Archive for the ‘BLACK BOOKS YOU MUST READ!’ Category

BAYO ADEBOWALE’S LATEST HOT POETRY BOOK IS OUT! -THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A POETRY BOOK LIKE THIS ON AFRICA BEFORE! -GET YOUR COPY NOW!

February 24, 2012

Book cover

Friday, February 24, 2012
BAYO ADEBOWALE’S LATEST GREAT POETRY BOOK IS OUT ! -“AFRICAN MELODY: A POETIC EXPOSITION OF THE AFRICAN ESSENCE” ! – GET YOUR COPY NOW ! -IT’S HISTORIC AND THERE HAS NEVER HAS BEEN ANY POETRY BOOK LIKE THIS BEFORE ON AFRICA!


Friday, February 24, 2012
BAYO ADEBOWALE’S LATEST GREAT POETRY BOOK IS OUT ! -“AFRICAN MELODY: A POETIC EXPOSITION OF THE AFRICAN ESSENCE” ! – GET YOUR COPY NOW ! -IT’S HISTORIC AND THERE HAS NEVER HAS BEEN ANY POETRY BOOK LIKE THIS BEFORE ON AFRICA!

BACK TO AFRICA !- THIS BLACK AMERIKKKAN DAN FOSTER DID SO WELL ADJUSTING IN NIGERIA THAT HE’S WRITING A BOOK ABOUT HOW TO DO BUSINESS IN NIGERIA- IMAGINE! BLACK ON!-FROM NAIRALAND.COM

May 26, 2011


FROM NAIRALAND.COM
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
Welcome. Please Login, Register, Or Activate!
type your username and password to login

Date: May 26, 2011, 03:20 PM
689857 members and 612647 Topics
Latest Member: Farmingdal
Nairaland [Nigerian Forum] Home Help Search Who is currently online? Recent Posts Login Register
Nairaland Forum | General | Welcome | Politics (Moderators: aisha2, Jarus) | CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
Pages: (1) (2) Go Down Send this topic Notify of replies
Author Topic: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book) (Read 5257 views)
Mobinga
CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« on: September 01, 2010, 04:47 AM »

When yes means maybe: Doing business in Nigeria

Quote from: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Dean Foster is the author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa”

Foster believes the key to success in Nigeria depends on your contacts and commitment

Providing a tip or “dash” for services, including the processing of official documents, is normal

London, England (CNN) — In a business culture where negotiations are fluid and what’s agreed on Monday might not necessary mean the same thing on Tuesday, how do you get the job done?

It’s a challenge some foreigners encounter when doing business in Nigeria.

However, things don’t have to be difficult explains Dean Foster, president of the cross-cultural training company Dean Foster Associates and author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

“The bottom line is that you cannot expect to go into Nigeria, make the deal, turn around, walk out and expect things to go as planned,” Foster told CNN.

You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life

–Dean Foster, author of “The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa.”

“If you’re committed to business in Nigeria you have to know that you’re entering an environment that requires your constant attention and constant renegotiation. Adaptability and flexibility on your part is key,” he continued.

Knowing the right person is also fundamental, according to Foster, who says personal relationships are often more important than regulations and laws. It’s something, he warns, many outsiders may feel uncomfortable with.

“You have to be wary of the old tradition of ‘dash,’ which in Nigeria essentially means putting money in the hands of an individual,” he said.

“It is of course in many respects illegal, but it is still quite a common convention. And the degree to which you, as a business person, want to co-operate with this will determine to a great degree the success you have in Nigeria.”

But despite the challenges, Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.

“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

Dean Foster’s top five tips for doing business in Nigeria.

1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

2. Among traditional Nigerian business people, an appointment is rarely private. Try not to be irritated if your meeting is interrupted by phone calls and/or visits from your client’s friends and family.

3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you
want more food.

4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

5. Nigerians are good bargainers, and you should expect to bargain and compromise in the marketplace and at the negotiating table.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/BUSINESS/08/31/business.etiquette.nigeria/index.html

Quote
Comments in the Cnn Forum

sweet03 I personally will not do business in Nigeria again, i dont believe them and they r not worth the hassle. THey are sweet talkers, so do not try it.

Indykid Is there any Nigerians in this forum??? If so , put your wallet in your front pocket. just sayin, Angry Angry

heo9542 Doing business in Nigeria, thats a good idea. I get emails for it all the time and they seem trustworthy to me. I cant even tell you how many millions of dollars I have waiting for me in escrow over there. This guy neva jam Grin Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #1 on: September 01, 2010, 04:57 AM »

Quote
According to Foster, as long as you understand the cultural etiquette, doing business in Nigeria can offer vast opportunities. But, he says, success comes down two key factors: contacts and commitment.

Quote
Foster is adamant business in Nigeria can be a rewarding experience — and not just financially.
“The people are fantastic — you realize that the social networks and relationships you put so some much energy and time into, are in fact is part of the great reward. You’ll build friendships and relationships that will last a life,” he told CNN.

so whats bad about this article, look at the glowing compliments Grin

Dis Guy
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #2 on: September 01, 2010, 04:59 AM »

Quote
1. Agreeing with people is considered to be a sign of respect. Nigerians generally say “yes” to a request because their respect for you does not allow them to say “no.”

this is a solution to all those fights on Nairaland, everyone should just agree and say yes sir yes ma! simples!

gozzilla (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #3 on: September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM »

I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

calyx
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #4 on: September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM »

99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.

Care-Taker (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29 AM »

The man is a ”been to”

Those are the attitudes Nigerians have that we are going to change for the better.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GodBlessNigeria

deor03 (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:38 AM »

Quote from: gozzilla on September 01, 2010, 08:35 AM
I am still trying to pick out the the bad in this article.

Me too !

Quote from: calyx on September 01, 2010, 08:57 AM
99% of the content of this article is true and well informed.
Also, True !

PapaBrowne (m)
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #7 on: September 01, 2010, 09:39 AM »

Very accurate article!!! The guys knows so well!!

jba203
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #8 on: September 01, 2010, 10:08 AM »

The bright side of the article is that, it paints a picture that doing business in Nigeria can potetially pay dividends. However, 90% of the article shows Nigeria’s volatility in establishing a working sytem. It is also written as an arlet to those who may wish to do business over there. It talks about contacts and commitment: that in stable economies cannot serve as a determinant for good business.

ziga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #9 on: September 01, 2010, 10:50 AM »

@OP

I don’t agree with you that the article painted Nigeria black. The writer is obviously someone who has done some real research on Nigeria because he actually presented the facts as they are.

He gave the positives and negatives, and he tried to rationalize the reasons for it and he was not in anyway sarcastic about his remarks. This is unlike some other reports that i’ve seen that look like they were written from the seat of a plane.

This report is a very honest evaluation of the situation on ground. Thanks to the reporter for being factual.

Mobinga
Re: Cnn Article Paints Nigeria Black
« #10 on: September 01, 2010, 11:08 AM »

Hehehe!! Oya let me modify the topic

goldplated (m)
Re: CNN :: Doing Business In Nigeria
« #11 on: September 01, 2010, 07:54 PM »

A wonderful tribute!

kulyie
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #12 on: September 02, 2010, 03:53 PM »

he’s sure right.he’s bin in nigeria 4 over 10 yrs,so he shud know wot livin n doing buisness in nigeria entails especially doing business in lagos.we have a lotta cultural influences wen doing business n foreign counterparts who arent aware of dis may experience cultural shock Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed Lips sealed

Ranoscky (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #13 on: September 02, 2010, 04:14 PM »

Pls, i’ll lyk to know if Dan Foster is back in nigeria, any1 to help me out with d answer? Undecided

nanidee (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #14 on: September 02, 2010, 04:28 PM »

@ poster, Dan Foster, or Dean Foster?, Undecided Undecided Undecided

bones1 (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #15 on: September 02, 2010, 04:31 PM »

Article is an accurate and non biased account of Nigeria

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #16 on: September 02, 2010, 05:00 PM »

Perfect analysis Cool

matiltom_d (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #17 on: September 02, 2010, 05:23 PM »

I’m confused in here o! Dan Foster the OAP or Dean Foster?

ayex0001
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #18 on: September 02, 2010, 05:33 PM »

Maybe he wanted to say Usman Dan vodio, lol

xtremeidea (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #19 on: September 02, 2010, 05:38 PM »

Dan Foster has written a book? woooooooooow Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

Tokotaya
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #20 on: September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM »

It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

chosen04 (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #21 on: September 02, 2010, 06:57 PM »

Quote from: Tokotaya on September 02, 2010, 05:41 PM
It’s an error by the OP. This is about a different Dan, from the OAP

Are you serious?

JUO
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #22 on: September 02, 2010, 07:48 PM »

this guy don drink nija water

blakduches
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #23 on: September 02, 2010, 08:17 PM »

A true depiction of the nigerian system.

oladayo042
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #24 on: September 02, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Factual truth abt Naija.
3. Do not eat everything on your plate; leaving some food is a signal that you have had enough. If you clean your plate, you are indicating that you want more food. Shocked Shocked

rebranded (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:28 PM »

I see Dean Foster NOT Dan Foster pls change the heading its misleading!

Nymph node (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #26 on: September 02, 2010, 11:45 PM »

The dark dude is a presenter, Inspiration FM Lagos the other is a US based writer he wrote Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East

* Dan-foster Inspiration Fm.jpg (10.52 KB, 299×448 )

* dean+foster.jpg (16.8 KB, 320×240 )

Dis Guy
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #27 on: September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM »

Quote
4. Nigerians tend to stand close to each other while speaking. If you are uncomfortable conversing at this distance, try to refrain from backing up.

so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

shilling (f)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #28 on: September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Quote from: Dis Guy on September 03, 2010, 01:47 AM
so why do we still talk like we have loudspeakers in our mouth??

I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

rasputinn (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #29 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22 AM »

The day a man as unserious as Dan Foster(sorry Dan,but you know what I mean)writes a book about doing business anywhere,,,,,,,, ,,,,.,.,.,.,

agitator
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #30 on: September 03, 2010, 07:44 AM »

MTN knew about this and they are the greatest in africa, vodacom didn’t and they lost
Julius Berger also towed this line, and some new foreign construction companies are following their footsteps. Cool

Jakumo (m)
Re: CNN: Doing Business In Nigeria (Review Of Dan Foster’s Book)
« #31 on: September 03, 2010, 07:54 AM »

Quote from: shilling on September 03, 2010, 07:02 AM
I was also wondering about that. I’ve never noticed that about Nigerians whenever I visit – standing so close. I feel super-uncomfortable when a person does that.

Please don’t feel uncomfortable, since a true Nigerian conversation is not in progress until you can SMELL the breath and body odor of the person invading your personal space, and feel your ears ringing from the glass-breaking volume of their speech.

YORUBA!-SAVE YORUBA LANGUAGE BY USING IT EVERYWHERE YOU CAN,WRITING IT,READING IT,SPEAKING IT TO YOUR CHILDREN ONLY AT HOME,AND HAVING “BEST YORUBA SPEAKING CONTESTS” AT EVERY EVENT YOU CAN(IGBEYAWO,IPADE ATI GBOGBE!)-FEMI OSOFISAN HAS TRANSLATED THIS PLAY INTO YORUBA FOR GOMINA FASOLA, TUNDE KELANI ATI GBOGBO WON OMO YORUBA!

October 19, 2010

FROM thenationonlineng.net

Old play, new language
Edozie Udeze 17/10/2010 00:00:00

Who is Afraid of Solarin? a play by Professor Femi Osofisan, has always been a symbolic one. It is so because it is a comic treatise on what makes Nigeria and Nigerians unique. In the play, Osofisan uses plenty of comic scenes and statements to portray the story of a society where things work upside down. The name Solarin is used symbolically because of his role in trying to give a better direction to Nigerians and to the Nigerian state. The play chronicles Nigeria’s many socio-political problems in such a way that the audience are made to feel the impact while the play is on stage. You can’t help but laugh and hiss and then wonder the sort of society Nigeria is and why the people are what they are.

