Archive for the ‘BLACK MEN’ Category

BLACK PEOPLE! -SKIN BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!-FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

July 5, 2020

FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week
20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By Lauren R.D. Fox

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

 

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better; they are only using what they know. So why is this practice still being used in the Millennial generation? Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?
– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

BLEACHING!-SKIN-BLEACHING MODELS BANNED FROM DAKAR FASHION WEEK!--FROM MADAMENOIRE.COM

 

 

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpufmodelsmodels

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

Fade To Black: Skin-Bleaching Models Banned From Dakar Fashion Week

20 comments
July 25, 2013 ‐ By
2
1
6

Source: Omar Victor Diop/ Dakar Fashion Week

One can blame white supremacy or colonization for the mental conditioning Blacks have endured, but finally in the African diaspora’s fashion industry, a change has come. Adama Ndiaye, founder of Senegal’s Dakar Fashion Week, has put her foot down on beauty practices used by the models who participated in Dakar Fashion Week this year. Many women in Senegal, as well as other countries have turned to skin bleaching to achieve lighter skin and this year Ndiaye banned any models who decided to participate in what she calls depigmentation. She states:

“It’s not even pretty, for me, it’s just a turn off.”

Ndiaye’s purpose for the ban is to teach the models about their self-esteem; she also noted the health of  the models’ who have bleached their skin is at risk. According to Dermatologist Fatoumata Ly:

These ladies bare the telltale signs of long-term bleaching: blotches of discoloured skin on their arms and faces. Women often use prescription-strength corticosteroid creams to lighten their skin. “When absorbed into the bloodstream, corticosteroids pose serious risks, particularly for the heart,” she said. Skin cancer is also a potential side effect.

Although skin bleaching is a dangerous, it is still widely used in Black communities throughout the world. There are many who do not believe (or are told), their skin complexion is attractive. Growing up in a Caribbean family, my great-aunts who were born into a colonized society often offered my cousins and I skin bleaching lotion when we enjoyed too much time in the sun. Although others would find their actions insulting, I believe this provides great insight. My aunts were born in the early 1900s. Not only did they want to speak the Queen’s English but they wanted to have her fair skin (although they have a café-au-lait skin tone). In many ways, the time period they were born in  and its complexities gave them a pass to their ignorance. They did not know better;  they are only using what they know.  So why is  this practice still being used in the Millennial generation?  Even better, why do (some) Black women participate in #TeamLightSkin or #TeamDarkSkin debates as though they get a cookie for skin color pride. To be  comfortable in one’s skin means to not be dependent on something that is conditional. Beauty trends are constantly evolving; what we think is beautiful today, may not be tomorrow.

Thankfully, some people in Senegal are getting that message. When asked what she thought about Ndiaye’s ban on skin-bleaching, one model, Dorinex Mboumba, responded:

“I think it’s a great idea, it will discourage others from the practice. We don’t need to change the color of our skin to be beautiful.”

Do you think skin bleaching will ever fade out?

– See more at: http://madamenoire.com/287820/fade-to-black-skin-bleaching-models-banned-from-dakar-fashion-week/#sthash.5GjuEgym.dpuf

George Floyd Died A Month Ago. There Have Been Protests Every Day Since. | HuffPost

June 26, 2020

The fight for justice is far from over, but the fact that so much has changed in such a short time highlights how historic this moment really is.
— Read on www.huffpost.com/entry/george-floyd-died-one-month-ago-the-protests-are-still-going_n_5ef3c2c9c5b615e5cd389336

“BLACK MAN -YOU ARE CHOSEN”..Tweet from MINISTER FARRAKHAN (@LouisFarrakhan)

November 3, 2018

https://youtu.be/nZPxhx0ItWc

NIGERIAN BOY MAKES HIS OWN CAR OOOO!

September 14, 2018

https://www-informationng-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/www.informationng.com/2018/09/student-arrives-school-in-his-locally-made-sports-vehicle-in-enugu-photos.html/amp

ASO OKE OOO!–THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CLOTH IN THE WORLD !!!!

