Archive for September, 2010

YORUBA LANGUAGE IS DYING!-NEW BOOK ON ISSUES IN YORUBA RELIGION/LANGUAGE/CULTURE BY ROTIMI OGUNJOBI

September 30, 2010

FROM yeyeolade.blogspot.com

YORUBA CULTURE-A NEW BOOK ON ISSUES FACING THE CULTURE/RELIGION-INCLUDES MY ESSAY “THE DEATH OF YORUBA LANGUAGE?”

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Perspectives of Yorubaland: Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
By Rotimi Ogunjobi

Perspectives of Yorubaland:
Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
Front Cover
Rotimi Ogunjobi
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xceedia – tee publishing, 2010 – Art – 128 pages

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Table of Contents
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Contents
The Lost Kingdom
7

The Place of Susan Wengers Art in Yorùbá Religion
13

Ethical Insights from Odu Ifá
36

Exploring Art and Spirituality In The Yorùbá Culture
41

Metaphysics and Gender in an African Ritual Play
48

Exploring Ile
62

The Batá Drums
71

Ìbéjì Custom in Yorùbáland
81

The Death Of Yorùbá Language?
89

ODU EJI OGBE Ori Chant
97

The Leopard and Chimera A fable
101

Appendix
128

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abundantly Orisa African art Afro-Cuban añá animals art and religion Art In Yorùbá artist batá drums Beier bless me abundantly bulging eyes carved ceremonies child Chimera Cuba dance dead deaf fish deities divine English Eredo exhibition feast festival Gèlèdé goddess gods/goddesses human ìbéjì children ìbéjì figures Ibitokun’s Igbo igede Ile-Ife Ita Yemoo jee n sowo Kehinde king king’s father king’s palace Lawal Leopard Leopard’s head Leopard’s wife let me labor monuments mother mask myths National Museum NCMM Newark Museum Nigeria Obatala Odu Ifá Ogboni Olabimtan Olodumare Olokun Oranmiyan Orisa ma jee Orunmila Osogbo Osun groove palm-oil parents people’s performance religious ritual river sacred sacrifice Sango Santería shrine songs sowo asenu Orisa spiritual stew Susanne Wenger symbols Taiyewo tattoo told town Ori koo traditional Ulli Beier Wenger’s art worship Yorùbá art Yorùbá belief Yorùbá culture Yorùbá language Yorùbá religion Yorùbá Speaking Yorùbáland
Bibliographic information
Title Perspectives of Yorubaland: Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture
Author Rotimi Ogunjobi
Editor Rotimi Ogunjobi
Edition illustrated
Publisher xceedia – tee publishing, 2010
ISBN 9784983710, 9789784983716
Length 128 pages
Subjects Art / General
Reference / General
CLICK ON TO MY ARTICLE IN THIS BOOK HERE:

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Posted by YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE at 1:59 AM

>YORUBA LANGUAGE-NEW BOOK ON ISSUES RELATED TO-PERSPECTIVES OF YORUBALAND:COMPENDIUM OF WRITINGS ABOUT YORUBA ARTS AND CULTURE BY ROTIMI OGUNJOBI

September 30, 2010

>

from yeyeolade.blogspot.com

YORUBA CULTURE-A NEW BOOK ON ISSUES FACING THE CULTURE/RELIGION-INCLUDES MY ESSAY “THE DEATH OF YORUBA LANGUAGE?”

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Perspectives of Yorubaland: Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture

 By Rotimi Ogunjobi

Perspectives of Yorubaland:

Compendium of Writings about Yoruba Arts and Culture

Front Cover
xceedia – tee publishing, 2010 – Art – 128 pages

  

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BLACK WOMEN POWER-THE POWER OF THE BLACK NAKED BREAST!

September 28, 2010

FROM tribune.com.ng

FROM TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER

The politicisation of the female breasts
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Written by KEHINDE OYETIMI
Sunday, 12 September 2010

The employment of the female breasts and sexuality in Nigerian politics has shown that nothing is too sacred to be involved. The erstwhile cultural implication of the female anatomy is beginning to lose its relevance as it has been railroaded into the mainstream of Nigerian politics. KEHINDE OYETIMI writes.

FROM time immemorial and of all the unique structures that make up the anatomical configuration of the female, nothing seems to arrogate much attention to itself than the exterior twin organs of the female chest – otherwise referred to as the breasts. Unlike in males, which of course are just a couple of buttons attached to the chest, the breasts of the woman have always been objects of much interest, whether overtly or covertly. Apparently, the breasts of the woman are secondary sexual organs, but the peculiar curve and arch of the breasts, their sensitivity to contact or touch, their role in the suckling engagement of infants, lend ever-abiding credence to both their artistic beauty and functionality.

In virtually all societies, the body of the woman is an object of interest, while it is a taboo to give an explicit detailing of the female anatomy, in other climes, the female body is worshipped. In pristine societies (settings that were not yet tainted with the vagaries of modernity), the female was held in awe and typified in utter sacrosanctity. African culture and so many others usually do not openly place much discourse on the female breast. Many cultures whose historico-cultural progress could not be documented hold varying but unique perspectives on the body of the woman – especially the female breasts. Any attempt towards the interpretation, perception and understanding of the placement of importance on the female breasts would naturally yield both cultural and conventional elucidation.

The Amazonian women, as captured by Greek historians, are depicted as a collection of a nation of female warriors. In world history, nothing more captures this unique gathering of women-warriors.

Records show the Amazonian women-warriors with their left breasts usually exposed, while the right ones were covered. This, of course, was done for the purpose of warfare. It was believed that in warfare, the left should be exposed so as to aid the handling of the arrow when shooting with the bow.

In pristine African milieus, women typified fertility. The female body commanded cosmic energy and it was therefore a taboo to misrepresent the body of the woman. In fact, of all the chambers of the female body, none assumed such spiritual connotations than the breasts. It was an act of utmost sacrilege for the female body to be exposed in near or total nudity. The breasts of the woman in African cultural settings were instruments, not just for the sexual gratification of the invasion of the male character, but had far reaching cosmic influence on monarchs. Monarchs who have lost their political and social relevance were cursed with the exposure of the female breasts, in protest. The breasts of such women were weapons of social and political change. Two very sacrosanct parts of the female anatomy in traditional African societies were the breasts and the vagina, the exposure of which attracted a curse to the male viewers. The deliberate exposure of the female body was the height of a man’s or monarch’s undoing.

Mordecai Sunday Ibrahim, President, Southern Kaduna Youth Vanguard, stated that “As far as I am concerned, it is an indecent act. A woman for whatever reason is not supposed to expose the sensitive parts of her body in the name of asking for change. We witnessed this in the 30s and the 50s, but of course in the 21st century we can see that these things are affecting the morals of our children. We should begin to think of better ways of pushing our case. What is wrong with hunger strike? What is wrong with carrying placards? Exposing the breasts is not decent. Neither Christianity nor Islam advocate this nonsense. Anywhere culture goes against your faith, you should drop culture. If we want to go into that then we should go on to wearing bante which my grandfather was wearing.”