This was why it was selected as the independence play this year by the trio of Mufu Onifade, Tunde Kelani and the Lagos State government. However, the play which was translated into the Yoruba language by Dotun Ogundeji as Yeepa! Solaarin Nbo!!, is meant to send home the message to the larger Yoruba theatre audience.

In this new experiment, the message is supposed to sink deeper, so that people who love to see the lighter side of Nigerian myriad of problems dramatized on stage, would have a better view of it. The few days the play was on stage in Lagos last week proved that a lot of people were really eager to laugh away the problems of the society. Not only that the artistes led by Ropo Ewenla were on top of their game on stage, the large turnout of theatre lovers showed that the choice of the play was apt and appropriate.

To make the play appeal more to the audience, the producers introduced an opening glee. This marriage of convenience between opening glee and full-length drama presentation was Mainframe and National Association of Nigerian Theatre Arts Practitioners (NANTAP) Lagos chapter’s synergetic way of joining the Lagos State government in celebrating the 50th independence anniversary of Nigeria. This way, there was no moment of boredom. The artistes were able to appeal to the audience to wake up to the realities of the moment; to make Nigeria great.

Is this Nigeria of our dreams in 1960? That seemed to be the question raised on stage by the actors. Ewenla, the lead character was able to convince the audience that we need to do more; we need to work harder and be more honest to make Nigeria a better place for all and sundry.
Yeepa! Is an exclamation that something hilarious or ominous is about to happen and that people should sit up to welcome it. This situation calls for an acclaim, calling the Nigerian people that there are more than meet the eye. Solarin was an enigma of some sort when he was alive. Although the name is hyperbolic in a way, it goes to portray a visionary leader who saw long before now what the Nigerian society portended. Now the play in his name says it all.

Anywhere this play goes on stage, the euphoric appeal it gives leaves much to be desired. The Yoruba version of it also did much more; the message seeped deeper into the fabric of the audience whose laughter and hisses tore deep into the night. And so, it is kudos to Onifade for his sense of humour and wisdom. The play truly helped to embellish the mood of the moment and bring Nigerians back to that moment of reflection.

Share this Article: del.icio.us Digg Technorati Facebook
Comments (0 posted):
CAPTCHA is wrong.
CAPTCHA is wrong.
CAPTCHA is wrong.
total: | displaying:
Post your comment
THE NATION welcomes your opinions. This is a public forum and your comments will be moderated. Please air your views with courtesy and respect. Libelous and abusive comments are not allowed.
Disclaimer: Comments made here are the opinions of our readers and not a representation in any way of the views of THE NATION.

Your name: Your e-mail address: Your website: Add your comments: YORUBA LANGUAGE IS DYING ALONG WITH OTHER NIGERIAN/AFRICAN LANGUAGES SO WE MUST DO AS MUCH OF THIS AS POSSIBLE-USE THE MOTHER TONGUE FOR ALL PLAYS,EVENTS,PUBLICATIONS THAT YOU CAN AND SAVE AFRICAN LANGUAGES! TAKE CARE OF YOUR MOTHER TONGUE LIKE OTHER SELF-RESPECTING PEOPLE IN THE WORLD DO-IT IS YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE, NOT YOUR SECOND AND GOD GAVE IT TO YOU SO CHERISH IT,SPEAK IT ONLY IN YOUR HOME TO YOUR CHILDREN AND LET OUR MOTHER TONGUE LIVE!

IREKE ONIBUDO BY D.O. FAGUNWA HITS THE STAGE BOTH IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH THANKS TO CHAMS,NIGERIA!-FROM NIGERIAN COMPASS NEWSPAPER

December 2, 2009

IREKE ONIBUDO-A NOVEL FOR THE GREATEST YORUBA NOVELIST D.O. FAGUNWA,PERFORMED AS A PLAY IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH BY CHAMS PLC NIGERIA,NOV. 2009IREKE ONIBUDO-A NOVEL FOR THE GREATEST YORUBA NOVELIST D.O. FAGUNWA,PERFORMED AS A PLAY IN YORUBA LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH BY CHAMS PLC NIGERIA,NOV. 2009

IREKE ONIBUDO-FAGUNWA'S GREAT YORUBA NOVEL ON STAGE,COMPLIMENTS OF CHAMS NIGERIA!

IREKE ONIBUDO-FAGUNWA'S GREAT YORUBA NOVEL ON STAGE TO CHAMS,NIGERIA!

FROM compassnews.net

Wednesday, Dec 02nd
Last update:11:29:27 PM GMT

‘Fabulous Adventures…’ of Nigeria’s theatre Monday, 23 November 2009 00:00 Nigerian Compass
Veteran art critic, PITA OKUTE who watched the recent presentation of The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man, Femi Osofisan’s English language stage adaptation of D. O. Fagunwa’s Yoruba novel

Ireke Onibudo, at the National Arts Theatre appraises the production against the background of the development of the stage performing art in Nigeria.

AT the end, a critic complained that the play was too long. I agreed. Three hours or so of dance and drama may be quite hard on the backsides. But having observed that “nowadays all the money goes to musical jamborees and comedy shows rather than serious or cerebral activities,” one suspects that the translator-playwright, Femi Osofisan, sought to compensate: To enlighten and entertain at once. Ergo – the song and dance routines that trailed the tale at every turn. Perhaps, there was just a chorus or two too many, but the overall effect was somewhat cheery.

Clearly, the greater challenge of his spirited dramatic interpretation lay in deconstructing the epic narrative of Ireke Onibudo from the infinite canvas of the novel to the less extensive stage of the National Art Theater’s Cinema Hall II. Such spatial limitations do not matter to Osofisan, whose enduring style is to extend the stage far beyond its allotted boundary into the audience. Complain, if you will, about the relevance of all that ‘movement.’ The artistic director, Tunde Awosanmi has bought into this peculiar trademark and in The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man, he and the playwright create resonating chords for a moral tale birthed on mental, physical, moral and spiritual trials. In this regard, the wanderings of Oba Ireke (Kunle Agboola) and the reporter Beyioku (Olugbemi Adekambi) amidst the audience denote the hero’s strange but enthralling odyssey from pauper to oba – the king.

By will power, moral restraint and sheer good fortune, Ireke triumphs over adversity to become a celebrated warlord and noble man. His story runs alongside a fable told by his dead mother: the heinous murder of the Tiger’s children by the sly, wicked Fox. With an animal cast to embellish the narrative, the stage is set for spectacles of engaging folk theatre. Colourful and confusing in turns, the performance is overdone sometimes by tedious dialogue and spurious acting. The narrators, a blend of characters and voices add to the overall dullness. Osofisan’s commendable effort is overshadowed by pervading myopia. One is hard put to understand why his gargantuan translation of Fagunwa’s novel stopped merely at this leaving the entire song and dance sketches of the play to be rendered in vernacular. Thus, the strong and unpalatable suggestion that there is a river of interpretation he was too scared or ill equipped to cross. In the end, non-Yoruba speaking audiences may either feel greatly enriched by word plays they hardly understand or grossly cheated of their deserved enjoyment.
Nonetheless, the varying abilities of Tunde Oshinaike (Young Ireke), Charles Ihumiodu (Oba Alupayida), Kunle Agboola and Omotara Soretire (Ifepade) combine to pull the play through. Oshinaike exhibits great presence of mind throughout and is the live-wire of this engaging theatrical package.

Still, The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man mirrors at large the curious trajectory of Nigerian theatre in the last four decades: From the eventful era of Hubert Ogunde, Moses Olaiya Adejumo, Duro Ladipo and many others to those far off days when theatre groups from the universities toured the country with incisive productions for the masses and corporate interventions such as Ajo Productions held up the flag of Nigerian drama in the turbulent socio-political winds.

Thereafter, the sly, wicked fox of ill-conceived government policies like Structural Adjustment Programme devoured the growing spirit of a blossoming Nigerian theatre. The craft endured a wilderness of dwindled public support, severe competition from local and foreign television and the local home video industry among other alternative media.

It would be stretching the parallels a bit to suggest that the monster has finally been slain and that theatre has finally come into its own as a result. Yet, one can not fail to observe a growing love affair between Corporate Nigeria and the Nigerian stage. The Chams Theatre Series a yearly “feast of theatre” hosted by Chams Plc, a computer hardware and maintenance services company, exemplifies this happy trend. The series kicked off in 2008 with the production of D. O. Fagunwa’s Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo and theatre lovers around the country are mightily thrilled that Chams is helping to keep their beloved craft alive and well.

The Series has lived up to a promise of enlivening the pleasure of the people and enlarging the pockets of practitioners. To paraphrase Osofisan, Chams employs over a hundred theatre artistes for about three months every year and offers free, to live audiences, a vivid experience of theatre that the people yearn for but which is so hard to come by these days. Here, one might add, is corporate social responsibility at its eclectic best.

The event at the National Theatre ended with a dance drill which was topped by a significant question from the cast. Chams ye da? (Where is your Chams?), they chanted and the management of the visionary Nigerian company went on stage to take a deserved bow with the happy cast and production crew.

It is easy to imagine that they might also be asking the same important question in Enugu, Port Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Kaduna and other such places, where the people are also yearning for ‘vivid’ theatrical experience. It is even easier to believe that the Chams Theatre Series might also berth in those places soon, if only to prove that the theatre tradition in Nigeria does not begin in Ibadan and end in Abuja after rolling through Lagos, Akure and Ondo.
Kudos still to Chams Plc.
===========================================================================================FROM CHAMS.COM

——————————————————————————–

kicksofftonational acclaimtheatre series The Chams TheatreSeries kicked offto great public and criticalacclaim acrossNigeria in September 2008 withperformances across four citiesand two adaptations of D.O.Fagunwa’s classic Ogboju OdeNinu Igbo Irunmale.——————————————————————————–

