Archive for the ‘BLACK FILMS’ Category

EBONY MAGAZINE DOES NOT PUT BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES ON ITS COVER-SAYS WHITE BRAINWASHED BLACKS SINCE SLAVERY ONLY GO FOR CREOLE-CRAZY-MULATTO-MENTALITY-IMITATION-WHITE-GIRL-BEAUTY BUT IN THE 60’S WE WOOLLY HAIR BEAUTIES FORCED EBONY TO PUT ITS FIRST BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY,WITH WOOLLY HAIR AND AFRICAN FEATURES ON IT’S COVER AND NOW GABOUREY SIDIBE HAS BROKEN AGAIN THE IMITATION WHITE GIRL CEILING OF EBONY-BLACK ON BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

March 29, 2010

GABOUREY SIDIBE IS A BIG BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME AND DON’T LET ANYBODY LIE AND SAY NO!

February 3, 2010

CLICK ON HERE TO SEE PUBLICATIONS ON HER:
blackskinnedbeauties.blogspot.com

Gabourey Sidibe
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Gabourey Sidibe

Sidibe at the 2009 Toronto International Film Festival
Born May 6, 1983 (1983-05-06) (age 26)
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 2009–present
Gabourey “Gabby” Sidibe (born May 6, 1983) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress who made her acting debut in the 2009 film Precious.

Contents [hide]
1 Life and career
2 Filmography
3 References
4 External links

[edit] Life and career
Sidibe was born in Brooklyn, New York and was raised by her mother in Harlem.[1] Her mother, Alice Tan Ridley, is an R&B and gospel singer, and her Senegal-born father, Ibnou Sidibe, is a cab driver.[2] She has attended several New York City area colleges: Borough of Manhattan Community College, City College of New York, and Mercy College.[3]

In Precious, Sidibe plays the title character, a physically and sexually abused sixteen-year old, with a four year old child by her own father and with another child on the way. The film won numerous awards, including the Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Award.[4]

She has finished shooting her next film, Yelling to the Sky, a Sundance Lab project directed by Victoria Mahoney and starring Zoe Kravitz, in which she plays a bully.[5]

On December 8, 2009, she appeared on the Jay Leno Show to promote Precious. Her “Earn Your Plug” challenge was to answer trivia about ‘N Sync with the help of surprise guest Lance Bass from the band. A week later, on December 15, she was nominated for a Golden Globe in the category of Best performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture Drama for her performance in Precious. On February 2, 2010, Sidibe was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.

[edit] Filmography
Year Film Role Notes
2009 Precious Claireece “Precious” Jones Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
Hollywood Film Award for Rising Star Award
Iowa Film Critics Awards Best Actress
National Board of Review Breakthrough Performance Female
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Satellite Award for Outstanding New Talent
Women’s Film Critics Circle Award for Best Young Actress
Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Alliance of Woman Film Journalists Award for Best Actress
Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated — Black Reel Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Black Reel Award for Best Breakthrough Performance
Nominated — Black Reel Award for Best Ensemble
Nominated — Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated — Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Independent Spirit Award for Best Lead Female
Nominated — NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture
Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated — St Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated — Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association for Best Actress
Nominated — Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association for Best Breakthrough Performance
Nominated — Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association for Best Ensemble
2010 Yelling to the Sky Latonya Williams (post-production)

[edit] References
^ Stated on the Late Show with David Letterman, November 9, 2009
^ Williams, Kam (2009-11-10). “Gabby Sidibe “Precious” Interview with Kam Williams”. NewsBlaze. http://newsblaze.com/story/20091109180950kamw.nb/topstory.html. Retrieved 2009-11-10.
^ Gabourey Sidibe profile
^ “Push’ takes Sundance grand jury award” Ed Zeitchik, Hollywood Reporter, January 24, 2009
^ Yadegaran, Jessica (2009-11-12), “Gabourey Sidibe on being ‘Precious'”, San Jose Mercury News, http://www.mercurynews.com/movies-dvd/ci_13763264, retrieved 2009-11-15
[edit] External links
Gabourey Sidibe at the Internet Movie Database
Gabourey Sidibe bio FR

This article about a United States film and TV actor or actress born in the 1980s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v • d • e

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabourey_Sidibe”
Categories: 1983 births | African American actors | American film actors | Living people | People from Brooklyn | Senegalese Americans | American screen actor, 1980s birth stubs

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YOU WILL GET YOUR BLACK MAN WHO APPRECIATES YOUR BIG BEAUTIFUL BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!

THAT'S A WHOLE LOT OF BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIFUL WOMAN!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME!