Dr (Mrs) Gloria Olushola Adedoja, Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan, found no basis for the practice since other avenues are available. “I am not sure if that cultural implication of exposing the female breasts for change is still there. But in those days, it was there. Exposing the breasts is not the only way by which women can champion their causes. Women can make their reactions known by saying them in the dailies, writing notices to the people that are in charge. Even there could be the use of dialogue. Grievances can be made known through different fora. I doubt if such acts are relevant in our societies because people do not really recognise them. Now some of them could even be paid to do so but in those days it was not like that. When women came out like that, in those days, it meant that it was an issue that men could no longer handle,” she advised.

Dr Sola Olorunyomi, of the Institute of African Studies, University of Ibadan, saw a modern relevance of the practice. “When such interventions are made, they must not be used flippantly. I don’t necessary think that it has been misused. The Ekiti incidence was a show of the miscarriage of justice. There was really need for some kind of response by the people. Roads and infrastructure would come only when governance is good. Governance is foundational. If there is one thing people should response to, it is actually governance. I think it still holds some relevance,” he opined.

Unfortunately, in modern times, female breasts have been commoditised and commercialised. The media have constantly used the woman in the sale of goods which have no immediate relevance to her. Yet unfortunate is the fact that there is a gradual shift in the politicisation of the feminine power of the woman. Nigerian politics has invaded the sacrosanctity of the female energy housed in the female body. Threats using the female sexuality have become the norm in the Nigerian political space.

A bit of the horrendous act was demonstrated last year in Ekiti State during the electioneering engagements that almost marred the peace of the state. Women with tired, sagging and flabby mammalian glands came out in their droves carrying placards. The sickening aspect was the sensuous irrelevance of such breasts in display. What must have helped the Amazonian women in warfare, that Nigerian women must quickly adopt, was the distraction that their exposed left breasts caused their male opponents. Of course, what would be more disarming to a warring man than the incapacitating influence engineered by visual contact with the undulating, sensuous movement of youthful, firm breasts? The recent threat in the contemporary documentation of such incidents was the “No Jonathan, No sex” campaign of the Organisation of African Women in Diaspora, which was reported last month. The politicisation of the feminine sexuality is of course beginning to lose its power of suasion and social relevance. The same appeal to such sexuality was witnessed at the beginning of this month in Cross Rivers State when a group of aged women from Erei, Biase local government area stormed Calabar half dressed protesting what they collectively termed the “disenfranchisement and illegal arrest of their sons.” It would not be farther before the nation witnesses the use of the female breasts in electioneering, since it has been nationally inaugurated by the campaign for a Jonathan presidency in 2011.

In 2002, a group of women threatened to bare it all in the Niger Delta in protest against the incessant abuse of their environment by oil producing firms. Speaking, Terisa Turner, an anthropologist, argued that by exposing the breasts and the vagina, “The women are saying: We all came into the world through the vagina. By exposing the vagina, the women indicate that we hereby take back the life we gave you. It is about bringing forth life and denying life through social ostracism, which is a kind of social execution. Men who are exposed are viewed as dead.” If the baring of the female genitalia would do the nation good, perhaps it would now. There are more pressing demands now within the Nigerian socio-political landscape now than ever before. One wonders if the only negotiating tool possessed by the female gender is couched in her sexuality.

MUHAMMAD ALI TELLS IT LIKE IT BLACK IS!- OUR BLACK HERO HAS NOT CHANGED ABOUT BLACK TRUTH! -2001 INTERVIEW

September 27, 2010

READERSDIGEST.COM

Face to Face with Muhammad Ali

Muhammud Ali may no longer float or sting, but make no mistake: He’s all in there, and his words still pack a punch.
Interview by Howard Bingham
From Reader’s Digest
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The date was set: Muhammad Ali would talk to Reader’s Digest on the morning of September 11 at his home, an 88-acre farm in Berrien Springs, Mich. But when the hour arrived, the world was turned upside down. Ali agreed the interview should go on, but for several hours the room was mostly quiet as the terrible events unfolded. He stared silently at the big-screen television while the World Trade Center buckled, and crumbled. And then Ali began to talk.

His Parkinson’s and his age — he turns 60 on January 17 — have turned him into a slow-motion version of his former self. Make no mistake, though: Muhammad Ali is in there. All of him. Son of a sign painter and his Baptist wife, heavyweight champ, poet and wit, black rights advocate, draft resister, philanthropist, father, and now grandfather six times over, the roles and causes Ali embraced remain a part of him, and from up close you can see and hear them all.

You can feel his warmth as well. At one point Asaad Ali, ten, the youngest of his nine children, peeked into the room. The round-faced, smiling boy stopped short, waiting to be acknowledged. Ali turned his head, his expression frozen, and slowly, wordlessly, unfolded his body to create an opening. Asaad ran to him, filled the space, hugged his dad, and his father hugged him back.

As images of Osama bin Laden began flashing across television, a transformation of sorts began for Ali. The man who started life as Cassius Clay, and then announced his conversion to Islam in 1964, suddenly became only the second most recognizable Muslim face in the world.

Reader’s Digest had come to Ali’s home to discuss the new film based on his life. Scheduled to open December 25, Ali stars Will Smith, who, after bulking up and getting a ’60s haircut, bears an uncanny resemblance to the champ in his prime. The interview covered the movie, September 11, Islam and much more, in part because of the presence of Howard Bingham, 62, a Los Angeles-based photographer who met the fighter in 1962. Bingham has long been considered one of Ali’s closest confidants, and unlike many people, he has not taken advantage of Ali — financially or otherwise. He is not on Ali’s payroll, nor does he follow Islam. The two men banter like brothers, and move easily through the events of a long shared history. With Bingham in the room, Ali was able to be completely himself.

Bingham: Tell us your reaction to the attacks this morning.
Ali: Killing like that can never be justified. It’s unbelievable. I could never support hurting innocent men, women and children. Islam is a religion of peace. It does not promote terrorism or killing people.

Bingham: Muslims are supposed to be responsible for this. How does that make you feel?
Ali: People say a Muslim caused this destruction. I am angry that the world sees a certain group of Islam followers who caused this destruction, but they are not real Muslims. They are racist fanatics who call themselves Muslims, permitting this murder of thousands.

Bingham: When you became a Muslim, the religion was perceived as anti-white. Has that changed?
Ali: The real Islam comes from Mecca. All people are God’s people. The devil can be any color.

Bingham: Do you know some black devils?
Ali: A lot of them.

Bingham: Has it become easier to be a Muslim in America?
Ali: Yes. When I first accepted the religion, you’d say you were Muslim, people thought that’s funny. Now there’s not half the trouble.

Bingham: How do you feel about different religions?
Ali: Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams. They have different names, but all contain water. Religions have different names but all contain truth.

Bingham: What does your faith mean to you?
Ali: [It] means [a] ticket to heaven. One day we’re all going to die, and God’s going to judge us, [our] good and bad deeds. [If the] bad outweighs the good, you go to hell; if the good outweighs the bad, you go to heaven. [I’m] thinking about the judgment day and how you treat people wherever you go. Help somebody through charity, because when you do, it’s been recorded.

I go to parties, [see] good-looking girls. [I] take a box of matches with me. [I] see a girl I want to flirt with, which is a sin, so I [light] my matches, [touches his finger] oooh, hell hurts worse than this. Buy a box of matches and carry them with you. Put [one] on your finger and see how long you can hold it. Just imagine that’s going to be hell. Hell’s hotter, and for eternity.

Bingham: A movie’s been made about you. Does that surprise you?
Ali: No. It’s about the third movie made of me!