July 31, 2018

THE BLACKEST BEAUTY MUST BE CELEBRATED!!

February 4, 2017

JOOO fight all this bleaching by Celebrating the Blackest beauty like the white boy celebrates the ugly white/girl/no/lips/no/hips/no/nose/no/ass/no/color as beautiful! Everywhere you go salute these Blackest Beauties and let them know that they are the most beautiful ! Put them back on top of the Beauty Pyramid like God did in the beginning!

BLACK WOMEN!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MISS FIYAH-FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

March 2, 2016
WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY-MISS FIYAH!–FROM DARK SKIN 101 ON FACEBOOK

BLACK, BEAUTIFUL BLACK!–“BLUE-BLACK”–A POEM BY MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK

January 21, 2016

from menelik charles on facebook

‘Blue-Black’ has typically been…

A phrase which suggested one was ‘ugly’ in Black America. But I have a much better interpretation of the phrase: ‘beautiful’.

Can I get a witness?

(c) Menelik Charles.

Menelik Charles's photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Comments
Charles Reaves
Charles Reaves Very lovely.
Like · Reply · 1 · 2 hrs
Menelik Charles replied · 1 Reply
Sandra Golding
Sandra Golding Beautiful..
Like · Reply · 1 · 57 mins
Menelik Charles replied · 1 Reply
Sharon Cooper-Walker
Sharon Cooper-Walker Beautiful! Sudan perhaps?
Nathan Hare

Nathan Hare Witness. Witness.

 

BLACK BEAUTY!!!–BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!—THIS BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IS FROM FACEBOOK ATI MENELIK CHARLES!

December 19, 2015

FROM MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK!

WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Saturday, December 19, 2015

BEAUTY!!!–BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY!—THIS BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY IS FROM FACEBOOK ATI MENELIK CHARLES!

FROM MENELIK CHARLES ON FACEBOOK!

FARRAKHAN SAYS WHITES INVENTED EBOLA TO KILL BLACKS!-FROM NIGERIANA.ORG

December 15, 2014
African News, Editor’s Pick, Featured News, General

Farrakhan: Whites Invented Ebola To Kill Off Blacks

Fox News reports:

Firebrand Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan’s latest racially-charged claim is that Ebola – the deadly disease ravaging parts of Africa and now diagnosed on American soil – was designed by white scientists specifically to kill off blacks.

The 81-year-old leveled the charge in his organization’s newspaper, The Final Call,insisting the disease is man-made and cooked up in a laboratory as a means of population control. He underscored the claim on his Twitter page, which has 308,000 followers.

“There is a weapon that can be put in a room where there are black and white people, and it will kill only the black and spare the white, because it is a genotype weapon that is designed for your genes, for your race, for your kind,” Farrakhan wrote.

Farrakhan has previously made similar claims about AIDS. This time, he cited a 2000 research paper by the now-defunct think tank Project for the New American Century which predicted “advanced forms of biological warfare that can target specific genotypes, may transform biological warfare from the realm of terror to a politically useful tool.”

The first known case of Ebola dates back to 1976, but outbreaks have occurred, mostly in Africa, in the decades since. The current outbreak began in Guinea last December and spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Senegal and is now responsible for more than 3,300 deaths. The disease, which has a mortality rate of between 50 and 90 percent, is spread by contact with body fluids and no credible medical authority believes it affects races differently.


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The first diagnosis on U.S. soil associated with the current outbreak came on Wednesday and involved a Sierra Leone man who flew to Dallas.

But Farrakhan is not alone in his suspicions about Ebola. Villagers in remote areas of Africa have alleged the disease is a Western plot and has even killed aid workers. And in the U.S., Delaware State University agriculture professor Cyril Broderick wrote a letter to a Liberian newspaper charging Ebola was created by the U.S. military and pharmaceutical companies who are intentionally spreading the deadly disease in Africa.

“The U. S., Canada, France, and the U.K. are all implicated in the detestable and devilish deeds that these Ebola tests are,” wrote Broderick.

Source


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