Audiences trooped out in largenumbers for the English and Yorubatheatrical performances of OgbojuOde or The Forest of a ThousandDaemons in Lagos, Ibadan, Abuja andIfe.The enthusiasm, interest andsubsequent appreciation of theperformances underscored the fact ofthe Chams Theatre Series helping to filla gap in the cultural life of Nigeria.According to Mr. DemolaAladekomo, Group Managing Director,“The Chams Theatre Series is a strategicintervention and contribution ofChams plc to the rejuvenation of theArts and stage culture in Nigeria. It isalso a means of promoting our cultureand re-orienting Nigerians to the valuesthat we hold dear. We believe thosevalues should prompt action in oursociety.”The Ogboju Ode performances are“the beginning of what we envisageas a long journey of discovery andsharing”, Aladekomo informed guests.It was a great beginning indeed.Extensive reportage and reviews in themedia confirmed the strong interestpresentation of the plays elicited withlocal and international stakeholders ofthe company.Culture and Tourism ministerMr. Olatokunbo Kayode wrote into offer official Federal Governmentrecognition and support of the effortby Chams plc to provide corporatesupport for the revival of theatreculture in Nigeria.Chams plc sponsored productionof the plays after acquiring the rightsto the works of D.O. Fagunwa

the family of the late author and theD.O. Fagunwa Foundation. Fagunwa’sdaughter was a star guest at the Lagosperformance of the Yoruba adaptationon Sunday, September 14 at theMuson Centre. Other guests includedChief Segun Olusola, Chief Mrs. DerinOsoba, Rev Olu Odejimi, doyen ofthe Nigerian Stock Exchange, Rev OlaMakinde, Prelate of the MethodistChurch Nigeria. There were also Mr.Tayo Aderinokun, MD of GuarantyTrust Bank, Ahmed Yerima, Tani Obaro,MD, SystemSpec, as well as othermajor players in the banking, financialservices and oil and gas sectors.Town met gown in Ibadan as thecivil society joined the academia towatch presentation of the play. Theaudience spilled over and activelyparticipated in the presentation.Diplomats and members of theNational Assembly joined a largenumber of stakeholders in theinformation and communication“The Chams Theatre Seriesis a strategic interventionof Chams Plc to therejuvenation of the arts andstage culture in Nigeria.”cOver stOrycover story6 | futureteNse6 | futureteNseThe presentation of Ogboju Ode Ninu IgboIrunmale is the first in a journey of atleast seven years in the first instance forthe Chams Theatre Series. Chams plc has acquired he rights tothe five works of D.O. Fagunwa. The company plansto present a theatrical adaptation of one work eachyear. Add this to other works by other Nigerianauthors and it is easy to understand what the chiefexecutive Mr. Demola Aladekomo described as “thebeginning of what we envisage as a long journey ofdiscovery and sharing”.Next in line for 2009 is the work Ireke Onibudo.Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa was born in 1932 inOkeigbo in present day Ondo State. He was a teacherand writer. He died in 1963 at a relatively young agebut with many accomplishments under his name.According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, OgbojuOde Ninu Igbo Irunmale (Night of a Thousand Daemons,was the first full-length novel published in the Yorubalanguage. His secondnovel, Igbo Olodumare (“The Forest of God”), waspublished in 1949. He also wrote Ireke Onibudo (1949;“The Sugarcane of the Guardian”), Irinkerindo NinuIgbo Elegbeje (1954; “Wanderings in the Forest ofElegbeje”), and Adiitu Olodumare (1961; “The Secretof the Almighty”); a number of short stories; and twotravel books.Fagunwa’s works characteristically take the form ofloosely constructed picaresque fairy tales containingmany folklore elements: spirits, monsters, gods,magic, and witchcraft. His language is vivid: a sadman “hangs his face like a banana leaf,” a liar “hasblood in his belly but spits white saliva.” Every eventpoints to a moral, and he reinforces this moral toneby his use of Christian concepts and of traditionaland invented proverbs.Fagunwa’s imagery, humour, wordplay, and rhetoricreveal an extensive knowledge of classical Yoruba. Hewas also influenced by such Western works as JohnBunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, which were translatedinto Yoruba by missionaries.Some Yorubaintellectuals dislikedFagunwa’s lack of concernwith contemporary socialissues. Other criticspointed to his knowledgeof the Yoruba mind, hiscareful observation of themanners and mannerismsof his characters, and hisskill as a storyteller.Long Journey of Discovery and Sharing

technology world to watch theperformance at the Congress Hall ofthe Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja.By the time, it got to the Ile Ife onSeptember 24, enthusiasm and interestwas at fever pitch. Not surprisingly, theeager audience crashed through somedoors to ensure space in the OdoduwaHall of the Obafemi AwolowoUniversity. There was standing roomonly as the hall was brimful.The Chams Theatre Series has therights to the five works of Fagunwaand would sponsor one play eachyear. Aladekomo said the firm hasalso acquired the rights to works bywriters from other parts of Nigeriain order to broaden the appeal aswell as showcase the universality ofpositive values shared by Nigeriancommunities.Professor Femi Osofisan of theUniversity of Ibadan, wrote the“The Chams Theatre Serieshas the rights to five worksof Fagunwa and wouldsponsor one play eachyear.”futureteNse | 7futureteNse | 7D. O. Fagunwa’s Ogboju Ode tells an inter-esting adventure story of the journey ofthe intrepid hunter Akaraogun into thestrange land of Langbodo. His journeytakes him through many weird experi-ences and encounters with spirits, elves, mermaids,witches, monsters and the multifarious dwellers of theforest. He returns to a heroic welcome and takes timeto enthral his fellow citizens with hair-raising ac-counts of his escapades.Akaraogun grows in influence as news of his incred-ible journey spreads. He elicits the envy of the titularhead of the community.The monarch then comes up with a creative schemeto send this potential rival out of sight. He dreams upan assignment to fetch a missing treasure from Lang-bodo. Who better to lead the expedition but the manof valour and courage Akaraogun? Akaraogun enlistssix other brave hunters and then go on an excitingjourney of discovery suffused with dangers and thrills.Play wrights Prof Femi Osofisan and Prof Akinwun-mi Isola present interesting dimensions to the OgbojuOde story that deepened audience appreciation of thestory. Watching each play was like watching a differentbut similar account.Osofisan’s The Forest of a Thousand Daemons is akinto a dance drama with plenty of dances, chants andoriginal songs. He puts an interesting twist to thetale as the hunters accomplish the last of many teststhe good king of the nearest town to Langbodo givesthem. Now reduced to four men after the death oftheir colleagues, the adventurers learn to their surpriseyet relief that Langbodo is not a physical space but astate of being where humans come to a fuller realisa-tion of their essence and learn to live in love and har-mony with other beings.Osofisan’s Akaraogun, the protagonist, is a youngman, full of energy and verve, as are his fellow war-riors.Osofisan and artistic director Dr. Tunde Awosanmi say they sourced the rich repertoire of songs in theplay mainly from Yoruba oral tradition including therepertory of the hunter’s guild. Femi Osofisan, TundeAwosanmi and Tunde Adeyemo provided additionalcompositions.Akaraogun in Prof Isola’s Ogboju Ode is a greyingand bent old man who recounts to a scribe the inter-esting narrative of his travels through the forests ofdemons. Isola uses the flashback technique as the nowaged Akaraogun looks back at the adventures he andhis fellow hunters undertook. They arrive at the physi-cal location Langbodo and bring back to their home-land many goodies from the far away land.Proverbs, oratory and dance are alsostrong in the Yoruba presentation. Rendering in theoriginal language enriches the texture, depth of mean-ing and eloquence.Dif erent Takes on An Interesting TaleProfs Femi Osofisan and Akinwunmi Ishola

English adaptation while ProfessorAkinwumi Isola of the ObafemiAwolowo University wrote the Yorubaadaptation.Speaking on the significanceof the performances, Prof FemiOsofisan, a former General Managerof the National Theatre, asserted, “Byselecting this work, Chams is renderingan immeasurable service to thepreservation of our culture, at a timewhen our country like others in the so-called Third World are faced with themenace of globalisation. Certainly, suchprojects as this will help the processof our cultural rebirth. Fagunwa hasshown us that we have our ownfolklore and fables, our stories and sagacOver stOrycover story8 | futureteNse8 | futureteNseand heroes as authentically rich, andenriching, as any other in the worldrepertory. With him, we can also standup and announce that we are also partof the ancient heritage that first gavemeaning to humanity.”Presentation of the Ogboju Ode plays byChams plc provided direct employmentto 82 theatre practitioners and indirectemployment to many more, thusfulfilling its mission as a corporatesocial investment.This is the testimony of the technicalconsultant to the Chams Theatre Series, Prof FemiOsofisan.Speaking at a press briefing before theformal presentation of the plays, Osofisan,an experienced hand in theatre management,administration and teaching, said the involvementof Chams plc has helped revive morale amongstthespians.Theatre often involves many other aspects ofthe arts, from music through choreography andinto fields such as costuming. Osofisan said thatby sponsoring these major productions, Chams hadprovided employment for the cast and crew overmany months.A 48-person cast and crew featured inThe Forest of a Thousand Daemons while thecast of Ogboju Ode had 36 persons.CSR Mission AccomplishedGuests at the Lobby of the ConGress haLL attransCorp hiLton, venue of the abuja showMr aLadekoMo with aLhaji GboyeGa aruLoGun at the ibadan showMr & Mrs aLadekoMo weLCoMinG the priMate of the MethodistChurCh of niGeria, his eMinenCe, dr sunday oLa Makindethe ChairMan, prof. a.d. akinde with Miss diwura aGunwa,dauGhter of the Late pLaywriGht

==========================================================================================FROM

HomeSunday MagazineScreenWhen the stage depicts our loss
When the stage depicts our loss
By VICTOR AKANDEPublished 8/11/2009ScreenRating: Unrated
For as long as we can remember, we have allowed those basic values of art and culture to die; stage play being one of them. Have you ever wondered why as a parent you are struck by nostalgia each time you visit your country home? Have you paused to ask why some of our brothers abroad prefer to speak with us in our native tongue rather than in English? The answer is not farfetched; we value ourselves at a distance. My brother in-law was on yahoo chat with my wife a few days ago and in all the three-paged dialogue, hardly did I see a full sentence in English language. Beyond that, it was obvious he found relish in Yoruba proverbs and idiomatic expressions. Gbenga has lived in South Africa for five years now.

My wife’s boss is another example. Dele, while in Nigeria spoke through his nose; it amazes than amuses my wife that her oga desires so much the feel of being a Nigerian with the spontaneity at which he infused Yoruba language in their phone conversations. You may not understand how far away you are from your culture until you take out time to see a stage play. I did, and it was mind blowing.

Have you heard about the young lady called Nneka Egbuna? She won the MOBO award in the African singers’ category last month. But that is not the story. Nneka, half Nigerian-half German, used to think she was white skin until she left the shores of Nigeria. Today her music is for the emancipation of the black man, not only from colour bar, but of the glorious abundance of life, wisdom, and riches deposited by God on the soil and airspace of the black continent. That young girl is nothing short of a black activist as a victim of colour bar.
But here we are neglecting our heritage out of ignorance, and our leaders out of insensitivity have refused to promote those values that stand us out. We fall at the feet of what is called western civilisation, forgetting that the Elizabethan theatre tradition isn’t dead in Britain, just as the Shakespearean experience is still a classic.
Amidst the oddity, one corporate organisation has identified with the vision of rebranding Nigeria in the real sense by choosing not only to encourage the impoverished stage actors by engaging them for half a year but also enlivening the theatre tradition as a new leisure for children of school age.

This Information and Communication Technology firm, Chams Plc, began what it called The Chams Theatre Series in 2008 with theatrical adaptations of the D.O. Fagunwa book, Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale. This year, perhaps like never before, it is the story of this extraordinary adventure of the Sugarcane Man called Ireke Onibudo by the same author. It gladdens my heart to know that Chams is sponsoring this unique experience as a strategic intervention and contribution to the rejuvenation of the Arts and stage culture in Nigeria. It is thoughtful that it sees Corporate Social Responsibility initiative as also a means of promoting our culture and re-orientating Nigerians to the values that we hold dear.

The taste of the pudding is in the eating. As I savour the expertise of Prof Femi Osofisan in bringing this complex plot to stage and the exquisite delivery of the cast, I glance across my shoulder to acknowledge if my Igbo friend was in the same reverie with me. He looked more excited. I told him what he was missing in the area of the music lyrics. But he said to me that the rhythm was complimentary enough to the story. Only then did I know that even I had undermined the power of drama as a universal language. Ben, that’s his name, said that stage play is to him the best form of entertainment; he praised the Yoruba culture to high heavens.

The beauty of the road show for Ireke Onibudo which started yesterday is that although it will be presented in Yoruba and English languages, there will be two different stories entirely from a single theme, as Prof Femi Osofisan and Prof. Akinwunmi Isola, playwright the English and Yoruba languages adaptation respectively; it is only imaginable that interpretation, style, comic relief, suspense, folk song, costume, choreography, and other dramatic elements will make for separate savouring.

The company is extending the number of shows from seven, which it had last year, to eleven this year in response to popular demand. Perhaps this is one of the reasons that the sponsors will also be taking the Chams Theatre Series to schools,s allowing for students from selected schools in four cities to join adults to experience the thrill of live theatre from the D.O. Fagunwa’s collection.