Bingham: But don’t you have any kind of emotional feelings — it makes you feel good, makes you feel … ?
Ali: [It’s] good to know people still want to read about me, people still want to hear about me. After so many years, from 1960 until now, it’s good to know that I’m still popular.

Bingham: What do you think of Will Smith?
Ali: I think he’s a great actor. And for this role, he’s the best one to do it because he looks like me a little bit and acts like me, sounds like me.

Bingham: Out of his look and your look, which one is better-looking?
Ali: Some will say him; some people say me.

Bingham: So what do you say?
Ali: I say me!

Bingham: What was your best fight ever?
Ali: The [fight against] famous Joe Frazier in Manila.

Bingham: Which loss hurt most?
Ali: Amos Johnson in the Pan Am trials in 1959.

Bingham: Did you ever win a fight that you thought you’d lost?
Ali: No.

Bingham: Did you ever lose a fight you thought you’d won?
Ali: No.

Bingham: Should boxing be banned like so many people advocate?
Ali: They said it should be banned because it’s too brutal. Football is brutal, [and] wrestling. Motor-car racing. The reason they think it’s bad is black people control it.

Bingham: Knowing what you know now, would you go back and change anything?
Ali: In boxing [I would] do everything the same, wouldn’t change nothing.

Bingham: What about taunting Joe Frazier?
Ali: Joe Frazier, [I’d do] everything the same, wouldn’t change nothing.

Bingham: Resisting the draft?
Ali: I know I’d do that the same.

Bingham: All those years back you were a kid who believed in himself enough to tell everyone that one day you would become champion of the world. Where did your confidence come from?
Ali: I had it in my heart. I believed in myself, and I had confidence. I knew how to do it and [had] natural talent, and I pursued it.

Bingham: Now, after you were older, who influenced your life and the beliefs that you have?
Ali: After I started boxing, Sugar Ray Robinson. And my idol was a man named Elijah Muhammad. [His] Islamic teaching is what made me so confident.

Bingham: What people have inspired you — or who is the most unforgettable character you’ve ever met?
Ali: Malcolm X. He said courageous things, wasn’t afraid of nothing. [He was a] good speaker about black people and their condition and treatment by whites.

Bingham: Your wife, Lonnie, Asaad’s mother … you’ve been with her longer than any of your first three wives. What does she mean to you?
Ali: Everything.

Bingham: You’ve said that some people are chosen to spread a message and that you were chosen to spread the word of Allah. What exactly do you mean by that?
Ali: For an example, black people called themselves Negroes for a hundred years, and now they say Afro Americans. But that started after they heard Elijah Muhammad. They didn’t accept all Elijah said, but the part about Afro Americans [they did]. Chinese have Chinese names, Cubans have Cuban names, Germans after Germany, Indians after India — all people by the name of their country. There’s no country called Negro.

When I heard that, it shocked me. We have our names for Chinese. Castro-here comes [a] Cuban. But here come Jones of Washington, he doesn’t know who he is. He got slave names. Negroes named George Washington. So we took — we have — slave names. Muhammad Ali is Muslim.

Bingham: What does Muhammad Ali mean?
Ali: [Muhammad means] worthy of praise and praiseworthy, and Ali means the most high. Clay means dirt. When I heard that, then everything [came together]. We’re taught to love white, hate black. The color black meant getting put out, you are being blackballed. Black was bad. There’s blackmail. They made angel cake white and devil’s food cake chocolate. Think about that, angel-food white and devil’s-food chocolate. [The] ugly duckling is the black duckling. Black magic …

I mean, black is good. In business you want it black. Blackberry juice-the blacker the berry, the sweeter the juice. The rich dirt is black. Black ain’t bad. The greatest ballplayers are black. The greatest football players are black.

Bingham: Everything but boxers, huh?
Ali: [The] greatest boxers are black.

Bingham: What were your thoughts when you lit the Olympic flame in Atlanta?
Ali: [It] show[ed] that people in the past didn’t hold it against me because here I am rejecting the Vietnam War, joining [the] Islamic religion, and then, of all people, raising the flag. They were thinking of me to light the Olympic flame, so that was a good thing.

Bingham: Do athletes have a responsibility to become role models for people?
Ali: They don’t have to, but it’s good if they do because then the kids look up to them and want to be like them. It’s good to be an example for them in the way they live.

Bingham: Are you a role model that people look up to?
Ali: I’ve been told so.

Bingham: Why?
Ali: Because I’m pretty, daring, bold, courageous!

Bingham: If there was one thing that you could make happen in this world, what would it be?
Ali: Find a cure for cancer.

Bingham: What disease do you have?
Ali: Parkinson’s.

Bingham: Do you think that your Parkinson’s was caused by boxing?
Ali: Not all people [with Parkinson’s] box. Janet Reno, Michael J. Fox fight, right?

Bingham: Have you ever asked yourself “Why me?” in struggling against your Parkinson’s?
Ali: I never ask “Why me?” for no condition. There’s so much good, [I’ve] been so blessed. God tries you. Some things are good. Some things are bad. All of them are trials.

Bingham: How would you like to be remembered?
Ali: He took a few cups of love, one teaspoon of patience, one tablespoon of generosity, one pint of kindness, and stirred it up well and served it to each and every deserving person.
From Reader’s Digest – December 2001

GABOUREY SIDIBE! -BLEACHING OUR BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY? NO RACIST ACTION SUCH AS THAT CAN BE ACCEPTED! PROTEST WITH BLACK PEN POWER! WRITE ON EVERY BOARD/SITE THAT COVERS THIS RACIST ACTION! WHITES CANNOT CONTINUE TO FORCE THEIR POOR WHITE STANDARD OF BEAUTY ON BLACK US!

September 21, 2010

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BLACK-SKINNED WOMEN: QUEEN MOTHERS OF THE BLACK RACE AND ALL BEAUTY!
Why do I sing Praises of your Beautiful, Black, ebony,velvet skin,”Blacker than the sky at midnight”{1},your full mushroomed mouth, your beautiful broad nose, your generous “Congo hips” {2}and full-flowered backside? Because for too long many of the Black Race have abused, dishonored you, degraded and denied you your crown, Queen of Queens,Queen Mother of the Black Race, Black Beauty Supreme! From you all the beauty of the Black Race springs forth.In fact all the world’s beauty springs from you,Mother of all beauty of all the races of the world! Your Black midnight,licorice,dark black chocolate,beauty, is Blackness concentrated in your beautiful “Black-blueberry”{3} face!

First in the order of creation is always given respect by Afrikan tradition. The 1st wife, the 1st elder, the 1st kingdom, the 1st original inhabitants, of the earth-all are considered with honor. So it should be with Black Beauty-our darkest -skinned Sisters are the 1st Mothers of the Universe-Black as a color came before all the many tones of brown,red,yellow and white. But for too long our Dark-skinned Queens have not been given the respect and place of honor they deserve. IN FACT THE WHITE BOY HAS INTIATED the cycle of reversing the true order of things by turning upside down the pyramid of Beauty, and placing white-light on top and relegating the most beautiful Black-skinned Beauties to rock bottom!