SEE MORE FLICKS AND PUBLICATIONS ON GABOUREY SIDIBE HERE-
http://blackskinnedbeauties.blogspot.com/2010/05/gabourey-sidibe-is-big-black-skinned.html

ABOUT THE BLEACHING OF GABOUREY’S ELLE COVER-
http://hollywoodcrush.mtv.com/2010/09/17/gabourey-sidibe-elle-cover-multiple-choice/

THE VIRGIN AND THE NARROW PATH MOVIE NIGERIAN FORUM, FORUMS, SOCIAL NETWORK, NIGERIA JOB FORUM, BLOG, WEBSITE, SITE, NOLLYWOOD, ONLINE MESSAGE BOARD-BASED ON BAYO ADEBOWALE’S GREAT NOVEL ON VIRGINITY!

January 27, 2010

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via THE VIRGIN AND THE NARROW PATH MOVIE NIGERIAN FORUM, FORUMS, SOCIAL NETWORK, NIGERIA JOB FORUM, BLOG, WEBSITE, SITE, NOLLYWOOD, ONLINE MESSAGE BOARD.

TUNDE KELANI’S LATEST INTERVIEW WITH POSITION TV,JUNE,2009-OUR GREATEST AFRICAN/YORUBA FILM MAKER! -FROM GUARDIAN NEWSPAPERS

June 6, 2009

OUR GREATEST YORUBA FILM MAKER!

OUR GREATEST YORUBA FILM MAKER!

FROM ngrguardiannews.com

Friday, June 05, 2009

Tunde Kelani’s cinematographic life on Position TV
By Michael Orie

POSITION TV featured its first non-visual arts personality on Thursday. The encounter with cinematographer Tunde Kelani focused on issues surrounding the production of films in Africa, the hopes and the impediments. The interview, which ran on Silverbird TV yesterday from 11a.m. represents a bold attempt at examining the bourgeoning film industry especially in the context of evolving technologies.

Tunde Kelani has been at the forefront of a production of cultural films using contemporary themes to paint on the canvas of indigenous myths and traditions. As a director of photography whose primary function area is the photography of the moving image, Kelani tells the story as much as the screenwriter. His passion is to use lights, both natural and contrived, to create images, organize his visual landscapes and to interpret the narrative in concrete terms.

His answer to the regular question, why do you do what you do? Is that he drew a real passion for photography very early in life. He managed to own his first still camera in elementary school and never learned to use it, despite being his regular companion, for many years. It was at Abeokuta Grammar School, that his vision and passion for capturing the world through images grew. The rich Yoruba culture of his immediate townscape, the rockhills of Egba, the sheer splendour of the flora of the deep rainforest surrounding brought the assurances of a fully committed life’s pursuit.

That he would wind up working for the new television arm of the Nigerian Broadcasting Service was inevitable. And from there, he went directly to London Film School, graduating with a professional diploma after a session.

The period of Kelani’s induction into the budding cinema industry in Nigeria coincided with the time of the production of the first generation of indigenous Nigerian films. This period, with all of its hopes and excitements was short-lived. African cinema nose-dived with the declining national economies. Even so did the cinema going culture, which all through the decade following the national independence was practically enjoying a boom.

Kelani thinks the cinema failed primarily because of the absence of the enabling government policies and infrastructure.

That absence itself was the direct result of African politicians not coming to terms with the role of cinema in the building of a nation. Its powers of persuasion that could have been employed to promote development goals, its capabilities as a tool for engendering national pride and racial identity.

Kelani declared that “It was a mistake, and it is still a mistake to leave our film production culture to market forces.

“Before the advent of Nollywood, which emerged and has sustained itself unassisted by the state, Africa practically allowed others to tell her stories for her,” he said.

On the issue of good practice and performance quality especially in Nollywood, he is optimistic that quality is generally on the rise. And he surprised the crew by expressing dissatisfaction even with his own work.

“A lot of work has been done by our establishment here which people appreciate a lot, but they can be done better, with more resources at our disposal. Take our latest movie “Arugba”, for example. We have returned to the film location on several occasions when we had a little more money that we felt we could use to improve on certain aspects of the work”.

But things are bound to be better off for someone like him, than it would be for, say, an upstart. He didn’t entirely agree.

“I think we have been privileged. I have a good education in film production. I have been well exposed. At the time we started things were not as difficult as they are now.

“What can you do when power supply is far from guaranteed? Who wants to buy a film when they have no electricity supply in the house to watch a DVD? I don’t think we have sat down yet to seriously consider how much this country loses because of the unimpressive power sector. You see, that is a real problem for all of us”.

Kelani’s latest film was recently adopted by the Lagos State Government for a series of mobile cinema exhibitions in all the local government areas of the state. That experience of being on the road he is quite grateful for. It is not only reminiscent of the Yoruba traveling theatre tradition which he remembers so well as a very young adult in Ibadan (he was an avid follower of the theatre trends at the erstwhile popular proscenium stage theatre in Ibadan, Obisesan Hall), in recent years, Kelani’s Mainframe crew has engaged in extensive community cinema work in Benin Republic.