===============================================================
from 234next.com
Large turnout for Fagunwa play

By Akintayo Abodunrin

November 14, 2009 08:43PMT
print email

‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ and ‘Agbara Ife’, being the English and Yoruba adaptations of D.O. Fagunwa’s ‘Ireke Onibudo’ by Femi Osofisan and Akinwumi Isola respectively, premiered last weekend in Lagos.

The plays opened to a packed house at Cinema Hall I, National Theatre, Iganmu, on Saturday, November 7 and Sunday, November 8. Eminent Nigerians including former governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, Joseph Sanusi and his wife, Doyin Ogunbiyi of Tanus Communication, poet Odia Ofeimun, chair of the Fagunwa Foundation, Diwura Fagunwa, artistic director of the National Troupe, Ahmed Yerima, chairman, board of directors, Chams plc, Reverend Bayo Akinde, Lagos State commissioner for tourism, Tokunbo Afikuyomi and other lovers of stage drama were among those who saw the play. Children drawn from schools across Lagos also saw the English adaptation on Monday, November 9 at the same venue.

The Reverend Olu Odejimi, co anchor at the opening with Dayo Olajuwon on Saturday started on a light mode with, “Say to your neighbour good afternoon and how do you do?’ Though ‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ started almost an hour late, people patiently waited while formalities including introduction of guests and the Chams family song rendered by uniformly attired staff of the ICT company were observed.

While Isola and Kola Oyewo who directed his adaptation were at the premieres, only Tunde Awosanmi, director of the English version was present. Isola informed that Osofisan was away on sabbatical outside the country.

One source, different plays

And as Isola, author of ‘Ole Ku’, ‘Efunsetan Aniwura and other plays disclosed earlier at the press preview of the play some weeks ago, though the adaptations are from the same source material – Fagunwa’s Ireke Onibudo written in 1949, the edu-taining plays indeed differ in their treatment of love, the central theme of the original novel.

Similarly, some popular Nollywood actors in the Yoruba genre who feature in ‘Agbara Ife’ gave a good account of themselves. Peter Fatomilola, Toyosi Arigbabuwo, Samson Eluwole (Jinadu Ewele) and Kayode Olaiya (Aderupoko) who started their careers on the stage showed that their skills have not deserted them. Others including Gbolagade Akinpelu (Ogun Majek), John Adewole (Tafa Oloyede) and Jolaade Adejobi (Mama Wande) also distinguished themselves.

In a short speech at the end of ‘Agbara Ife’ on Sunday, Demola Aladekomo, Managing Director of Chams Plc, thanked the audience and stressed the importance of love. He also specially acknowledged the team responsible for the second edition of the theatre series including Fiyinfolu Okedare, Ayodeji Akindele, Isioma Eboka, Bisola Oladipo and Dayo Olajuwon.

The Chams Theatre Series debuted last year with Yoruba and English adaptations of Fagunwa’s ‘Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmole’ by Osofisan and Isola. It is, according to Aladekomo, “a strategic intervention and contribution to the rejuvenation of the arts and stage culture in Nigeria. It is also a means of promoting our culture and re-orientating Nigerians to the values that we hold dear.”

‘Agbara Ife’ showed in Ibadan, Oyo State yesterday while ‘The Fabulous Adventures of a Sugarcane Man’ will show in the city today and tomorrow. Both plays will also be staged in Abuja and Akure before the series ends on November 30.
)

Posted by seyi on Nov 21 2009

pls when is it gonna be stage in Abuja,time days and venue would be most appreciated.

Posted by Fatai on Nov 28 2009

Thank you Chams Plc.

=============================================================
from tribune.com.ng

Chams set Lagos, Ibadan aglow with Ireke Onibudo
By Adewale Oshodi – Updated: Tuesday 17-11-2009

A scene in the play IN the first two weekends in the month of November, Lagos and Ibadan theatre lovers were treated to live stage performances, Ireke Onibudo, sponsored by IT giant, Chams Plc. Adewale Oshodi reports how the performances in both cities went, and what lovers of theatre in Abuja and Akure should expect when, the performance train moves to their cities.

For the second year running, Information Technology (IT) firm, Chams Nigeria Plc, through its Chams Theatre Series (CTS) subsidiary, has demonstrated its commitment to the revival of the arts and stage culture in the country.

It all began last year, when Chams sponsored the adaptation of Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa’s work, Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale, in both English and Yoruba for stage performances in four cities across the country.

This year, another of Fagunwa’s works, Ireke Onibudo, which theatre lovers in Lagos and Ibadan had already enjoyed, will be staged in Abuja between Saturday 21 and Sunday 22, November, 2009 while the train will move to Akure between Saturday 23 and Monday 30, November, 2009.

Apart from the fact that both English and Yoruba adaptations of Ireke Onibudo are being staged free of charge for theatre lovers in these cities, students also have a special session to enjoy the play.

Already, those who have watched the play in Lagos and Ibadan can testify to the brilliance of the playwrights, who adapted the book Professor Femi Osofisan, for the English adaptation and Professor Akinwumi Isola, for the Yoruba adaptation as well as the Artistic Directors Dr. Tunde Awosanmi, for the English adaptation and Dr. Kola Oyewo, for the Yoruba adaption.

The play, Ireke Onibudo, based on Fagunwa’s 1942 book of same title, was about the adventures of an eponymous hero, Ireke Onibudo, before he finally found his true love who helped him to overcome all his troubles. The play placed emphasis on the capabilities of man in the struggle for survival.

Both adaptations gave prominence to the interplay of humour, as well the presence of all dramatic ingredients which Fagunwa injected into the writing of the play, like fables, folktales, poetry, perseverance, love etc.

The cast of both adaptations were made from seasoned theatre professionals who proved their mettle by rendering a near-perfect performance. For the English adaptation, artistes like Toyin Oshinaike, Albert Akaeze, Kunle Agboola, Charles Ihimodu, among others, and the Yoruba adaptation, artistes like Peter Fatomilola, Gbolagade Akinpelu, Samson Eluwole, Toyosi Arigbabuowo, Kayode Olaiya, among others, gave a performance that could only be described as excellent.

The fact that the translators, Professors Osofisan and Isola, as well as the artistic directors, Dr. Awosanmi and Dr. Oyewo, are among the best that could be found anywhere in the world, really had a great impact on the performances.

The play treated the audience to a series of Yoruba folklore songs, which as a result of the changing world, are no longer popular. The audience was also reminded about the beautiful Ekun Iyawo, literally bridal chant or wailing, rendered by the bride on the eve of her marriage, which is one of the final rites of marriage ceremonies in traditional Yoruba society.

The costumes used really depicted the situation in which the artistes were at a particular point in time; like Ireke’s torn agbada after being severely beaten in the town of Alupayida; or Ireke’s mother’s costume, an all white net that covered her entire head to toe, to depict a ghost when she appeared to Ireke under the sea; or even the Arogidigba (Queen of the Coast) and her lieutenants who had a silky, beautiful and shimering attire to complement the popular belief that the queen of the underwater is a stunning beauty.

The sound effects were creatively employed to intensify the reality of the setting. The effects brought life to the performance. Sounds of birds chirpings in the forest, or sounds of the underwater, as well as its usage to create an atmosphere of fear, was simply excellent.

The lights were used as transistional guide to seamlessly link the scenes. Therefore, Abuja and Akure residents can expect to also enjoy what Lagos and Ibadan theatre lovers had enjoyed by storming the Cyprian Ekwensi Centre for Arts and Culture, Abuja and Adegbemila Hall, Akure, when the performance train gets to their cities.

==========================================================

FROM

BROTHER LINDSEY BARRETT ON NIGERIAN LITERATURE-FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER,OCT. 17,2009

October 17, 2009

from ngrguardiannews.com

Saturday, October 17, 2009

Nigeria’s Literature At Odds With Her Poor Politics, Says Lindsay Barrett

LINDSAY Barrett is one Diaspora Pan-Africanist, who boldly stuck out his head in the heady days of the 1960s to relocate from Jamaica to parts of West Africa before settling down finally in Nigeria. He was consumed in the vibrant Literature and cultural life of the land he chose to make his home and significantly made his contributions as journalist and writer. Although in his late 60s, Barrett is still active in his journalistic and creative engagements that have earned him fame. More than these, his relevance as a writer also came to the fore recently when he was shortlisted, along other eight nominees, for the NLNG Prize for Literature with his new work, A Memory of Rivers. However, at the Grand Awards Night ceremony last weekend in Abuja, the judges said no winner emerged, and thus, the prize money of $50, 000 was decreed to be given to the Nigerian Academy of Letters to develop Literature. In this encounter with ANOTE AJELUOROU, Barrett reminisces on the journey back to his African roots and the milestones so far. Excerpts:

IT would look like you have been there forever, even while still having your works relevant to issues of today. When you look back at this long stretch of involvement in Nigerian Literature, what really occurs to you?

I’m always saddened by the fact that Nigeria has produced the greatest body of Literature of relevance and strength of any African nation yet little matching national development. Its work is as important if not more so to the rest of Africa than any national Literature, like South African Literature of resistance, Ghanaian Literature of political awareness. Nigerian Literature has cut across all formulas and yet we have produced a national Literature that seems to be at odds with our seeming inability to get the administrative strength of our nation right.

I came to Nigeria directly because I was influenced by her Literature. I came to Africa because I wanted to renew the spirit of ancestral hope. I felt that there was hope in knowing where you came from and that we could renew our links, that we could strengthen our systems.

But for anybody coming from the Diaspora, you don’t have to choose any one country. Quite frankly, if you come from Jamaica, you may be inclined more to Ghana. There is a strong sense of the Akan story in the Afro-centric areas of Jamaica. If you are from Trinidad and Tobago, Cuba or Brazil, you get inclined to Yoruba. If you come from Haiti, you will look back to Angola or Central Africa. Once you begin to know about cultures, you see similarities, you see polarities that attract you. So, if one is academically inclined, you may have a sense of this root movement. I have not been so inclined. I tried to be a Pan-Africanist. For me I look at the contemporary, political issues and see all Africa’s relevance in trans-nationality terms.

But through Nigeria’s Literature I found that there seemed to be a chart. I saw Nigeria producing such rich Literature. There was no constant interaction between the creative and the service sector. When I came that was a disappointment, but Nigerians continue to be the most creative people, expressing creative elements in African life.

By failing to do something, you inspire criticism. You have Soyinka; you have Chinua Achebe and the rest. So Nigeria is a paradox by failing to meet the expectation of those who have the highest expectation. It throws up incredible responses. And, that keeps happening; that is what creative people do. That is what is happening in Literature today. But unfortunately, look at your media (the Radio, the Television), which should be the public media throwing this expression out so that people become infused with the spirit.

Our modern media is behind in Literature. When I came into this country, I lived on writing at least two serious radio drama every month and I re-branded for four years. I lived on programme production, producing a programme called ‘The story-teller’. I wrote two stories every forth-night. I was paid 7 pounds, 7 shillings but because I had the facility to do that and the medium was there to do it, I could make a living but you can’t do that now. Our media has fallen behind even the musical aspect of the media is less than what it was.

When I came into the country, there was a newspaper called, Daily Express. I remembered that the literary days in the Sunday Express was as good as any newspaper. There were incredible critiques from people like J.P. Clark and others. And so we are living a life where the spirit is willing but the material reflex is weak.

There was a time you had small group talking literary stuffs like the Mbari Club. But such things do not seem to happen any more?

Basically, the tradition did not catch up and take hold of its own creative tone. And we had the period of materialism that came up in the oil boom years, and people became enamoured; these things became less important. What is also probably responsible is the fact that nobody really got around to finding a way to make a living out of the arts as pop music and others.

