaps he made himself. I cut that picture out and placed it above my bed, and that’s where it stayed until I left, 30 months later. I don’t know why I did it. I was compelled by a spiritual force that I couldn’t resist. And I came here in December of ’74.

Ofalaya: I met the Oba in 2003 in Key West, Florida, when he was a prince. He came to Key West to declare one of the beaches there an African burial ground. And I met him there. And I did some volunteering at the African museum in Key West that he helped start. My sister’s a Shango priest, so I wasn’t unfamiliar with the culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II : I was born in Oyotunji in 1976, right here on the property during a storm. And the house blew over. I remember my dad telling me the story. And he came over there to rush and see if my mother was OK, and he said she came crawling out holding me from under some boards.

Olapejuo3

Olapeju: It’s not so much a religion as it is a culture or a lifestyle. We’re here to honor our ancestors. That means I honor yours. That means you honor mine. It’s a different dynamic than just going to church on Sunday and praying.

Akintobe: This is not part-time. Full-time. Twenty-five hours, daily. Sleeping, wake up, it’s part of you. Go to bed saying certain things, wake up saying certain things. God, God. To the Orishas, to the ancestors, daily. All day long. Praising. Giving thanks.

Ofalaya: After you go through your initiation, you spend three weeks with your Iyalosa. She would be your godparent who helps you go through the transition of becoming initiated, becoming a priest or a priestess. You have your physical parent or your biological parent, and then you have your spiritual parents. One of the Orisha will be your father and one of them will be your mother.

I have done things that I never thought I would ever do. Like chopping wood, and not using a cell phone.

You get up at 5 AM and spend your time with yourself, really. Because after that, until the time you go to bed, your time belongs to everyone, and whatever needs to be done in the nation. The farming is a big thing that we work together on. Someone weeds, someone waters, someone plants.

Olapeju: I have a job outside, so I also have to take into account my work schedule. But I assist with the raking.

Olayatan: Tours come. They invite us out for lectures and presentations. We do cultural events. We have priests who do consultations for people. They read them and give them counseling.

Akintobe: I’m a priest. I’ve been initiated into the secret mysteries of Obatala, who is my father. That was 1978. And then I went to the high priest of Ifa in West Africa in 1992. And I went back again in 2000 to finish it up. So I’m Babaaláwo, “father of secrets.”

HOW OYOTUNJI WAS FOUNDED

Oba: My dad, he was born in ’28. He was about 41, 42 [when Oyotunji was built.] He had two temples in New York, and he was the first African American to tell black people that, Look, not only are you African, you have a culture and a religion, and here it is.

He said he was nothing until he ran into African culture. He was bumping in the dark.

Akintobe: He was a man who loved art; he was a commercial artist. And he was a dancer with the Katherine Dunham dance troupe. That’s when he toured Egypt and Cuba, and that’s when he really got into African culture. His mother and father came up under Marcus Garvey, so he came up early.

Oba: He married a European woman, a Dutch woman in Greenwich Village. It was with [her] that he became radicalized as this African traditionalist. And he said it was because he noticed she had a culture: They had holidays and pageantry and all these sorts of things, and my dad was very interested in it.

And he asked her one time, and she said, “You don’t have a culture. You don’t have a religion. Because you have not been taught it.” And she opened him up. And she introduced him to a black nationalist, Harvey. And Harvey started taking him from Greenwich Village to Harlem, and that’s when it all started. He got fired up at those rallies and speeches. Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael and Martin Luther King.

He said, “We’ve got to get out of the city. We’ve got to do like they’re doing in Africa. If we’re nationalists, we’ve got to have a land, at least.” And so he started to design it. They chipped in and bought this property here for about $500. They began to build temples and institutions first. This is back in the 60s.

Akintobe: We didn’t have any electricity, we didn’t have any indoor plumbing. [This was] back in the 70s to ’85. We were so into studying, the initiations, learning as much as we could get our hands on, and trying to absorb and prepare ourselves as custodians of the culture. This place was like a university.

Olayatan: Kerosene lamps, outhouses. Wood stoves for cooking and heating. I loved the energy then. And I love the energy now, but it’s—that’s the way it was then.