So Black people have been taught well how to deny our most

beautiful one her crown, taught how to reject our Blackest, most Afrikan features, full lips and nose and mouth and woollest hair, for the weaker characteristics of the white race. Shame on Black people! When will we wake up to this Black Beauty concentrated, from whence all our lesser beauty comes. When will we give the crown of crowns,the throne of thrones, to the Blackest Queen of Queens?

Most of us who suffer from”mulatto-mentality” and “yellow fever”, as Fela, our great Nigerian Musician calls it, will go on and on about what about us lighter queens-aren’t we/they beautiful too, yet you/we should be aware that such queens have gotten all the play in the past and that even in Black Egypt one of the reasons for its downfall was the allowing the lighter ones of the race, to place themselves above the rest of us in the name of lightness and pride of light-closer/to/whiteness. So if we’re yellow,to light brown/red, then we should give respect where respect is due and not live off of the artificial white thrill of having “white features” as if it is an advantage. Where would you be without your BLACKEST great Grandmother? We should honor the Blackest part of ourselves, thus giving us true pride of Blackness, not verbal signifyin’ but real testifyin’ that BLACK is beautiful! If the Blackest, most Afrikan-featured Sister isn’t respected as the Supreme Beauty of the Race,the Black woman’s beauty is not really respected at all for what it really is(only in terms of how closer to white we look). We all reflect the strengths of this concentrated beauty in ourselves, all the manifestations of how Blackness can present itself are seen in our faces. Down to the milk-lightest of us, our Blackness is what dominates us whether physically or mentally. But the Mother is greater than the child and so the Blackest is greater than all the other tones of the Black Race. If we don’t respect our Blackest Queen, we don’t respect our True Black selves. We must have a Black value for BLACKNESS in features and skin tone. We must have a Black Standard of Beauty based on the Black-skinned woman. ALL PRAISES DUE TO OUR BLACK-SKINNED QUEEN-MOTHERS!

Sister Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade
1981,Lagos,Nigeria

COMMENT ON BOARDS ON THIS-WILL ADD AS I GET MORE-

http://hollywoodcrush.mtv.com/2010/09/17/gabourey-sidibe-elle-cover-multiple-choice/

>NIGERIAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION VISIT TO AFRICAN HERITAGE RESEARCH LIBRARY,JULY 26-31,2009,ADEYIPO VILLAGE,VIA IBADAN

September 20, 2010

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>BLACK WOMEN’S NUDE POWER! -IN NIGERIA (2009) YORUBA WOMEN IN EKITI USED IT TO PROTEST INJUSTICE!

September 20, 2010

>

FROM news.onlinenigeria.com

Nude protest dangerous – Ifa priest

Monday, May 11, 2009 – Sunnewsonline.com Viewed 60 Times Rating: by 0 users

The run-off elections in Ekiti State might have come and gone, but one event in the whole political drama that would for a long time to come generate discussions would be the half-naked protest of the women.

It was like a script being played out of a Yoruba movie, but alas it was no play but reality, as the women, most in their twilight, marched out with their ‘twin flats’ (as they are no longer twin towers) in broad daylight to protest the state of the elections. Is it evil? Does it portend doom? What are the implications? These are some of the questions that will keep bugging us for a long time to come.

Speaking on the significance of the protest, an authority on Yoruba traditional practices, Chief Yemi Elebuibon, said it was an ancient practice, which women used to protest an anomaly in the society.

“In the olden days, when a king has fallen out of favour with the people, the women could stage the protest to oust that king. Usually the king would vacate the throne if the women carried out the protest but in most cases, what they usually do is to issue a warning or give an ultimatum to the authorities to correct an anomaly.

And when such warning goes out like that the authorities usually meet their demands without further ado.”

And for the Peoples Democratic Party members, who equally staged its own protest, wearing white and sprinkling salt on the streets of Ekiti, the Ifa priest said it held little or no significance. However the salt that was sprinkled meant that they were trying to neutralise whatever adverse effects the parade of the women would have caused.

“The fact they wore white was no big deal. But by sprinkling salt, they were trying to neutralise what the women did.”

However, he was quick to warn that the act (the women’s protest) in itself has grave implications if nothing is done to neutralise it.

“The implication of the women’s protest is dangerous for Ekiti as a state. It will affect the inhabitants greatly unless they do the correction to what they protested for.

Having other people wear white (what the PDP did) trying to counter the effects of the protest, will not wipe it off.

”In a place where tradition is held in high esteem, such efforts would be futile. As such a counter procession would not be allowed to be fruitful. It is one of the ways by which the people have their say.”

Going spiritual, the famous ifa priest, who distinguishes himself from a medicine man, was quick to give a relevant ifa quote, which are some sayings of the ifa deity.

“We say we are in a democracy. In the olden days, a monarch was rejected by a procession, and when all the women decide to go out naked, it means the situation had become unbearable. One of odu ifa eseogbe, explains it thus: Bi obinrin ba n gba ja meji meji ao sai mo pe eruru aye de adifa fun oosaala oseremagbo, nijoti o n lo ree gbe jojolo ni iyawo atile jojolo lo awoko wale.

It simply means that when a woman ties two sashes, there will be confusion on the earth.

“Ifa divination was performed for oosaala oseremagbo the day he wanted to take jojolo as a wife. He sent jojolo away and asked awoko to come home.”

”In this stanza of ifa, it simply says that people need to do things as ordered by God. Should they decide to do things the wrong way, it will only bring havoc.”

He further implored the Resident Electoral Commissioner, Mrs Ayoka Olusola Adebayo, to be consistent with her pronouncements.

“The Resident Electoral Commissioner needs to stay by her word. If she used her tongue to pronounce certain things and does otherwise, it is too dangerous. As a nation, we need to be careful so that we don’t destroy the nation the way our people behave.”

>LOVE-AFRICAN LOVE!-NOTHING LIKE IT IN THE WHOLE WORLD!-SEE THIS NIGERIAN DAUGHTER’S GREAT LOVE FOR HER INSANE MOTHER WHO LIVES ON THE STREETS BEGGING!-BLACK LOVE-YOU CAN’T BEAT IT!

September 20, 2010

>from thenationonlineng.com

’Insanity can’t separate us’•Amazing story of a mentally-ill mother and her 13-year old daughter

By Evelyn Osagie Published 22/08/2009 News Rating: Unrated

Being mentally-challenged is such a traumatic experience which instantly makes one a social outcast. And because of the rather unpredictable behaviour associated with such people, show of affection, care and love is often in short supply. But in Nasarawa State, North Central Nigeria, as EVELYN OSAGIE reports, not even insanity, as it were, has been able to separate 13-year-old girl, Indian, from her mentally-challenged mother as she has determinedly been caring and showing love and affection to Mama Indian, her mother. This, she does, not minding who is looking at her.

IT has been five solid years now. The barely covered market stalls and open sheds have provided Mama Indian with whatever shelter she needed. Silently, she would sit on the ground looking straight ahead as if pondering over something. She holds up her jaw with both palms as if waiting for something or nothing in particular, completely oblivious of every activity around her. Her systems have practically adapted to the changes and vagaries of the weather. The heat and cold have come to mean nothing to her just as the yellow sun and the starry sky have also become her close companions. And of course, the dustbin nearby and dirty drainage close by have also become her kitchen and bathtubs. Everyone seems to come and go except these elements and her little daughter, Indian, whom she lovingly and fondly calls by her name. This is the puzzling world of love between a mentally-challenged mother and a loving and caring daughter, which has made it impossible for her to ditch, reject or deny her mother.