There’s no one place that Soyinka’s plays are regularly staged and viewed; nowhere, and yet we have so many brilliant playwrights among the old groups that came out of Soyinka – the late Wale Ogunyemi and Bode Sowande and so on. It’s sad because we all lionise Wole. But I always tell my son that the tragedy is, all of you that lionise Wole, how many of you have read his books? But how many of those that shout loudest about Wole actually know something about his works that appeal to them.

I wish that all the taxi drivers had seen the ‘road’ in his plays. I wish everybody that shouts about him really know what Jero is, really could see the role Jero played in his book Trials of Brother Jero. This man is an artist of a popular sensitivity, but he has been put in his compartment and seen as an obscurantist, which he is not to me. We throw up great artists but we do not actually live and believe in their work. We’re all part of the fault, really.

Amongst those personalities you have mentioned: Soyinka, Clark, Okigbo and the rest. Which of them did you have more bonding with at the time?

I don’t see differences; I see similarities. The person who got me this hotel accommodation is Wole’s son, who is like my son like other Wole’s children. They know how I interact with their father. Christopher Okigbo was the first person I really bonded with in this country when I got here and he died shortly after that.

He was the one who put me in Mbari as secretary. J.P. Clark was the person who insisted that I should come to Nigeria when we met in London in 1961 or so. I was producing a programme with some Nigerian writers, and J.P. was one of them. So he said, what the hell are you doing in Europe, a man like you? You belong in Africa; you belong among us. You come to Nigeria; any time you get to Nigeria, you’ll see that we are your people. You know how J.P. talks. I took it as a joke but five years later, I remembered it when I was living in Sierra Leone; and I told myself, why not go to Nigeria?

The truth is that in my life, I just make friends and they all had some meaning to me in their works. J.P. Clark’s The Raft was actually one of the things that drove me to writing plays, and I wrote several plays. I did not act in it but I did effect in a radio production of The Raft in London. And, it was an excellent, extraordinary work.

It reminded very much of my home in Jamaica, my actual home, which is near the sea. When I got to Paris, I wrote a series of plays that were produced. Well, I don’t know where most of my works are, unfortunately. It was during the Commonwealth Festival in 1965. It was a play largely influenced by The Raft. That was a play called John Pukumaka. Pukumaka is a Jamaican term for big stick. They have influenced me in various ways.

Wole strongly influenced me not so much by his works but his activism, social activism. We have not always seen eye to eye, politically; but I strongly respect his commitment to whatever he believes in. After all, when Wole was in detention I was serving the Nigerian government on the federal side seeking to prevent secession. At that time, my biggest fear was the balkanisation of Nigeria.

Some people asked me after nearly 50 years in Nigeria, if that thing happens again, would you be on the same side? Now, I’m not so sure what side I will be. I will just pack my bags and leave. At that time we had this block against Africa’s division, and I empathise and sympathise with Wole’s plight because Wole did not promote secession. Wole believed that we need a different mood in the federal side to encourage the Igbo not to go rather than to fight them physically to prevent them going. That was his theme.

The people I was working with were no less patriotic than him. But they felt that the other side was less altruistic than Wole thought. Of course, in a military era, things were not always as planned. When I was working on the federal side, it was made publicly known that I was praying for and advocating for the release of Wole Soyinka.

I have always gotten away with that in Nigeria. I suppose it’s because I’m a very poor man and nobody thinks I have any interest. So when I make these comments, Wole will say, don’t mind Barrett. But we remain friends even when we fall on different sides on any argument but I will support him to hold his side.

With the kind of disappointment that greeted you on Africa’s failures, why didn’t you pack your bags and head back home to Jamaica or Europe?

Where do I go again? I have made my life here; I’m 68 years. This year I will be 43 years in Africa. I have been back to Europe several times and I have lived elsewhere. I was in Liberia before the civil war came. But it’s not something you can just give up. Remember that the objective I have in coming to Africa will always be there no matter how disappointing I get.

I have several children here and in Liberia, and I live for their sake, whether they know it or not. If I lived in Jamaica or Europe, I could live off writing. But the fulfillment of struggling to put in place the renewal will not be there. I have said I may be disappointed by things that have happened in Nigeria but I’m not totally disappointed by Nigerians because the struggle continues.

Like the event that happened recently (the CORA Party for nine shortlisted poets for the Nigeria Prize for Literature); it means there is progress at certain levels. The other thing is that one doesn’t just give up because your life is not your own. So, I don’t have the right to give up.

I was telling somebody that Nigeria is celebrating her 50th birthday next year. Nearly everyone I told said, what are we celebrating? They said we are celebrating nothing. I said, no; celebrate the fact that you have survived so far because of the civil war of such brutality when you were not 10 years old. And you call yourselves Nigerians 40 years after that civil war.

We who are inside Nigeria tend not to know the extent to which we are actually better off than many others. The challenge that we have to overcome is to assume our full potential, but not to say we have achieved nothing. We have achieved a lot. History has it that Nigeria picked the bills of anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa. Abacha, who we all abuse, is the same who brought peace to Sierra Leone.

Somehow, the President is looking to 2020 to set a target that can be owned. Why don’t we own our mistakes and our triumphs in the last 50 years? We don’t. Nigeria’s failures have been so spectacular that why not just celebrate the fact that we could fail so spectacularly and still be alive?

We seem to over-look not only our potentials but sometimes, willingly fail to recognise the opportunities offered us. We should work harder to own our opportunities more in the next 50 years; that should be our concern.

How familiar are you with writings coming out of Nigeria at the moment? And, are you satisfied?

There are lots of incredible writings going on. One of those I can say without fear of being challenged for nepotism is when I say my son, Igonibare (Igoni Barrett), is one of the finest writers I have seen over the years.

I’m particularly happy to say I have nothing to do with developing his talent. What I did was when I saw his talent I told him I admire it and asked him to keep it up. I have distanced myself from promoting him until he could see any of his achievement, which resulted to his book of poems that is recognised globally as a brilliant work. This made me happy.

But he is not the only one. There’s an interesting thing going on among the women. You have Chimamanda; she is a brilliant writer although I still have my reservations about her style. But, no problem. The real original is Sefi Attah. I haven’t really read much of her works except excerpts on the web but she writes beautifully. There are two others, who have not gotten equal recognitions. One of them is Kaine Agary, who won the LNG prize with Yellow Yellow last year; brilliant book.

Then there is a girl, Bimbola Adelakun with her Under the Brown Rusted Roofs. The book is not well put together. If I had the money I really would have loved to publish that book. It’s an extraordinary book. I find her potentially much more satisfying than Chimamanda, who is, herself, quite a talent. Then there is a book called Burma Boy (by Bandele Thomas, a Nigeria resident in Great Britain); extremely brilliant. Nigeria is producing a national Literature totally at odds with her inability to get her politics and management of her affairs correct.

There is so much other stuffs coming out that is not properly produced, not properly edited and so on. It means there is a lot bubbling in the pot, and how to get it out. What we need today is the coming together of the media to make this industry big.

As it was before, Nigeria Literature is beginning to have world audience again. It had it before, and it’s coming like a second time around. I think government should take note of this and encourage essay competitions, literary clubs in schools. It’s clear that the world wants to hear Nigeria; and, they want to hear something better.

In most parts of the word, Literature has a way of permeating into politics and governance. But here those who govern don’t even read the available books on major issues. Why is this so?

Actually, I can’t agree with you more. Literature elsewhere is an integral part of the spirit of governance because it has influence on those who govern.

I think that in Nigeria, an important cause of this dichotomy goes back to education. The average Nigerian is not educated enough to treat Literature as a vital element of service. And, what is regarded as higher is making money to sustain the family. But the truth is that Literature is the basis on which everything else is based.

© 2003 – 2009 @ Guardian Newspapers Limited (All Rights Reserved).
Powered by FirstEntSol LTD®

“THE BLACK,FIRST EUROPEANS: AFRICAN SLAVS,AFRICAN CELTS-EDITED BY OGU EJI EFO ANNU-FROM AFRICANRESOURCE.COM

May 30, 2009

from african resource.com

The Black (First) Europeans: African Slavs, African Celts – Edited by Ogu Eji Ofo Annu
The Black (First) Europeans: African Slavs, African Celts

Compiled and Edited by Ogu Eji Ofo Annu

April 14, 2008

Reconstructing the phylogeny of African
mitochondrial DNA lineages in Slavs

To elucidate the origin of African-specific mtDNA lineages, revealed previously in Slavonic populations (at frequency of about 0.4%), we completely sequenced eight African genomes belonging to haplogroups L1b, L2a, L3b, L3d and M1 gathered from Russians, Czechs, Slovaks and Poles. Results of phylogeographic analysis suggest that at least part of the African mtDNA lineages found in Slavs (such as L1b, L3b1, L3d) appears to be of West African origin, testifying to an opportunity of their occurrence as a result of migrations to Eastern Europe through Iberia. However, a prehistoric introgression of African mtDNA lineages into Eastern Europe (approximately 10 000 years ago) seems to be probable only for Europeanspecific subclade L2a1a, defined by coding region mutations at positions 6722 and 12903 and detected in Czechs and Slovaks. Further studies of the nature of African admixture in gene pools of Europeans require the essential enlargement of databases of African complete mitochondrial genomes. See: Boris A Malyarchuk et. al “Reconstructing the phylogeny of African mitochondrial DNA lineages in Slavs,” European Journal of Human Genetics 9 April 2008;

Genetic Distance

However of all the non-African populations, Europeans are most closely related to Africans. As the genetic distance from Africa to Europe (16.6) is shorter than the genetic distance from Africa to East Asia (20.6) and even much shorter than the Genetic distance from Africa to Australia. Cavalli-Sforza proposes that the simplest explanation for this short genetic distance is that substantial gene exchange has taken place between the nearby continents. Cavalli-Sforza also proposes that both Asian and African populations contributed to the settlement of Europe which began 40 000 years ago. The overall contributions from Asia and Africa were estimated to be around two-thirds and one-third, respectively. Europe has a genetic variation in general of about a third of that of other continents. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_history_of_Europe

Neolithic Farmers

It is a further surprise that the Epipalaeolithic Natufian of Israel from whom the Neolithic realm was assumed to arise has a clear link to Sub-Saharan Africa. … The data treated here support the idea that the Neolithic moved out of the Near East into the circum-Mediterranean areas and Europe by a process of demic diffusion but that subsequently the in situ residents of those areas, derived from the Late Pleistocene inhabitants, absorbed both the agricultural life way and the people who had brought it. See: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/103/1/242

Bohemia

“In its former name, Csechkoslovakia, is preserved the racial roots, Slav. Two countries were formed from the breakup of that country: Slovakia, and the Csech Republic; it’s identity now lost in the new appelation.

But, both hide the more ancient and more original name of Csechkoslovakia which was Bohemia. Bohemia the name given the land by the incursive Germanic tribes who found African (by phenotype) Celts calling themselves the Boii. And, from that tribal name the land they lived on was called by the Germans, Bohemia.

In its original, earliest, and longest phase (Africans were there from paleolithic times), it was African. See Marc Washington: @ http://www.beforebc.de/all_europe/02-16-800-00-18.html; http://www.beforebc.de/all_europe/05-09-100-00-01.html

You are reading Rasta Livewire. For all things Africa, visit AfricaResource: The Place for Africa on the Net.

Related Posts:
The First (Black) Europeans: The Original Africans Of Europe – By – Oguejiofo Annu
The Roots of Afro-Europe: Y-DNA Haplogroup R1b1*, Cro-magnons, and Afro-Europeans – Dana Marniche
Human Diversity: Pale Skin/Black Genes
African Genetics Revisited: Europeans are genetically inferior to Africans
Black Like The Ancient Europeans: The Black (First) Europeans
Original West Africans Of Ancient Greece!!! The Black (First) Europeans III
The Fake Englanders
The Nigerian/Ethiopian Roots Of the Ancient Greeks – Edited By – Jide Uwechia
The Forgotten People:The African Origin Of China Part 1 – By: Lauren K. Clark
Pale Skin/Black Genes: African Tribes of Europe

Posted in Articles, Prophet, Rastas.