Oba: The early people who came here were not builders. They were PhDs and doctors and stuff. So they were building [houses] out of cover sheets and pallets. Not that you can’t build out of pallets, but you’ve got to do it right. And so the houses leaked, and they got blown over by storms.

 

Olayatan: Technology came in. We got electricity. We got running water. But somewhere between Nixon and Reagan, somewhere in there was a kind of turnaround. The economy started getting tougher. Folks were struggling for money. Then the oracle says, OK, things are going to get really tough. And we didn’t know what it meant at that time, but [he was predicting] the onslaught of drugs and crime in the city.

So he says, “OK, the priests have to go out and form other communities like this.” So [since the 80s,] they have [established] shrines and temples in various parts of the country and priests that administer to the community. To try and let them know you can reconnect with your ancestors and your ancestors’ culture.

Oba Adejuyigbe Adefunmi II

THE NEW KING

Oba: [In 2005], I was traveling across Seven Mile Bridge [in Florida] one day and I got a call from one of the elders. He said, “I’ve got to tell you something. Where are you?” I said, “I’m over the water, the best time. Going over a long bridge.” He said, “Oh, perfect.” And then he told me: “Your father passed away this morning.”

I couldn’t even hear what he was saying before my mind was racing. And I came back to Oyotunji, and I went through three months of traditional preparation for coronation. It was the second time that we had done it on North American soil. For three months, we had to wear black and be secluded in the room. And we had to serve all of the chiefs.

They would ask the spirits, How are we doing? Each day, they would check in with the divinities, with the oracle, to find out exactly what’s needed. How’s my spirit? How’s my character? And so I had to feed them and cook for them every time. Basically, they had to demean my character all the way down from whatever I had picked up in my life.

I remember the day after coronation, people were saying, “That didn’t even look like you out there!” It had really changed me.

And so I remember what I always said to myself was, I want to be able to build Oyotunji. I want to be able to build it standard, nice.

So we’ve remodeled this temple here. We did the Oshun temple down the road. We built the bathroom, the shower house, the media center. All of these buildings here, we remodeled them. Redid the palace. We redo the road twice a year. We’ve been able to just continue to just build and build and build. The only thing we didn’t redo is my house.

RACE IN THE SOUTH

Akintobe: That young man [Dylann Roof, the Charleston shooter] just turned 21. To have such hate. And why? Not once did he say that he was discriminated against. Nothing of that sort. [It was] something that he just felt. That he could do it, get away with it.

Can the stroke of a pen change the heart of our enemy? That’s the question I always ask. Passing a law? Taking down the Confederate flag? How do you change the heart of our enemy?

Oba: America never went into repair mode. It’s always been, put a new tablecloth on the dirty table because we’ve got guests. And over time, you’re going to smell it coming through the cloth.

After the Civil War was won, the Klan would still carry the Confederate flag. So our ancestors got used to seeing the Confederate flag not as a symbol of culture and heritage. Fuck no. They rode in and burned your house down. That was your visual. If they came in and grew gardens to help poor black people, it’d be a different thing. But they didn’t. It was always segregation.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. –Olayatan

WHY CULTURE MATTERS

Olayatan: It’s important for us as Africans in America to know who we are, so we can know what we have brought to the world, and what we can bring to the world in the future.

If you steal a person’s culture, then you stole the most precious thing that they have. Because that culture talks about history, contribution, and all of those things that we as a species stick our chests out about. What my people have done. What my ancestors have done. And basically, Africans in America have been told, You ain’t done nothing. You ain’t nothing, you ain’t done nothing, you’re not gonna do nothing. Because you never did anything. And so many of our people have bought into that. And that’s a tragedy and it’s a sickness.

Oba: Europeans have to know this culture, especially in America. You’re talking about healing. Taking the flag down and all these superficial things are not healing. Understanding each other’s culture is healing.

Akintobe: Oyotunji is the solution. Something was missing, but I found it here. When you know thyself, nobody can say anything to you. Once you know thyself, if you know your historical past, your ancestral past, what your people were, what they did before captivity… You walk with your shoulders and your head high. You’ve got nothing to be ashamed about and everything to be proud of. Everything.

Christopher Kilbourn is a freelancer in New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter.
Topics: Oyotunji, South Carolina, Yoruba, Oba Oseijemoyotunji

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