Light-skinned Indian is, of course, not an American, an Indian or of Asian descent. She is a full-blooded Nigerian. But what makes her unique is her love for her mentally-sick mother. Though almost as helpless as a 13-year-old would be in the situation, Indian has nevertheless not lost focus and she hopes a better future will come her way some day. And nobody can grudge her for that, if only as a reciprocation of all the care and concern she is giving to her mother, even in her demented state.

If ever you hold the notion that the mentally-challenged do not know or recognise members of their household, you are damn wrong. For Mama Indian, every morning, as school children file past in droves to their various schools, she would patiently wait to see her daughter before getting involved in any other activity for the day. She keeps this task with precision and it is same in the evenings. She is always sure of getting one or two things from her daughter, who always makes sure she has a gift for her mother. Sometimes the kind-hearted Indian brings her mother’s food from home.

Although worlds apart in terms of mental balance, the girl and her mother are always together in mind and spirit. The love that exists between the two goes beyond the state of their mental health, it is beyond the issue of sanity or insanity, it pervades eternity. They have not allowed their fate, distance, or space to separate the cord that binds them as mother and child. Perhaps, the guilty party in this game of care and affection, if any, is Indian who has kept her mother lucidly in love amidst insanity. All that seems to matter to her most is getting education and reaching out with love to her mother.

The closest one often hears or sees of affection being shown to the mentally-challenged by their loved ones is when they come to show some solidarity with these loony fellows under the cover of the night. Only a few could dare the daylight and reach out to theirs in such a precarious condition. Whether in the day or night, some psychologists say, the show of love adds to their lifespan. No doubt, the story of Indian and her mother has given ample meaning to the maxim, ‘Blood is thicker than water’.

Indian comes across as a brainy young girl with a heart of gold. Teachers in her village testified to it but add that she needs a lot of encouragement. Life has not been fair to this little girl with big heart. Everyone talks about this intelligent young girl who sometimes follows her mother about to make sure the sick woman is kept out of trouble and the dustbin.

Indian was a student of Pilot Primary School, Chessu. She finished her primary education in 2008 but could not go further due to lack of assistance from any source. So, she now spends her time following her mother about from a distance to make sure she does not stray too far from her reach.

“I don’t want her to get lost, that is why I am always on her trail,” she said, when asked why she is always following her mother at a distance. She explained that she is “no more a kid” as an excuse for keeping an eye on her mother from a distance. Even when her mother behaves in a way that could embarrass her sometimes, the young girl remains unperturbed and goes about helping the woman to get out of the problem she might put herself.

Keeping her clean was a special thing to her. “I want to make sure she is clean and neat always but before I will come back, she would have sat or sleep on the floor and soil herself again,” she said.

She is often seen plaiting Mama Indian’s hair and dressing her with clean clothes. In fact, for these reasons, Indian is usually reproached by some. Her mother’s insanity and the fact that she goes about begging also sets her in the black book of some who feel she should have more important things to do with her life.

Meeting Indian was an interesting experience. After trying to see her twice without any luck, this reporter finally met her on this hot Sunday afternoon. Shocked at the large size of her family because one had thought she was all alone in the world.

The first time the reporter was told that Indian had gone to a nearby village for something they could not disclose. At the third visit, a lady answered and went in to call her.

Standing before one was a shy-looking girl. She emerged from the back of a mud house that served as her grandparents’ house. “Good afternoon ma,” she said and sat on a cane chair in front of the house.

“How are you?” “Fine,” she answered.

“Do you understand English?” “Yes,” she said.

“What is your name?” “Indian Ayuba,” she said in a tiny voice. “What class are you in?” “Primary Six.” But before the reporter and her escort could say anything else, they were interrupted by a young lad who claimed he was a cousin of hers. He asked the fellows around in Hausa language what the reporter had come for and he was duly briefed.

He then said in English: “She is very intelligent. In fact, she is the best in her mother’s compound.” Without further prompting, he went on: “She is level-headed, quiet and respectful and she is greatly interested in education.”

Back to Indian, the conversation continued:

“How is school?”

“Fine.”

“I heard you like school a lot.”

“Yes, I do. My mother wants me to go to school. She tells me everyday.”

“So, you would be going to school tomorrow?” “No, I have finished Primary Six since last year, but I have not been to secondary.”

“Why?”

“Because, there is no money to send her to secondary school,” answered her cousin, who refused to give his name.

“There is no money to send me to school,” Indian answered for herself.

Asking her about her father was obviously a big embarrassment to her. She probably never expected it and she was visibly cut off guard. After a moment of silent and painful rumination, she volunteered an answer with difficulty. “My mother told me that he lived in the big city but I can’t remember,” she said.

“You see, her mother was living in town before the sickness started, she brought her home. She was very small then, and since then, she has been living here,” her cousin said.

“What about your mother?”

“You passed her by when coming,” Indian said.

“Where?”

“She is in the market, you passed her by when coming here. She is not very well,” her voice had become emotional at the mention of her mother.

The road to Indian’s place is tarred, one could easily be carried away by the smooth ride that one may fail to notice the market some miles before.

“Who has been taking care of you since your mother became ill?”

“My grandmother.”

“Did you see your mother today?”

“Yes, I see my mother everyday. I make sure she is okay, even today, we saw, we were together.”

“So, you see her everyday?”

“Yes, when I was still going to school, I see her every morning before going to school and whenever I come back. I used to stay with her, especially, in the morning or evening,” she said with so much pride that one would have thought she was trying to impress one.

She continued: “Whenever I was going to school, my mother would wait for me. She would call my name, look at me and ask if I was okay. She would ask me if I had eaten. Even today, we saw and she still asked me the same question.

“Most times, I plait her hair and change her clothes. People laugh at me but I don’t always care what people think, she is my mother and I love her. Her present condition cannot separate us. When I grow up, I will bring her to live with me. She will oblige me if I ask her to live with me,” she said innocently, her eyes were now red.

“So, people laugh at you because of your mother?”

She is being stigmatised in school, and in the village.

“Yes, both in school and in the village. They call me the daughter of a sick mother, and they usually say I would soon be like my mother. These remarks disturb me a lot,” she said.

Turning to her cousin, this reporter asked why nothing was done to take the mother off the street. He said the question should be directed to Mama Indian’s father. At the back of the house there sat Koja Ayuba, Indian’s grandfather.

He is nothing like Indian or his daughter, he is tall and dark.

“Good afternoon Sir.”

“Good afternoon,” Indian’s cousin said he does not understand English that much. He explained that it had been “about five years now. She used to stay in Lafia before she became sick and they brought her here.”

“Why was nothing done to cure her of her illness?”

“We tried our best but she does not like taking medicine. And then the situation became worse that she no longer comes home again but she doesn’t look for trouble. She minds her own business and we take care of her sometimes.”

“Why have you not been able to send Indian to secondary school?”

“Lack of money is what has prevented my grand daughter from going to school. She is not the only one but what can we do? I am old as you can see.”

After speaking with the old man, the cousin suggested a meeting with the woman at the market.

On getting to the market, Indian came down and went straight to meet with a dark-complexioned lady, wearing a black dress. Even with her appearance, one could see she was once a beautiful woman. She was wearing a blouse and a wrapper, and she had a hair extension on her head (courtesy of Indian, of course). She appeared to be in her thirties.