By Don Jaide April 27, 2008

4 Responses
Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

Dathi Mac Ghille Chulainn said
on April 28, 2008 I am an Irish Canadian, I have been to the Motherland five times and I have always felt that Ireland is very closely related to Africa. Do you know the story about Scota, daughter of Pharaoh Nectanebo?

terrell ali bey said
on August 6, 2008 you are right ,may you share the reality with the people,she is an egyption princess who went to southern ireland 3500 4000 years ago.,when they tell they coded story of st patrick kicking out the snakes in ireland the snakes were the moors in reality,in legend they said snakes.

terrell ali bey said
on August 6, 2008 http://indigo.ie~marrya/scota.html …………………..this should help everyone overstand scota,an how she was killed.its good reading .if you dont get it just put it in the search.peace to brother jahdey

Dana said
on August 29, 2008 I had also read somewhere that her name has something to do with the name of the Goddess Sekhet or Sekhmat.

When early Brits said black Irish it was apparently literal. It did not mean “Spaniard” or “tanned” as some American Irish like to say. The same goes for Scotland’s early blacks. I found this passage in J. A Rogers book, NATURE KNOWS NO COLOR LINE, published 1952.

“MacRitchie adds that ‘the legends and the history of the Scottish highlands are both witnesses to the existence of a purely black people there.’ Boswell and Dr. Johnson saw descendants of these black people when they visited Scotland. In his “Journey to the Hebrides, September 1, 1773, Boswell wrote of one clan, the McCraes, ’some were as black and wild in their appearance as any American savages, whatsoever.’ Martin who had visited these Western Islands eighty years before Boswell said of the people of Jura, “black of complexion ,’ of Islay, ‘generally black’. and of Arran, ‘generally brown and some of a black complexion. ”

The quote from David MacRitchie came from the book, Ancient and Modern Britons, published in 1926. MacRitchie a British archeologist also said “So late as the tenth century three of these provinces were wholly black and the supreme ruler of them became for a time the paramount king of Transmarine Scotland…….We know as ah historical fact tha nigher El Dubh has lived and reigned over certain black divisions of our islands – and probably white divisions also – and that a race known as the sons the Black succeded him in history….. p. 32. This is on page 70 of Roger’s book.

The name Douglass is supposedly derived from the word Dubh – as in Dublin?!

The quote from Boswell according to the book is from the book, WESTERN ISLANDS OF SCOTLAND, a 1934 reprint of edition from the year 1703, see pp. 236, 272.

THE BLACK OLMECS:”THE BIRTH OF OLMEC CULTURE MESOAMERICA’S MOTHER CULTURE”-FROM CARNAVAL.COM

May 19, 2009

olmec9book:"THE HISTORY OF THE AFRICAN OLMECS" BY PAUL ALFRED BARTONv81twoheadsfrom carnaval.com

COUNTDOWN to 2012
The year 2012 will be 520 years after Columbus
delivered the message of the promised land in 1492

——————————————————————————–
The Birth of Olmec Culture Mesoamerica’s mother culture

The Olmecs were the first Mesoamerican people to fathom the concept of zero, maintain a calendar, and use a hieroglyphic writing system based on the Manding system of West Africa. These intellectual achievements, as well as Olmec myths and rituals, were influential in the subsequent Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec cultures.
Once we move beyond recognizing the African roots of Mesoamerica’s mother culture we come to the more fascinating theories regarding the source of their culture and the cause of the trigger for an immigration representing so much knowledge and talent.
The Toltecs were never conquered and kept good records. Prof. Herman L. Hoeh in his exhaustive Compendium of World History explains the birth of the Olmec civilization by comparing dates with history before Christ.
The first seeds of Olmec culture began in the Americas as the result of Spain expelling the North Africans who had enslaved them in 1892 BC or 3 millenniums prior to 1492. The date has been kept by adding 520 years to the great flood and corresponds with the date of GIANTS arriving in Mesoamerica as recorded by the Toltec historian Ixtlilxochitl.

The Mysterious Olmecs
1849 BC

Who was this mysterious people that have so baffled the modern-day historians and anthropologists? To find the answer to this riddle we must go back, once again, to the OLD World!
“In the year 1883 B.C. an invasion of Spain took place from the confines of North Africa. Having become a civilized land and wealthy due to changes in climate and the presence of many producing gold mines, Spain aroused the greed of Egypt and other North African nations.
A king by the name of GERION or DEABUS, with a large army and many ships, conquered Spain and forced the inhabitants to dig gold for their new African overlords. Many Spanish slaves died from overwork under this tyranny”
Osyris slew Gerion in 1849, upon which part of his tribe took to ship and sailed to the New World. A tradition found among the Toltecs of Mexico and preserved by Ixtlilxochitl declares there once were giants in their land. Even the date of the arrival of these giants has been preserved by the Toltec historian. It was 520 years after the flood. (Bancroft “Native Races of the Pacific States”, vol. V, p. 209. )
The year of the flood was 2370-2369. And 520 years AFTER the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and many of the giants were expelled.
Herman L Hoeh
Compedium of World History (google)
or Compendium of World History
1963 1966, 1969 Edition pf PhD Dissertation

The Book of Mormon
The Book of Mormon is about a small group of Jews who fled Jerusalem in 600 B.C. and sailed to America. However, there is an older book within The Book of Mormon called The Book of Ether. It tells about a group of people who fled the Tower of Babel at least 3000 years before Christ called the “Jaredites”. Because they were a righteous people the LORD did not confound their language, and a Prophet led them called “The Brother of Jared” (his actual name was Mahonri Moriancumr). All of the Jaredite names are Hamitic, and the descendants of Ham were black. Most Mormon scholars believe that the Jaredites were the ancient Olmecs; the first civilization on the American continent.
“The existence of the OLMEC culture in Mexico and Central America, along with terraced pyramids (similar to SUMERIAN ZIGGURATS), calendrical systems, mathematics and sculptured figures WITH BEARDS or Negroid features implies, to many observers, “a CONNECTION with such peoples as the…PHOENICIANS, HITTITES… or CARTHAGINIANS” — all of whom were CANAANITES
hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
“While official Mormon promotional literature and activities continue to make claims of scientific support from the fields of archaeology and anthropology, there are NO non-Mormon specialists in these fields who support the premise of an ancient Hebrew civilization in the pre-Columbian Americas. ”
John Keyser AMERICAN INDIANS AND THE BOOK OF MORMON hope-of-israel.org/olmec.htm
Olmecs by John Keyser on the web by google
Mormons & Olmecs by google

” It was 520 years after the flood….
The year of the flood was 2370-2369 BC. And 520 years after the flood — that is, after 2369 — is 1849 BC, the very year a great battle was fought in Spain during which Gerion was slain and MANY OF THE GIANTS EXPELLED.
(Bancroft, Native Races of the Pacific States, vol. v, p.209).
OLMEC CONSPIRACY
The widespread Academic Repression of overwhelming evidence of diffusion to the Americas by a profession based upon the discovery of truth would seem to support the many claims of Eurocentrism by Afrocentric web authors. We’d rather add it to our list under the title the Curse of Columbus. Here is a sample from the web
“A great deal has been made of the “Negroid” features of the Olmec colossal heads. Various dubious theories have been advanced.”
mesoweb.com/olmec
——————————————————————————–

“without proper evidence” & “academically irresponsible” to suggest African origin is racist
Billie Follensbee

“Olmec Heads” by google

African Empires of Ancient America
by Clyde A. Winters PhD
biography
“The view that Africans originated writing in America is not new. Scholars early recognized the affinity between Amerindian scripts and the Mande script(s).” Beginning with Rafinesque in 1832, Leo Wiener (1922) Harold Lawrence (1962)

LINKS
Makubwa Homepage
Links showing Afrocentric origins of Olmec civilization
Photo of Olmec and African Heads
Professor Alexander Von Wuthenau compared the Olmec heads to the Head of King Taharka, a Nubian-Kushite ruler of ancient Egypt.
A History of the African-Olmecs
by Paul Alfred Barton published Sept 2001 at amazon
Manding in West Africa Today
by CIA — The World Factbook — Mali || Senegal ||Gambia || Guinea-Bissau || Guinea

Home || Discovery of Diffusion is Past Due || Strange but True || The 4 Voyages || Columbus or Indigenous People’s Day || Hispaniola’s Colon Memorial Lighthouse || Olmecs & Mother Africa || Countdown to 2012 || Dawning of Age of Aquarius || aForum || Link Lists & Resources
Carnaval Main Page ( reset your frame set for full menu options)

Last Link Check 26MAY2006

THE BLACK DAUGHTER ETHIOPIA IN THE BIBLE!-THIS SISTER DRUSILLA DUNJEE HOUSTON IN 1926 WROTE THIS GREAT BOOK ON ETHIOPIAN BLACK HISTORY-CHECK OUT THIS CHAPTER POSTED BY A GREAT SITE:TSEDAY.WORDPRESS.COM

May 9, 2009

race-type-of-the-early-dynastiesan-ancient-cushiterameses-ii-surnamed-the-greatan-ancient-cushiterameses-ii-surnamed-the-greatfrom tseday.wordpress.com

An Ethiopian Journal“Are ye not as children of the Ethiopians unto me, O children of Israel?” (Amos 9:7)
OLD ETHIOPIA – ITS PEOPLE
with one comment

SOURCE: http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/we/we05.htm
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire
by Drusilla Dunjee Houston [1926, no renewal]

CHAPTER II

Because of the great lapse. of time, it seems almost impossible to locate the original seat of the old Ethiopian empire. Bochart thought it was “Happy Araby,” that from this central point the Cushite race spread eastward and westward. Some authorities like Gesenius thought it was Africa. The Greeks looked to old Ethiopia and called the Upper Nile the common cradle of mankind. Toward the rich luxurience of this region they looked for the “Garden of Eden.” From these people of the Upper Nile arose the oldest traditions and rites and from them sprang the first colonies and arts of antiquity. The Greeks also said that Egyptians derived their civilization and religion from Ethiopia. “Egyptian religion was not an original conception, for three thousand years ago she had lost all true sense of its real meaning among even the priesthood.” (Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection–Preface.) Yet Egyptian forms of worship are understood and practiced among the Ethiopians of Nubia today. The common people of Egypt never truly understood their religion, this was why it so easily became debased.

Ptolemaic writers said that Egypt was formed of the mud carried down, from Ethiopia, that Ethiopians were the first men that ever lived, the only truly autochthonous race and the first to institute the worship of the gods and the rites of sacrifice. Egypt itself was a colony of Ethiopia and the laws and script of both lands were naturally the same; but the hieroglyphic script was more widely known to the vulgar in Ethiopia than in Egypt. (Diodorus Siculus, bk. iii, ch. 3.) This knowledge of writing was universal in Ethiopia but was confined to the priestly classes alone in Egypt. This was because the Egyptian priesthood was Ethiopian. The highly developed Merodic inscriptions are not found in Egypt north of the first cataract or in Nubia south of Soba. These are differences we would expect to find between a colony and a parent body. Herodotus (bk. ii, p. 29) says that Meroe was a great city and metropolis, most of its buildings were of red brick. 800 B. C. at Napata, the buildings were of hard stone. (Meroe–Crowfoot, pp. 6, 30.)

The Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature says, “There is every reason to conclude that the separate colonies of priestcraft spread from Meroe into Egypt; and the primeval monuments in Ethiopia strongly confirm the native traditions, reported by Diodorus Siculus, that the worship of Zeus-Ammon originated in Meroe, also the worship of Osiris. This would render highly probable the opinion that commerce, science and art descended into Egypt from the Upper Nile. Herodotus called the Ethiopians “Wisemen occupying the Upper Nile, men of long life, whose manners and customs pertain to the Golden Age,those virtuous mortals, whose feasts and banquets are honored by Jupiter himself.” In Greek times, the Egyptians depicted Ethiopia as an ideal state. The Puranas, the ancient historical books of India, speak of the civilization of Ethiopia as being older than that of Egypt. These Sanskrit books mention the names of old Cushite kings that were worshipped in India and who were adopted and changed to suit the fancy of the later people of Greece and Rome.

The Hindu Puranas speak of the Cushites going to India before they went to Egypt, proving Hindu civilization coeval with that of Chaldea and the country of the Nile. These ancients record that the Egyptians were a colony drawn out from Cusha-Dwipa and that the Palli, another colony that made the Phoenicians followed them from the land of Cush. In those primitive days, the central seat of Ethiopia was not the Meroe of our day, which is very ancient, but a kingdom that preceeded it by many ages; that was called Meru. Lenormant spoke of the first men of the ancient world as “Men of Meru.” Sanskrit writers called Indra, chief god of the Hindu, king of Meru. He was deified and became the chief representative of the supreme being. Thus was primitive India settled by colonists from Ethiopia. Early writers said there was very little difference in the color or features of the people of the two countries.

Ancient traditions told of the deeds of Deva Nahusha, another sovereign of Meru, who extended his empire over three worlds. The lost literature of Asia Minor dealt with this extension of the Ethiopian domain. An old poem “Phrygia,” was a history of Dionysus, one of the most celebrated of the old Ethiopians. It was written in a very old language and character. He preceeded Menes by many ages. Baldwin says that the authentic books that would have given us the true history concerning him, perished long before the Hellenes. The Greeks of historical times distorted the story of Dionysus and converted him into their drunken god of wine. “They misconstrued and misused the old Cushite mythology, wherever they failed to understand it, and sought to appropriate it entirely to themselves.” One of the poetical versions of the taking of Troy, on the coast of Asia Minor, was entitled “The Æthiops,” because the inhabitants of Troy, as we shall prove later, who fought so valiantly in the Trojan war, were Cushite Ethiopians. This version presented the conflict as an Egyptian war.

In those early ages Egypt was under Ethiopian domination. In proof of this fact, the Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature says, “Isaiah often mentions Ethiopia and Egypt in close political relations. In fine the name of Ethiopia chiefly stood as the name of the national and royal family of Egypt. In the beginning Egypt was ruled from Ethiopia. Ethiopia was ruined by her wars with Egypt, which she sometimes subdued and sometimes served.” Modern books contain but little information about the country of the Upper Nile, but archaic books were full of the story of the wonderful Ethiopians. The ancients said that they settled Egypt. Is it possible that we could know more about the origin of this nation than they? Reclus says, “The people occupying the plateau of the Blue Nile, are conscious of a glorious past and proudly call themselves Ethiopians.” He calls the whole triangular space between the Nile and the Red Sea, Ethiopia proper. This vast highland constituted a world apart. From it went forth the inspiration and light now bearing its fruit in the life of younger nations.

Heeren thought, that excepting the Egyptians, no aboriginal people of Africa so claim our attention as the Ethiopians. He asks, “To what shall we attribute the renown of this one of the most distant nations of the earth? How did the fame of her name permeate the terrible deserts that surrounded her: and even yet form an insuperable bar to all who approach. A great many nations distant and different from one another are called Ethiopians. Africa contains the greater number of them and a considerable tract in Asia was occupied by this race. The Ethiopians were distinguished from the other races by a very dark or completely black skin. ” (Heeren’s Historical Researches–Ethiopian Nations. Ch. 1, p. 46) Existing monuments confirm the high antiquity of Meroe. In the Persian period Ethiopia was an important and independent state, which Cambyses vainly attempted to subdue. Rosellini thinks that the right of Sabaco and Tirhakah, Ethiopian kings, who sat upon the throne of Egypt in the latter days, must have been more by right of descent than by usurpation or force of arms. “This may be judged,” he says, “by the respect paid to their monuments by their successors.”

The pictures on the Egyptian monuments reveal that Ethiopians were the builders. They, not the Egyptians, were the master-craftsmen of the earlier ages. The first courses of the pyramids were built of Ethiopian stone. The Cushites were a sacerdotal or priestly race. There was a religious and astronomical significance in the position and shape of the pyramids. Dubois points to the fact that in Upper Egypt there were pictured black priests who were conferring upon red Egyptians, the instruments and symbols of priesthood. Ethiopians in very early ages had an original and astounding religion, which included the rite of human sacrifice. It lingered on in the early life of Greece and Home. Dowd explains this rite in this way: “The African offered his nearest and dearest, not from depravity but from a greater love for the supreme being.” The priestly caste was more influencial upon the Upper Nile than in Egypt. With the withdrawal of the Ethiopian priesthood from Egypt to Napata, the people of the Lower Nile lost the sense of the real meaning of their religion, which steadily deteriorated with their language after their separation from Ethiopia.

If we visit Nubia, modern Ethiopia today, we can plainly see in the inhabitants their superiority to the common Egyptian type. The Barabra or Nile Nubians are on a footing of perfect equality in Egypt because that was their plane in ancient days. Baedecker describes them as strong, muscular, agricultural and more warlike and energetic than Egyptians. Keane says the Nubians excel in moral qualities. They are by his description obviously Negroid, very dark with full lips and dreamy eyes. They have the narrow heads which are the cranial formation of Ethiopia. Race may be told by shape of the skull far better than by color or feature, which are modified by climate. The members of the Tartar race have perfectly rounded skulls. The head of the Ethiopian races is very elongated. Europeans have an intermediate skull. The cranial formation of unmixed races never changes. Keane concludes by saying, “All Barbara have wooly hair with scant beards like the figures of Negroes on the walls of the Egyptian temples.” The race of the Old Empire approached closely to this type.

Strabo mentions the Nubians as a great race west of the Nile. They came originally from Kordofan, whence they emigrated two thousand years ago. They have rejected the name Nubas as it has become synonymous with slave. They call themselves Barabra, their ancient race name. Sanskrit historians call the Old Race of the Upper Nile Barabra. These Nubians have become slightly modified but are still plainly Negroid. They look like the Wawa on the Egyptian monuments. The Retu type number one was the ancient Egyptian, the Retu type number two was in feature an intermingling of the Ethiopian and Egyptian types. The Wawa were Cushites and the name occurs in the mural inscriptions five thousands years ago. Both people were much intermingled six thousand years ago. The faces of the Egyptians of the Old Monarchy are Ethiopian but as the ages went on they altered from the constant intermingling with Asiatic types. Also the intense furnace-like heat of Upper Egypt tended to change the features and darken the skin.

In the inscriptions relative to the campaigns of Pepi I, Negroes are represented as immediately adjoining the Egyptian frontier. This seems to perplex some authors. They had always been there. This was the Old Race of predynastic Egypt–the primitive Cushite type. This was the aboriginal race of Abyssinia. It was symbolized by the Great Sphinx and the marvelous face of Cheops. Take any book of Egyptian history containing authentic cuts and examine the faces of the first pharaohs, they are distinctively Ethiopian. The “Agu” of the monuments represented this aboriginal race. They were the ancestors of the Nubians. and were the ruling race of Egypt. Petrie in 1892 exhibited before the British Association, some skulls of the Third and Fourth Dynasties, showing distinct Negroid characteristics. They were dolichocephalic or long skulled. The findings of archaeology more and more reveal that Egypt was Cushite in her beginning and that Ethiopians were not a branch of the Japheth race in the sense that they are so represented in the average ethnological classifications of today.

Egyptians said that they and their religion had come from the land of Punt. Punt is generally accepted today to have been Somaliland south of Nubia. On the pictured plates at Deir-el-Baheri, the huts of the people of Punt were like the Toquls of the modern Sudanese, being built on piles approached by ladders. The birds were like a species common among the Somali. The fishes were not like those of Egypt. The wife of the king of Punt appears with a form like the Bongo women with exaggerated organs of maternity. This was a distinctive Ethiopian form. The king had the Cushite profile. The products carried by the wooly haired porters were ebony, piles of elephant tusks, all African products and trays of massive gold rings. Punt is mentioned in the inscriptions as a land of wonders. We find marvelous ruins in southeastern Africa that substantiate these reports. The inscription in the rocky valley of Hammat tells how 2000 B. C. a force gathered in the Thebaid to go on an expedition to Punt to bring back the products that made the costly incense of the ancients. The Stage Temple at Thebes showed in gorgeous pictures another expedition in 1600 B. C. We now know that Somaliland yielded the frankincense of ancient commerce, which was used in the ceremonials of all ancient kingdoms. Punt was called the “Holy Land” by the Egyptians.

In Egypt today, the most effective battalions are those commanded by black Nubians. In ancient ages the Egyptians followed the lead of the Ethiopian to battle and it is instinctive in them to do so today. Cushites were the backbone of the armies in the earliest ages. The Egyptian has no warlike qualities. It was the Cushite who was the head and brains of the foreign conquests. It was the Cushite element of the Old Empire that extended itself in foreign colonization eastward and westward around the world. Across Arabia and southwestern Asia, even to the central highlands, inscriptions and massive images in stone stand as voiceless witnesses that they were the commanders of the Egyptian armies and that the Ethiopian masses accompanied the soldiers as trusted allies and not as driven slaves. We must remember that in the early ages they were not a subject race but that their power as a great empire was at its zenith.

The Egyptian of today much changed from the ancient whom Herodotus called black, is content to live in a mud hut beside his beloved Nile. He is despised by the prouder Nubian, who saves his earnings to buy a home and piece of ground in his native Ethiopia. Reclus tells us that the dislike between Egyptians and Nubians is carried to such a great extent that the Nubians even in Egypt will not marry an Egyptian woman and that he refuses his daughter in marriage to the Egyptian and Arab. This could have come down alone front an age-old consciousness of superiority. He knows the proud traditions of his race. In books careless of ethnography, we find the Nubian classed with Semitic stock. They have no affinities at all with this race. Nubians are never able to speak the Arabic tongues gramatically. Nubian women are seldom seen in Egypt. They are the most faithful to the manners and customs of the Old Race. The Egyptian of today makes
little showings of ambition or the spirit for great deeds. He squanders his earnings upon trinkets and seems content in the same mud hovel in which the masses of Egyptians primitively lived.

Prichard recognizes two branches of the Nubians, the Nubians of the Nile and those of the Red Sea. In the age of Herodotus, the countries known as Nubia and Senaar were occupied by two different races, one of which he includes under the name Ethiopian; the other was a pastorial race of Semitic decent which led a migratory life. This distinction continues to the present day. The Red Sea nomadic tribes are extremely savage and inhospitable. The Nile Nubas or Barabra are the original Ethiopians. They are agricultural and have the old Hamitic traits. They plant date trees and set up wheels for irrigation. These are the Ethiopians mentioned in chronicles as possessing war chariots. Their allies were the Libyans. Semites at that age of the world had no possession of iron vehicles. Heeren says “that the ancestors of these Ethiopians had long lived in cities and had erected magnificent temples and edifices, that they possessed law and government, and that the fame of their progress in knowledge and the social arts had spread in the earliest ages to a considerable part of the world.”