“Mobile cinema is one of the ways we can get ahead in the face of our NEPA problem”.

Another interesting revelation from the programme is the discussion on Oshodi. Position TV asked to know if his choice of Oshodi was deliberate and if he gets his stories from his densely populated surrounding. Many writers and artists like to touch base with the people. For example, British-Nigerian author and film writer Biyi Bandele moved down to Brixton in London from the more middle-class setting of Battersea.

Kelani replies: “I have enjoyed living and working in Oshodi. I cannot claim that I have not been inspired by it. We dedicated one of the settings in our film, Ole Ku to Oshodi as a way of documenting it. Nobody knew that Oshodi was going to transform so suddenly. With hindsight, we would have done more work, taken more pictures. All that is now gone. It is a bitter sweet situation”.

Jesus is Black, See! (If you know history, Black people are the first race so ofcourse you know Jesus is Black) Pictures here!

February 26, 2009

Black Jesus

Black Jesus

b_black_jesus

Black Madonna

The Black Madonna ABove, Below
Black Jesus Pictures!

jesus_our_savior_black

Black Jesus3

jesus_at_door_black

Black Jesus and the Rastafarian Disciples

black_jesus5

FESPACO:THE LARGEST PAN-AFRICAN FILM FESTIVAL AND BROTHER DANNY GLOVER,ALWAYS TRAVELLING TO THE MOTHERLAND NARRATES THIS DOC ON IT-FROM THE FINAL CALL NEWSPAPER

October 16, 2008

FROM finalcall.com

——————————————————————————–

FESPACO: The largest Pan-African film festival you’ve probably never heard of
By Ashahed M. Muhammad
Updated Oct 7, 2008, 12:33 pm

Narrated by award-winning actor and outspoken activist Danny Glover this 82-minute documentary chronicles FESPACO (Le Festival Panafricain du Cinéma et de la Télévision de Ouagadougou) an African film festival held bi-annually every odd year in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in West Africa.

FESPACO began in 1969 when a group of visionary film enthusiasts joined together to create venues for works written, produced and directed by Africans to receive wider exposure. This desire led to the establishment of an outlet to promote the works of African filmmakers and led to the creation of networking opportunities for film industry professionals across the globe to share their ideas and techniques. Algeria, Tunisia, Mauritania, Mali, Senegal, Morrocco, Burundi, the United States and the United Kingdom are just some of the diverse global locales represented by filmmakers displaying their creative talents at FESPACO.

Previously called the Republic of Upper Volta, the land now known as Burkina Faso was renamed in 1984 by President Thomas Sankara who fought against imperialism and corruption which ultimately led to his death in 1987. It is important to note that during the time of French colonial rule in areas such as Burkina Faso, filmmaking was forbidden to Africans which makes the establishment of a film festival hosted there even more remarkable and meaningful.

Even if you consider yourself a Black film aficionado, it is quite possible that you’ve never even heard of the film festival and there are a number of reasons for that.

Here in the United States, there are very few outlets for Black films dealing with serious and interesting Black oriented themes. There is little if any support for Black films that deal with topics other than crime, sex, dysfunctional relationships, or stepping fetchit-esque representations of comedy.

As a contrast, FESPACO features movies with political and socially relevant themes such “Chisholm ‘72: Unbought & Unbossed” a 2004 documentary directed by Shola Lynch dealing with Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm’s historic 1972 presidential bid. “Drum”, a 2004 film about South African journalist Henry Nxumalo played by award-winning American actor Taye Diggs deals with those who challenged apartheid in the 1950s. In 2005, “Drum” earned FESPACO’s top award, the “Étalon de Yennenga” (Stallion of Yennenga) given to the African film that best shows the realities of Africa. The award also symbolizes African cultural identity that lives on through the creation of African filmmakers who use their talents to effectively tell our story.

Another FESPACO award winner, 2003 documentary “Beah: A Black Woman Speaks” covers the life of Black actress Beah Richards and was directed by Black female filmmaker Lisa Gay Hamilton. Ms. Hamilton was given the prestigious Paul Robeson Prize awarded for the best film by a director from within the African Diaspora.

Awards are also given for the Best First Film (called the Oumarou Ganda Prize), and awards for Best Actor and Actress, Best Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Editing and other categories similar to the Oscars that are awarded to film industry professionals in the United States.

FESPACO is written, produced and directed by Kevin Arkadie, whose credits include “NYPD Blue,” “NY Undercover,” “Soul Food,” and “The Shield.” Interviews with FESPACO award winners (and losers) as well as a behind-the scenes peek into the unique challenges faced by filmmakers from Africa and the African Diaspora make this DVD well worthwhile.

The next FESPACO film festival is scheduled for Feb. 28th through March 7th 2009. (To order the documentary go to http://www.fespacodocumentary.com/. For more information on attending the festival or qualifications for film entry, visit the English language website at http://www.fespaco.bf/index_en.html.)


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