She was busy in her own world when Indian met her and a drama ensued.

Immediately Indian met her, her countenance changed. She became calm and attentive. From a fairly safe distance, one watched how the two exchanged pleasantries and Indian, probably, taking time to explain to her that she had visitors who meant no harm. Before one knew it, she was walking towards the team with her mother. When they got close to them, she knelt down and greeted the team in Hausa Language. Encouraged by her action, the reporter moved close to her and asked how she was doing. She answered that she felt good, still in Hausa language. And then she said with pride: “Indian, she is my daughter and she is a nice girl”, a claim that moved one almost to tears. Curiously when she was offered money she refused it and rather directed that it be given to her daughter that she needs it more than her. Oh, what a boundless maternal love!

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17 Responses to “’Insanity can’t separate us’•Amazing story of a mentally-ill mother and her 13-year old daughter”

Oreshile sulaiman ademola at 22 Aug 2009 7:23:36 AM WAT Oreshile sulaiman ademola Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 7:23:36 AM WAT

I must tell u i have never read anything dat made me shed tears as dis. The article is super emotion

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tobi Jos at 22 Aug 2009 9:12:13 AM WAT tobi Jos Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 9:12:13 AM WAT

tears in my eyes. we all have to do smoothing for this girl. How can we go about it.

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ADA at 22 Aug 2009 9:33:40 AM WAT ADA Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 9:33:40 AM WAT

INDIAN NEEDS TO BE HELPED TO COMPLETE HER EDUCATION SO SHE IN TURN CAN GIVE HER MOTHER A DECENT LIFE AWAY FROM THE MARKET. HOW CAN ONE SEND HELP TO HER?

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Adeyemi sam. olusegun at 22 Aug 2009 9:48:10 AM WAT Adeyemi sam. olusegun Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 9:48:10 AM WAT

As i was reading the article my eyes became red before i new what was happening tears came out and could not eat again.This is pathectic.How do we assist this girl to get back to school.

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shillingford at 22 Aug 2009 9:59:54 AM WAT shillingford Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 9:59:54 AM WAT

we are really in a different world, this is an emotional story of true love, how i wish we have a responsible government with an organise social security system that will help this young princess to achieve her mothers dream of going to school? oh my god! may god in his infinate mercy give her the courage to continue this good work of taking care of her only mother and provide all her needs

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Adekunle Olayiwola at 22 Aug 2009 10:13:34 AM WAT Adekunle Olayiwola Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 10:13:34 AM WAT

I want to implore the reporter to take further step in this matter. I thought PDP govt promises free 9-year basic education for all. This girl must not be allowed to waste away, considering her intelligence and great human feelings. I wish to read later that she has been promptly enrolled in a secondary school and necessary resources for her proper upbring are being provided. Please come to her rescue fellow Nigerians.

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dele at 22 Aug 2009 11:14:48 AM WAT dele Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 11:14:48 AM WAT

Blood is really thicker than water.This is THE NATION’s project now.Any how you may want to go about it,Evelyn Osagie,the girl must go to school and the mother taken care of.You may involve NTA Newsline too.I’ll like to read of the devt soon.

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Abdjeleel lawal at 22 Aug 2009 1:56:24 PM WAT Abdjeleel lawal Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 1:56:24 PM WAT

Oh! My eyes full of tears,a big pity 4 indian and her mum,wit my own view i tink solution as come dat y dis is being published becos i wonda y now and y nt b4 dis time.also suggest Acct open 4 d girl 4 well meaning nigerians 2 contribute 2 d future of dis young girl..Am also a student bt i tink my own and urs little contribtn can make a difference,so help us God.amin..

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Isa HASSAN at 22 Aug 2009 2:07:42 PM WAT Isa HASSAN Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 2:07:42 PM WAT

I was moved to tears on reading this article i think the govt and kind hearted Nigerians should help INDIA so that she could give her mother a well deserve life.God bless Her.

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Abduljeleel at 22 Aug 2009 2:50:57 PM WAT Abduljeleel Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 2:50:57 PM WAT

Oh!my eyes full of tears,dis is serious,any way it is now time 4 me and u 2 come 2 indian and her mother 2 aids,am also a student and am nt pray 4 dis,so am suggesting an Acct open 4 dos dat wish 2 contribute…i cant just wait 2 read d latest update on dis issue becos dis an urgenlt case.

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DAMBO at 22 Aug 2009 2:56:59 PM WAT DAMBO Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 2:56:59 PM WAT

NASSARAWA STATE SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT PLEASE COME TO THE AID OF INDIAN AND HER MUM.

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Shodiya Olukayode Ayodeji at 22 Aug 2009 4:18:23 PM WAT Shodiya Olukayode Ayodeji Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 4:18:23 PM WAT

To me, it is highly emotionally. The last paragraph really touched me. I think Indian, needs more attention in which will be directly refers to the mother as well. We read in the same paragraph that the money offered her (the mother), she direct it to Indian. Because, She cares for her Mother. Her educational life needs to be boost. I pray that God in his Infinite Mercy touch her Mum and heal her of her illness in Jesus Mighty Name. It is really touching…It really a big bundle of maternal love.

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Alhaji at 22 Aug 2009 5:10:51 PM WAT Alhaji Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 5:10:51 PM WAT

Enough of this emotion expressions. Osagie, my daughter, please, this matter of MAMA INDIA must be brought to the attention of the First Lady of Nassarawa State.If she fails to do anything humanely as expected, then, she is not worthy of that office. I know she has many conflicting demanding situation like this, but this should be given utmost attention and priority. Both mother and child are within redeemable distance of the First Lady. Please, Please, Please, my daughter, Osagie, you got a can to carry on this issue. You cannot be tired. If there is a way you want us to assist, get in touch with me through my e-mail. Remember that Abike Dabiri became famous because of the then controversial miracle baby girl,MARY. We are watching . This may be your own chance.

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Obi at 22 Aug 2009 7:48:01 PM WAT Obi Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 7:48:01 PM WAT

I am a Nigerian residing in the U.S. This story is not shocking because it is happening as we speak in many locales across Nigeria. What is touchingly uncommon about this story is the unwavering dedication of a CHILD to countering the stereotypical ignorant judgements of the adult world surrounding her and which she helplessly has to depend on but assuredly not for too long. Yes, it brought tears to mine and your eyes and NOW WHAT? SPARE ME!! IN JESUS MIGHTY NAME. Evelyn Osagie has opened a wound that afflicts us all but being the bearer of this news might want to go further and I beg her time in partnering with me and my US based Nigerian organization in this effort. I apologize for my tone but there comes a time when we should in the words of the late President John Kennedy (USA) “ask not what your country can do for you, but instead what you can do for your country”. Evelyn, you have my e-mail address and I will research a more direct way of reaching you possibly via your newspaper and things would start happening instantly for Indian. It is about her. Sorry, I cannot reveal more personal information through this means due to the tireless 419 correspondence that these things generate.

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Seyi at 22 Aug 2009 9:50:41 PM WAT Seyi Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 9:50:41 PM WAT

I really shed tears after reading dis article for d heart of gold possess by this little girl pls do a follow up 4 pplp 2 b able 2 help d india n mother

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bello biodun at 22 Aug 2009 10:41:58 PM WAT bello biodun Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 22 Aug 2009 10:41:58 PM WAT

I have never in my life moved this way.This is the area where wealthy Nigerians need to invest. though i dont have much,but i believe with the little i have and my prayer in this only month of ramadan, this young girl will achieve her mother wish and mother india will be well in shall~allah amin

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Billie at 23 Aug 2009 10:09:24 AM WAT Billie Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 23 Aug 2009 10:09:24 AM WAT

Where are the NGOs, where is the wife of governor,the philanthropists this girl most complete education pls save the poor girl and her mother from diein.

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MORE COMMENTS FROM ANOTHER ISSUE OF THE NATION-
 
Emotions on “Insanity can’t separate us…

By Our Reporter Published 25/08/2009 News Rating: Unrated

On Saturday, The Nation ran a story entitled: “‘Insanity can’t separate us’ Amazing story of a mentally-ill mother and her 13-year old daughter.”

Since then, there have been reactions from home and abroad by readers touched the story.

The responses have not ceased coming. Here are some of them:

Oreshile Sulaiman Ademola:

I must tell you I have never read anything that made me shed tears as this. The article is super-emotional.

Tobi, Jos:

Tears in my eyes.We all have to do smoothing for this girl. How can we go about it?Ada:

Indian needs to be helped to complete her education so she in turn can give her mother a decent life away from the market. How can one send help to her?

Adeyemi Sam Olusegun:

As I was reading the article, my eyes became red before I new what was happening tears came out and I could not eat again. This is pathectic. How do we assist this girl to get back to school?

Joseph Ameh:

I’ll like to offer the little girl a school scholarship to secondary school. Please, if you guys can connect me to the family I will appreciate and also take the mother to church for prayers. I advised the mother should go get a medical report. I will be willing to pick her bills. Obi:

I am a Nigerian residing in the U.S. This story is not shocking because it is happening as we speak in many localities across Nigeria. What is touchingly uncommon about this story is the unwavering dedication of a child to countering the stereotypical ignorant judgments of the adult world surrounding her and which she helplessly has to depend on but assuredly not for too long. Yes, it brought tears to mine and your eyes. I apologise for my tone but there comes a time when we should in the words of the late President John Kennedy (USA) “ask not what your country can do for you, but instead what you can do for your country”. Dele:

Blood is really thicker than water. This is The Nation’s project now. Any how you may want to go about it; this girl must go to school and the mother taken care of. You may involve NTA Newsline too. I’ll like to read of the development soon.

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8 Responses to “Emotions on “Insanity can’t separate us…”

Bode at 25 Aug 2009 3:34:02 AM WAT Bode Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 25 Aug 2009 3:34:02 AM WAT

Yes, I read the story and like many others, it brought tears to my eyes. Everyone whose heart God has touched should please contribute to helping this girl and her mother. Nothing could be too small. Whatever problem the mother might have, there are people in Nigeria who are capable of helping to heal her. This is a story of unusual love and affection.

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AKINOLA M.A. at 25 Aug 2009 6:59:23 AM WAT AKINOLA M.A. Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 25 Aug 2009 6:59:23 AM WAT

This story is heart rending and very touching…I read the story the very day it was published and i never realized there was space for readers reaction…Anyway,this newspaper should take this issue up as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).Set up a current account in her name and publish it so that donors will who are willing to help can pay directly into her account…I have no illusion about the virtue of the oppressed only the need to relieve the oppression..Action speaks louder than voice…it’s time to act!

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segun, Israel at 25 Aug 2009 9:38:20 AM WAT segun, Israel Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 25 Aug 2009 9:38:20 AM WAT

I pray that we would one day have a government that is conscious of her social responsibility to the peopla.

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Lere Ojedokun at 25 Aug 2009 9:43:31 AM WAT Lere Ojedokun Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 25 Aug 2009 9:43:31 AM WAT

The article was a five-star piece. It was a hallmark of investigative journalism. While I commend Reporter and The Nation for this great work, I strongly appeal to the newspaper organisation to take up the plight of this hapless girl and mom. They both deserve decent living.

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Atat at 25 Aug 2009 10:41:04 AM WAT Atat Rating: Unrated ( Author/Admin)

said this on 25 Aug 2009 10:41:04 AM WAT

This is by far the best story i’ve read in the Nigerian dailies this year. It was really touching. How can one contribute his widow’s mite to this little angel?

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Queen Tee at 25 Aug 2009 1:00:52 PM WAT Queen Tee Rating: Unrated (

OBAMA!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MICHELLE OBAMA WEARS ANOTHER BLACK DESIGNER’S CLOTHES!-A NIGERIAN DESIGNER BASED IN U.K.- BLACK ON!

September 13, 2010

from beijingtoday.com
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/7968011/Michelle-Obama-wears-Duro-Oluwu.html

Michelle Obama wears Duro Oluwu
August 30, 2010 Filed under howie wang
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(Telegraph)
Michelle Obama adds another designer to her United Nations fashion portfolio.

President Obama and wife Michelle leaving a restaurant in Martha’s Vineyard, whilst on their summer holidays

America’s First Lady Michelle Obama’s holiday wardrobe this year includes a vibrant, patchwork, folkloric dress by the London-based Nigerian designer, Duro Olowu. The dress, a funky, layered, smock-style, features at least five different silk prints.Mrs Obama was photographed wearing the dress while out for dinner this week, with her husband, in Martha’s Vineyard. She has previously worn Duro Olowu’s designs in 2008 and 2009, and has long been a ‘collector’ of the newest and most eclectic brands on Planet Fashion, assembling a United Nations-style wardrobe since her husband was elected. Her fashion portfolio includes designs by the Taiwan-born Jason Wu; Thakoon Panichgul, who was born in Thailand; the Chilean-born, Maria Cornejo; Narciso Rodriguez, the only son of Cuban immigrants; London’s Erdem Moralioglu, who is of Turkish-Canadian descent; the Manhattan-based Naeem Khan, who was born in Mumbai; and the London-based Glaswegian, Jonathan Saunders, along with mainstream brands such as Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Oscar de la Renta.
America’s First Lady Michelle Obama’s holiday wardrobe this year includes a vibrant, patchwork, folkloric dress by the London-based Nigerian designer, Duro Olowu. The dress, a funky, layered, smock-style, features at least five different silk prints.
Mrs Obama was photographed wearing the dress while out for dinner this week, with her husband, in Martha’s Vineyard. She has previously worn Duro Olowu’s designs in 2008 and 2009, and has long been a ‘collector’ of the newest and most eclectic brands on Planet Fashion, assembling a United Nations-style wardrobe since her husband was elected. Her fashion portfolio includes designs by the Taiwan-born Jason Wu; Thakoon Panichgul, who was born in Thailand; the Chilean-born, Maria Cornejo; Narciso Rodriguez, the only son of Cuban immigrants; London’s Erdem Moralioglu, who is of Turkish-Canadian descent; the Manhattan-based Naeem Khan, who was born in Mumbai; and the London-based Glaswegian, Jonathan Saunders, along with mainstream brands such as Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Oscar de la Renta.
Duro Olowu, 44, was born in Lagos and studied law in England, before switching to his first love, fashion, long having been inspired by the unexpected mix of fabrics, textures and draping techniques of the clothing worn by the women of his native land.
He launched his own label in London in October, 2004, and was an instant hit with his use of luxurious fabrics and vibrant, clashing prints. He won the New Designer of the Year award at the British Fashion Awards in 2005.
Last year, he opened his own boutique in London, in Mason’s Yard, on Duke Street, St James’s, offering both ready-to-wear and made-to-order. Earlier this year he was given the International Designer of the Year award at the 2010 Africa Fashion Awards, in Johannesburg.
He has just been named as one of the six shortlisted finalists for the 2010 Swiss Textiles Award, which will be decided in November. Last year’s winner was Alexander Wang.
Other Duro Olowu fans include Princess Caroline of Monaco, David Bowie’s wife, Iman, and Thelma Golden, the director and chief curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/7968011/Michelle-Obama-wears-Duro-Oluwu.html

>OBAMA!-BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY MICHELLE OBAMA WEARS BLACK (NIGERIAN) DESIGNER’S CLOTHES ! -BLACK ON!

September 13, 2010

>

Michelle Obama wears Duro Oluwu

August 30, 2010 Filed under howie wang
(Telegraph)
Michelle Obama adds another designer to her United Nations fashion portfolio.
michelle_afp_story_1704295c
President Obama and wife Michelle leaving a restaurant in Martha’s Vineyard, whilst on their summer holidays


America’s First Lady Michelle Obama’s holiday wardrobe this year includes a vibrant, patchwork, folkloric dress by the London-based Nigerian designer, Duro Olowu. The dress, a funky, layered, smock-style, features at least five different silk prints.
Mrs Obama was photographed wearing the dress while out for dinner this week, with her husband, in Martha’s Vineyard. She has previously worn Duro Olowu’s designs in 2008 and 2009, and has long been a ‘collector’ of the newest and most eclectic brands on Planet Fashion, assembling a United Nations-style wardrobe since her husband was elected. Her fashion portfolio includes designs by the Taiwan-born Jason Wu; Thakoon Panichgul, who was born in Thailand; the Chilean-born, Maria Cornejo; Narciso Rodriguez, the only son of Cuban immigrants; London’s Erdem Moralioglu, who is of Turkish-Canadian descent; the Manhattan-based Naeem Khan, who was born in Mumbai; and the London-based Glaswegian, Jonathan Saunders, along with mainstream brands such as Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Oscar de la Renta.
America’s First Lady Michelle Obama’s holiday wardrobe this year includes a vibrant, patchwork, folkloric dress by the London-based Nigerian designer, Duro Olowu. The dress, a funky, layered, smock-style, features at least five different silk prints.
Mrs Obama was photographed wearing the dress while out for dinner this week, with her husband, in Martha’s Vineyard. She has previously worn Duro Olowu’s designs in 2008 and 2009, and has long been a ‘collector’ of the newest and most eclectic brands on Planet Fashion, assembling a United Nations-style wardrobe since her husband was elected. Her fashion portfolio includes designs by the Taiwan-born Jason Wu; Thakoon Panichgul, who was born in Thailand; the Chilean-born, Maria Cornejo; Narciso Rodriguez, the only son of Cuban immigrants; London’s Erdem Moralioglu, who is of Turkish-Canadian descent; the Manhattan-based Naeem Khan, who was born in Mumbai; and the London-based Glaswegian, Jonathan Saunders, along with mainstream brands such as Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Oscar de la Renta.
Duro Olowu, 44, was born in Lagos and studied law in England, before switching to his first love, fashion, long having been inspired by the unexpected mix of fabrics, textures and draping techniques of the clothing worn by the women of his native land.
He launched his own label in London in October, 2004, and was an instant hit with his use of luxurious fabrics and vibrant, clashing prints. He won the New Designer of the Year award at the British Fashion Awards in 2005.
Last year, he opened his own boutique in London, in Mason’s Yard, on Duke Street, St James’s, offering both ready-to-wear and made-to-order. Earlier this year he was given the International Designer of the Year award at the 2010 Africa Fashion Awards, in Johannesburg.
He has just been named as one of the six shortlisted finalists for the 2010 Swiss Textiles Award, which will be decided in November. Last year’s winner was Alexander Wang.
Other Duro Olowu fans include Princess Caroline of Monaco, David Bowie’s wife, Iman, and Thelma Golden, the director and chief curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Michelle Obama via Bunmi Koko & Francis Udom to Put Nigerian Designers on Global Map!

by Ladybrille®Nigeria on August 9, 2010One Comment
Just when I was wondering and rationalizing, in my head, what seems to be an illogical exclusion by the World Bank of Nigeria’s fashion industry in its proposed US30million dollar investment in Nigeria’s creative industries (film and music); I receive further validation I am correct on my thought that the World Bank missed the boat on fashion.
Although a relatively young industry, especially when compared to film and music, Nigeria’s fashion industry and its professionals have been gaining huge strides and commanding the world’s attention. Visit LadybrilleNigeria.com link here to see what Nigerian designers, the world over, have been up to. The latest global news giving even more “shine” to Nigeria’s fashion industry and designers is the recent commission of the Nigerian owned label Bunmi Koko by America’s First Lady Michelle Obama to design a jacket for the First Lady.
“Bunmi Olaye, 27, who runs Bunmi Koko with her partner Francis Udom, was given the honour after sending a prospectus of her designs to the White House.
Soon after a call came to the couple from Washington asking if a coat could be made for Mrs Obama.
Mr Udom said: “Someone said they were from the First Lady’s office and she was interested in a cream coat we had featured and could we make it for her.
“We were stunned but kept calm and said we would make her a coat in September. I hope she likes it.””
The Bunmi Koko label is operated by Bunmi Olaye (creative designer who is of Yoruba origins) and Francis Udom (engineer turned fashion entrepreneur who is of Calabar origins). Udom’s business acumen combined with Olaye’s creativity has caught the attention of both the everyday woman and celebrities like ex-Spice girl Melanie Brown, Estelle, Mischa Barton, First Lady Michelle Obama, among many. The two have also amassed numerous nominations and awards. For example, Olaye was a recent winner at the 2010 Africa Fashion International Africa Fashion Awards in the category of ‘Best Emerging Designer’ (International) while Udom was a finalist and nominee for the Emerging Entrepreneur of the Year Award at the Grampian Awards.
I am excited for the Bunmi Koko brand and even more excited about the massive attention their designs on the body of the First Lady will bring to Nigerian designers and its fashion industry. The best is yet to come. Carry on Bunmi Koko and of course all industry professionals.
To emerging and existing designers, be inspired. Anything is possible! I would also take a page out of Bunmi Koko’s “What to Do to Grow your Fashion Label” and send quality illustrations of my work towhomever I desire to wear my designs. You never know, like Olaye and Udom, you might just score big and the rest, like they say, “is history.”
Read the article on Bunmi Koko dressing Mrs. Obama here.
Read the article on Francis Udom Leaving the “oil rigs” to pursue fashion here.
Watch Bunmi Koko interview at the AFI Africa Fashion Week below.
~Uduak Oduok
~Courtesy Photo/Bunmi & Francis with Nelson Mandela
Related posts:
  1. Michelle Obama Rocks London Based Nigerian Designer Duro Olowu at Martha’s Vineyard
  2. Africa Fashion Awards Winners & Nominee(s): Bella Naija, Uduak Oduok, Bunmi Koko, Duro Olowu, Ituen Basi
  3. Nigerian Designers Rally for Haiti?
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