Maurice, that reliable authority on ancient remains, declares, “The ancient Ethiopians were the architectural giants of the past. When the daring Cushite genius was in the full career of its glory, it was the peculiar delight of this enterprising race to erect stupendous edifices, excavate long subterranean passages in the living rock, form vast lakes and extend over the hollows of adjoining mountains magnificent arches for aqueducts and bridges. It was they who built the tower of Babel or Belus and raised the pyramids or Egypt; it was they who formed the grottoes near the Nile and scooped the caverns of Salsette end Elephante. (These latter are wonders of Hindu architecture.) Their skill in mechanical powers astonishes posterity, who are unable to conceive by what means stones thirty, forty and even sixty feet in length from twelve to twenty in depth could ever be raised to the point of elevation at which they are seen in the ruined temples of Belbec and Thebais. Those comprising the pagodas of India are scarcely less wonderful in point of elevation and magnitude.” (Maurice’s Ancient History of Hindustan.)

——————————————————————————–

Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)

THE AMAZING CIVILIZATION OF ETHIOPIA…
Aithiopians
INTELLECT OF NEGROES
BLACK EGYPT,THE WHITE LIES AND THE BLACK PROOF:FROM WASALAAM.WORDPRESS.COM
Written by Tseday

September 14, 2008 at 3:41 am
Posted in African History, Ethiopia

Tagged with Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ethiopia, Ancient India, Ethiopia
« The Royal Tombs of Aksum – EthiopiaThe Ethiopic Calendar »
One Response
Subscribe to comments with RSS.

The so-called Somalia state versus Somaliland

This piece of work is based upon the mere facts collected elsewhere from South East Asia, Greece, Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia and indeed the wonderfull Somaliland Republic.

For the failed state of Somalia all you can expect is confrontational rhetoric against everything, even this accredited Scientific research will be unheeded.

The only guts they commonly agree is plunder of the past, present and even their own future. That is why approximately ten years ago they created the so-called Mafia style semi-autonomous province of Puntland.

This dry region whic happens East-western Somalia is the imminent neighbour of Africas best kept secret or The Somaliland and more than that it is stronghold of War Lord president of Somalia`s TFG. The latter was area ruler when he just copied our way of functioning statehood may be positively but wrongly with plunder of the his name selection,because the name Puntland belongs to Somaliland and it is our historical ownership and label rights that can not be internationally endorsed.

East and west Somaliland is best

Ali Mohamoud Noor Ali-Eid
Etterstadsletta 37 A
0660 Oslo
Norway

Ali Mohamoud Noor Ali-Eid

September 14, 2008 at 3:51 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
This is great! I want to paste it on my “BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!” SITE AND GIVE(AND LINK YOU)YOU AS SOURCE!
yeyeolade.wordpress.com
Black on !

Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade

May 9, 2009 at 12:09 pm

Blog Stats
12,592 visitors

Pages
SELAM ~ WELCOME
● Changing Images of Ethiopia from the Outside World
● Biblical references to Ethiopia
● Christianity in Ethiopia
● Appeal by HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I to the League of Nations 1936
● Address by HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I to the UN 1963
● The Ruins of Empires and the Law of Nature
Search for:
Categories
African History (43)
Dalit cause (India) (2)
Doomsday / Conspiracy (7)
Ethiopia (80)
Humanitarian, Social & Environmental Causes (50)
Lost civilization (1)
Mythology (11)
Palestinian Cause (23)
Personal Statement (2)
Think GREEN (4)
World Peace/Truth (34)

Through the centuries, Ethiopian Christians have claimed to have the Ark of the Covenant. Do you believe the ark rests in Ethiopia?
Yes
No
I don’t know

View Results
Polldaddy.com
Blogroll
Abey Roads
Dear Ethiopia
See You In Ethiopia
Top Posts
Constellation Cassiopeia
OLD ETHIOPIA – ITS PEOPLE
The Royal Tombs of Aksum – Ethiopia
Traveling back in time to ancient Ethiopia
Ethiopian Astronomy/Zodiac
Anniversary of the Battle of Adwa
Treasures from Ethiopia
Hal Turner’s objection to the AMERO Currency
Roses: Ethopia’s future (?)
Thyia: Tree of Wisdom
Recent Comments
deepethiopian on TEZA – a film by Haile Gerima
keyurapatel on Global warming rage lets global hunger grow
Wayzarit Assumpta Tafari on Ethiopia seeks prince’s remains
smarterthanyou on Hal Turner’s objection to the AMERO Currency
Michael Burks on Free Palestine
Tariku on Ethiopia, an Astonishing Christianity on African Soil
Tseday on Ethiopia, an Astonishing Christianity on African Soil
Tariku on Ethiopia, an Astonishing Christianity on African Soil
Hwahwazira on Ethiopian Astronomy/Zodiac
Luis Estepa on The Royal Tombs of Aksum – Ethiopia
Rudy Aunk on THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN INDIA
photobreathe on The Challenge for Ethiopia
Menasseh on Anniversary of the Battle of Adwa
Jah-Jim on The Emperor Haile Selassie I in Bath 1936 – 1940
Adam Bacchus on THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN INDIA
Tags
Africa African Civilization African History Ancient Egypt Ancient Ethiopia Ancient Ethiopian Civilization Ark of the covenant Astrology Axum Benyamin Netanyahu Beta Israel Blue Nile British Empire Capitalism Christianity Dalit Deir Sultan Ethiopia Ethiopian Famine Ethiopian History Ethiopian Orthodox Church Food Crisis Free Gaza Freemasonry Gaza Greek Mythology Human Rights Israel Jerusalem Lalibela Magdala Mythology Nile Valley Civilization Osiris Palestine Palestinian Cause Poverty Queen of Sheba Racism Stolen Treasures sustainable food system USA West Bank World Peace/Truth Zionism

Jesus is Black, See! (If you know history, Black people are the first race so ofcourse you know Jesus is Black) Pictures here!

February 26, 2009

Black Jesus

Black Jesus

b_black_jesus

Black Madonna

The Black Madonna ABove, Below
Black Jesus Pictures!

jesus_our_savior_black

Black Jesus3

jesus_at_door_black

Black Jesus and the Rastafarian Disciples

black_jesus5

A BLACKamerikkkan SCHOLAR MAULANA KARENGA EXPOUNDS ON THE BEAUTY/WISDOM OF ODU IFA-FROM STATEOFTHEBLACKWORLD.ORG

November 26, 2008

FROM stateoftheblackworld.org

ETHICAL INSIGHTS FROM ODU IFA:
CHOOSING TO BE CHOSEN

Los Angeles Sentinel, 01-25-08, p. A-7
DR.MAULANA KARENGA
Nowhere is the profundity and beauty of African spirituality more apparent than in the Odu Ifa, the sacred text of the spiritual and ethical tradition of Ifa, which is one of the greatest sacred texts of the world and a classic of African and world literature. Its central message revolves around the teach-ings of the Goodness of and in the world; the chosen status of humans in the world; the criteria of a good world; and the re-quirements for a good world. Although these themes are throughout the Odu Ifa, nowhere are they more explicit than in Odu 78:1. The Odu (chapter) begins by declaring “Let’s do things with joy…” For it is understood that the world was created in goodness and that we are to find good in the world, embrace it, increase it, and not let any good be lost. It is obvious here that all is not well with the world, given the poverty, oppression, exploi-tation and general suffering of people. But inherent in this firm belief in the good that is found in the Odu Ifa is the faith that in the midst of the worst of situations there are good people, good will and possibilities for creating good, increasing good and thus constantly expanding the realm of good.
The chosen status of humans is a sec-ond major tenet of Ifa. Odu 78:1 says we should do things with joy “for surely hu-mans have been divinely chosen (yan) to bring good into the world” and that this is the fundamental mission and meaning of human life. And we are chosen not over and against anyone, but chosen with everyone to bring good in the world. Thus, all of us are equally chosen. In fact, the word for human being is eniyan which literally means chosen one, and we are divinely chosen without dis-tinction of nation, race, gender, special reli-gious relationship or promise. Surely this poses an ideal many other world religions are still striving to establish as a central moral doctrine.
But even as we’re chosen, we must also choose to be chosen by doing good in the world. Thus, Odu 78:1 also says that no one can reach their highest level of spiritual-ity or rest in heaven until we all achieve the good world “that Olodumare, God, has or-dained for every human being.” This estab-lishes a divinely ordained right to a good life for every human being. But joined to this human right is the obligation of shared re-sponsibility of humans to make the world good so that everyone can enjoy a good life. The important contribution this makes here to theological and social ethics is that it teaches that transcendence in the spiritual and social sense can never be individualistic, but must always include the happiness and well-being of others. The Odu Ifa says all deserve a good life and good world; ultimate transcendence is impossible without it, and it is a shared task of all humans to achieve it.
The question is, then, posed to the sage and master teacher, Orunmila, of what is a good life and the conditions for the good world. Orunmila answers by saying that the achieving of a good life or good world is de-fined by several essential things: full knowl-edge of things; happiness everywhere; free-dom from anxiety and fear of hostile others; the end of antagonism with other beings on earth, i.e., animals, reptiles and the like; well-being and the end of forces that threaten it; and finally, freedom from pov-erty and misery. Now, it is of great signifi-cance that the first criteria for good life and good world is knowledge. In fact, Orunmila also says that knowledge or rather wisdom is the first requirement for achieving the good. This points to knowledge or education as a basic human right, necessary not only for our understanding our humanity in its most
ETHICAL INSIGHTS FROM ODU IFA: CHOOSING TO BE CHOSEN 2
Los Angeles Sentinel, 01-25-08, p. A-7
DR.MAULANA KARENGA
expansive forms, but also to realize it in the most meaningful and flourishing ways.
But again the good world will not come into being by itself. Thus, five re-quirements are necessary to bring it into be-ing. The first requirement Orunmila lists for achieving a good world, as noted above is wisdom. The text says we must develop “wisdom adequate to govern the world.” This reaffirms human responsibility for the world and the need to obtain adequate wis-dom to carry out this responsibility effec-tively. The core wisdom here is of necessity moral and spiritual wisdom which conceives the world in its interrelated wholeness, re-spects its integrity and works constantly to save, renew and expand the good in it.
Orunmila also taught that humans must move beyond moralities of convenience to a morality of sacrifice, i.e., self-giving in a real, meaningful and sustained way. The Odu Ifa says that “one who makes a small sacrifice will have a small result” (Odu, 45:1). It says to us “be able to suffer without surrendering and persevere in what you do” (Odu, 150). Also, a central moral quest in the Ifa spiritual and ethical tradition is to achieve iwapele, a gentle character or iwarere, good character which are often in-terchangeable. Orunmila cites this as the third requirement to achieving a good world. “It is gentle character which enables the rope of life to remain strong in our hands” according to Odu 119:1.
Orunmila teaches that another one of the main requirements for achieving the good world is “the love of doing good for all people, especially for those who are in need and those who seek assistance from us.” This requirement seeks to create a moral community based not on cold calculation of rule and duty, but on the love of doing good and the joy and benefit it brings to the doer and the recipient of the good. Odu 141:1 says, “Ofun is giving out goodness every-where. (But) Ofun does not make noise about it.” Indeed, to do things coldly and/or loudly is to diminish the good done.
The last requirement Orunmila cites as a requirement for creating a good world re-turns us to the fundamental meaning and mission in human life. He says what is re-quired is “the eagerness and struggle to in-crease good in the world and not let any good be lost.” Again, Orunmila calls for a profound commitment to the good world, and an ongoing and intense struggle for it until it is achieved. The Odu suggests that we must stay ever-ready and engaged, for it says in the pursuit of good, “a constant sol-dier is never unready even once” (Odu, 159:1).
Dr. Maulana Karenga, Professor of Black Studies, California State University-Long Beach, Chair of The Organiza-tion Us, Creator of Kwanzaa, and author of Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture, [www.Us-Organization.org and http://www.OfficialKwanzaaWebsite.org].


%d bloggers like this: